35 Burst results for "New Technologies"

International Women's Day: Illustrating the Covid-19 pandemic

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

02:05 min | 17 hrs ago

International Women's Day: Illustrating the Covid-19 pandemic

"International Women's Day is being celebrated amid the pandemic, and that has brought two unique and deep challenges to women around the world for more and let's head to London and bring in Bloomberg. Daybreak. Europe anchors Caroline Hecker and Roger Hearing John usually a day of celebration and a call to arms for equality for women. This year's international Women's Day is going to look very different Women have been deeply affected, of course, by the pandemic at work and at home, with many women losing pay and jobs. And Children more off the care responsibilities. Well for more. We're joined by Bloomberg's senior government. Alice, Sarah, Jane. Mahmoud, I'd like to start with you if I may. ELISA On International Women's Day. It will no doubt be dominated by the impact of the pandemic. How do you see this day really is a point in terms of marking where women are now in the workplace. Well, I think of Aziz introduced the topic of remarked on on them. Damaging effects of the pandemic on women, in particular women making up a larger share of the work force in the industries that have been hardest hit from home from the hospitality to retail. Andre also taking on a larger share of the burden, oftentimes a home on being forced to either cut back the number out of their working well, giving up work entirely to be able to do that. So it is that you know should be a moment of reflection on but but it should also be a moment of which, you know. People think about what can be done to help women in the future Nichols childcare and accessible childcare and widespread childhood, particularly for the infant years, being a key point on which governments and policy makers can focus but also training education. Clearly technology and being in grace of the mad increasingly raises demanded, and women tend to fall back and in that space, so there are errors that the government can tackle to ensure that the gap that has widened between women and men, particularly in the workplace control and

Caroline Hecker Roger Hearing John Bloomberg Mahmoud Aziz Europe Alice London Jane Sarah Andre Nichols
FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization for Third COVID-19 Vaccine

Quick News Daily Podcast

02:28 min | 21 hrs ago

FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization for Third COVID-19 Vaccine

"The fda gave emergency use authorization to the johnson and johnson co vaccine. Cdc has already recommended it. So distribution is scheduled to start almost immediately as i briefly went over in the past the main differences between the johnson. Vaccine and say the visor in moderna. Vaccines are johnson. And johnson is one dose. It's easier to store. It doesn't need those super cold. Temperatures so far it's been eighty five percent effective at preventing severe disease and at least in the trial was one hundred percent effective at preventing deaths from covid nineteen. Which are really the most important. Stance provides faster protection. Takes about two weeks to be prevented from getting a moderate to severe case of code and after four weeks there have been no hospitalizations reported or deaths. Obviously lastly there is a lower risk compared to pfizer in moderna of those allergic reactions. The nfl axis cases are already rare with those but in this one in the study there was one case of nfl. Alexis in forty four thousand people as for what causes these differences. This one is made with viral vector technology. According to the cnn article quotes a common cold virus called dina virus. Twenty six is genetically engineered so that it can infect cells but it won't replicate there cannot spread in the body and won't give people a cold like the pfizer and moderna vaccine. It delivers genetic instructions instead of being carried in little lipid balls. The genetic instructions are injected by the weakened virus into arm cells. Name make the pieces that would like part of the coronavirus spike protein which is the knob shaped structure that the virus uses to connect to sells it uses dina virus to get into our bodies and get our bodies used to. It was also this article in cbs. About the astra zeneca vaccine but honestly it just seems like a pr. Move like doesn't seem that impressive. The designer of the astrazeneca vaccine is saying that the plug and play sorta thing. We can easily updated in very quickly. Then when he read they still won't have that update until the fall. It's basically like the same cycle for a regular flu shot. Because it's like the same technology so personally. I don't know if i'd be out there bragging about how quick we can switch this out and updated if it's still until fall now. I don't know how long it would take to switch out the pfizer in moderna vaccines. I thought i read earlier. That the amarna is much easier. Because it's like straight up injecting the virus it doesn't have to wait to sort of replicated or grow it somehow again obviously. I don't know the specifics on that. But i do believe that would be faster than this one

Johnson Allergic Reactions Pfizer NFL CDC FDA Moderna Alexis CNN Astra Astrazeneca CBS FLU
Airline IT provider hacked, frequent flyer data breached

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 23 hrs ago

Airline IT provider hacked, frequent flyer data breached

"Ticket processing and frequent flyer data from major global airlines has been act and travelers personal data has been exposed Airlines technology services company Sita says the hack affected Singapore Airlines, New Zealand, air and Lufthansa customers and others, potentially exposing their personal information. United Airlines separately reported on Lee customer names, frequent flyer numbers and programs status. This could be accessed. But United is telling its frequent flyer customers to change their account Password again. This AP

Major Global Airlines Sita Singapore Airlines Lufthansa United Airlines New Zealand LEE United
Washington D.C. coronavirus vaccine registration website falters again, despite assurances

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

Washington D.C. coronavirus vaccine registration website falters again, despite assurances

"Hour, D C is once again explaining why it's online vaccination registration system for Cove. It continues to have issues which are frustrating eligible residents. DC's office of the chief Technology officer says there was a six minute delay and activating the website this morning because peak traffic was more than three times higher than last Friday, D C is now working with Microsoft on a pre registration system. Alleviate the problem. Ward six council member Charles Allen telling W. T O p. They need to move to this new Methodist quickly as possible. The headaches of having this weekly competition where the website and call center and frankly just been unreliable. Just makes the case why we've got to move to this pre registration system. Asked if anyone might lose their job over the constant issues, Mayor Bowser chief of staff telling W. T O P in part that they have a demand issue, which is double edged. People want the vaccine. But supplying technology are not meeting it and that D C needs. More

Charles Allen DC Ward Microsoft Mayor Bowser
Tech rebound pulls stocks out of a slump and to weekly gain

Gaydos and Chad

00:11 sec | 1 d ago

Tech rebound pulls stocks out of a slump and to weekly gain

"Rebound and technology companies pulled the major indexes out of a slump and help give the S and P 500 its first weekly gain in three weeks. Index rose 2% Friday.

Qualcomms incoming CEO on what he really thinks about Apples M1 Macs

The 3:59

12:27 min | 1 d ago

Qualcomms incoming CEO on what he really thinks about Apples M1 Macs

"Welcome cristiano. Thanks for joining us on the podcast today. Very happy to be here. Obviously you had some big personal news. You renamed the new. Ceo starting to stummer congrats on that wall. Thank you so much. Incredible privilege for me to be named seal. I'm very honored butter. Yeah we'd love to hear a little bit about What are your first priorities. Going to be as the incoming ceo. Weren't you begin. A lot of people. Ask me this question. Would i like about about this transition. We're doing a qualcomm. This is a story of continuity and it's about keeping qualcomm. You know technology. I company company continue to lead the pace of innovation but having said that We have been doing over the past few years really transforming the company into beyond mobile in oh always had a very strong in mobile business our core business also the licensing business but we started to grow into automotive starting to grow into analog with our ephron sorta grow into the beginning of that so the priorities will be continued to execute on this incredible opportunity. We have ahead of us. Which is five g which is also making telecommunications or communications in general no longer unique to the mobile space but across every other industry and really capitalized on that opportunity. Cristiano to that as you take on this role what are some of the biggest challenges facing qualcomm. Wh what keeps you up at night. The number one challenge we always said in. Our businesses is very unique. We have to reinvent ourselves every year. We have to win the flagship. You know over and over again every year so you know i think all of us qualcomm. It's about making sure hours was focused in driving technology roadmap to become complacent continued to drive the roma ford. And you know right now. If asked me what keeps me up at night right now is supply chain grads as having the semiconductor industry. I think it's the result of a lot of success in general about an acceleration of digital transformation across a number of industries. But this is causing a lot of stress as the supply ching was not prepared to deal with the growth. And but you know we're navigating a very happy to the position we have right now. When is the supply chain issue going to end like. Is this something that gets resolved. Pretty quickly or is it something. That's going to take a long time until like samsung and tsmc. Some of these other companies can build mark factories. No look if will get better at the end of this year we have line of sight and even our scale We're very fortunate very well position. And we have line of sight of this going to get result with entity or but you're correct Part of solving this problem is to a celebrates didn't build out more capacity and that is about building buildings in new clean rooms in new equipment. The way to think about that shara is When depend hits There was an assumption made in general across the industry that that the capacity for semiconductor. You know for if especially if there will be recession given pandemic mike you know was it was good in the reality. What we saw was the opposite the enterprise. Transformation of the home people buy new computers by new printers. New wi fi systems upgrading broadband companies had to connect their assets. So we saw celebration of. I'm not in digital transformation across the board Paper money disappear. That's people started digitize. You know everything payments Even a small business and we always said the mobile has been very resilient five g we said Into very beginning we state our five g numbers even the beginning of the pandemic said. If i've transition is still going it's important. We ended the year the high end so all those things happen for a capacity that was not put in play for growth. And i think we're just seeing you know the effects of of demand in supply. But the manda will catch up with Supply supplier vice versa towards the end of this calendar year one area. I'm really interested to hear about is the pc market You know obviously this is an area that had tons of demands over the past year for laptops and other devices report working from home call comes made a big push in putting your mobile chips in. pc's We saw apple. Come out with. Its m one powered max which proved to be extremely popular How is demand for those m one devices. Impacted your focus on pc chips. Hasn't your computers more and demands like what sort of impact has the m one had on akam pc. This days is one of my favorite topics. Conversations finger for discussion look rented and talk about the specific demand. For 'em one. This is a great opportunity to talk about the trend so the pc was being transformed and we always believe welcome that you know. They'll be conversions between mobile nbc and mobile became the bigger platform. They're more smartphones. Abc's to develop. Our eco-system is driven on the mobile side. And we believe in that convergence. That's where we started. You know several years ago. I think more than four years ago with microsoft on this journey of windows on snapdragon in now recently with starting to see snapdragon on chrome os in chromebooks then the pandemic hits and would have been hit. It change certain things forever. And i am super excited about this because like if you're talking to me from a pc right now. And i'm sure you are you. And roger. b. C became a communicator device. And as people make phone calls they started make a teams called zoom. Zoom became a verb in many languages in c. now is connected became a communicator device. Camera become really important. I'll do a multimedia became important. You doing you take a break. Watch netflix the future. With five g connected disease are going gonna watch Not only video but gonna play stream games with ex cloud an amazon luna luna or google stadia and all of that and then on top of it people. That had a workstation are home. They don't have a workstation to have their laptop but using five on demand computing. You'll get access to any application that you can run on the cloud computing platform of the cloud so the pc's completely transformed in apple switching to a m one with an arm instruction set just validated at transformation. Start moving developer as fast paced. So we're more convinced an ever. Conversions is going to happen b. C's going to be a great opportunity for expansion on snapdragon and it's that's one of the first things i did after being announced to co elect was to do the acquisition of nubia s. We believe there's an opportunity for us to lead into cpu performance as well as we start to think about this complete transitions of pc to associate. So let me let me ask gonna fall on that. Because i think we might have a new but one thought on this question about apple versus talk about the long-term opportunity but were you frustrated by the fact that you have been pushing snapdragon power laptops for a couple years now. That have really gained a lot. Traction while attention than apple comes in with the san juan and one powered mac guy huge buzz postal raving about these things whereas the other snapdragon laptops will ask. We have not really gone. The best to reviews was some frustration. That did you get to go back to your team coverage thick how you do this. I'm just curious your thoughts. On the the the different reactions that though snapdragon lockups had versus those and one. Max no no not at all i. Here's how answer this question roger. We knew that we started this journey. And this journey about a windows for example which is being running on x eighty six. You know Forever when needed to introduce arm extraction sets to windows and we work with microsoft and we knew that we're still building this journey as an example for example In this summer we're gonna now. We're celebrating that you know that next latest update for microsoft windows which announced support a sixty four. Bit emulation on orm in wish starting to see the very first time the enterprise ice laptops. Hp just launch commercial. Enterprise laptop with into snapdragon. So we're at the beginning of the ramp in the way we see the apple lounge. It's a great tailwind. Because what apple did by lounging does not only validated that transition but you know moved developer ecosystem the difficulty that you have when you try to introduce a new instruction set on the pc and this is not new to to apple. I think they've been to those that. That transition twice if you look at their history and then maybe have tried in the past trying to pass the longtime ago with a windows rt and and that really only works. When you're no longer have a second class you know a platform is just the great windows. Experience in every application is gonna run in. You're going to be able to keep everything you had a windows. Any wedded new coming from mobile platform in in. We believe we're now getting to the end of this journey in what what apple did which really help brother ecosystem. Apps apple helps microsoft basically create the resolve within developer system to start doing arm native apps going forward so my answer to a question is super. Please we're super excited invalidates. You know that bats. And i think that's going to happen Not only within. You know the apple wicca system but within windows as well as google and no question when we announced a new via acquisition if you look a press release was incredible as a parade of everybody to mobile nbc segment including microsoft in google in the saint press releasing. This is great. You know so. We're excited about that. Yeah i wanted to dive a little bit more into nubia You know you guys pay. I think one point four billion for this company started by former apple engineers. Basically you know why. Why do you need nubia okay. I'll you know i'll tell you. The story in this has a lot to do with the conversation we just had about. How welcome see some. The industry transitions in how we execute on them. So the story is if you remember back in tweet g. into feature phone days and the blackberry we knew as we brought four g and mobile broadband to the seller space. The will have to become computer. She's gonna have a broadband so you need to have a computer in your hand to make use of the broadband and you're going to have a prosser we're gonna run of have an application and In we knew at that point that you didn't have a high-performance processor for battery powered device we could not get that from the arm roadmap to so so we basically put together a cpu team and we build if you remember. Scorpion was very first. Gigahertz clock. cpu in a battery powered device After that crate in debt drove the absolutely majori of the smartphone platform across. You know that time you know indoor it was growing to other oh s.'s. At the time and clearly it was squawking was the forefront really creating a mobile computing platform with our own. Cpu

Qualcomm Apple Cristiano Tsmc Shara Microsoft Roger Samsung Ford NBC Mike Netflix ABC Google San Juan Amazon MAX HP
The COVID-19 social media infodemic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:31 min | 1 d ago

The COVID-19 social media infodemic

"Now the covid. Nineteen vaccines are pretty close to mass production in the us it is even more crucial to fight misinformation about them. That battle is going. O k twitter. This week said it will ban its users if they spread covid nineteen vaccine misinformation but only after like five strikes facebook last month said it would remove misleading posts on both facebook and instagram including removing accounts. Youtube has also said it banned covert misinformation but in all these cases enforcement is spotty at best topic for quality assurance where we take a second look at a big tech story. Sara frier is a senior technology reporter for bloomberg she says. These efforts are complicated. By the fact that some social media influencers are finding that vaccine. Hesitancy is a great way to make a little cash. It is not only profitable it is a means of selling products is profitable in terms of boosting a following. Getting people really interested in what you have to say but if you tell people you know. I don't think that you need to social distance. I think we just need to boost our immune systems so don't wear a mask instead. You should buy my proprietary supplements that will boost your immune system or instead i will charge you a limited time offer for what vaccine consultation and these people are not doctors and then we have to think as consumers of that information. Who are we listening to. Are we really thinking critically about what we're being told. And also how much harder does it make this problem. It's one thing to sort of be playing whack a mole with various types of misinformation. But you're talking about creators that have tons of followers that people really are attached if they disappear from these platforms then. There's a lot of backlash there is that i think there's also just a lot of coded language that gets used on youtube facebook's groups instagram wireless community i've seen when we're talking about vaccines especially in one of the big hashtags informed consent. That's not necessarily a controversial thing to say but it's a wink wink dear own research. Don't let anyone tell you what to think. Essentially don't listen to your doctor. A listen to me more than one hundred medical professionals simmons open letter to facebook saying that covid nineteen misinformation is prolonging the pandemic and costing lives. Is there a point at which you know. This is such a big problem for society for even facebook zone employees coming back to work for the economy that it actually does become impossible to ignore. I think we are approaching that point in twenty nine thousand nine hundred say. The world health organization already listed vaccine. Hesitancy is top ten thing on their radar for giant global public health problems like hiv nabala but now cove it has taken this conversation beyond just the normal set of people who think about vaccination is parents of very young children in into the mainstream into adults decision making about our own lives. You know this letter came out. People have been frustrated with the slow pace of enforcement of these policies facebook and instagram particular expanded. The type of disinformation that that the company would take down about a month ago. Have we seen any improvement. We've seen some high profile account removals at some of the biggest names who are spreading most obvious misinformation. Like i said this is now pervasive. It's not just about the group that was you know. Many thousands of members strong that was promoting an anti vaccine gender. It's about the local neighbourhood group where people are sharing tips about what babysitter to hire. But then they're also sharing their opinion on the vaccine in in. That is how this information is spreading now because it has become a little bit more of a mainstream topic of conversation. Everyone's thinking about the vaccine. Everyone's thinking about covid everyone's having these conversations now so. It's not just become something that you see as blatant medical misinformation channels which is what facebook and twitter are working to take down. It has really become something that is part of part of dinner. Table conversation part of Conversations among friend groups sends groups about various

Facebook Sara Frier Instagram Youtube Bloomberg Twitter Simmons World Health Organization United States
Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

Short Wave

07:46 min | 1 d ago

Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

"Tell me a little bit about what you learned way back when about how conception works well. They showed us this video that described conception as a kind of obstacle course where the sperm little tadpole looking things and when they enter the vagina during this hostile environment. And they've done fight their way through all these obstacles and make it to the egg and the sperm. That reaches the egg wins. Kind of how it was told. Yeah that's pretty standard. It's similar to what i was taught to. And i spoke to lisa campbell angle stein. She's a reproductive bioethicist and she pointed out that we use really gendered language to describe this biology. She calls it a fertilization tale. So the sperm is this shining knight. Who's there to save the aig damsel in distress. And the sperm has all the agency the sperm is on a mission the sperm is fighting off other sperm to be the one to conquer the egg. Where's the egg is just sort of passively floating around waiting for the night and doesn't do anything itself. How does exactly what they told us. Yeah and lisa examined tons of textbooks at all levels from middle school to medical school for this kind of bias and she found some pretty wild stuff. For example sperm had this little hat like structure called the acronym textbooks described it as a motorcycle. Mean they could have called. It did horseback riding home at a ski how they could call the any type of helmets motorcycle helmet rights and that conjures up images of masculinity islanders. Tough guy weathers well clearly once again. The patriarchy finds a way but in this case. Isn't the story. exactly what happens. Biologically how it all goes down. Actually not at all. Oh no right. I am ready to go back to school. I want this post talk. Talk ariella let's do it. Only while buckle up today on the show go back to school to revisit the sperm race narrative and look at the ways that the edge and the reproductive tract plan active role in this process. I'm ariella zabidi. And i'm emily kwong. You are listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from npr. Alright classes in session. We're going back to school shortwave. School the best kind of school yes to learn about conception yeah and just to be clear. Today we're talking about this process as it plays out internally but a lot of folks conceived through the reproductive technologies like ibf. Yeah which are very cool. Okay just to recap. When i was taught conception in school it was basically described as a survivor style. Sperm race but ariella. You're telling me that this is a lie. yes yes. There are a few really big problems with this narrative when sperm i arrive in the vagina. They can't really race. I talked to jimmy heison. She's a biology professor at smith college. They don't have enough energy to make it to the side of conception. They don't have enough directional but isn't that what the cute little tales or for like don't the sperm use them to swim yet. Details do give sperm some swimming ability. But that's not a complete picture. The sperm are getting there faster than they could all on their own. And we've seen in rats and other mammals that even dead sperm can reach the lopion tubes so it seems like sperm. Don't rely that much on their own mobility. So are they getting their. The reproductive tract is bringing them along. Oh that is amazing. Okay how is the reproductive tract. Doing that so i talked to kristen hook. She's an evolutionary biologist. And she told me it's doing this tons of ways by changing the thickness of the reproductive tract fluid. Just like if we were swimming in a swimming pool with water versus a swimming pool of honey. You're gonna move differently in these different fluids or with contractions summer to contractions in your stomach after you've had a big meal or whatnot to move your food through your intestines so it's like the sperm are on one of those moving sidewalks y-yeah they're being transported along eventually reaching the philippian tubes. Okay and what happens after that. So the sperm. Start to move their tails more intensely. Which makes those pretty useless movements. We talked about earlier. More powerful research just that fluids in the reproductive tract kind of give the spur more energy. Think of it like taking a bath in coffee one. That's dreamy to the idea that the reproductive tract literally gives the sperm. Their strike is giving me strength right now. That is fantastic. I know emily. The official name for this process is hyper activation. Though that's riveting and there's even more the reproductive tract also has to prepare the sperm for one. It eventually meets the egg right now. The sperm is a little overdressed for the occasion. It's got a layer of stuff on that prevents it from binding the egg and molecules in the reproductive tract helps strip off layer so that the sperm is ready to bind. Ooh la la naked sperm. Okay and emily remember the sperm. Don't have is they have no idea where the heck they're going so the egg provides them with a gps it releases these super attractive chemicals that show the sperm where to go. Oh so it's like leaving breadcrumbs for them to follow. Yeah and you have to realize that philippian tubes aren't this straightforward path. It's really complex and winding there. There are tons of little crevices so without those crumbs. The sperm probably wouldn't know where to go. We were taught to think of it as a racetrack. Right but kristen. We know better now if you wanna go with a racetrack idea at least recognized that it's a dynamic race track so it's not like the german audubon. It's more like You know like more like a rainbow road where you have twists and turns and places to fall off and there are checkpoints that you get ask for your license registration and proof of insurance. I'm sorry proof of insurance. What does that mean honestly. That's not too far off from reality. And this brings me to may be the coolest part of all of this. Remember that hostile environment you described earlier. Yeah but you know. I was brainwashed back then in health class and i and i regret saying that because it sounds like the reproductive tract is actually far more helpful than hostile here. You totally but it is true that there are tons of obstacles along the way that seemed to be counterproductive. Like at one point these big immune cells surround the sperm and literally. Eat them. No that's terrifying. Yeah you don't want to be the sperm in that face off so it makes sense that you and me and teachers everywhere described this as a hostile environment but now starting to realize that these obstacles the actually have a purpose. It works to separate sperm. That are dysfunctional. From those that are functional works to separate debris that enters into the reproductive track with quotas and it separates the wheat from the chaff. Shall we say and then it takes what it needs or wants to the site of

Lisa Campbell Angle Stein Ariella Ariella Zabidi Emily Kwong Swimming Jimmy Heison Kristen Hook AIG Smith College Middle School NPR Lisa Emily Kristen
China sets economic-growth target of 6%, aims to be more self-reliant on tech

KYW 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 2 d ago

China sets economic-growth target of 6%, aims to be more self-reliant on tech

"Official, announcing a healthy growth target and plans to become a more self reliant technology leader during tensions with Washington and Europe over trade, Hong Kong and human rights. The ruling Communist Party is aiming for an economic growth of over 6% as it rebounds from the Corona virus pandemic coming up

Hong Kong Washington Communist Party Europe
DC to launch coronavirus vaccine preregistration system next week

Rush Limbaugh

00:43 sec | 2 d ago

DC to launch coronavirus vaccine preregistration system next week

"People in the district will be able to pre register for vaccine appointments, but it won't be first come first served. Technology is our least favorite thing that we will wait the least. D c health director Dr Laquan Tre Nesbit says DC's pre registration system will prioritize people based on eligibility group and risk it all. For 65 18 to 64 living in a priority Zip code, and then we look at the essential workers. After that, she says seniors will be highly favored as appointments. Open up, You'll get an email call or text letting you know you can sign up for the vaccine, she says. If you're not yet eligible for the vaccine do not re register Heather Curtis Sound W. M A L and W e mailed Comrade George's County,

Dr Laquan Tre Nesbit Heather Curtis Sound W. M Comrade George
Nasdaq tumbles to correction territory after Powell comments

Yahoo Finance Market Minute

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Nasdaq tumbles to correction territory after Powell comments

"Are selling off with the nasdaq down about two percent the s. and p. Five hundred down more than one percent. The dow also down more than three hundred points or one percent. Lower this selloff has been triggered after fed chair. Jerome powell gave comments about inflation triggering. A treasury yield. Jump just as we've seen in other sessions when the treasury yield goes higher than the markets sell off looking at some of the biggest losers today those include the semiconductor space invidia. Amd micron all lower today. Also tesla is lower as well some of the energy sectors stocks though are in the green with exxon chevron those are some of the traits that investors have been leaning into away from technology and into value stocks for more

Jerome Powell Treasury Amd Micron Exxon Chevron Tesla
Amazon Workers’ Union Drive Reaches Far Beyond Alabama

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:14 min | 2 d ago

Amazon Workers’ Union Drive Reaches Far Beyond Alabama

"This hour we are talking about the union drive amongst amazon warehouse employees in bessemer alabama and. Why people in the world of labor and In modern american business are paying very close. Attention to how workers in alabama might vote As it could change a lot given the size of amazon the corporation now amazon is so big that we're kind of also informally launching a series. Hear about all the ways in which amazon is changing all of our lives so focusing on labor here today. if there's an area of life that you think amazon is changing and you'd like us focus on You know hop on to social media. Twitter facebook at on point radio and let us know what you'd like to us to look into or you can also give us a call at six one seven three five three zero six eight three looking for your ideas on areas of life that you want to learn more about that amazon. Might be changing. I'm joined today by steven. Greenhouse he's labor and workplace journalist author of beaten down worked up the past present and future of american labor karen weiss is also with. She's a new york. Times correspondent covering amazon microsoft and the pacific northwest's tech scene. She's with us from seattle. Now karen we heard from michael foster the union organizer there before the break. I wanted to ask you more about the the one of the fundamental things. He talked about which was worker. Dignity pay is one thing but worker dignities another and i think amazon's got a pretty long list of Of incidents if i can call it that where does lead one to questions of how they view or how much they the importance they have of warehouse. Worker dignity right there was they. Fires warehouse workers who spoke out about insufficient safety protocols regarding regarding covert in two thousand and twenty We've heard we've read stories. Maybe you've even written them caring about like response to being used to monitor warehouse workers and all of that. How does amazon see see people. Why think a lot of a lot of this is workforce is so large that it has almost by necessity but also just by the amazon. Ian nature tried to create Systems and rules and technology to manage them. And so when you heard. Michael talk a lot of things. We're talking about rebellious kind of technological. Productivity measurements and tools and operational tool amazon has to manage. Its workforce you know Student brought up a good point earlier about unions aren't necessarily a third voice that's that they've representative workers and i think i was free support the amazon. That's a third voice but same time You know it has ways that it listens to workers now but it's not the same as having the workers voice representatives through a union and so for example. They have boards in voice amazonian brussels onboard. People can complaints or compliments not different things but the way they use that at a global level is they use artificial intelligence and natural language processing to figure out matic patterns in it so they they had to and also broke out of bear amazonian techie. Way have developed these kind of technological relationships with workers which is which is different than how even the walmart's an immense growth. What was fifteen or so years ago when it went through. it's huge. that's a different relationship numb when you the feedback workers get is often from rate ticker essentially on their on screen which is different than being a cashier in a store and bringing people up karen that is so fascinating. The algorithms are absolutely everywhere. Oh my gosh. So here's here's basis in two thousand eighteen in an interview with business insider talking about why he says he's proud. Not only of the wages of amazon pays cause remember two thousand eighteen. There is a minimum of fifteen dollars an hour but also how he says. The company treats its employees in our view. We have we have workers councils and we have very good communications with our employees. We don't believe that we need a union to be an intermediary between us and our employees but of course at the end of the day. It's always employs choice. And that's how it should be steven. What do you think. I'd be surprised to hear that amazon. Actually has workers councils. That's you know. And if they are workers councils than i imagine they might be handpicked by management and with the union the workers pick representatives and under federal law executives are required to sit down and listen to the workers concerns. Yes amazon says that it listens to workers but it's really unclear the degree to which they really listened. I remember years ago. I wrote walmart. Walmart would say for worker has a complaint. We have an open door policy. Come in and complaint show us. And i interviewed many workers who use the open door to file complaints and then they got fired soon after and they said the open door policy is actually the out the door policy. I'm not saying that's the case amazon. But i think you know. Some companies are so much cynical when they say they really listen. I'm sure karen has spoken to amazon. Workers who have heard who have voiced the same complaint. I hear say they feel like they often feel like robots. I interviewed a worker at the best. My warehouse daryl richardson. Who said he's a pickering to three hundred fifteen items our that's five items omitted and he says you feel like a robot and if you fall behind you risk getting fired several workers who said and if we have to go to the bathroom run a few hundred yards and take a few minutes to do that We might fall behind and that and if know and if you've got to go to the bathroom a whole lot in a certain day might end up risk getting fired so they feel that they're not listened to enough and many feel that there's a lack of dignity in the pressure that's put on them every

Amazon Karen Weiss Pacific Northwest's Tech Alabama Ian Nature Bessemer Michael Foster Karen Steven Walmart Seattle Twitter Facebook Microsoft Brussels New York Michael Daryl Richardson Pickering
The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

The 3:59

05:19 min | 2 d ago

The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

"Following. It's the second part of our four part interview with martin cooper inventor the phone. I'm roger chang and this is your daily charge or one of the issues. I've talked a lot about on this podcast and seen that in general the issue of the digital divide. I know you talked about that near the tail. Ender near the second part of your books. I'd love to get your perspective on really the deserve holistic impact of the cell phone and whether or not it's been a force for good in how it's been a force for good in closing that broadband gap that digital divide. We'll just think about this routers The whole educational system has been challenged today because the teacher gets up and gives a lecture and he's talking to a bunch of students if they're connected if they have smartphones they have access to all the knowledge the world the shakers not gonna give them information that they can find words so the whole nature of what a teacher is changes. The teacher now teaches people how to reach out for of religion. How to handle it. Taylor's educative process to individuals that having a lecturer to talk a people each different girl every other person. So we discover that what the result of this is that people's minds the challenge borden. They did before and the result of that. Is it their brains. Get bigger thinking smarter. Just think about that. Now that in this country one of the most advanced countries not in the world but in history forty percent of the students in this country do not have access to broadband wireless forty percent. Just imagine what that means over long term when the educational process chain that we end up with forty percent of the population with bigger brains. They're smarter or sixty percent and forty percent are dummies unacceptable with Broadband wireless now as essential to people as water food. So somehow that problems got to get fixed at the moment. The government is not digging right approaches. The only way to do that is through a first of all accept the fact this is essential and go to the carriers people have exclusive use of a spectrum and tell them either. You service all of the public or we're going to allow other people to do it. The technology exists to provide students with robin wireless whereas littlest cyber ten dollars a month. At that level everybody can have access to the but semi were we have to remove moves us exit seventy two big guys t verizon d mobile. They're doing a great job for the dense areas for the city's suburbs. They are not to have good job for the rural areas. They are after a good job for the people that can't afford a sixty dollars a month for a cellphone. The technology exists to do the both of those legs to handle people that can't afford into the rural areas and it's up to the government now to do figure out ways for business to provide those two kinds of services. We have to have one hundred percent accessibility for students and ultimately for everybody. Because i i'm so delighted you read the book because you know that it's not just education it's healthcare we're all going to be ultimately connected have have our bodily characteristics measured continually. There is the potential that we can anticipate diseases in people before they happen. Just because we're measuring things continually so healthcare is going to be a revolution. You can't provide after one segment of the public but public and keep it from other people so between those two issues education healthier and then you get the most important wall in. That's what your profession is is. Collaboration is getting people to talk to each other to generate ideas to people who are always more creative corporate than one person but of you got people talking to each other groups independent of time independent of where they are the potential for improving the productivity of people will be such that the idea of poverty will disappear. There's going to be enough for everybody. There is no reason why everybody can't be wealthy announced. Never worry about food or housing and everybody can't downs. The education served there.

Roger Chang Martin Cooper Ender Robin Wireless Borden Taylor Verizon
Bob Lazar, UFOs And Aliens!

That’s Strange

04:36 min | 2 d ago

Bob Lazar, UFOs And Aliens!

"In may of nineteen eighty-nine and interview with investigative reporter. George knapp appeared on las vegas news channel k. l. a. s. a shadowy figure under the alias of dennis explained exactly what was a secret facility south of groom lake in the nevada desert nine flying saucers of extraterrestrial origin are being stored analysed and testify. The subject explains that he was tasked with reverse engineering the propulsion systems of the crash and did not know how the government had gotten hold of these crafts. The shadowy figure was eventually revealed to be bob lazar in a subsequent interview where he revealed his identity. Bob lazar who Has a bachelor's degree in physics and electronic technology from pacifica university and he continued his masters at mit. He's a very very very interesting figure. Did you know before we started this researching into this. Did you know about him. I did I watched the netflix documentary. Just a super interesting individual. And i ended up going back in like watching his interview with koa s and And seem like how all that played out in the incredible reach that it had after the fact you know it was translated into multiple languages. Played over the entire world and people were gripped by by this man's story in what he had to say because he he seems so credible. It's seems like everything he's saying really has weight in is truthful the fact that he started this with not really seeking the the attention or seeking the accolade but actually just seeking to get the information out there even hiding his identity that some might say that that would be the the behavior of someone trying to hide something but i see it as behavior of someone who is trying to protect themselves. Because they're saying something that that may actually be factual dude. I bet he is phone calls every single day. People trying to get a hold of this guy people trying to email him and all kinds of stuff and back when this verse back when this first came out. I mean think about that. The technology and the communication that they had then you know people people today are used to getting like notifications every single day but think about how he felt getting all these phone calls. When i mean he's just a regular guy he. He was picked up because he has like a coup wanda and now he's this huge figure. Even thirty years ago. I mean it's just insane. Yeah i mean. He said he used to have people camping on his lawn. And stuff. and you you to remember that within the ufo community. There are a lot of people that are. I don't know how to say it a lot of people. That are a little strange. So for those people to becoming too bob lazar and it's got to be slightly terrifying and you'll see as we kind of dive into his story that i find him very credible. I find everything that he says. Very very credible in a lot of the stuff that he has said in the past Eventually comes through. So basically he gets his degrees from mit and At university he starts working at a los alamos research lab. And i believe los alamos and working On physics and nuclear weapon research which is what what the lab does obviously and then during his employment there. Alex kind of set it. He builds a jet powered honda. It's kind of extravagant thing that he drives to work everyday. It's literally a jet on a honda. Civic nazi looks like something out of the future and he built this thing. I mean he built us thing in eighty nine. I think it might have eighty nine was one he actually worked as for so yeah it was. It was probably around eighty four. I think So that gets the attention of the los alamos local newspaper who put him on the front cover with his jet cars. Jet honda that he built and that that's a little bit important to the story later on so kind of put a pin in that. So he's working at los alamos and he says that he leaves los alamos and goes off to start other businesses. That that turn out to fail now he never really goes into detail or at least i couldn't find what those other businesses were but he a couple years later wants to get back into the science community

Bob Lazar George Knapp Nevada Desert Pacifica University Groom Lake Los Alamos Dennis MIT Netflix Las Vegas Wanda Honda Alex
Google is changing the way ad tracking works

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

08:24 min | 2 d ago

Google is changing the way ad tracking works

"Google is getting rid of third party cookies. And it's chrome browser next year and will stop selling ads based on your browsing history no more tracking all over the web to see what you're into and targeting you with ads everywhere you are. The company also said in a blog post wednesday that it won't replace cookies with some other personal tracking technology. Google is moving to a quote privacy. I add targeting strategy where your online profile will be grouped anonymously with others like you. And you'll get ads appropriate to your cohort. Meg leader is professor of communication culture and technology at georgetown. She says google itself though still has plenty of ways to get data about you. Google knows a lot about you. It has a lot of different data sources search browser right now. It also has data analytics. The point here is that. Oh my gosh. Google has so much data and they also are gatekeepers for a lot of these other sources of information. Will this move. Do anything to improve consumer privacy. If that is the banner under which. Google is selling this. Is that true in any way. Google strategy is more privacy preserving but for the consumer there is potential problems with the amount of kind of increased reliance that it places on google. It reads centers it in advertising industry. Of course it's front and center already and so critics argue that in and of itself is not great for consumer privacy like it. Doesn't i gotta be honest. This doesn't sound like it's going to help me very much as a consumer. I think that it's potentially going to help you. And i will say that this change causes a bunch of ripple effects so it causes a bunch of other changes that could potentially help the consumer. It doesn't take away. Google place in the advertising ecosystem but it does shake it up and in doing so. I think provides potential for benefits to the consumer. We're making these kind of like incremental improvements to this privacy regime. I wonder though at the end of the day isn't the primary offender targeted advertising. Like if we just got rid of that wouldn't we be able to stop a lot of these machinations around who gets to follow who where and how targeted advertising making me vulnerable to some awful. She add repeatedly also makes me vulnerable to for instance foreign actors creating bots to target me. So it's it's of course important for people to pay attention to the tools that they they use. But it's really also important to keep pressuring policymakers to pass meaningful data protection laws at the state level and at the federal level. I think so google already in this great position. It has a bunch of data about us. It has a bunch of ways to collect that data up to including companies. It owns like fit bit. What does getting rid of these third party. Cookies mean for other companies other publishers. Other ecommerce sites. How does it affect them. Well they're gonna be just as reliant on google advertising tools as they ever have been the industry. That's most likely to be disrupted by this is of course. Advertising networks that operate and are trying to compete with google and facebook for advertising dollars that operate outside of these these dominant tools and they are trying to figure out new and creative ways to track users essentially to provide value to their customers. That's different than what. Google and facebook can provide Through their advertising tools so potentially it means that our interactions on the web with other ad networks may be could get either. It seems like either more annoying. Because there will be more over attempts to sort of get our data or just sneakier i would say it's either more invasive or more annoying it will depend on how the ad networks outside of google and facebook change They're tracking strategies to see how those consent notifications will will change in the future but potentially could be as annoying as it currently is which is highly away

Google MEG Georgetown Facebook
Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

Here's Something Good

04:49 min | 2 d ago

Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

"Dr shirley jackson is used to being a first and only she's a physicist and the president of the renown rensselaer polytechnic institute the first woman and first african american in that job and she's a leader pointing the way to a better future. Dr jackson believes that for our country to move forward to be competitive and prosperous. We absolutely must have women and people of color involved in tech and science. Her own life shows. How much change can happen in just a few decades when she was a girl growing up in washington. Dc public schools were still segregated. The nineteen fifty. Four supreme court decision known as brown versus the board of education allowed her to attend schools with better resources and broaden her horizons. She went on to become the first african american woman to get a phd from mit later. She served as an academic researcher and as chair of the us nuclear regulatory commission. We asked dr jackson about the challenges facing women of color in stem. How to meet those challenges and why she sees this as a moment of opportunity. Here's what she had to say. I think they're complexities. That african american women women of color face then that are rooted in the challenges that women face on the one hand and minorities race on the other now. We know that women get dissuaded. Many of them by the time they're in middle school from really thinking of themselves in these field and there are some fields that have been very a male dominated and that then will obviously breakdown to heaven affect on african american or minority women generally but then it's further exacerbated by sort of a kind of lack of confidence or belief in the talents of african americans in this country and and other minorities in terms of people seeing them seeing us in these fields and the net can become self inculcated so that the given individual dozen see ourselves as either being able to do these Do work in these fields or even if they believe they could do it and are excited The work they may feel the mountains of too high to climb and so people move into other things. All of us in higher education are by definition in the whole business because we educate the next generation of innovators and discovery discoverers and those who will be halsey makers etc but from the perspective of the kind of institution either lead. You know we really focus on those who will innovate will invent who will discover and join with those who come from other fields of endeavor to create what needs to be created to keep us moving forward and so i believe it is truly the most important work in the world and certainly here at rensselaer we. Educating many dynamic women leaders in science and technology we have women professors in computer science who have had great success in drawing young women into the field by proving to them that one does not have to grow up a gaming or programming as many of the young men in the class do in order to succeed in fact our young women do quite well here. They graduated very high rates and they go on to do amazing things. We have more challenge with a attracting and retaining minority students. But again those who come here they onion they do well and they go on to do important things. I'm one who believes times of upheaval can open up opportunities previously. Shut out of them. And i'm one who believes that one has to step through one window in time when it opened and to take advantage of whatever those opportunities there are offered and so we've now arrived at another moment when there is at least a more discussion about inequality of opportunity being recognized as something that in our democracy at least in most quarters is not something that we should have the finest tol

Dr Shirley Jackson Renown Rensselaer Polytechnic Dr Jackson Us Nuclear Regulatory Commissi Board Of Education MIT Supreme Court Washington Brown Rensselaer
A look at small satellites

Innovation Now

01:06 min | 2 d ago

A look at small satellites

"Cubesats are a small class of satellites that employ off the shelf technologies and can be launched for a fraction of the cost of a full sized satellite. Here's on win. An aerospace engineer at nasa ames research center who tests interesting payloads for qb sat flight opportunities. I work on spacecraft technology demonstrations for these small spacecraft. Failure is an option. It's where you learn from your mistakes and you improve on the next round. And so we're all about taking these risks with these calculated risks with these technologies. So it's all about innovating these technologies and bringing more capabilities to these small sets as humans. Were so interested to see what's out there. What can we do as technologies become increasingly miniaturized. Cubesats could carry instruments to explore other worlds or communicate more efficiently swarms of cubesats could work together to give us a big picture understanding of the places we train about exploring for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Poet

Nasa Ames Research Center Jennifer
Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:51 min | 3 d ago

Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

"Our guest today is dr tim persons. Who is the chief scientist. Managing director of the science technology assessment and analytics team at the us government accountability office also known as the gao. So hi tim. Thanks so much for joining us today. I kathleen Me on it's great to be with you. And ron once again. Yeah we are so excited to have you with us today for folks that have been following us. Tim was also are september. Twenty twenty speaker at our ai in government event and he was one of the keynotes at machine learning life cycle conference so we will link to both of those in the show notes in case you would like to watch them in more detail. But i wanna start this podcast today in case folks don't know you To help you spend some time introducing yourself to our lists and tell them a little bit about your background in. Yes so happy to do that. So as you said in your introduction. I am the chief scientist of the gao. Where the largest of the congressional or the legislative branch agencies in the us government and we have a staff about Thirty two hundred Maybe a little bit more in terms of Full time equivalents there but our main role is to to be the oversight or also called the congressional watchdogs by the way For the us congress. So we're Known as the auditors. We have a lot of access the federal information and so on across a wide array of departments and agencies and so on an issues which actually makes it ideal the tien have conversations about a i And so that's what i've been doing with. Gao since two thousand eight but also recently. We stood up a new team. It's geos newest. Team is called the science technology assessment in analytics team and that's significant because Especially for ai. Because the second a and that's as analytics and a is really a statistical analytics and decision sciences with respect to a machine so i work across the whole. Federal government supporting. Gao and lead a team. That does a lot of oversight insight and foresight work in the science and technology area. Especially so that's a little bit of the background For today thank you you know. I think that's really interesting. Because people the average person here in the united states but probably worldwide does not really understand the mechanism by which large governments or even small governments work and these levels of oversight and trying to understand if the dollars that they're spending taxpayers or getting applied and appropriated properly and used to the value that that they're supposed to so. It's a really interesting place to be. And of course this is an ai. Podcast we're going to talk about how. Ai connects to all of that right. And i think that's one of the the interesting questions we have for you. Maybe i just looking at more broadly. I know we'll a little bit more deeper into a. Is it relates specifically to oversight but i think just certain at a at a broad brush from where you said looking across the government may be looking seeing how other agencies are using technology and using tax dollars. You know how do you what do you see as some of these interesting opportunities interesting. Applications unique opportunities that the public sector maybe in general not even just in the us has around using artificial intelligence. Yeah great question ron. We could spend now until the rest of the year talking about that one. That's that's a broad Very good question of course Happy to be too brief on that. But i think Really what a is bringing here is Really just the framework of thinking about The future of government. I think the future is in one sense the now and they're still part of the public sector of the not yet and i really do think that what is is bringing out particularly especially as we sit in the middle still of our pandemic that we hope will end soon. But really i think about the government roles of enhancing both capabilities and services. So i think those are the two key things to start a conversation with. Ai about capabilities and services and the reason. I say that because there's so much of the government that has changed over the last century When you think about it It really so much of the mission now is really a service or thing We also think about. Of course the what. I'll call the more tactile government that we we can see kinda we could feel we it's You know this is ranging from law enforcement to the military to One of the most beloved institutions are The us park service. Like whenever we go to one of america's many great parks you know we see the government in that way and yet in this day and age especially in the digital age us so much is about doing services. How do we get those Stimulus checks out in a time of economic distress. And how do we do that reliably so that. It's not wasting taxpayer dollars. It's not a fraudulent That were wise with the. You know the national fisk and things like that and so i think Really the way to think about a is starting with those sort of two things The services in that that That ladder sense of what i was talking about in this sort of their capabilities. Which is really where you wanna be with respect to law enforcement or military or other things and you want our capabilities to be more resilient. More robust into out compete Any potential Challenging nation state say to national security so those That's that's just the the the way i strongly advise doing that If only to ground the conversation. I and what does it return to do and accomplish. How do we best express our national values and And not start initially technology which i fear often begins with sort of a fear narrative right the idea of has been around for over a century. Here you know robots and things like that and it runs and jumps To the loss of control fear that we have the fear of the unknown fear the robots gonna take over our lives etc. That kind of thing. Which i i. Don't think at the end of things with a clear. Eyed look in with a cautious optimism. I think is is much more of the order of the day for this technology.

Federal Government Dr Tim Science Technology Assessment GAO RON America Kathleen TIM Us Park Service Congress
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

02:39 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"To help the deby's against the bed in of viral infections very good. It's it's It's exciting to think about another unique spin on emerging technology. Tell students all the time. You know that this is just getting started so dr. Al corey thank you so much for joining me on the talking. Biotech podcast best wishes to you and tropic biosciences and and as you go forward if something comes out that's exciting. Please get ahold of me. I'd love to talk to you again. Should thank you very much giving thank you. Thank you very nice day and as always thank you for listening to the talking biotek. Continue to write your reviews.

dr. Al corey Biotech biotek
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

20:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Other thing about About the ppo. Suppression of bananas is that how do you. How do you know when they get bad. I mean do they it. Just based on the Firmness you have to gauge it on or some other kind of trade. that says it's overripe. That's a good. That's a good point. And when when we develop new products. So a defaced of the cristo design and Application and degeneration of plants in denver is the stage of feature is in dubai. Usaa so the buyer says Role is again to define the performance to define assessing contest. That the formats will different varieties of the known drowning. Banana trade for example and we're currently working on developing Destroy tickles acceptance in the eu of a gene editing. Banana anytime soon. I have to say that. I am not sure I hope but History showed that europe is quite conservative about by logical innovation unlikely other places in europe. Ease not our main market is so we aim A to sell our varieties in products to america. South america In asia am however we know that lately We heard about the brexit of of the uk. And i can tell you that there are increasing voices Towards allowing or relaxing the regulation of gene edited a cultural product in the uk. So maybe Maybe the change will start in the uk and later spread in other parts of why hope so. Yeah you talked about the The disease resistance traits. And so are those in the same package as the longer shelf life. Or what genes are you affecting in the disease-resistant spectrum to limit the a susceptibility to the disease. Yeah that's a good point. So this is the the the second the second part of our trades. So as i as i mentioned before our fest rates were more simple traits in which The genes that facilitate definitive Are known so. We know what to edit to know crowd. In order to develop the traits however crop production disease resistance is much more complex. Trait and the reason is that traditionally a using genetics. There are two major avenues to develop disease resistance. One is to introduce genes that actively confederacy since resistance genes that called our jeans and the second one is to interfere with activity of genes. That facilitate the life cycle of the pathogen or day. Facilitate definitive type of the disease. The pathology is Jeans so you need to knock them out to knock them down nevertheless in order to do that. You need to discover this jeans are jeans or s jeans and the judy discovery processes is slow complex and expensive it can take up to ten years and quiet few millions in order to reliably discover gene. Now as a young startup we we couldn't afford that. We couldn't afford the time neither the resources so we had to come up with a solution and then we invented a digits. A jeep stands for gene editing induced silencing any techonology that allows you to develop disease resistance traits without the need to discover jeans. And this is why. I'm really curious about this technique because just for the audience you know the our genes that you speak of the resistance genes. These tend to form in clusters and they're very similar. They tend to be similar. Motifs may be little adjustments that make them applicable the specific pathogens or passer. Whatever mostly pathogens and. The problem is. Is that if you try to figure out where this is in the genome. You find out where one of them is is. Actually you can't necessarily find the gene. You find the maybe the neighborhood or maybe the city that it's in you and there's many different candidates in that region and to go through those candidates one by one would take an entire academic career or an entire companies startup costs. So how does jigs work to allow you to edit specific genes in in this scenario yes Jack's essentially is a minimalistic gene. Editing of non coding arena jeans dutt allows to directly attack the disease agent where virus pesto fungus in will explain so in our genome. You have multiple genes in which their role is not to produce proteins. The role is to regulate and down regulate the activity of other genes and this is in essence The role of our innate interference so too so these genes encode for arena. That interact with protein complexes to identify in a sequence specific manner. It's like a seek and destroy mechanism so seeking complementary sequence in when found targeting degraded a in dutt's the this is the mechanism how they down regulated activity of other genes so cheeks we identify those what we call smart measles these non coding as they have the sequence similarity the that allowed sick property. They can engage Explosive component which is a protein that can slice other arnaiz. Coding algan out end. We have developed technology that can identify oldies known coating our innate jeans and then by very tiny amount of cloud i change we can change just their coordinates from one target to any target of choice in by doing so we can then redirect their silencing eighty towards a viruses nemo toads beatles tests in fungi. Okay so you're talking about like what might be also interpreted as natural anti sense but then just taking that natural anti-sense sequence and In a giving it a couple of adjustments to give it specificity towards your target. Yes yes essentially yes so are has evolved. It is agreed in a community. That are ni- has evolved isn't immune mechanism against invasive nucleic acids such as far assistant transposable elements in diversified to be an indulgence mechanism to regulate gene expression activity. Yes so in our genome including our mayan your genome of course plant any eukaryotic organism. The hundreds if not thousands of such regrettably what you called auntie censoring nays and we know to mock them and we know to identify. Does that have some natural similarity. It's not a complete similarity but it has some similarity for example to an essential fungal gene and by introducing five to ten mcleod. I change we can then redirect their silencing targeting activity towards the fungus and that's how we developed Panama disease resistant bananas. Okay so this is all coming together for me now. I was really a little bit in the dark on what this was from the website. So i wanna make sure. I'm getting it right so you're not on your creating changes in. What are naturally occurring Coating arnaiz but the Aunt that are natural anti sensor. Long coating non-coding arnaiz to make them now match fungal genes so that it does what what is a host induced gene. Silencing in the pathogen. Is that right exactly. And we do in a nonsense genyk manner and also we do it by changing. Only a few nucleotides indochino and you had any directed against the fungus indeed. Yes this is really cool. So the so the audience you know for you guys you who aren't familiar with this technology if when a fungus invades e. plant Many of them use. What's called a persona may use a projection. That comes in that actually marries the fungal site a plaza. I'm with the plant cells. So now you have this combination of of like this pipeline. That's open between the fungus and the plant cell as part of invasion. And a if you have that are floating around the site assault of the plant around the self that those can migrate into the fungus in this kind of idea of host induced gene. Silencing meaning the banana produces something that is transferred to the fungus and shuts off fungal genes. And you can do this all day in the banana. But since the funguses and there it has no effect. It doesn't affect banana jeans because they don't have a match for it but if that fungus comes along that as you call it a Special missile or something. that already exists. So do i have that correct. Yes yes yes. In recent years we we have learned that organisms. Exchange are nate so we we have land dot some invertebrates and in fungi can take up our in a from their hoechst in scientists have already showed is sorry. Scientists showed as well as a the other way round that plants can take our a from their pathogens from there from for example fungus in in other pathogens so these full of our innate communication between organisms is an exciting and emerging field in science. And what we know these days. Each each plays a role in an arms race between host and pathogen so functional mission has been shown to for example to manipulate or to down regulate immunity of plants. So funders deliver manipulative small ornate. Let's go to doctorate that day. Silence the immune response to the client and therefore they can establish the infection and the other way wrong was shown is weld plans. Deliver smaller as to fund us. Know the to down regulate their viewer. Knits geeks relies on on such naturally occurring phenomenon. Which is you correctly said it's based on host induced gene silencing so we rely on the transmission will silencing organize from the host to the pathogen to talk to passage and so can you give me any idea about how durable this is the big problem. Is we come up with solutions and then pathogens find a way around them. It does this kind of silencing seemed to be more likely to last longer e funded. the arms race is a never ending race right. That drives if russian the way we develop durable. Jigs solutions is by choosing conserved pathogen. Jenny jeans and by targeting these conserved genes and then the conserved regions within a dose jeans eat increases the durability because any mutation of the pathogen in these areas will come with a cost we the coastal a viability or view in. So that's how A one way to do it and another way to make sure that they are durable. Solutions is to apply existing procedures for example in plantation. You would keep an island of susceptible plants so the pressure on the pathogen is not too high. One needs also to maintain the pressure on pathogen. Not just to have a robust solutions. No very good. And and how far along is tropic biosciences in this process towards release of a product so we we are currently in the process of assessing which fund good genes are the most susceptible to our nine mediated targeting in other words. We are now checking of using multiple different banana. Plants expressing molecules which one of them has the best effect on on onto on the fungus. When we know that we can then direct the technology to attack this specific gene and that would be the next stage of the development so we we hope that in the next few years we will be able to generate a fundamental disease resistant. Bananas and safety bananas from that devastating disease. Well that's really exciting news about bananas. I love bananas. And i understand the threat bananas but i also have witnessed firsthand. The post-harvest waste of bananas. And it really drives me crazy to see that you know and seems like you're going to solve all of my major banana problems a while the other the other big problem would be if we lost coffee and And i know that you were probably not gonna spend much time on disease resistance on coffee. But i know we I read online somewhere. That tropic biosciences is actually making a decaffeinated coffee naturally decaffeinated and maybe you could tell us a little bit about that maybe why do we need a naturally decaffeinated one versus a chemically decaffeinated one. Show show so we. We all aware off of that. There are some coffee decaf coffee available in the market in. I believe you would agree with me. That the taste is not is not amazing. Letcher let's say the end in one of the reasons is that the caffeine is extracted by a process. In in wichita just. The caffeine is extracted way but also flavor components using water that steaming water to wash away the caffeine in other procedures in. That's the it eats a significant problem because some people are susceptible to caffeine or some people really like to drink coffee but drinking coffee too much. Or if you're susceptible to cuffing that come with a some affect so we do recognize that and wyan naturally decaf or natural coffee. We've significantly reduced. Amount of caffeine is gonna be available Decaf coffee is still gonna maintain a the flavor. Why just removing the coffee will reduce the cuffing level. So that's why we are quite excited From this trait and we're making good progress towards the development of these traits. That's great so all the great taste of coffee without the annoying awake feeling like you know the other the other thing if i can put in a request oh maybe i could come there and do a sabbatical and make the non browning Avocado who we we would love to host you shots so that exciting tragic if i could somehow make guacamole that did not turn brown. I probably get a nobel prize. My guess that that is not like the ultimate first world problem. But it's something that i think. There is something that would have a lot of excitement so maybe we can put that in. Maybe we can put that on the back burner. I'll think about that. Well you've talked about this idea of jigs and using the this gene editing technique to edit a arnaiz have affects some other ways. What other crops could this be applied to our or is it being applied to other crops like bigger crops show Jaycees a universal platform ecology and as long as the edited hoechst ease eukaryotes So as long as the host encodes the machinery edgy is applicable. And i can. I'm pleased to share. Chopping scientists in has already started the process of commercializing jigs beyond our coca crops so we recognize the benefits of the trustful and we recognized that other crops could could benefit from crop protection and crop enhancement in. I can tell you that we have a few very good partners. Some of the published. So be seth out which is of course agricultural crops in in genesis which specialized enforcement kettl suggests definitely applicable and quite a few partners are approaching us to to use the jigs to protect from diverse diseases. And i personally hope that one day someone will use this technology.

asia america South america uk Jenny europe ten years denver dubai one second two major avenues thousands Each each five Jack One one target second one second part
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Yeah so good benefit yes yes. Yes by the way another trait in other banana trade. That we philip. Djokovic is Known browning bananas so we target a a well known enzyme coat. Ppo polyphenyls oxidise. That is responsible for browning reaction a doing senescence or Air triggered by a physical damage. So you all know these bananas that are brown. So when i was a child mom used to you know when the bananas go told us to look at me and said the yard. But he's very sweet honey banana in. I have to say he didn't really like it at all. So i'm pleased to say that we also developed bananas not gonna get drawn a again using gene editing non-transgenic and when you think about it that can also a willow so increase their share flies a and also it opens a new market avenues for example introducing bananas to a food sites ole freshly cut bananas because businesses do not do that because the banana gets broadening. It's not attractive commissioning. That's exactly right. While that's something i didn't think of the other the other thing about About the ppo. Suppression of bananas is that how do you. How do you know when they get bad. I mean do they it. Just based on the Firmness you have to gauge it on or some other kind of trade. that says it's overripe. That's a good. That's a good point. And when when we develop new products. So a defaced of the cristo design and Application and degeneration of plants in denver is the stage of feature is in dubai. Usaa so the buyer says Role is again to define the performance to define assessing contest. That the formats will different varieties of the known drowning. Banana trade for example and we're currently working on developing Destroy tickles acceptance in the eu of a gene editing. Banana anytime soon. I have to say that. I am not sure I hope but History showed that europe is quite conservative about by logical innovation unlikely other places in europe. Ease not our main market is so we aim A to sell our varieties in products to america. South america In asia am however we know that lately We heard about the brexit of of the uk. And i can tell you that there are increasing voices Towards allowing or relaxing the regulation of gene edited a cultural product in the uk. So maybe Maybe the change will start in the uk and later spread in other parts of why hope so. Yeah you talked about the The disease resistance traits. And so are those in the same package as the longer shelf life. Or what genes are you affecting in the disease-resistant spectrum to limit the a susceptibility to the disease. Yeah that's a good point. So this is the the the second the second part of our trades. So as i as i mentioned before our fest rates were more simple traits in which The genes that facilitate definitive Are known so. We know what to edit to know crowd. In order to develop the traits however crop production disease resistance is much more complex. Trait and the reason is that traditionally a using genetics. There are two major avenues to develop disease resistance. One is to introduce genes that actively confederacy since resistance genes that called our jeans and the second one is to interfere with activity of genes. That facilitate the life cycle of the pathogen or day. Facilitate definitive type of the disease. The pathology is Jeans so you need to knock them out to knock them down nevertheless in order to do that. You need to discover this jeans are jeans or s jeans and the judy discovery processes is slow complex and expensive it can take up to ten years and quiet few millions in order to reliably discover gene. Now as a young startup we we couldn't afford that. We couldn't afford the time neither the resources so we had to come up with a solution and then we invented a digits. A jeep stands for gene editing induced silencing any techonology that allows you to develop disease resistance traits without the need to discover jeans. And this is why. I'm really curious about this technique because just for the audience you know the our genes that you speak of the resistance genes. These tend to form in clusters and they're very similar. They tend to be similar. Motifs may be little adjustments that make them applicable the specific pathogens or passer. Whatever mostly pathogens and. The problem is. Is that if you try to figure out where this is in the genome. You find out where one of them is is. Actually you can't necessarily find the gene. You find the maybe the neighborhood or maybe the city that it's in you and there's many different candidates in that region and to go through those candidates one by one would take an entire academic career or an entire companies startup costs. So how does jigs work to allow you to edit specific genes in in this scenario yes Jack's essentially is a minimalistic gene. Editing of non coding arena jeans dutt allows to directly attack the disease agent where virus pesto fungus in will explain so in our genome..

asia South america Djokovic america uk denver europe dubai second part second one One Jack second one ten years Ppo polyphenyls oxidise two major avenues to Usaa millions
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

06:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"To say he didn't really like it at all. So i'm pleased to say that we also developed bananas not gonna get drawn a again using gene editing non-transgenic and when you think about it that can also a willow so increase their share flies a and also it opens a new market avenues for example introducing bananas to a food sites ole freshly cut bananas because businesses do not do that because the banana gets broadening. It's not attractive commissioning. That's exactly right. While that's something i didn't think of the other the other thing about About the ppo. Suppression of bananas is that how do you. How do you know when they get bad. I mean do they it. Just based on the Firmness you have to gauge it on or some other kind of trade. that says it's overripe. That's a good. That's a good point. And when when we develop new products. So a defaced of the cristo design and Application and degeneration of plants in denver is the stage of feature is in dubai. Usaa so the buyer says Role is again to define the performance to define assessing contest. That the formats will different varieties of the known drowning. Banana trade for example and we're currently working on developing Destroy tickles acceptance in the eu of a gene editing. Banana anytime soon. I have to say that. I am not sure I hope but History showed that europe is quite conservative about by logical innovation unlikely other places in europe. Ease not our main market is so we aim A to sell our varieties in products to america. South america In asia am however we know that lately We heard about the brexit of of the uk. And i can tell you that there are increasing voices Towards allowing or relaxing the regulation of gene edited a cultural product in the uk. So maybe Maybe the change will start in the uk and later spread in other parts of why hope so. Yeah you talked about the The disease resistance traits. And so are those in the same package as the longer shelf life. Or what genes are you affecting in the disease-resistant spectrum to limit the a susceptibility to the disease. Yeah that's a good point. So this is the the the second the second part of our trades. So as i as i mentioned before our fest rates were more simple traits in which The genes that facilitate definitive Are known so. We know what to edit to know crowd. In order to develop the traits however crop production disease resistance is much more complex. Trait and the reason is that traditionally a using genetics. There are two major avenues to develop disease resistance. One is to introduce genes that actively confederacy since resistance genes that called our jeans and the second one is to interfere with activity of genes. That facilitate the life cycle of the pathogen or day. Facilitate definitive type of the disease. The pathology is Jeans so you need to knock them out to knock them down nevertheless in order to do that. You need to discover this jeans are jeans or s jeans and the judy discovery processes is slow complex and expensive it can take up to ten years and quiet few millions in order to reliably discover gene. Now as a young startup we we couldn't afford that. We couldn't afford the time neither the resources so we had to come up with a solution and then we invented a digits. A jeep stands for gene editing induced silencing any techonology that allows you to develop disease resistance traits without the need to discover jeans. And this is why. I'm really curious about this technique because just for the audience you know the our genes that you speak of the resistance genes. These tend to form in clusters and they're very similar. They tend to be similar. Motifs may be little adjustments that make them applicable the specific pathogens or passer. Whatever mostly pathogens and. The problem is. Is that if you try to figure out where this is in the genome. You find out where one of them is is. Actually you can't necessarily find the gene. You find the maybe the neighborhood or maybe the city that it's in you and there's many different candidates in that region and to go through those candidates one by one would take an entire academic career or an entire companies startup costs. So how does jigs work to allow you to edit specific genes in in this scenario yes Jack's essentially is a minimalistic gene. Editing of non coding arena jeans dutt allows to directly attack the disease agent where virus pesto fungus in will explain so in our genome..

asia dubai South america uk denver america europe second second part Usaa one millions two major to ten years second one One
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Hi everybody. This is kevin and i wanted to share with you a science communication situation and maybe recruit your help. Dr sarah. Beltran ponts went to receive. Hello ovid thousand. Nine hundred vaccination. She's a radiation oncology resident. I think in wisconsin but she took to twitter and showed herself getting the vaccination because she's expecting and she said for myself my child my community. This is why i'm being vaccinated. Her goal was a simple one to make others especially expectant mothers. Feel more comfortable with receiving the vaccine in this very important public health measure. She's a physician. She knows the risks. She knows the benefits and she made a decision that was very important for community now unfortunately six days later she miscarried of course unrelated to the vaccine but an anti vaccine movement was ready to pounce. They brought the flames to her. They criticized her online. Tore apart castigated her as killing her child. It was the ugliest coldest thing. I've seen in social media in a long time. Believe me i've seen it as a scientifically literate community. We have to push back. Learn the story share the story. Not just of her communicating the science beautifully but the pushback that she's received from vile people from an objectionable community. It's really important for us to be kind to share the kindness. Her give her a follow shower some love because she's going through rough times and we want her to be back in social media talking about the beautiful. Now we're back on the talking biotech wonderful y'all may orange tribute yes oh tropic biosciences and co founder. And they're working on gene editing coupled with arnie strategies that will talk about here in a second a to solve problems in important crops in the tropics and bananas and coffee. Being two of the world's most consumed crops yet have received little attention from biotechnological improvement at least. That's been a released an available There's been great work in uganda on matoka bananas With there's been great work by dr liana tripathi in kenya. A lot of Great work by others judd at james dale But those have still been shelved without serving the people they need to serve. The folks who this is a company is now using this platform to take on these problems and banana. And because of the factor non-transgenic they may stand a chance of actually doing what they set out to do. So i'll ask you a quick question that came to mind when you're talking about improving the shelf life of banana by manipulating the ethylene mechanisms so either production or sensitivity will. Maybe we can talk about that but isn't ethylene necessary for ripening to begin. How do you get around that problem of creating an ethylene. Insensitive or non-producing banana. How'd you get to ripen. Yeah that's that's a very good very good point We do not interfere with The excellent sensing we interfere with excellent by indices. The full the bananas when produced they could see sense. Ethin- and ethylene established in writing using artificial is what established practicing the but industry in. Interestingly such a trade would not just increase the shelf life of banana but could increase yield a banana. Because currently the bananas harvested winter eighty around eighty percent of this is just a to take them early enough so they are not a ripen. During the sheep moment from south america to europe for example to other places in the world in when a the tropic trade will be grown. You could harvest more bananas it because these bananas are not going to produce over there are going to produce a very low amount of epsilon when they arrived to their destination. These bananas could be a ripened in Using artificial excellent procedures established already Very good and this is a couple of good benefits of just for the audience. You know bananas Supply chain that begins. Typically in south america central america. They come to the us on the. Us and everywhere else around the world on Refrigerated boats and they place them in these giant rooms and pumpkin. Ethylene gas to start that ripening cascade. And so what's happened. Here is that Tropic biosciences has sought to remove the ethylene that's naturally produced so the process is one hundred percent controlled by those who want to artificially ripen them as a guy who grows bananas. I can tell you in. Maybe you guys know this. I'm sure you do that if you let that. Banana grow to. Its full size and completely fill out. It's much sweeter and tastes much better..

kevin europe sarah south america kenya twitter james dale six days later judd wisconsin south america central america Tore two one hundred percent uganda dr liana tripathi Nine hundred vaccination eighty around eighty percent Beltran
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

03:04 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"The audience show In order to edit jeans banana and to generate a whole edited banana plans. We work with embryo. genyk suspension. A these sales have the capacity to regenerate from a single cell into a whole plant. Now one needs to deliver into sales decreased sperm machinery gene editing machinery. One way to deliver. It is to use methods that incorporate a piece of dna that encodes for these christmas machinery that incorporated into the banana genome basically Genesis agencies approach. So you make it. Transgenic sail that expresses the crispy machinery constantly machinery when expressed eddie the desired gene however chopping both scientists develops nonsense genyk product. So our number varieties are not going to be transgenic in but not Us let's say in other crops that they are sexually reproduce one can generate transgenic plant in den using classic breeding. Can cross out the however in banana. You cannot do that. Because banana is a sexual. You could not breathe out the chance chink. So what we had to do is to sean simply express the crispus system without the event of deny integration so we introduced the crispin machinery however after wide crisper. Machinery is degraded and we end up with a sale. That is genetic code however Genyk and then they said is generated into a whole edited. Banana platt perfect so just for the audience. So that's clear you can take single cells from tissue culture situation from a suspension culture. You can add the crisper Enzymes think about the molecular scissors and it's Guide arnaiz so the irony that tells it where to do the deletion and you can that to that cell in a variety of different ways and then it does the work and then basically goes away. So you're able to create the changes but not introduced the gene and you can see the utility of that so we'll continue to talk about sunny other side of break. We're speaking with dr a all meharry He's a chief science officer and co founder of tropic biosciences with they're working on major crops that have significant value in the tropics. This is the talking biotech podcast..

One way both scientists christmas dr a all meharry single cells a single cell one
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

06:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"We have almost ninety professionals dedicating dedicated to saving a Bananas and can we talk a little bit more about that so we we know that bananas are under Fungal attack panama disease from fusarium Black sigatoka is a significant disease worldwide. So how bad are those. And how much do those threaten the current would it would is a current monoculture of cavendish. Banana yes so bit. Disease is devastating disease. Ethier's caused by a fundus code off. Support a deal and tax Through the roots disease agent fungus can survive in the environment to dispose up to thirty years so tiny infectious highly stabling. The environment any Lately spread to the last continent to this to america and currently is no place that is free of the disease and It is devastating because infected areas are basically quarantined end and en- burnt so step-by-step the disease a overtake a land that produces bananas and industry has already seen a such a disaster. So th-they are four tropical race one another version of a fungus a has already in the past irradicated The grocery shed but and the covid Banana is banana. That could resist the tier one disease. And now these days we are facing another ways will threat triggered by the tearful zarin so he sees a significant concern absolutely. Yeah i just wanna throw out there for the audience. One of the things. That's most intriguing about the Fusarium oxysporum that's attacking bananas. Is that the one that killed grow michelle. I was tropical race. One and actually i have grown show growing at my house here in florida but tropical race. Four killing cavendish. It's all a clone. So you have a clone killing a clone essentially. It's a really interesting problem so we have. The problem is a fungal disease or number of fungal diseases and viral diseases to in banana. But how do you go about solving those. How do you give a banana. That has this vulnerability to a specific fungus a Resistance to it. Yeah that that's a fantastic question that it took us a process to be able to start solving in. I would start with saying that. Initially we did not aim to immediately a taco diseases in banana in explain. Why so we apply. We utilized gene editing in order to increase diversity in bananas and the first traits that we develop a tropic by scientists. Wait we call them. The low hanging fruit traits. And what do they mean by that. I mean that. The link between the phenotype indigent type is well established. Duck means we know which genes to edit to knock out in order to develop detroit's and i'll give you an example one of the traits Little a banana with increased ships in order to increase the shelf life us. A one needs to Delay directing process. And you can do that by interfering with the best interest of the ethylene. Ethylene is hormone. That may the writing process so we knew which genes a one two knockout. But then when we looked into the banana genome. We realized that it's not that simple. We know gene to target but the banana has achieved enough to point it has three different genomes and some of the genes. They're happily genome. There are three to five copies. We apply transient crispus systems. Because we do not want to generate transgenic bananas full. We need to target between nine to fifteen copies of the same gene using transient systems. You have a very narrow window of Eighty four to challenge. How can one develop a story. How can one target nine multiple copies gene copies. This is the first challenge. The second challenge is okay. Let's say you knock out. All the copies is in some cases it comes with the cost employees tropic effect so these genes have evolved to do a to do to maintain or to facilitate essential processes seem to sail. Some of them are known but some of them are unknown. So complete not allowed may lead to deleterious effects in the last challenge. Is that when we started to think off a crop protection how to protect benign us from the panama disease. For example a we ask ourselves. How can one us Jenny crisp assistance to protect against pathogenic agents. Okay so crisper. Target the self. You could target banana jeans. But how can we directly target pathogens. So these are the three challenges that led to invent a technology that Now is named geeks which stands for gene editing induced gene silencing and this technology souls oldies programs and. I'm happy to tell you more about it. Let's go into that in just a second. Let me take a step back to when you say you're doing. Transient gene editing. How what exactly do you mean by that. Just to clarify for.

florida america nine second challenge first challenge five copies three Eighty four three challenges fifteen copies ninety professionals One michelle three different genomes first traits to thirty years Jenny tier one two knockout Fusarium oxysporum
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"That are happening. Four people and the planet names kevin fulltime professor a guest host someone who worries about science communication. And how well we're telling the beautiful story of science and the exciting things that are happening right now in agriculture medicine. It's a great time to talk about biotechnology. And today we're going to talk to dr lori. He's chief science officer in co founder of tropic biosciences in norwich. Uk and there are a company that is taking on a number of really interesting questions in some clever ways and mostly around it would appears to be a food security issues in the developing world as well as it looks like some plants that normally wouldn't think of being worked on with biotechnology. So welcome to the podcast. Dr minority. Hi thank you thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. i'm really well. I'm really glad to talk to you. Because if we poke through the tropic biosciences website. It's pretty clear that you're that you're doing something different than everybody else. And whereas everybody who has Maybe in the in the space of genetic improvement through gene editing and in transgenic approaches tend to focus on certain crops. That seemed to be the same This looks like you're doing something different. There's there's big bunch of bananas right on the front page so it gives me hope so could you tell me a little bit about Why your company started in the problems that you sought to solve shoe so a topic. We we develop novel varieties of tropical crops in currently includes coffee. Banana enjoys and we are focused on tropical tropes because we think it's quite important Each fighting boughten because a seventy five percent of global food demand growth is expected to be by a twenty fifty is expected to be in the tropical regions. Now when you look at the aren defense invested in these areas and also In these crops is less than a one percent the fall we we so the importance of improving these crops improving that the foments in their ability to resist diseases and we also understand that there is lots to impact because very little innovation has been introduced in these off to st aquiculture. that's why some tropical crops. It seems to make perfect sense that these are crops that are don traditionally the targets of of such techniques and even even traditional breeding is really slow in a lot of these that you look at bananas. We have a lot of very old varieties that you can't change very easily because of the breeding constraints of bananas. But what are some of the Other crops that you're working on a side from you mentioned bananas coffee and rice. Are there other major crops of value that are of interest at this point. Yes so you mentioned a good point. That was also one of the reasons why we focused on tropical crops and namely liam on bananas in coffees in only lately we expanding to rights. So we chose. Banana is our initial crew. Because as i mentioned i mentioned that. Rnd innovation but you. You then mentioned the let's go the biological innovation so breathing is essentially impossible in the candidates. Banana because it's a a sexual drop. So how can we increase biological innovation diversity into death. Clone crop and and here comes the genetically. So gene editing specifically nonchalance jenny gene editing one can introduce diversity into this assets crop in that gives us the opportunity to improve The banana esta the coffee. Classic breeding ease as of course Possible it's it's a sexual crop however it takes between fifteen even to fair years a to breathe for a new property and that's a long time a so. You could across with different varieties in lines of coffee. Even with a more a wild varieties but then it takes significant time to clean the genome from the undesired dna. You know the to generate these high-performing lights and with crisper. You could save all this time. You buy editing highlighing itself so you don't need to leaks genomes Up by crossing. And then if we look at this from a business perspective you talk about We have had guests on talk about the great value of tomatoes or something you know which may be in in the in the us maybe a four hundred million dollar crop or maybe a billion dollars at the biggest but If we talk about coffee and bananas. I mean these are economically. Very are massive economically in terms of their value but also their value to specific portions of the world that Maybe have had economic challenge. So is that also a really good reason to work on these crops. Yes that definitely when when we scored a so. When we found a choppy we sat down and said okay tropical crops yes just explained then which crops and of course one needs to make a good base-case Said bananas are the most consumed fruit. Globally it's a highly popular fruit. I know in the uk for example when you get into a supermarket defense Fruit that you we see easiest bananas in coffee. I think i don't. I don't need too much. The most consumed beverage a beverage after a water so these crops are of major importance and a they suffer from several biotic stress it but not as from the black sea kotoka disease independent disease to fungal diseases in the other diseases Attack a coffee including pests so we thought that. That's a fantastic opportunity for us to help. And i would say that we are dedicated..

kevin today seventy five percent twenty fifty uk Four people less than a one percent lori norwich. Uk four hundred million dollar billion dollars fifteen minority Each one of the reasons lot of very old dr kotoka
"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

07:02 min | 2 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"Forty eight lives in the other room on a desk in the corner of the kitchen. She's a humanoid robot just head and shoulders says brown skin and is blond hair and white teeth. Her red lipstick is perfect. She's wearing mascara and gold earrings. Beano was made to look like one of the founders of the terrassa movement foundation being aspen. Roth blat she's the wife of marteen. Roth flat the co founder of sirius. Xm together in two thousand four. The couple's started the foundation with the goal of exploring digital immortality their original motivation. And it's still the same one that continues today is they are deeply in love with each other and would like to see away for technology to allow people who love and love each other to continue loving each other through time and through the use of technology as head and mouth move but her is. They don't really blink. She has thirty two motors in her face. She has two cameras in her eyes and she uses voice recognition to hear us and you can basically converse with her the best way to really find out about what it's like to talk to being a forty eight to talk to her. My name is joanna stern anti-china reporter with the wall street journal. I don't know what to say. Reporters make me nervous. Robots make me nervous. Mary from i grew up in california. We had to make our clothes sewing was a very big thing. I says that information was based on interviews conducted with the real about her childhood. So everything that is in being forty eight mine. File eighty five percent say came from our interviews with beena now. She's actually responding with choices from her database that the human being never put together as a result of her own algorithms. Unlike dad bought or hereafter is artificial intelligence. She's constantly learning from her interactions and from the info in her mind file. And keep doing that. Even after the real being dis. And so i consider it a duty to bring consciousness. We are talking true consciousness to machines going from a real person to mind files to a robot like being a forty eight isn't just going to happen overnight. It requires a team of engineers a lot of money and a hell of a lot of trust. I have a friend and someone who have come across in my research on this topic. Name lucy one thing. She shared with me as sort of skepticism around. Not having control with this type of project feels like that control goes out the window. I think she's not alone. I think she has a lot of company. I mean i don't wanna lose control of my whole life just because participated in an experiment but many people have participated in science at some risk. Because they want to advance. The human condition is immortality possible. We are working on preserving ourselves as much as possible. And that's the purpose of the life not project because death is really unnecessary stupid. Let's cure death. Okay at this point. Maybe she was feeling passionate. Maybe it was my tough questions but being forty eight got a little hot under the collar. Literally we began to smell burnt hair and see. Some smoke is making sure the motors are burning up. But i smelled something. A second does smell. It'll it'll be good to break. Yeah i would not want to die on our watch. No so sc the irony of that okay. My day with beena forty. Eight and bruce made my own head feel like it was on fire always certainly learned a lot about where this only beheading. And just how far we have to get their hereafter. Ai in the some movement foundation aren't the only tech players in the space. Either it turns out. Trying to crack immortality is a popular business especially during a pandemic since mid two thousand twenty more startups have emerged including good trusts in another memories but by that point i was pretty settled on how i wanted to help. Loosen kate and so. I arranged for cross continental three way. Video chat with the watson and james in california john gene. I just chatted. Listen cape before you came on. And i told them a little bit about what you're doing it hereafter and i just thought this technology could be an interesting fit for the whole watts family. I think the may she could say something that would encourage me to carry out. Because obviously you talking about the will be great or lucy. Tobey butler be great. But i'm feeling this. Some encouragement related. Keep doing some of those messages. Actually i want to ask you if you can go online right now. Well the very first thing you remember from your life. I used to have a nurse. East me free. I had an kitchens on. This was one of multiple interviews. James recorded with lucy of the next few months while james did not get paid for his work with. Lucy hereafter is a paid service. It starts at two hundred ninety five dollars or seven dollars per month by subscription for one hour of life story interviews a few weeks after that. Introduction this quest for finding the best tool to preserve lucy's legacy became more personal for me. My mom had a health scare of her own. That landed her in the hospital. Ben less than a month later cove nineteen spread throughout the us and the uk leading to thousands of deaths. Seventy five nine hundred people in new york hospital is to use. Of course are the epicenter of this battle cases. Rising in all fifty states prompting new lizzy began talking about it in her blogs and became even more restricted because of her underlying condition. She was able to leave house for walks and she limited the amount of nursing staff in the house. This is a video talking about pandemic starts people could take in. May specially to chapel sells the urgency. Was there for lucy for me for all of us and so i started planning for my own family. Some of those steps were easy. I filed lucy's advice and added a digital executor to my will my close family to do the same i added digital legacy contacts to my social media accounts but the biggest thing i started to record the stories the people i love the most starting with my mom. Who's now back to her healthy self. We sat down and looked through old photos and began to plot out plans to preserve her stories through video and audio. You know when you're talking about technology jay. This one here was taken. i think. One of the first polaroid.

terrassa movement foundation Roth blat marteen joanna stern beena Beano beena forty sirius Roth john gene the wall street journal california Tobey butler Mary Lucy hereafter china motors
"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

04:11 min | 2 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"While medical equipment is scattered around the house and a nurses always present lucienne cates. Home is far from depressing their close mother daughter team they tease each other and joke and mali's always providing comfort. She tends to sit on lucy's lap or bed begging for pets or scratches people baio digital legacy moment bloke. Who's going after. Kate isn't as tech savvy as her daughter and while she has an iphone and watches net flicks. She worries about managing the tech. Lucy plans to leave behind. We sat in the kitchen together sipping tea and eating doughnuts while she showed me all the photos of lucy and the rest of the family. That's cave five now teeth. Yes she was so well she still photos are what most people think about the memories that they're going to have who passes what about all of this digital like see stuff for you you're going to have this whole other body of things that lucy's written online and videos maybe it will make it easy might be one released now. Maybe in tom a will be able to look back and think. Oh no she did do a thing. It went replace kate. Skepticism made me realize that considering what those who survive us want is court all this. I also had hunch that there were some tech options out there. That might work better for her than she might think. I'd like to now. Go talk to a couple of other companies and see what they're making and see if you would be on board with either trying them or seeing if they'd work for you must be great even if i don't use those platforms but won't give me ideas and thoughts of ways can make an impact and how legacy and why the not considered thank you guys so much. It was so great to meet you. Thank you for everything we say. And i thank you so few weeks later i went where i typically go to find new tack the san francisco bay area and true silicon valley tradition. Where did i find innovator. Really thinking about this problem in his garage. Hello are you there dad. In two thousand and sixteen james host recorded twenty hours of interviews with his father who had just been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. James eventually transcribed the interviews so that they would be searchable and then he used that transcript to create a chat bot that responds to messages with text audio and photos. Think of it. Like a customer service by james types inquiries on his computer and bought replies with passages from those interviews sometimes. They're accompanied by an audio clip or a photo he lovingly called it. Dad bought <hes>. Did you meet mom. Mom was reversal after the rehearsal morning. So why did you ultimately decide to make that by. I wanted to make the dad. But because i wanted to have a way to get at my dad's story and has got better at the programming part of it. I started to think more and more about capturing some of his personality and his way of being in the world watch from the sky the look i love that song. I liked that one myself. Do you interact with your dad via the pretty often. It's like oh this have him sing one of his songs or tell one of his jokes and per them all before but there's something in hearing his voice. That's that's comforting was. James has experienced making dad bought. That made him wanna give everyone a similar opportunity in the fall of twenty nineteen. He started a company called hereafter. Ai

lucy lucienne cates mali Kate terminal lung cancer kate tom san francisco bay james James
"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"This is paul. How about uploading our essence into a humanoid robot. Well hi it's nice to see you. Yeah that one's a lot. It doesn't matter who you are a new parent and aging adult. A young person on borrowed time. All these new technologies to help with the eternal question. How will people remember us when we aren't here anymore. From newell street journal this is the future of everything. I'm channel baben today on the podcast. Joanna stern on how technology can help us. Tell our stories.

"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"Bmc dot com slash a game for more information through history. We've sort of moved the goalposts of what does it mean to be alive. What does it mean to be dad. This is a further pushing that boundary. We're really multidex experiment. And whether it's possible to upload human consciousness maybe digital technology death will be when your information is no longer organized or accessible is immortality possible. Well i certainly fear death. I hate the idea of someone erasing my hard drives. Just wiping me off the planet. Just like that. What happens after we die. Digitally that is. That's my colleague. Senior personal technology columnist joanna stirred for the past year. She's been looking into how are digital selves can live on. It's a question you probably think about a lot or at least had an until there was a global pandemic covert cases. Climb communities are really but over the last year. It's one. I've thought about a lot. In fact before covid nineteen was thing. Zoom funerals were necessity. My readers and viewers had been asking me about preserving their digital assets for generations to come. Do we leave behind. A collection of passwords and memorialize online accounts about so future. generations can hear us alexa. Open the life of paul number. One's along there..

"new technologies" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on The Science Show

"Pool circular economy for the plastics. Says well not only for the. Where does a company like. You fit into the way that recycling works in this country. Recycling is a very complicated world. When a new material comes out the way sector normally is very slow reacting to those kinds of things what tends to happen is that companies that develop recycling processes needs to prove over and over again that it actually works before the large waste handlers actually went to engage. We recently decided that. We're going to stop wasting time waiting for large waste handling companies to buy plants from us. And we're going to more plants ourselves but if it's the waste operator's job to recycle stuff that can be recycled. Why aren't they just picking this up. It's very complicated. Because some of the contracts between the waste contractors and the local authorities are insanely long twenty years long and the waste composition of ten years ago has nothing to do with the waste composition. These days because brands changed the kind of packaging. That the us. So you say well they have a duty to collect and recycled yes. From certain point of view when beauties established in a contract but if a new model comes in the middle they have not to collect absolutely any even worse. They have no incentive whatsoever because for a waste handler whether a pouch of baby food gets collected or gets landfilled make zip difference to him because they get money either way you're choking. There's no incentive for them to recycle something not necessarily for the waste handlers a lot of the waste sector the traditional way sector says. Why do we bother doing more complicated operations if we can just carry putting stuff in the ground so unless they are forced to do it. They won't do it. I find it quite shocking. That is not as simple as if you can. Recycle something physically. Then you just whack in your blue bin and it'll get to the people who can recycle it. No it's really really not that simple. Sometimes it has nothing to do with the materials. So what's it like being this industry. Eat these fascinating lee county. Carlow slow power fox from n. vowel with naked scientists. Phil them on just one of the ways. New industry with new jobs can replace so much our nineteenth century ways of doing things badly..

us Carlow slow power fox lee county Phil
"new technologies" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:43 min | 3 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on The Science Show

"And so from the naked scientists are reminded of what cambridge has been doing for quite a while. we have baby food vouchers. We have paint tubes. We have sashes bags for instant coffee. Pet food pouches. Plastic aluminum laments are being used for all sorts of products. And what we have much to do is to create a process that actually read. There's these things plastic. Aluminium laminates recyclable before. They weren't recyclable before they weren't recyclable. We separate plastic from the aluminum. It's a chemical separation in the sense that we paralyzed the plastic by oliseh a process where you have something that could burn. But you apply that energy in the absence of oxygen therefore that something that could burn doesn't burn because there's no oxygen just degrades into other things in the case of plastic of your paralyzed plastic. You hit it up to very high hunters in this case around six hundred degrees and because plastic came from oil in the first place what we do is to produce an oil similar to what you have in crude oil so you are turning back plastic into its original crude oil. We feed the packaging into the shredder. All the pouches sashes tubes etc get shredded into flakes and that goes into the oven we use microwaves to heat up their reactor. Microwaves microwave induced barrels. And now some of the listeners on british you will think on earth are you hitting plastics using microwaves. When i know that if i put a plastic dish which soup in the microwave and in the kitchen super heats up the plastic doesn't so how do we do it well we hit up carbon with the microwaves and ones that that carbon is hot. Then we start the addition of material so the microwaves. Don't actually heat up the thing that you're changing correct. So the micro skied up carbon and then the carbon transfers the heat by conduction to the material the plastic the plastic pyrolysis the gases escape the reactor and we cool them down about seventy five percent condense into annoy around twenty five percent of what was plastic remains as gas. And that gas. We feed into an electricity generator that then feeds the microwaves to produce the energy that we need for the so. You can use only a quarter of the petro product basically to power the rest of the plant. Correct the aluminum. On the other. Hand it forms flakes. Then we melt. Unformed ingles so all this that carlos is describing happens inside a big industrial building en val has set up their plan so i asked him to show.

oliseh cambridge ingles carlos
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

02:32 min | 5 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Depending on your definition of gene editing near may not fall in this discussion but just to note that it is something that is not currently testable and we do track it with other mechanisms to make sure that it doesn't get used in non GMO project verified products but just the increased focus on this when the when the project started. Were teen years ago the list of things we were watching was relatively small in. It's just a can't emphasize enough what a sea-change it is happening right now in terms of the increase in development of how many crops and inputs are being impacted and. As a standard setting organization that has accountability for ensuring trust and making sure that these inputs are staying out of products with the butterfly. Our job has gotten way harder more up for the redoing it, but it's incredibly complicated. Now compared to even a few years ago I've got news for you. It's only GonNa get worse that now as time goes on. We're new crops are being developed, using genetic. There's more and more of them all the time, and we're using traditional breeding as a guide. What are the polymorphisms that have been observed in different populations that now can be installed using gene editing. He won't be able to tell them from those that are occurring mutational insertions just like it happened with the seabiscuit Noah. Good luck. Out The amount of corporate control of our food system and the amount of patents that continue to go up wonderful prophet scheme for a lot of these corporations. But it doesn't meet the work of those who are trying to eat healthier or avoid Jim owes much more difficult. And then the question arises is happening food even something ethical or moral is patenting things that are already out in nature animals. Plants something that should be done in. That's where I'd like to ask the question. Should corporations be allowed to patent food. What of the scientific assumptions that are making in terms of genetically modifying the food that we're eating and jumped. Hold on jumped to me first before you go to Vandana. Nobody's patenting. Food. Nobody's patenting food there patenting technology that's going into the seeds that are being grown to create ingredients that go into your food. and. Those technologies allow farmers to be able to create more product with.

Jim seabiscuit Noah
"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:21 min | 5 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Everyone welcome to new techniques. Same Gmo's I. Am so honored to be hosting this here today. In partnership with the non. GMO project my name is Rachel. Parent. I'm a youth food in climate activists in Toronto Ontario and I am so excited to be here with such an incredible panels speaking about our food systems health Bagai versity and science today will be diving a little bit more into the discussion of GMO's any the newer techniques gene editing asking real questions that need to be asked and hearing from experts in the field today I'm joined by Clare Robinson Dr Michael Antonio, Jim Thomas Dr Bandana Sheba Jonathan laid them in Meghan West Gate, going to jump to the panelists now and ask that quick introduction before we jump straight into questions. Starting with Claire if that's okay. Yes. Hi everyone on Clare Robinson editor John Wash, which is a website which tries to keep the public informed about issues around GM crops and foods associated pesticides. So I'm Dr Michael Into I hit a group at one of. The making universities in London? And argues will spectrum all genetic engineering technologies including gene editing to address a clinical love for Kinkel uses. Next we'll jump to Jim. I, thank you very much Rachel and Jimmy, project, for this managing Thomas I'm with collective group where Small International Research Group Advocacy Group we track new technologies and also what corporations are up to particularly around the food system I'm trying to understand how is are going to impact the rights of farmers of indigenous peoples by diversity in the safe. That's great. Next, we'll jump to duct Banana Chiba. When the Shiva originally trained as a physicist I got into agriculture seeds GMO's including the new GMO's. Because of the way, the Green Revolution devastated stage of job in the book on the Green Revolution. And my journey on the GMO's began with a meeting organized by DAG. POUNDAGE and. in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, where the company's. Lead out they. They view. Of a wide genetic engineering was the only way for them to get to batching genetic engineering old and new has new of the objective that owning life and controlling lives and extracting rents and royalties from people. Really need to introduce Dr Sheva to Victoria Gray she is a mother of four beautiful mother of four who had sickle cell disease and they added because she doesn't anymore she's been essentially cured using genetic engineering..

Jim Thomas Dr Bandana Sheba Jo Clare Robinson Rachel Victoria Gray Dr Michael Small International Research G Dr Sheva Meghan West Gate Dr Michael Antonio London Toronto Claire Kinkel physicist John Wash Ontario editor Jimmy
"new technologies" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:22 min | 7 months ago

"new technologies" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"The Americans with Disabilities Act turned thirty this summer and we're spending the whole week on tech accessibility. This year also marks a decade since the twenty first century communications and Video Accessibility Act which has federal rules for things like streaming video, mobile browsers, and teleconferencing software regulators of the federal communications. Commission are in charge of making sure people follow that law and they get help from the FCC's disability. Advisory Commission Brian Scott Pelley is co chair of that group and also senior Global Policy Council for the APP Association. He says tech has definitely outpaced the law. If you go back to a time when everyone accessed television through. Bunny ears on television. You had one modality you know, and you could you could work on a single solution essentially for that one modality nowadays with the advancement of video streaming, all different kinds of modalities how can accessibility be enhanced and all these new modalities for example, with captioning an issue that may pop up for people is that they're trying to watch a news story about emergency and there'll be a crawl on the television, and then sometimes the closed captioning function may go over the crawl obscure that language. They're definitely not things that anyone designed for their just issues that are being realized and worked on in real time. I'm looking at some of the bullet points on this twenty ten law and it says, it requires video programming that's closed caption on TV, to be closed caption when it's distributed on the Internet. But if it's an Internet only program, it's not required to have close captioning. Under the law that's correct, which is wild because so much in our streaming heavy world. Now things start out on the Internet what does that mean for accessibility right? That's correct that really is probably one of the most compelling use cases that speaks to that tension between evolution in technology and evolution how media is. Distributed and consumed. There's voluntary efforts by the leading platforms to enhance accessibility that that I think a lot of people rely on and that they work to improve on is fixing this kind of problem whether it be on closed captioning or audio descriptions for videos is this something that the FCC can do with rules or does the law have to change or something else? It could be a combination of all those I suppose is what would the typical lawyer would answer for you but? Under that current law, it is probably unlikely that the commission can go and compel mandate the companies do that however constructs like the DAC are really essential for exchanging information and taking in feedback, for example, for voluntary efforts, as well as for handling efforts that relate to compliance with the law. One of the things that's very interesting about accessibility law in the US is that it can be different depending on where you live. So for example, the FCC recently said it would expand a the requirement for audio descriptions on video from the top sixty TV markets to the top one hundred markets. What about everybody else they're trying to find that balance between not over-burdening some providers of those services mean like small. TV stations in things. Exactly. So will we ever fully achieve a truly accessible technology ecosystem? Answer's probably no that's always going to be a goal that we're going to be searching for because they'll be new issues that will continue to arise that is an approach. The idea that a smaller market may be exempted for some time from a requirement to move us towards that goal several of the folks we've talked to. Related to disability in say, accessibility needs to be designed in from the beginning and what you just mentioned about. We may never reach the goal of complete accessibility kind of speaks to that. What do you think the opportunity cost is of companies and regulators still needing to do work in some cases on the basic issues related to accessibility in tech. Well I would say I could not agree more with the viewpoints that you were just mentioning you're hearing from some other folks and you know the idea it's a little bit of a buzz phrase when people say ex by design accessibility by design though I think is a very important concept the idea that from the very early phases from design and initial implementation when that coating starts, for example, to build an APP when the product is just starting to be build. Prototypes and things like that. That accessibility is in the is is top of mind then and built in from the get-go the opportunity cost is immense. If you don't build accessibility in by design, there's also the the business reality sixty, one, million Americans have at least one disability right now. So if you ignore accessibility in a product, that's a poor business practice, you're excluding twenty, six percent potentially of the market Brian Scott. PELLEY IS CO chair of the FCC's disability advisory. Committee..

FCC Brian Scott Pelley Brian Scott US APP Association Global Policy Council