35 Burst results for "New Relic"

Gautrain's Vision And The Future Of Public Transport

Future Cities Africa

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Gautrain's Vision And The Future Of Public Transport

"Table kobe's my guest to the future cities. Africa is chief operating officer of countering management agency sample. Welcome give us a quick tour of your background. And so major highlights thank. You think it's an thank you for having me on this interview. Tunnel the one thing about me that most people don't know i'm angelina unit. Despite the way you know i and dress and everything else everybody assumes all these things so somebody things. I'm accounting somebody things them in. It and all that are actually a civil engineer qualified. Originally as a as a hydraulics engineer But i went into the as immediately our sponsored by you know the railway companies in my last year my studies i went into the relays immediately being there for the last two years and of discounting the date that the this feb would be lack Two years since. I started my career in the relics. I'll just it out and went into consulting energy and mining Before and also it and technology and everything else in between Probably about six years back. I was called back to come and be part of the longtime expansion of the healthy was yet. I'm one of the very few engineers that we hired on the health rain when it started in two thousand five. I think that's when they prefer. It was announced. I joined the house during dead at the earliest ages. So as they say around. Yeah i know where the bodies buried

Kobe Angelina Africa
"new relic" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

05:51 min | Last month

"new relic" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"Manager. New relic are you great scott. Thanks for having me on. I appreciate we actually are both in portland and we know a bunch of the same people so it's always nice to talk to another portlanders. Yes exactly the an artist's collective that is portland indeed indeed. of course it's all just ice and snow in any things right now where we're calling from our our snow bunkers. Here in oregon. We're glad we have our indeed so that power we are going to do great things I wanted to talk to you about A couple of things. There's a lot of buzzwords that are kind of bugging me in the community. At devops not withstanding there's also observability yes and i'm trying to really dig into the essence of whether they're just are they buzzwords. Are they really words that we needed to describe best practices in.

portland both oregon scott
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | Last month

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Biden tells world leaders that "America is back"

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:59 min | Last month

Biden tells world leaders that "America is back"

"The clip that we showed that president by there in michigan being real fiery about about his covert relief bill. That wasn't the only speech he gave. Today he spoke to the munich munich security conference which he went to a all the time when he was a member of the senate and chair of the senate foreign relations committee have a listen to what he had to say to our allies over in europe. I'm sending a clear message to the world. America is back. The transatlantic alliance is back and we are not looking backward. We are looking forward together. Democracy doesn't happen by accident. We have to defend him. Fight foreign strengthen renew it. We have to prove that our model is isn't a relic of history is the single best way to revitalize the promise of our future and me with that speech. President biden sending a clear message to the alliance that the last four years are done. The united states is back wanting to assume its role as the leader of the free world. A bullwork of the of the of the western alliance. Do you think though that that message is being well received in europe will. It's a welcome message but it's a message that is also coming as president biden is trying to really do away with some of the damage that was caused over the last four years. He's trying to essentially say to our allies. The last four years or anomaly. They were not reflective of american values. But let's be very clear for a very long time. The united states will be known around the world as a country that elected president trump and the president trump also former president trump also had seventy five million people vote for him the second time around so our allies are also looking at this guy at our country and saying what exactly is going on in america so while president biden of course is is signaling that america wants to again embrace our allies. There's really a lot of damage that needs to be had there in our allies including europe and in other places. They've figured out how to function within america. That was weaker. And i didn't wanna be part by a of multilateral deals multilateral agreement so you also are entering back into the world stage with that are saying we figured out how to talk about climate. Change how we talk about the pandemic without america being part of a partner of that analysis really president biden wanting to go back into the furlough based on my reporting a lot of people who welcome idea leaders. Welcome that idea. But i think that it's still very early. Because america has that that that stained really In that and that that that reputation now because president trump went to these to these conferences went to these. These these gatherings and really did damage. They are really did. Somebody's poke his finger in the eye of a lot of our allies

President Biden America Senate Foreign Relations Commi Transatlantic Alliance Munich Europe President Trump Western Alliance Donald Trump Michigan Senate
"America is back," Biden tells Munich Security Conference

All Things Considered

03:19 min | Last month

"America is back," Biden tells Munich Security Conference

"By video link at the Munich Security Conference. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron also spoke NPR's Rob Schmitz was watching from Berlin. Welcome, Rob. Hey, Howdy President Biden emphasized today that he is reaffirming America's commitment to the transatlantic relationship. What else did he have to say? He had a lot to say. First off. He really hit home that Europe is a cornerstone of America's approach to the rest of the world, and that the transatlantic alliance is more important than ever, he pointed out. The West faces a new set of challenges. He mentioned the strategic threat of China as well as Russia and, of course, the Corona virus pandemic. But he said one of the biggest challenges the West faces now is that as we gradually come out of this pandemic, he said, many people in the world are wondering if autocracy Has emerged as a better system for governance. And he said the U. S and Europe need to work together to show the world that democracy will prevail. Here's what he said Democracy doesn't happen by accident. We have to defend it. Fight for it, Strengthening renew it. We have to prove Our model is in a relic of history. It's a single best way to revitalize the promise of our future. And the response from Germany or France. You know, Merkel and the crone got right down to business. Both of them reacted with the kind of a laundry list of items that have built up over the past four years that need to be done multilateral approach to vaccinations for the developing world, reinvigorating The Iran nuclear deal. The Paris climate accord Afghanistan, you name it, these air all issues that from the European perspective have suffered from neglect under the Trump administration. And have been festering over the past four years. I spoke to Sudha David will of the German Marshall Fund after the event, and she told me it's clear. Both Merkel and McCrone are thrilled that Biden has reaffirmed the transatlantic alliance. Europe needs a strong U. S. And buying, I should say, because Merkel is now a lame duck. She's going to be inward looking as she looks to preserve her legacy, which has taken some knocks lately because Germany has not done a great job dealing with the second phase of pandemic. And Micron is going to be busy with an election in 2022. But are the French president? Macron did say that the EU needs to be more involved with its own security going forward, and we've been hearing that for the last couple of years. That was a complaint from former President Trump that that you needed to spend more on its own defense. Are they actually doing that? They are And as you mentioned, your former president, Trump spend years badgering them about this. And in today's speeches, both Merkel and McCrone pointed out there spending more than ever on defense and Grown even went so far to say that Europe should spend even more in the future because, he said, the U. S is clearly focused on China and in the Pacific region more than ever. And that means that Europe needs to step up its own defense to better manage threats in its own neighborhood. That's NPR's Rob Schmitz. Joining us from Berlin. Rob, Thanks for your reporting. Thank you. What is the point of buying something now? If you can't

Transatlantic Alliance Rob Schmitz Munich Security Conference Emmanuel Macron Howdy President Biden Merkel Europe Mccrone Angela Merkel America Trump Administration NPR Sudha David Berlin ROB U. Germany German Marshall Fund Russia Macron
Biden urges allies to show democracies can 'still deliver'

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Biden urges allies to show democracies can 'still deliver'

"In his first major appearance on the global stage as America's leader president Biden is urging allies to show democracies can still deliver for their people speaking virtually to the Munich security conference the president repeatedly called this an inflection point that the world isn't a fundamental debate about the future with some arguing autocracy is the best way forward he's encouraging world leaders to defend democracy we have to prove that our model is in a relic of history the president made clear he wants to repair a relationship with Europe that was strained under his predecessor vowing the U. S. will again engage on everything from climate change to challenges from China and Russia Sager made Donnie Washington

Biden Munich America Europe U. Sager China Russia Donnie Washington
Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

Photofocus Podcast

05:23 min | 2 months ago

Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

"This schmear young. And i'm joined by my co host. Who's dealing with the frigid. Fifty degree weather in florida right now. Skip cohen own. Showing you get not. I mean it's hysterical. Because it's the way we dress down here like today. I've got on shorts flip flops and a flannel shirt that makes no sense and if the fashion police came by most of us would be arrested. So that is. Let's get into today's program because you end. Our guest are both hanging out in a very cold place in the country right now when it's perfectly appropriate to do a hot podcast. How's that that sounds great because it is twelve degrees right now. Right things that. I'll i'll do my best not complain about having to put the top up. Okay hey seriously. Riley joins us today and she is a testimonial to a combination of the grapevine and social media. And here's the fun aspect of how i got to know riley. A good buddy of mine in boston sent me an. I am and a link to her work and said hey you need to go talk to her so a phone call later. That opened the door to this michigan based documentary photographer. She's an art director. She's an accomplished author. She's a big believer especially in themed projects like her diners of new york. Which is a a personal favourite of hers. And i happen to love the just to if you've lived in the new jersey new york area. Then you know that diners are just an incredible Concept she's a national geographic explorer. She's a fulbright fellow and her work has been published in numerous magazines and is in the permanent collections of seven. Different museums nine. Oh there's probably nothing. Riley can't photograph but as a journalist. What i love most about her work is. it's just about the simplicity of life And sometimes obviously more complex than a complex and less simple in any event riley. If i haven't screwed up something in technology here welcome to the mind. Your own business podcast. Thanks for having me well. It's good to have you here and i really am. I'm outnumbered today. Because i'm always complaining about the weather or or making shamir aware that she's in the coldest place in the country right now and now. The two of you can share that misery law like complaint. It's nice to have some company. Let me tell you and and riley. I'm so excited to chat with you because it sounds like you've had a very interesting journey. And we were kind of chatting in the pre interview chat and it was interesting to learn that you are not originally from michigan. But from the lemme say this right. American samoa correct yes. Correct soren and raised. That's somehow you ended up here in michigan. Where we're just happy to be in the double digits today and so kind of. Let's kick things off by having you kind of tell us about your background. how you ended up doing what you're doing today and just how you got here well since you mentioned where i was Warren raised american saw. I think that would be a great place to start off so you guys might know. American simul from a number of things like you know american football players to you know a variety of other cultural touch points. But you know the first person to make american samoa on the mainstream was the anthropologist margaret mead and some of her photographs and writings about american samoa. so you know and Independent som- so you know. When i was young american sama as i told you earlier is the third wettest is place in the world gets a tremendous amount of rain and one of the things that happens is that mold grows on just about anything including photographs and vhs tapes. You know back when there while people are using those so we had a you know a a system where we would take photographs When our film was ready would send it off to get you know in the mail to get back in the day and we get our photographs back. My mom would fill a photo album and then she sent it off to our grandparents the store because if we kept them on island they would mold in a number of years. We'd have no relics of our family. History so i became kind of fascinated by sort of documenting a place in time and the fact that where we were from. We couldn't really keep our photographs if we wanted them to actually survive more than say three years so that sort of drive to document is really becoming a leading charge in fascination with documenting things and being sort of for that picks niche interests. That might be sort of going away. So that's sort of a long answer to your question How i got started in my career was. I had my senior thesis in my undergraduate degree. I interned at the oregon shakespeare festival as a theatre photographer

Skip Cohen Riley American Samoa Michigan New York Shamir Florida Boston New Jersey Soren Margaret Mead Warren Football Oregon
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:57 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Announcement. You made was the new relic one platform. So this is a significant rerelease. Tell me about the product development for new relic one. And how you architect it it. You know it's a great question. As i mentioned you know that free new relic. We started off the rails monolith and then over time you know. We started adding new products. And they they might have their own services but they weren't as loosely couples. We'd like them to be from the rails monolith that was kind of the apn product and the browser product in a couple of other products. Might not at that point. We had so many different teams. You can imagine the challenge would be in. Sustaining high velocity. All of that and the moment for us was when we had bill some internal tooling that would allow any engineering company to write a react component. That could snap into a unified. Ui and the ui. The shell for that you why and the rest of all the other products was hosted from our new relic dot com. But like your code just like the component. You're working on was just served off your local desktop. So all you needed to deal with you know have no dh mpm installed and and just your could be just couple source code files and every time you press save your stuff would refresh in the browser and so i thought that was so compelling because when you combine that with this data to your that i've discussed that's like this really fast database that you can dump anything with a time stamp in now. Anybody who writes react can build really compelling application functionality in our platform. And i knew it was going to really accelerate our developers productivity but. What got us really excited. Was he said i don't think it's just new relic employees that could benefit from this capability. Let's offer to our customers to so what we did was. We said all of the tools and the components that we use internally to build say are apm product or a dash boarding product or are mobile monitoring product. We want expose them as public. Api so that if you want to include our charting components and our widgets and all of that kind of stuff so that you could rapidly build an application. I'll take you through an example. We have seen large restaurant companies. That have moved their business to the mobile application build applications on new relic wine to show the health of the point of sale systems and the mobile ordering activity by location. So they have this beautiful like you know geographic map that is showing their digital business in real time of the orders flowing through across the country and are there particular locations. That are having problems where people can't pick up their order. And who would have imagined that use case. I mean. That's you know when we're building you know in the early days and eight. Pm product right so that was an easy application for a customer to build because it was just a new view on the saints dated. And all they needed to do is write a bitty react code reuse an open source library for visualizing that map and they were good to go very interesting. Can you tell me more about the product pushing just how you managed such a large product from later position in the coming. I'm like very curious about the resource allocation. you know. you're spinning up a brand new product and you have tons of existing customers to support. Sounds like a big undertaking. It was a really big undertaking. And so what we did was we announced new relic one. The first release of it was in the spring of twenty nine thousand nine hundred and then in the fall which was kind of you know it was the first release new relic one in. It made no attempt to replicate all the functionality of all of our other products it was just a new kind of high level view. Think of it as your portal into new relic you jump from new relic one into new relic. Apm or new relic browser or mobile or any other products that are comfortable using with so it was the new front door that was phase one phase two was we added program ability so people could build those applications that came out in the fall and then phase three which was really the completion of like everything in new relic. One was last summer through a pretty herculean effort. We managed to migrate all of the rest of the user interface of all of our products into the new relic one. Ui and we did that doing some smart things by being able to take the views off of our other products make minor styling tweaks and do some ice framing tricks to i freeman the long tail of all of us and pages that made up our suite and then we did native ports into react in the modern clean y for our most popular views. And we continue to do that over time. But it's a seamless experience for many customers. They don't even notice what's kind of the quote old stuff new stuff is just one unified you now. and so. We're thrilled with how that came together in that all launched last summer. Let's zoom out. We've talked a lot about monitoring talked a lot about observability new relic specifically. Gimme your vision for the future of observability. What's going to change. What is left to be built. Oh i mean well. First of all as i say as long as their software will be bugs and problems and things that go bump in the night. I still can't believe that it's twenty twenty one and know bluetooth almost works but more often than not you know. The phone call gets dropped. Because i didn't get the pairing rate fast enough so offers kind of like that. But there's there's just continue improvement on troubleshooting. And that is almost like an arms race against ever-increasing software architectures increasingly complex suffer particulars. But i don't think that's the really exciting thing in my mind. The exciting thing is every ounce and dollar of energy and money put into building. Software is purely sunk cost until a human uses it for some business purpose. Let's say you're an ecommerce company in your buildings me commerce software. All that engineering effort isn't viable until a human use. It and often engineers. This happens in large companies but all too often engineers and product people. They're just obsessed on like getting their code done and committed and checked in and then they go onto the next piece of functionality. And i think the work to be done is to make sure we're continually reminding engineers that. Hey there's a human using the software you wrote last week. In fact. three hundred people use the feature. You wrote last week and as a builder software. That's really motivating to me like. Hey we all wanted just not only bill suffer build suffer that other people use and value right and you certainly want to know if it's broken so i would love and if we can better. Our platform can help if all software engineering culture so that they're continuing reminded that what they're working on their humans who use it and they have data that helps them know. How good is the software that they've been building and they're responsible for continually improving so that you're not just a feature factory. You're developing software that makes other people's lives better. And i think that our data has a role to play in that in our platform reds role to play in a and. That's why i think we're early in the journey..

last week last summer three hundred people first release twenty First One ounce Api twenty nine thousand nine hund phase three two eight one twenty one tons phase one phase
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:36 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Stack where the visibility is incredibly rich and deep for example inside. Epf you can see every network call that goes on within that cluster. And so for example you might have a micro service running inside a pod as talking to another micr service written in a different language talking. Another pod and eib concede the hp calls in between those two and it can measure the latency between the two and therefore infer the application dependencies between those can build a map between all of these services. You can marry it. With how couvert describes cluster. And what those workflows look like to come up with a very comprehensive view and all of that all by just observing at that layer that runs inside the lennox colonel and so doing that. Well take some really smart engineering. You're that kind of low level. I mean the colonel where you gotta be super thoughtful about the performance overhead. You certainly don't want to perturb the behavior of the application the system but you also want to collect the data in a way so that it's most useful and actionable so it takes really bright engineering do that. Well what we saw about. How pixie approach was they said. Let's build a platform on top of that in which engineers could write little pixie scripts in their language called. T. excel basically python. That will allow you to automate the troubleshooting and write some code to diagnose the problem and then code can be reusable so that it goes beyond just simple dash boarding because often. These problems are so complicated that off from one to execute a sequence of steps like grab the top ten slowest transactions that are running through this service inspect them for whether or not they are coming from the same user and then see if that user happens to be from a list of addresses that we know to be problematic. I don't know i'm just picking it up but like that's something that is kind of script and can go far deeper and do more and be more usable. The next time he might have a similar problem so the pixie team was really brilliant and saying. Hey let's make this something. That engineers can write scripts on top of and then a whole community can share those scripts so that the collective wisdom of how to troubleshoot these systems just gets bigger and bigger over time. How does monitoring cooper netties clusters compare to virtual machine monitoring which has been around for much longer. I think currencies clusters. Give the opportunity to you can make some assumptions on an application running and communities. That you can't make just a roberts from machine. So like there are deployments and there are end points and there are these quran as first class objects that help you describe what your application looks like and how it's deployed and therefore because it's deployed in this way of visualization or logic and operates on that data can do more knowing that so you can't you can kind of put a dependency map together that says oh your your shopping. Cart service is dependent on your pricing service. And here's the throughput. Between them all of that stuff just gets easier to put into a semantic way when you know you're running inside the communities environment you can make some assumptions. You can call some kuban. Eddie's api's to draw map contextual and it'll make more sense to the the engineer who understands kube reneges and works in that environment. We found that. Actually the pattern matching i see in that is really in the early days of new relic. What customers loved about our apm product was how it instantly showed just the right information in a language that was easy to understand as an engineer. And the reason why we can do that as we said hey. lot of. Applications running on popular frameworks in the ruby case was rails and in a lot of people were doing stuff with spring and so again because they had these like constraints of the framework air running in we could build far easier user. Interfaces far better visualization. 's that just made sense of the data so kuban netease doesn't just represent a market shift from your perspective. There's also an opportunity to rebuild your own infrastructure. You've got high throughput You know intense infrastructure that you need to engineer for you re platform d- the internal new relic company infrastructure. At all. we have so. I mentioned earlier. You know our core data to your we built from the ground up as a multi tenant database to natively process metrics events logs and traces. And the thing. That's i think pretty unique about it is it's multi tenant nature running at massive scale but two or three years ago. We're at a point. Where those multi tenants or all. The north american tenants for all deployed into one enormous cluster. That we were running in a data center and what we have done particularly over. The last year is migrate that workload into a collection of what we call cells. Worry say a thousand or five. Thousand tenants will run in a coup in eddie's cluster. That's running in amazon web services and that sell obviously if it happens have a problem. We could migrate a customer to another so but only the tenants in that cell would be affected by that and we can scale it independently and all those benefits of kind of breaking up into a cellular architecture. So we've been cuban. Eddie's in public cloud have been important parts of of delivering on those capabilities all along the way. Our data ingest rates are skyrocketing in growth right so as more and more customers have larger and larger workflows than they're adopting going beyond our apm capabilities to add logging and infrastructure. We just see more and more data coming into into our platform at very high growth rates and so essential part of managing and scaling with that growth to win your next big customer for your company. You need to know that your technology will perform the way that you want it to even under a big enterprise workload infrastructure that.

amazon python Thousand tenants Eddie quran two last year five excel a thousand three years ago eddie first class one north american hp lennox kube pixie Epf
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:59 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"But the cpu and the network in the compute to query that as i just described to our customers that basically a cost plus level. And so if you all that data in one place and it's economical and so if you wanna send more there you know it's not going to be your knock have an ugly surprise near bill. Then you're in a position to really have real correlation between like the application health the infrastructure health and the end user experience and the ability to build applications on top of that telemetry data. That could really solve some important business. Use cases that are specific to your company. So that's the approach. We take with it and i think it's really important. It's it's hard. Imagine a company being successful in production and software today without real time. Telemetry data and so virtually. Everyone understands that and now the next step is to say all right. Well what's the natural place to put. All that is limited data so that you're not jumping between different data stores to correlate across. It all interesting in. Can you tell me more about how you've had to adjust new relic and you've had just the platform as new engineering trends have emerged. Yeah i'd say the one that's most exciting to me is current eddies. So i think. I mentioned at the beginning that i started this journey into what we now call observability in the late nineties and that was a bet on this new thing called java that turned out to be where people run their workloads. The you know the the most popular place to run an application was the jvm for good part of the next two decades will now at two thousand twenty one scale i think a kuwaitis cluster in two thousand twenty one is akin to what a jvm was in in two thousand and so what we think about is how do you with the most friction lists way possible. Light up a kuban. As cluster with the deepest visibility to instantly see everything going on that cluster. And so we found this incredible little startup with mind-blowing technology called pixie labs and they do amazing with grenades. Don't require you to deploy the agents. They use this technology called epf and unlike other companies that are also looked at abc. They go deep into the application layer and they can show all the services and the network can dependencies between those services and the latency between the services and effectively map out everything going on in cluster. You know all of the discover things like databases and other things running in that cluster. All within five minutes if installations so we got so excited about. We acquired pixie late last year. And we want this to be something that every engineer in the world wants to us. And if you want something to be back ubiquitous engineer who uses cooper netease and. We think that's going to be a meaningful portion of the professional developer market so in order to reach that many engineers we decided to source pixie. So that anybody. Who wants to light up a eddie's cluster in five minutes and see that depth visibility instantly with pixie and so that's you know we've just begun thinking about the integration now but you know this technology reminds me of one thousand nine hundred eighty eight or where new relic was in two thousand eight. It's that kind of fundamental and exciting. So tell me more about what needs to be monitored. In a coup venetis cluster or in a post coober netease world wide is monitoring changed so much. Well we've talked a bunch of our customers. Some operators like the largest size of world millions of users and many many different teams each with their own micro service and other infrastructure related data stores and other packages that they deploy into the cluster of that work in concert to deliver an application say it's video streaming site and what we've heard from this like some of them love to deploy agents inside that application to see deep inside the micro service others don't or others have alternative ways to the might us open telemetry and so what these customers were saying. What what. I agree with it would be great. If you could have a very deep level of visibility across everything running that cluster without requiring somebody who deploy an agent inside the jvm more the python virtual machine or whatever. The process is running the code. Think of that as like an optional. Add on to go deeper inside that micro service but not a requirement to get visibility and good deep visibility and so that is different from where the state of the segment has been until recently and we think that it is great. We believe that there will always be a need. Especially if you want to do cross these services and there's a synchronous stuff going on there's always going to be a real value putting agents inside some if not most of your micro services but to get up and running without requiring an agent and still get deep visibility that is game changing. And that's probably got excited about pixie i just did a show about. Abf and another company built around ab pf and silia liam which is a higher layer that he'd be pf. Can you explain why it's so critical. Wyatt is it in an important technology. Its connection to the the links colonel and so on yeah is at that layer in the stack where the visibility is incredibly rich and deep for example inside. Epf you can see every network call that goes on within that cluster. And so for example you might have a micro service running inside a pod as talking to another micr service written in a different language talking. Another pod and eib concede the hp calls in between those two and it can measure latency between the two and therefore infer the application dependencies between those can build a map between all of these services. You can marry it. With how couvert describes cluster. And what those workflows look like to come up with a very comprehensive view and all of that all by just observing at that layer that runs inside the lennox colonel and so doing that. Well take some really smart engineering. You're that kind of low level. I mean the colonel where you gotta be super thoughtful about the performance overhead. You certainly don't want to perturb the behavior of the application the system but you also want to collect the data in a way so that it's most useful and actionable so it takes really bright engineering do that. Well what we saw about. How pixie approach was they said. Let's build a platform on top of that in which engineers could write little pixie scripts in their language called. T. excel basically python. That will allow you to automate the troubleshooting and write some code to diagnose the problem and then code can be reusable so that it goes beyond just simple dash boarding because often. These problems are so complicated that off from one to execute a sequence of steps like grab the top ten slowest transactions that are running through this service inspect them for whether or not they are coming from the same user and then see if that user happens to be from a list of ip addresses that we know to be problematic. I don't know i'm just picking it up but like that's something that is kind of script and can go far deeper and do more and be more usable. The next time he might have a similar problem so the pixie team was really brilliant and saying. Hey let's make this something. That engineers can write scripts on top of and then a whole community can share those scripts so that the collective wisdom of how to troubleshoot these systems just gets bigger and bigger over time. How does monitoring cooper netties clusters compare to virtual machine monitoring which has been around for much longer. I think currencies clusters. Give the opportunity to you can make some assumptions on an application running in communities. That you can't make just a roberts from machine. So like there are deployments and there are end points and there are these quran as first class objects that help you describe what your application looks like and how it's deployed and therefore because it's deployed in this way of visualization or logic and operates on that data can do more knowing that so you can't you can kind of put a dependency map together that says oh your your shopping. Cart service is dependent on your pricing service. And here's the throughput. Between them all of that stuff just gets easier to put into a semantic way when you know you're running inside the communities environment you can make some assumptions. You can call some kuban. Eddie's api's to draw map contextual and it'll make more sense to the the engineer who understands kube reneges and works in that environment. We found that. Actually the pattern matching i see in that is really in the early days of new relic. What customers loved about our apm product was how it instantly showed just the right information in a language that was easy to understand as an engineer. And the reason why we can do that as we said hey. A lot of applications running on popular frameworks in the ruby case was rails and in a lot of people were doing stuff with spring and so again because they.

five minutes quran python one thousand excel Eddie late nineties Abf two thousand two millions of users late last year two thousand eight next two decades first class each one place today java lennox
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:13 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"But the cpu and the network in the compute to query that as i just described to our customers that basically a cost plus level. And so if you all that data in one place and it's economical and so if you wanna send more there you know it's not going to be your knock have an ugly surprise near bill. Then you're in a position to really have real correlation between like the application health the infrastructure health and the end user experience and the ability to build applications on top of that telemetry data. That could really solve some important business. Use cases that are specific to your company. So that's the approach. We take with it and i think it's really important. It's vital it's hard. Imagine a company being successful in production and software today without real time. Telemetry data and so virtually. Everyone understands that and now the next step is to say all right. Well what's the natural place to put. All that is limited data so that you're not jumping between different data stores to correlate across. It all interesting in. Can you tell me more about how you've had to adjust new relic and you've had just the platform as new engineering trends have emerged. Yeah i'd say the one that's most exciting to me is coronets so i think i mentioned at the beginning that i started this journey into what we now call observability in the late nineties and that was a bet on this new thing called java that turned out to be where people run their workloads. The you know the most popular place to run an application was the jvm for good part of the next two decades will now at two thousand twenty one scale i think a kuwaitis cluster in two thousand twenty one is akin to what a jvm was in in two thousand and so what we think about is how do you with the most friction lists way possible. Light up a kuban. As cluster with the deepest visibility to instantly see everything going on that cluster. And so we found this incredible little startup with mind-blowing technology called pixie labs and they do amazing with grenades. Don't require you to deploy the agents. They use this technology called epf and unlike other companies that are also looked at abc. They go deep into the application layer and they can show all the services and the network can dependencies between those services and the latency between the services and effectively map out everything going on in cluster. You know all of the discover things like databases and other things running in that cluster. All within five minutes if installations so we got so excited about. We acquired pixie late last year. And we want this to be something that every engineer in the world wants to us. And if you want something to be back ubiquitous engineer who uses cooper netease and. We think that's going to be a meaningful portion of the professional developer market so in order to reach that many engineers. We decided to open source pixie. So that anybody who wants to light up a eddie's cluster in five minutes and see that depth visibility they can do that instantly with pixie and so that's you know we've just begun thinking about the integration now but you know. This technology reminds me of one thousand nine hundred eighty eight or where new relic was in two thousand eight. It's that kind of fundamental and exciting. So tell me more about what needs to be monitored. In a coup venetis cluster or in a post coober netease world wide is monitoring changed so much. Well we've talked a bunch of our customers. Some operators like the largest size of world millions of users and many many different teams each with their own micro service and other infrastructure related data stores and other packages that they deploy into the cluster of that work in concert to deliver an application say it's video streaming site and what we've heard from this like some of them love to deploy agents inside that application to see deep inside the micro service others don't or others have alternative ways the might us open telemetry and so what these customers were saying. What what. I agree with it would be great. If you could have a very deep level of visibility across everything running that cluster without requiring somebody who deploy an agent inside the jvm more the python virtual machine or whatever. The process is running the code. Think of that as like an optional. Add on to go deeper inside that micro service but not a requirement to get visibility and good deep visibility and so that is different from where the state of the segment has been until recently and we think that it is great. We believe that there will always be a need. Especially if you want to do cross these services and there's a synchronous stuff going on there's always going to be a real value putting agents inside some if not most of your micro services but to get up and running without requiring an agent and still get deep visibility that is game changing. And that's probably got excited about pixie i just did a show about. Abf and another company built around ab pf and silia which is a higher layer that he'd be pf. Can you explain why it's so critical. Wyatt is it in an important technology. Its connection to the the links colonel and so on yeah is at that layer in the stack where the visibility is incredibly rich and deep for example inside. Epf you can see every network call that goes on within that cluster. And so for example you might have a micro service running inside a pod as talking to another micr service written in a different language talking. Another pod and eib concede the hp calls.

five minutes python Abf late nineties one thousand two thousand millions of users late last year two thousand eight each next two decades today silia one place Epf one java nine hundred eighty eight ab pf teams
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:03 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I was an intern up on. So i couldn't afford a car yet. I used to rollerblade to work every day back when people used rollerblades and i love the job so much i remember rollerblade. I'd paid work here. You know and so you know. We look for engineering leaders. Who will pay well. Don't get me wrong. But love the nature their work and they feel lucky to be in this line work and i certainly feel lucky to be in the software business. And how much do you personally keep. Tabs on product direction at new relic because the scope of the product is always expanding. But you know you're the head of the company you do wanna have some focus on product. Tell me about your perspective on product. There's an ebb and flow to it. And obviously we're at a scale now where there's so much going on that. No one person can have complete visibility to everything. That's going on but i love to say close to park my cannon. I typically have three to five projects that i like to stay very close to and you know in ideal world. I'm not you know in the reviewing and rubber-stamping role. I'm also at the white whiteboard and ideas on how to make something amazing early enough where there is some real creative outlet there so i love that and it energizes me and sometimes i can contribute to helping the products be better and then this may be just a selfish thing. I do but i still like to allocate some time. I'll be doing it this weekend. Actually we're coming up on a three day weekend. It's a recording this on the fifteenth january. But i like to write code still and so new relics forms actually programmable and you can build applications on top of new relic and so i'll be building stuff over the weekend when that keeps me close to the code and gives me joy and once in a while these prototypes actually turn into things that the priority option and bills for real. Do you have any mistakes. That you've made in product development that stand out strategic mistakes. Oh yeah life is certainly about mistakes and learning from them and getting better at it. You know i'd say one mistake. That i can look back on his underestimating. How much continuous communications involved as certain level of scale to align the whole organization around strategic imperative that may require a change in direction so new relic one. I'm very proud of new relic one. And what is done. We re are protected our user interface for the next ten years and we decided to do that when we were about eight or nine years old as a company recognizing that most technology architectures i think i remember steve jobs saying this technology architectures have about ten years life in them and then at that point. They'll continue to go after those but you're kind of low velocity maintenance mode at that point and you're the risk of being leapfrogged by the market so we made the right decision to re architect our user interface to be the underpinnings of the next ten years of growth for the company and my chief product officer and i were really on it as well as the core team building that platform but i underestimated the effort involved in lining the remainder of the product organization around vision for understandable reasons. In hindsight. i mean if you're an engineer that's working on what you have been working on and and you're accustomed to the architecture that we had been running and it was a rails monolith right so it was very two thousand eight technology. The so you know if i were to do it over again i would spend much more time re communicating and aligning the pride tour around that vision rather than assuming for them to just get it on their own after i give one or two talks about it. I'd.

one two thousand three two three day five projects fifteenth january about ten years steve jobs one mistake nine years old about eight years next ten ten
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:50 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Lou. Welcome to the show scrapes video. Thank you you started new relic awhile ago and before that you started a different company wiley. Both of these companies were focused on what we now call observability hauer software applications today different than from when you started new relic. Well yeah you know. I'll talk about what's different today but also talk about what the same and i guess. It's what's the same as so long as our software there is going to be bugs and they're going to be problems that happen only in production and that's that'll be true forever. I think so as long as humans create software and just like in the medical field are so long as people get sick. Then there's going to be a need for doctors. And so i think so. Long as there are software. There's going to be need for tooling and visibility capabilities to help understand. Soffer behaves when it's running under load in particular and take that understanding to improve the performance availability stability and the customer experience of that software. So when i started wiley twenty-three years ago the idea was this brand. New thing. At the time in ninety eight was java and the idea was let's see inside. Jvm without asking our customers to change any of their source code and put that visibility to production low overhead and captures much data as possible and presented an easiest way possible to help customers debug their jvm's and fast forward to two thousand eight. When i found new relic the thought was well. It's a multi language world now and applications aren't running on two or three physical servers are running on twenty or thirty or so back in that time. Virtual hosts and it was very early in the cloud but people those hosts for running increasingly in new environments like amazon web services. So the idea was. How do you put visibility into that are composed of say a half dozen services running in a virtual environment where. There's multi-language in that. That really was the sweet spot. If new relic when it was founded through the first several years and now here we are in two thousand twenty one what an application looks like today is often hundreds of services thousands of containers more and more in coober netease incredibly complex. A lot of a synchronous work a lot of stuff going on systems like kafka and so trying to make sense of a really complex system is more challenging than ever and it seems like what's behind all of this complexity is imperative to help developers be more productive to first of all have smaller more independent teams who can deploy with pretty good isolation and rely on good. Api's and things like that to allow lots of those teams to collaborate on a large effort at high velocity but so that that increases velocity but it comes at the cost of increased complexity on how that whole integrated system works and the solution to that in our opinion is complete visibility into all the application micro services all of the infrastructure and the end user experience. All into a common platform that operates at massive scale and really the guts of observability. If you understand the difference between observability monitoring i'd say monitoring is about telling you when something's wrong but observability is having access to all the telemetry need to answer. Why is something wrong which you don't even know what question you need to ask next to get to the understanding of what's wrong in today's world it just like collecting a massive amount of data and trying to make sense of it. Is you know as rapidly as possible.

amazon two thirty Both twenty java hundreds of services twenty-three years ago three thousands of containers today half dozen services wiley two thousand first several years ninety eight twenty one servers kafka Jvm
Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

Software Engineering Daily

03:50 min | 2 months ago

Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

"Lou. Welcome to the show scrapes video. Thank you you started new relic awhile ago and before that you started a different company wiley. Both of these companies were focused on what we now call observability hauer software applications today different than from when you started new relic. Well yeah you know. I'll talk about what's different today but also talk about what the same and i guess. It's what's the same as so long as our software there is going to be bugs and they're going to be problems that happen only in production and that's that'll be true forever. I think so as long as humans create software and just like in the medical field are so long as people get sick. Then there's going to be a need for doctors. And so i think so. Long as there are software. There's going to be need for tooling and visibility capabilities to help understand. Soffer behaves when it's running under load in particular and take that understanding to improve the performance availability stability and the customer experience of that software. So when i started wiley twenty-three years ago the idea was this brand. New thing. At the time in ninety eight was java and the idea was let's see inside. Jvm without asking our customers to change any of their source code and put that visibility to production low overhead and captures much data as possible and presented an easiest way possible to help customers debug their jvm's and fast forward to two thousand eight. When i found new relic the thought was well. It's a multi language world now and applications aren't running on two or three physical servers are running on twenty or thirty or so back in that time. Virtual hosts and it was very early in the cloud but people those hosts for running increasingly in new environments like amazon web services. So the idea was. How do you put visibility into that are composed of say a half dozen services running in a virtual environment where. There's multi-language in that. That really was the sweet spot. If new relic when it was founded through the first several years and now here we are in two thousand twenty one what an application looks like today is often hundreds of services thousands of containers more and more in coober netease incredibly complex. A lot of a synchronous work a lot of stuff going on systems like kafka and so trying to make sense of a really complex system is more challenging than ever and it seems like what's behind all of this complexity is imperative to help developers be more productive to first of all have smaller more independent teams who can deploy with pretty good isolation and rely on good. Api's and things like that to allow lots of those teams to collaborate on a large effort at high velocity but so that that increases velocity but it comes at the cost of increased complexity on how that whole integrated system works and the solution to that in our opinion is complete visibility into all the application micro services all of the infrastructure and the end user experience. All into a common platform that operates at massive scale and really the guts of observability. If you understand the difference between observability monitoring i'd say monitoring is about telling you when something's wrong but observability is having access to all the telemetry need to answer. Why is something wrong which you don't even know what question you need to ask next to get to the understanding of what's wrong in today's world it just like collecting a massive amount of data and trying to make sense of it. Is you know as rapidly as possible.

Wiley Soffer LOU Kafka Amazon
"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:34 min | 2 months ago

"new relic" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Welcome to the show scrapes video. Thank you you started new relic awhile ago and before that you started a different company wiley. Both of these companies were focused on what we now call observability hauer software applications today different than from when you started new relic. Well yeah you know. I'll talk about what's different today but also talk about what the same and i guess. It's what's the same as so long as our software there is going to be bugs and they're going to be problems that happen only in production and that's that'll be true forever. I think so as long as humans create software and just like in the medical field are so long as people get sick. Then there's going to be a need for doctors. And so i think so. Long as there are software. There's going to be need for tooling and visibility capabilities to help understand. Soffer behaves when it's running under load in particular and take that understanding to improve the performance availability stability and the customer experience of that software. So when i started wiley twenty-three years ago the idea was this brand. New thing. At the time in ninety eight was java and the idea was let's see inside. Jvm without asking our customers to change any of their source code and put that visibility to production low overhead and captures much data as possible and presented an easiest way possible to help customers debug their jvm's and fast forward to two thousand eight. When i found new relic the thought was well. It's a multi language world now and applications aren't running on two or three physical servers are running on twenty or thirty or so back in that time. Virtual hosts and it was very early in the cloud but people those hosts for running increasingly in new environments like amazon web services. So the idea was. How do you put visibility into that are composed of say a half dozen services running in a virtual environment where. There's multi-language in that. That really was the sweet spot. If new relic when it was founded through the first several years and now here we are in two thousand twenty one what an application looks like today is often hundreds of services thousands of containers more and more in coober netease incredibly complex. A lot of a synchronous work a lot of stuff going on systems like kafka and so trying to make sense of a really complex system is more challenging than ever and it seems like what's behind all of this complexity is imperative to help developers be more productive to first of all have smaller more independent teams who can deploy with pretty good isolation and rely on good. Api's and things like that to allow lots of those teams to collaborate on a large effort at high velocity but so that that increases velocity but it comes at the cost of increased complexity on how that whole integrated system works and the solution to that in our opinion is complete visibility into all the application micro services all of the infrastructure and the end user experience. All into a common platform that operates at massive scale and really the guts of observability. If you understand the difference between observability monitoring i'd say monitoring is about telling you when something's wrong but observability is having.

amazon two thirty Both twenty java hundreds of services twenty-three years ago three thousands of containers today half dozen services wiley two thousand first several years ninety eight twenty one servers kafka Jvm
GameStop Stock Soars as Reddit Investors Take On Wall Street Bets

Squawk Pod

07:17 min | 2 months ago

GameStop Stock Soars as Reddit Investors Take On Wall Street Bets

"Stop the video game retailer. Stock has rallied over six hundred eighty percent this month and in the last couple of days the stocks volatility has pretty much everyone talking. So what's going on. First of all game stop is for the average mall going consumer dying brand a relic of simpler times when we used to have to physically go to the store and wait in line for the newest call of duty or for the latest harry potter book. So it's no surprise. That game stop has been a target for wall street shortsellers its demise has been foregone conclusion. So short and game stop. That is betting that game stop would continue to. Depreciate could have been a good bet except short-selling is risky and your losses if you lose that bad or basically limitless since there's no cap on how valuable the company has bet against could become so even riskier if stock you've shorted starts going up. You can essentially cut your losses without getting too in the weeds market mechanics here. When a lot of short seller's designed to cut their losses on a shorted stock. That's now suddenly going up it triggers. What's called a short squeeze. Demand goes up. Supply goes down. Price goes up more shortsellers. Try to cut their losses. It's a vicious cycle and one that can result in massive losses for their shortsellers and giant prophets for those who've invested in the stock on the way up which is when a popular reddit. Forum called wall street bets figured out that game stop was the most shorted stock in the us markets. It wasn't hard to convince reddit users in the forum to buy up enough stock in game. Stop to trigger that short squeeze making retail investors of bundle and sticking it to the wall street big guys in the process. This was all encouraged in many ways by high profile investors with a hefty social media presence. Jamaa only petia tweeted that he'd bet on the stock increasing himself cameron winkle voss of the winkle vi- suggested he might go along on the stock and must only tweeted that he was aware of the situation just aware of the situation in game. Stop took off again. In after hours. Trading and to wall street bets credit. The plan worked amid game. Stops rally shortsellers on wall. Street have accumulated over five billion dollars in losses year to date and that includes nine hundred million loss on monday and one point six billion lost on friday. As you're about to hear hedge fund. Melvin capital took an enormous loss on the bet so much so that rumors of bankruptcy were swirling on that wall street. Bet sub reddit. But the founder of melvin told our own andrew ross sorkin. The rumors aren't true. Here's andrew now some breaking news this morning on this game stop story. We've been reporting all morning. Having talked to gay. Plock into runs. Melvin capital gay. Plotkin saying that. Melvin capital has been out closed out its position in the stock force. That company was Firm i should say with short looks like lost a ton of money but short that company up through Before the end of the close yesterday but Gabe saying that They got out yesterday afternoon. Of course the question is what happens now. Game stop a game. Stop shares Melvin capital had to take in an additional close to three billion dollars in new capital citadel. Coming to the rescue along with point seventy two. This is a remarkable saga With game stop so many of these investors no really no longer really investing on the fundamentals of what's happening against up but more just continue to push up the stock and we've seen so many folks like you on musk. Go take to twitter about it. Chihua- polly fanning the flames. So there's a lot of fan fan. Flame fanning taking place right now big questions about regulators where they are what they should be doing a lot of criticism and critique online as saying that if you think manipulation what do you think wall street is doing everyday to us the retail investors so. There's a sort of a pop psychology dynamic at play. And i think we're all we're all learning and try and understand what it means but also what it means in the future for the ability of retail investors to get together on places like read it and other places Form an army of sorts and try to push up The stocks in in certain cases like this. So i'm at a loss for words. Joe i really am where are the regulators and is this just the beginning situation. We all do have a lot to say on this but you you obviously have a lot to san. That's interesting but obviously the plane with the calls. And you're you're seeing calls that are one hundred dollars out of the money going for nineteen dollars and things that you've got markups going from two billion to twenty five billion. Obviously everything you're saying we understand. This is this is a game obviously and these guys. When i put five dollars on a ncaa game that. I don't care that much about that's the same as jemaah putting a couple of hundred grand on some calls or lan or any of the guys were talking about this. I think it's kind of responsible. The kind of laughing about it laughing all the way to the bank. But you know there are market makers that have to take. How'd you like to be short some of these calls. Can you imagine being short some of these calls. Especially if you're not covering i mean you can lose. You can lose ten times your money. Unlike a regular investment where only lose one hundred percent. I mean this this this makes this makes bitcoin look like t-bills if you think there's speculation and crypto when you when you look at something like and now they're looking for the next mark right they'll find another game stop once they're done with game stop but in the meantime there's gonna be blood all over understand why i understand why elon musk is doing it. He hates the shorts. They've you know he's right. Thinks it's a game where he's playing a game to understand he's playing the game too. I don't understand why tomatoes doing this. I don't understand why the winkle loss guys doing this. I mean this is i. It's nothing about me. Said too much money it and if you if you think people look unkindly at the wealthy at this point like wait till you see what happens with with the retail investor who gets sucked into thing and gets caught in the trap with who can't afford to lose the money like these guys are doing. I'll tell you the thing there. There really is a merry band of retail investors. Out there both already but increasingly and this is what i think even more concerning i spent a lotta time night reporting this out but also spending time on the in some of these rooms there are places people are going out into encrypted rooms onto telegram onto signal where they where they effectively are planning their next raid. Where they're trying to look to say. Okay where can we do. You know who can we take down next. In this case it was capital that they were seeking to take down. That's why i think the news today that they're out maybe potentially a turning point. I don't know. I don't. I don't know what turns this stock back into some kind of a normal

Melvin Capital Reddit Jamaa Petia Cameron Winkle Voss Winkle Vi New Capital Citadel Chihua Polly Fanning Andrew Ross Sorkin Harry Potter Plotkin Melvin Gabe Andrew
The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

Jewish History Matters

09:53 min | 3 months ago

The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

"I'm jason leg. And i'm joined today by magden tater to talk about the history of the blood libel accusation and its continued relevance listen in for a wide ranging conversation about the history of the blood libel its origin in mediaeval europe and how it has transformed over the centuries and what it tells us about misinformation and how it spreads magdi. Tater is professor of history and the fiddler chair of judaic studies at fordham university. She's the author of numerous books. Most recently blood libel on the trail of an antisemitic. Myth which will talk about today. The blood libel is one of the long-standing false accusations against the jews. It is the myth in different variations and incarnations the jews murdered christian children and used their blood for various rituals. And it's obviously patently false but somehow people still believe it. And it has persisted. Across nearly a thousand years from medieval england to nazi anti semitism and beyond we can see the ways in which the imagery of the blood libel and it's false narrative persists even in new reconfigured forms like the conspiracy theories of cunanan as mark the these accusations across the centuries and different places and in different times became a vehicle for different anxieties about jews and about people's lives at large. And so we can see the blood libel in a certain way as a mirror of the fears that people had not just about jews but about all sorts of issues nevertheless the blood libel is not just a relic of medieval superstition. Or something like that. It's something which has changed with the times and which in many ways has piggybacked off of new technologies and new developments and this is one of magdi key arguments which is that. It's the printing press that enabled the proliferation and persistence of these false myths and disinformation which when published allowed them both to spread more widely. And also give these false accusations in air of quote unquote respectability because the existed in print in the first place and so this allows us to think deeply about the role of media technologies both image evil and early modern europe and also more recently with things like the radio. The newspaper even the internet as avenues. Not for the spread of information but rather of information. Thank you so much for listening in to this conversation. I hope that you'll check out. Magas book blood libel and also the accompanying web site the blood libel trail dot org where you can learn more about the book and also check out some really fascinating maps and other media about the anti semitic myth of the blood libel. Thanks again for listening. Hi magda welcome to the podcast. Hi jason thank you for having me. This is such an interesting topic. It's i think unfortunately very relevant to talk about bible accusations. Yes unfortunately i'm a scholar of premodern history and we always want to be relevant. But as i always said be careful what you wish for. Suddenly my book became quite rather than to although when i started. It was an academic exercise. Yeah i mean. I think that we are going to get to the question of the ways in which the historical blood libel accusation is still very relevant today but before we do that i think it might be useful for us to think kind of really brawley. What actually is the blood libel accusation manafort putting it into the context of thinking about how this is similar or different to other kinds of accusations that we see throughout history thinking about for instance the accusation of decide the accusation that jews had murder jesus and then also things like the accusation of the desecration of the host the totally kind of bizarre accusation. That jews would steal the the wafers from the church. You're right blood. Libel is one of a series of accusations against jews that emerged in the middle ages. And it's one that has relevance today decide was a theological belief and obviously accusation but became embedded as a believe and maybe then projected onto jews causing violence especially during easter. But it was so to speak a victimless crime. Every year whereas a number of other accusations emerged in the middle ages justice christianity catholicism where also solidifying certain and defining certain types of buildings and then there were also libels that emerged in moments of crisis such as epidemic. So poisoning of wells for instance. So blood libels one of the three medieval accusations. The so-called ritual merger. Acquisition are. Although i prefer to call it murder liable. But it's an accusation that emerged in twelfth century that claim that jews killed christian children to reenact the passion of jesus so that connects to the this site as it projection onto contemporary jews and reenactment that emerged in england and then in the thirteenth century it emerged in a new way on the european continent. And that's when it became blood. Libel that shoes killed christian children to obtain their blood. Although the very first accusation claimed of perhaps some other kind of form of cannibalism of eating a heart or something like that they reason why blood became so central is that this was the moment when the catholic church in the thirteenth century has affirmed the dogma of trans substantiation that is the communion wafer that was consecrated by a priest during mass turned into the actual body and blood of christ therefore blood becomes central motif in christian worship. So this is a moment where we have this both the transformation of the murder liable into blood libel of killing but the purpose of blood but also the emergence of not their occupation that you mentioned day host the secretion accusation that jews obtain steel by the consecrated wafer and then tried to stab it to obtain the blood of christ and both are connected in the sense that the blood becomes a even because jews cannot make their own consecrated way for they needed this blood of the innocent christian to be added to mater effectively making it into both the body and the blood of christ night but a accusation that jews stole the consecrated wafer then desecrated and blood flowed dot accusation kind of waned and disappeared after the reformation the blood libel and the murder liable kind of continued the life of their own. The reason for is is that they are related to deaths of children and to some perhaps victims perhaps accidentally killed drown children so it becomes a very intimate actually charge because it involves a death. Having a way for stabbed doesn't sound as unless you really believe what this way for means but accusing someone of a child. That may be found dead on sometimes. It wasn't even body that may have been somebody's child that becomes a very kind of an intimate accusation and very embodied accusation even that transformation from the murder libel that is of reenactment of the passion of christ which emerges at the moment when christians are beginning to liturgically focus on the passion of christ. So you think about jews and reenactment and all that stuff but the transformation to the blood libel shows you that this begins to be a very malleable accusation that can change depending on needs and the needs to came that connection between the new liturgy and the new theology of the blood and body of christ in the thirteenth century

Jason Leg Magden Tater Cunanan Medieval England Fordham University Tater Manafort Europe Magda Brawley Jason England
Former Gov. Rick Snyder, top aides, Flint officials arraigned on Flint water charges

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Former Gov. Rick Snyder, top aides, Flint officials arraigned on Flint water charges

"Officials are being charged for their involvement in the Flint water crisis. Michigan Solicitor General Fadwa who mood Says Snyder willfully neglected Flint residents and failed to protect their health and safety. The Flint water crisis is not some relic of the past. At this very moment, The people of Flint continue to suffer from the categorical failure of public officials at all levels of government. Snyder is being charged with two counts of willful neglect of duty each of one year misdemeanor. It follows a calamitous plan that contaminated Flint with lead and contributed to a fatal outbreak of Legionnaire's disease. Connecticut authorities are investigating whether

Fadwa Snyder Michigan Flint Legionnaire's Disease Connecticut
Top 10 Films of 2020

Filmspotting

06:01 min | 3 months ago

Top 10 Films of 2020

"Michael and tasha are gonna come back. We're going to get to. I'm going to call it the consensus between the four of us top two films of the year. Because there's a fair amount of crossover. We didn't maybe all put them in exactly the same slots but it's close enough and we'll also hear the other movies that round out their top five of the year but to get started is a longtime friend of the show formerly of film spotting. Svu with matt singer and critic for buzzfeed alison willmore. This is her choice for the number one film of the year. Hey films leading team. It's alison willmore here from the late almost budding. Svu podcast hoping. I'm slipping voicemail in with enough time under the wire. My favorite movie of the year is buck. Arou- the greatest neo-western anti-colonialist most dangerous game variants. That you'll see this year And also just kind of incredible exhilarating disturbing work that if feel keeps Showing me new things. The more i kind of think on it and revisit it so definitely a feel for twenty twenty For many reasons and one worth checking out if you haven't gotten to it yet it's not right. It's been a tough year guys but hopefully the next one will be better. I mean not so. I don't know about you but i am still wrestling with back row. And i i saw it caught up with it because i had seen so many lists including allison's And it was kind of on my radar all year. Long in one i had to catch up with and sort of squeeze it in here at the end so maybe not entirely fair viewing. I glad i had the experience. I'm just not entirely sure. What sort of experience i had. Which maybe you can. sense from. Allison's voicemail there it's just it's it's wild. It's it's maybe insane. It's i think my first viewing was. I really was intrigued by all of those ideas and genres that were coming you But on a for sitting like they never it. Didn't like really hit me directly in the experience. I almost needed. There are two different groups here. There's this small town of this village really. And then there's this this group of I guess they're americans who come for. We won't give too much. We don't spoil too much but neither of those. I needed more context for both of those sections of the film for registering for me as anything more than like this intellectual experiment. I guess which is kind of how. I did appreciate it. I'm at last. I can say. No i i did as well. I think described it this way for our listeners who support us on patriot and we did some bonus content and i mentioned back arouse being basically battle royale but mixed with the seven samurai and there's probably seven other films you could merge with this movie it does feel truly uniquely its own and that's why it's worth seeing but it's also this weird kind of mashup hybrid of other types of movies. We've seen before. So i am curious to hear what our listeners think about back row came out a long time ago right earlier in the year. Yeah i think so. We just caught up with it. But maybe as it is appearing on more or less like allison's in that number one slot more people are experiencing it and maybe more people can explain to us josh. What we miss definitely worth seeing not gonna make our top ten definitely not gonna come up here in our top five. Why don't you go ahead and get started all right so you heard mentioned there that earlier. My top ten. I had dick johnson dead number six actually right after it. I have another film that deals with dementia. In dick johnson is dead. That is the struggle that Her father kirsten johnson director. Dick johnson is facing and they explore that in a very unique way In that documentary but a very different way than my number five pick explores relic This is a horror film. And in her. Directing debut. Natalie eric james. She basically chooses to confront dementia via metaphorical horror. So the main character is an adult daughter played by emily mortimer who votes her aging mother played by robin navid in rural australia. And this is on a family estate. A family home that's been held for generations and as the movie goes on the walls in this home gradually disintegrate It's a very you know. Obvious symbol for what's happening to her mother But the movie the just the way. The movie handles this. Metaphor is delicate. creepy scary unsettling frightening and it captures all of the emotions that you know you would have in the mundane experience of an ageing parent with dementia it. It makes dementia demonic and liberalizes. That which you know how it can feel. Even if you're not in this sort of heightened scenario and so. I just think that's a strong that such a strong visceral connection to make and natalie erica jeans Just handles it so expertly. Her command of the genre. Here is is astonishing and i think why relic landed on my list and this high is it's ending which i am not going to give away but this is where you know you might be saying especially horror isn't for you. Oh i get it. I get the metaphor. I can imagine what happens. i don't need to see it. You know But this ending manages to involve body horror unconditional love in a way that was completely jarring Of a piece of the horror genre but also incredibly moving and that was kind of like when the movie concluded that way. I was like okay. This is one that's Not only am. I appreciate but probably gonna end up sticking with me to the end of the year

Alison Willmore Dick Johnson Tasha Allison Dementia Kirsten Johnson Matt Wrestling Michael Natalie Eric James Robin Navid Rural Australia Emily Mortimer Josh Natalie Erica
UK Royals

Travel with Rick Steves

05:16 min | 4 months ago

UK Royals

"Kings and queens with real power are a relic of the past in europe. Most of them today play ceremonial figurehead roles limited by their constitutions in britain pulls tell us most people are more or less supportive of the role. The windsors play as their royal family. Their lives are a regular beat for the british press and there are many elegance stops in british tourism connected to the queen and her family. Paul guest was an electrician on her majesty's royal yacht britannia when he was in the royal navy today. He works as a tour. Guide based in belfast. He's joined by. Elizabeth boardman a tour guide from bath not far from london. They're here to help us. Americans better understand the royals. In britain by the way our interviews recorded just prior to the global pandemic shutdowns liz. Paul thanks for joining us. Thank you very much right because if it's an interesting thing for us there's still kings and queens and in belgium and the netherlands spain over scandinavia. But they really have little power. But what's the purpose. Why do you. Brits willingly tax money to have kings and queens and princes printing around your country. I know that's a question that we always get asked his guides when we're doing our tours and yet one of the questions i always ask for members is put your hands up if you came on this tour just because we have a royal family. No one ever does that. We've got so much more to offer but the royal family are a big attraction for us as well because immediately. I'm sure if we just said prince charles prince william prince harry. Everyone has a visual of who they are because of the world media but for us as british citizens. It's a lot more than that. We're very personal about them. If we were to believe the Recent opinion polls approximately eighty eight percents of the british public are in favor of royal family which is quite surprising considering everyone still coming out of a depression and financial difficulties a hard but we like having the royals whether something actually practical about it and heavy responsibility to be a royal. Because do all the ceremonial stuff. I mean it's almost a fulltime job to be cutting edge hospitals and in the united states. We don't have anybody to do the ceremonial stuff except our politicians and in britain you can kind of divide. It threw the ceremonial stuff and politicians do the legislating. Yeah it's shared out between the royals. It's judy the of a sheduled which Follow i just want to reiterate what elizabeth sand and what what i think is It's a low for the royal family. I think we actually do love having a royal family On top of the huge amount of interest abroad and and brings in tourism and an income for the country to your heritage is sort of a celebration of england. Yeah goosebumps jurist. It's it's very interesting. So they are limited by the constitution so Do they have any political power at all. If a if a royal had a strong feeling about something what would they do. The house been royals of mid their feelings known especially prince charles on certain subjects. But as far as i'm aware they are told to sort of rain in a little bit on. Keep their opinions to themselves. So let's have a quick review of the royal family these days. Of course we've got queen elizabeth. She's getting old but she seems to be Still the metal name is did you of edinburgh also known as prince philip prince philip in their children so the eldest is prince charles who will be on next monarch followed by his sister. Princess own followed by his brother prince andrew. I'm also also a further brother. Who is prince edward. So all of these people are healthy and still in public Very match very much in the next generation. There's probably a lot of nieces and nephews. There is many nieces. And as we're speaking at the moment we've got three kings and one queen in waiting to go on the throne. What does that mean well. Basically what it means the next person in line for the throne when the queen dies will be prince. Charles right that will then be followed. By prince william his eldest son then prince william's eldest son prince george. Okay then we have his prince william's daughter princess charlotte. So i said that makes sense when the eldest son know if charles had an older daughter would she be next in line or is it still the old fashioned. Still be william. But when william and kate. Kate middleton who is william's wife when they were expecting prince george the eldest son. The law was changed if owner. So they couldn't grandfathered in but yeah grandfathered in so to speak the before the child was born. They changed the law. So they how that's historic it's historic. Donner gets the same rights in the lineage jackson. As it turned out they had prince george. But if prince george's had been girl it would have been a queen. Wow

Royals Paul Guest Elizabeth Boardman Britain Prince Charles Prince William Royal Navy Scandinavia Belfast Prince Charles LIZ Belgium The Netherlands Prince Philip Prince Philip Europe Elizabeth Spain London Paul Depression
UK Royals

Travel with Rick Steves

05:15 min | 4 months ago

UK Royals

"Kings and queens with real power are a relic of the past in europe. Most of them today play ceremonial figurehead roles limited by their constitutions in britain pulls tell us most people are more or less supportive of the role. The windsors play as their royal family. Their lives are a regular beat for the british press and there are many elegance stops in british tourism connected to the queen and her family. Paul guest was an electrician on her majesty's royal yacht britannia when he was in the royal navy today. He works as a tour. Guide based in belfast. He's joined by. Elizabeth boardman a tour guide from bath not far from london. They're here to help us. Americans better understand the royals. In britain by the way our interviews recorded just prior to the global pandemic shutdowns liz. Paul thanks for joining us. Thank you very much right because if it's an interesting thing for us there's still kings and queens and in belgium and the netherlands spain over scandinavia. But they really have little power. But what's the purpose. Why do you. Brits willingly tax money to have kings and queens and princes printing around your country. I know that's a question that we always get asked his guides when we're doing our tours and yet one of the questions i always ask for members is put your hands up if you came on this tour just because we have a royal family. No one ever does that. We've got so much more to offer but the royal family are a big attraction for us as well because immediately. I'm sure if we just said prince charles prince william prince harry. Everyone has a visual of who they are because of the world media but for us as british citizens. It's a lot more than that. We're very personal about them. If we were to believe the Recent opinion polls approximately eighty eight percents of the british public are in favor of royal family which is quite surprising considering everyone still coming out of a depression and financial difficulties a hard but we like having the royals whether something actually practical about it and heavy responsibility to be a royal. Because do all the ceremonial stuff. I mean it's almost a fulltime job to be cutting edge hospitals and in the united states. We don't have anybody to do the ceremonial stuff except our politicians and in britain you can kind of divide. It threw the ceremonial stuff and politicians do the legislating. Yeah it's shared out between the royals. It's judy the of a sheduled which Follow i just want to reiterate what elizabeth sand and what what i think is It's a low for the royal family. I think we actually do love having a royal family On top of the huge amount of interest abroad and and brings in tourism and an income for the country to your heritage is sort of a celebration of england. Yeah goosebumps jurist. It's it's very interesting. So they are limited by the constitution so Do they have any political power at all. If a if a royal had a strong feeling about something what would they do. The house been royals of mid their feelings known especially prince charles on certain subjects. But as far as i'm aware they are told to sort of rain in a little bit on. Keep their opinions to themselves. So let's have a quick review of the royal family these days. Of course we've got queen elizabeth. She's getting old but she seems to be Still the metal name is did you of edinburgh also known as prince philip prince philip in their children so the eldest is prince charles who will be on next monarch followed by his sister. Princess own followed by his brother prince andrew. I'm also also a further brother. Who is prince edward. So all of these people are healthy and still in public Very match very much in the next generation. There's probably a lot of nieces and nephews. There is many nieces. And as we're speaking at the moment we've got three kings and one queen in waiting to go on the throne. What does that mean well. Basically what it means the next person in line for the throne when the queen dies will be prince. Charles right that will then be followed. By prince william his eldest son then prince william's eldest son prince george. Okay then we have his prince william's daughter princess charlotte. So i said that makes sense when the eldest son know if charles had an older daughter would she be next in line or is it still the old fashioned. Still be william. But when william and kate. Kate middleton who is william's wife when they were expecting prince george the eldest son. The law was changed if owner. So they couldn't grandfathered in but yeah grandfathered in so to speak the before the child was born. They changed the law. So they how that's historic it's historic. Donner gets the same rights in the lineage jackson. As it turned out they had prince george. But if prince george's had been girl it would have been a queen.

Royals Paul Guest Elizabeth Boardman Britain Prince Charles Prince William Britannia Royal Navy Queens Scandinavia Belfast Prince Charles LIZ Belgium The Netherlands Prince Philip Prince Philip Europe Spain London Paul Harry
Viral posts on differing social media sites

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

06:13 min | 5 months ago

Viral posts on differing social media sites

"Both of us have been reviewing this really Wonderful well-done article by hoot suite. And who if you don now is a social media aggregation tools so you can use social media to make managing and sending in engaging in social media networks are multiple platforms much. Easier evans. Said that i'm so. They are experts note in social media and they wrote an article in. I won't name the article here for if you wanna go read. It will actually be in the show notes as well. Aim of the article is fourteen is central social media etiquette rules for brands. But today we're going to break down these fourteen rules and some of them we don't hundred percent agree with and we're gonna try to give you some reasons why we don't agree with them and that how it applies to you and to be interviewed matthew matt if wanna shortening the end so mask gonna go on these opie like the so bad. Let's get started here. i. I'm gonna thi this up. I want you to run with it but i think that the mindset when social media came out in you it now but this because you were a book on the to talk with that as well but i think that when social media started grabbing attention financial services there was this idea that it was the holy relic. The new holy grail was the next seminar american for this industry. And i don't think i've seen so many crash and with a strategy. It's been incredible. There's a lot of issues and we're going to help sort through some of those today. But i'll let you bet. Well it can be the holy grail. And when when i wrote the social media handbook for financial advisers one of the biggest things that we wanted to include in the book with with bloomberg finance. Was this idea that there is different etiquette there's different rules across different platforms and why it's so fun. That hoot suite wrote this article and something they don't include in this article. Is that the etiquette on. Twitter is very different than the etiquette on linked in instagram facebook. Pinterest right or tiktok or whatever else you're using out there and you truly need to understand what room you're in. That's the first point that they bring up here which is to read the room. If you're on linked in lincoln is not the place to talk about politics it is not the place to talk about your personal life. It is one place that you go to learn from other business owners. That is the culture that is there now if you want to be a little bit more personal engaging than you can go to facebook. I'm gonna throw this at you. Sure i've seen some incredibly viral post on lincoln. Here's an example. Recently we talked with internally as a team there is a post about a professional woman who took down her professional photo one with her like kind of working from home and this is what i looked like everyday not going the office and she talked about trying to be to be authentic under social media and the the post went viral like unlinked in which is not quite as comet right very true but i believe it had four thousand likes summer. But but here's the thing about that. That post specifically is it still was in the right room in the right context. She was talking about how to portray her personal brand in an environment that likes to know about people's personal brand. Now that's not saying that she shouldn't have put that on twitter instagram facebook especially instagram right. Because that would have been a great instagram post. But you do need to understand that you can have and in some situations but it has to be or in other situations if she would put some something about eating her favorite food at her favorite restaurant that she ports support wholeheartedly. You don't wanna put that on linked. In in fact you'll get blasted on lincoln for doing that but you're not gonna get blasted on facebook or instagram or even twitter even though twitter that's not appropriate either because twitter's consumption. The people who use twitter want hard and fast information about something very very specific. So that's what i think about reading the room. You all have to understand where your ideal clients are right. Some of them around lincoln. Some of them are on facebook. Some of them on twitter. Some of them are on instagram. And hack some of them are on tiktok and you need to understand where your ideal client is. And if you don't know how to figure that out we've actually got a couple of really great free white papers on. The page are on our on our website that talk about how to figure out how to really tease out. Who your ideal klein is. So i think the rule there is that if you have something with a personal spin on it but it relates back to business and being authentic or true or there's Personal lesson that you can come back and bring to business lesson. Those are more than those are acceptable lincoln post. Just not personal personal. That's correct. yeah and so. There are people on lincoln who publish their kids accomplishments. Their own accomplishments outside of work and i would say in most cases those end up being what i would call borderline lincoln. Post sometimes in really depends on the spin or what year prouty break. How big of an accomplishment but some personal accomplishments are relevant to business because somebody overcame something. Big right yes. So i guess. Those those meet the acceptable and sometimes Can become very viral anyhow. So that's the first tip here so bowl on number two here. I'm actually merge

Matthew Matt Lincoln Twitter Facebook Instagram Evans Bloomberg Klein Prouty
How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

Bitcoin Radio

04:11 min | 5 months ago

How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

"And partner at a marketing agency will actually to marketing agencies under the same roof when it's called inbound junction. Still active in historically into the bbc asked base. I'm a marketer for about more than ten years in the b. two b. safe-space which is very big in israel of work tel aviv based agency and about four five years ago we were getting pretty big fintech space and some are bigger and better partners in israel talks about about the growing space into my partners very early investors and bitcoin lost a lot of money in mccormack's ended just kind of opened a sister agency called market across and started working with projects. We were very active. In the seal boom downs of jean-ann we've matured with industry today. We are a full stack marketing agency working with a lot of big macs. How does marketing. How does marketing. For blockchain and crypto. How does that differ. 'cause said you're kind of doing both sides you have under one roof. How what's the. What's the core. Differences remark integration question. I would say lease the first generation of projects that i was part of thousands of so there. I always say that i think blockchain is over. Pr and marketed. Because there were actual products it was more of misstatements ideas and most of these eight based protocols again you know. You don't have a big city on the website of sign up or purchase. Or whatever. So very different from classical. I would say. Vw marketing which has literally a conversion point. Put something in relics alright optimizing towards a funnel or something like that. So i would think that that is the most core core difference between product marketing and more i would say branding and marketing and maybe even assisting fundraising style marketing. That's i think the core difference. And i think the other one would be today about. There's just so much charity very fast. So when you go to the other part which our product will be a wallet in exchange. Whatever you have environments where there's fifty or sixty comes king in two three years and it's so hard to differentiate especially for a marketer to try convey that message so i think that's how it this is so new and it kind of there. There are some leaders in some spots in the sphere. But but still. Is that a big issue. This this problem differentiation. Where we're as a marketer. You have to single out. You know you're trying to take your client and say this is why they're different but is the customer. The customer base even knowledgeable enough about about the technology that you could differentiate easily here. That's a that's a great question. So let's different you between i would say Based protocols and technology and then products like exchangeable so when people who come to us again mostly developers or developers in the blockchain space are very very techy. Maybe don't come from a business or marketing background. They'll come to us and say oh you know my network goes to eleven speed or whatever and you're in me as a marketer i'm gonna say right but what's on the block you know how many people transactions are actually processing so in. That's a. that's a big gap between when people want to sell the technical capabilities and want to say all right the me as a marketer pr person at least today people much more wanna see about adoption. So that's like. I think i'm the tech level where you need to go and say all right you're not gonna talk about triple charting. Whatever because that's not really the main thing had to bring that chored usable business use case and when it comes to product marketing and it's also a bit together. I think it's kind of like schilling. Is is great outside but when sit inside the strategy. That doesn't look right. there's a lot of exchanges. What's different about this other than you know. Argos secrete the easiest platform okay. Great but right now in other space would you giving people what's different in. How do you play on. That really executive could be the non. Kyc concept could be the fiat pairings. It could be a really good mobile interface. But we're in that place already. Were ordinary place where people are discussing that not just stating we're going to build a the nicest exchange so I think we're an industry. That's moving in the marketing. Space from wall want will ken to like our is in doing. So that's for me like my biggest mission with my clients. It's really trip. Notch it down from the potential to what's actually

Blockchain Israel Bitcoin Mccormack Tel Aviv BBC VW Schilling Argos
The Rise Of Remote Work

City of the Future

05:47 min | 5 months ago

The Rise Of Remote Work

"So Eric we've been working from home for about eight months now I hadn't noticed. Yeah. So how has it been going house remote work than for you in a lot of respects? It's very challenging. My Wife, Janine? She also works from home. She's worked at home this entire time and you know our marriage is great. You guys are still married just for the record year despite eight months of cohabitation and Co. working right. Yeah, no know there are definitely challenges. But when it comes to the PODCAST, this has actually been a brief and this is the one thing that got better I i. agree actually I mean, we used to every single time we had to record a podcast used to make sure we had this one booth and we would get in there. I would even sometimes like Jerry rig it. So the air conditioning wouldn't come on. So we would get the perfect sound quality for our podcast for you. Listeners just offer you guys and then as soon as we were regarded from home or like oh we. Just set up mic in our bedrooms at it's fine. Yeah. A picture in the dictionary of a super spreading event, it would be that little podcast with four people crammed in and Stuffy Air floating around for an hour on those little tiny seats. Yeah. So, from podcast hosting perspective remote work has been way better, and in fact I think we'd continue to do it this way even if the office opened back up when you think yeah I think so and and it is interesting because there are a lot of companies that we've been reading about. That are starting to offer this option to their workers. Right? You don't have to go back. You could be remote indefinitely. Maybe forever, what would you do if you had that option? I mean that's tough flood. There is something attractive about going somewhere with nature. Some were cheaper right re working from there but. I don't know even I don't miss the booth per se I do miss the office I. I think I would go back to be honest. I'm not going back. I'm not going back to that old way it was taking too much Outta me I'm not going to deal with it. That's Richard Florida professor of Urban Economics and an advisor to sidewalk labs. We wanted to hear what he thinks. Remote work will mean for the future of cities I mean for me, I've liked being home. I find that I like my neighborhood better. I find that I like my life better I'm certainly I mean, my kids are three and four. It's giving me a lot more time to spend with my two girls. So I've gotten to know my neighbors a lot more gotten to be like cycling buddies with my neighbors that I wasn't before some. Glad on long rides. With, people over on the front porch a lot we set up a front porch. I mean, we didn't. We have like an earn out there. Now we set up a front porch. For Richard It wasn't just neighborhood life that improved teaching classes got better to. taught my course online. So I was able to bring in people from all over the world. A mayors are backing up developers people from technology companies. We had to learn how to do it and we got better at it but another big thing for me was showing me the ability to do remote teaching in having go very successfully. So I actually think that's going to be a big deal. It is interesting that your experience highlights the two different advantages of remote work. Right on the one hand in your teaching you've brought in all of these global perspectives than ever before and on the other hand at the same exact time you're so much more keyed into the local, right what's happening outside your front door. Yeah. It made me appreciate the local in ways I mean is it forty? Your urbanism I never would have thought that the other thing is my neighborhood was a commuter neighborhood for knowledge workers for corporate people, which means as a remote were professor. In writer I was the only man adult men in the neighborhood during the day. I really felt like freaking oddball. Now. There are a lot of guys my age in the neighborhood all the time like out with their kids or out hanging around or going to the park. So it sounds like the daytime population of your neighborhood has gone up dramatically. But. Do you have a sense of what the daytime populations now like in the commercial districts of Toronto in those corporate knowledge sector places that the the folks who live around aren't going to anymore it's terrible. There's not many people down there and you know I, had saw more of those buildings were residential and they're not they are still office work. So I think personally central business district is a historical relic. During the industrial revolution beginning with manufacturing, we separated work from life. You know people used to work where they live, they were artisans or producers with above their shop. And then as we added transportation innovations, lay subways, trains, and transit people started the commute more and more not just the factories but the offices in develop these giant commercial towers and stack and pack knowledge workers. I think a lot of that's going away and I think this shift to virtual earth remote work is a big part of it. Richard. told us that this forced experiment in remote work has hastened the. Process that was already in motion, not just for individuals but for cities to the future of economic development is talent there is now no other economic development strategy and I'm talking economic developers all the time in the light bulbs are going off in their head. If you want to talk about the new economic development of the new city competition, it's been the shift away from the power of firms to the power of town. And I think especially in an era of remote work, the location of talent will be ever more important cities will and communities and suburbs and grow aries. The terms of the competition will be about competing for talent competing for workforce competing for people

Front Porch Richard It Janine Eric Richard Florida Professor Of U Toronto Jerry CO. Professor Richard. Writer Advisor
Transforming Your Marketing Plays With Jackie Lipnicki

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

03:47 min | 6 months ago

Transforming Your Marketing Plays With Jackie Lipnicki

"A sales rep if they you know, if I'm I'm thinking about this if I'm a prospect I get a quiz. Yeah might feel wage. Up out more likely than respond to a cold email to say Hey, you know like we've got this great solution for you, you know, not that I've never responded to a cold email. But but it just I mean we all know like he rarely respond to those things, but the quiz I would probably fill out if I thought it was pertinent to me now on the sgr side of things I could see the huge benefit being you've got some relevant information and the timing was right there cuz I feel like timing is almost everything in sales rep. I think it's really great from a timing perspective. But it also does a really good job, especially if the quiz is done right of having strong brand awareness because now that person who's been through a quiz has already seen your logo. They've already gotten familiar with you. They've already decided that there's some level of trust and credibility and their treats and so when they get this phone call and it's from Jackie, let me get New Relic and they just have a quiz with New Relic yesterday. And I know the things that they're struggling with it's much more exciting and impactful for that Prospect to say, yeah, I'll give you a shot. I'll hear you out. I'm interested. Obviously. That's why I took the quiz in the first place. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, that's awesome. Okay. Well, I I love that idea. I think it's an awesome strategy people can can try it. I think I might try to get our marketing team to do it will have to figure out a good quiz. So when you guys were making these quizzes was it you mentioned it was like a mix of like fun questions and then the questions with the information that you guys needed. Where did you strike the balance? They're dead. It really depends on the tone of your company and what you're trying to accomplish. So, you know, there are quizzes Which are typically like under five questions are usually pretty light and are more. Of funnel just generating that awareness do assessments which are a little bit more mid funnel which is when you're really just kind of going and you're asking 25 questions and trying to get a little bit more serious one quiz, we did at my last company. We were we basically helped small medium businesses with their blogging strategy. And so we made a quiz that was how much for blogging strategy would you say that you're you know, a seed a little plant or a full grown tree. Would you say that your blogging strategy is mostly you know, sending an email once a week once a month or once a year. And so some of the questions for us just gave us insight into what they were currently doing. But for them it was also fun to be like, oh what am I am? I am mature. Am I this and I thought so long Jim's were a little more well-rounded to be engaging and user-friendly. Yeah, I like it's like the the hopes about you. I think they still do it the website grader, you know, like you're going to get a great way to see where you fit. That's why you plug it in they get a lead and you know, they'll put start nurturing you but I like the offer, you know, see where you are where you stack up. It's a great way to engage people with the just a low entry point not a high commitment of hey, I'm going to email the sales rep back and then they're going to try to sell me. You know, like let me just do the quiz and then you guys can determine does this look like they're a fit and then we can start some Outreach and they're also somewhat familiar with us already. Yeah, and it's really good. It's just a really good way to bridge that gap between sales and marketing is marketing is trying to bring in the right leads and sales is trying to work the right leads. And so this does a really good job of bringing in a handful of qualified people and then simultaneously letting the SDR is in a e squall. I from a high-level do they match our criteria? Should I work this is this worth my time?

New Relic Jackie JIM
Transforming Your Marketing Plays With Jackie Lipnicki

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

05:35 min | 6 months ago

Transforming Your Marketing Plays With Jackie Lipnicki

"Joined by Jackie Lipnicki an account executive at New Relic and she's got some very interesting strategies to share with us Jacky. Thank you for joining the show. Thank you for having me happy to be yeah, we're excited to have you and before we get going if you can just tell us a little bit about yourself off then in about New Relic sure. So I started out as an SDR. I moved my way up through the chain eventually was an Str manager for a while and now I've been an account executive officer of the last year and half or so, I'm currently at New Relic and for those of you who don't know what New Relic is ultimately we are working with IP professionals basically make sure that they have digital experiences that work for their customers. So when you and I are engaging with software we want to work world and so we help them to do that. Awesome. Awesome job. Um, okay, so so let's get into it. And when we we talked about doing a podcast one of the things you mentioned that was super interesting to me and I think will be interesting to the audience age is you at a previous company you guys in deployed a like a quiz to call strategy and I'd love for you to just share how that wage. And what the results were there. Yeah. So my first job ever worked for was for in the techspace was a Content marketing company and they both interactive content and one of those things where you know quizzes assessments and for us as a sales team, we would basically leverage those quizzes and send those out to our prospects and they would fill out a series of questions and they were often times fun and lighthearted and you know kind of like a buzzfeed style of if you were whatever industry you're selling to if you were this kind of dog You know, whatever. What would you be if you did this, what would you look like? And then we throw in some hard-hitting questions that were more in line with what we needed as far as what's your maturity level in this space So at the end of the fact is we would get all the results back and it would give us as FDR's and his account Executives the ability to go and then target the people that we could see were answering questions that clearly have pains in the line to what we could solve for them. And so an example might be that if you're a demand gen marketer working for the IG security space, you might ask some questions like, you know, if you were a security system, which would you be if you were trying to figure out where your weaknesses are what would you say your biggest weakness is if you were this or that and so those questions were kind of Surfing some great answers for us and help us with our targeted messaging. Yeah. So as a sales rep if they you know, if I'm I'm thinking about this if I'm a prospect I get a quiz. Yeah might feel wage. Up out more likely than respond to a cold email to say Hey, you know like we've got this great solution for you, you know, not that I've never responded to a cold email. But but it just I mean we all know like he rarely respond to those things, but the quiz I would probably fill out if I thought it was pertinent to me now on the sgr side of things I could see the huge benefit being you've got some relevant information and the timing was right there cuz I feel like timing is almost everything in sales rep. I think it's really great from a timing perspective. But it also does a really good job, especially if the quiz is done right of having strong brand awareness because now that person who's been through a quiz has already seen your logo. They've already gotten familiar with you. They've already decided that there's some level of trust and credibility and their treats and so when they get this phone call and it's from Jackie, let me get New Relic and they just have a quiz with New Relic yesterday. And I know the things that they're struggling with it's much more exciting and impactful for that Prospect to say, yeah, I'll give you a shot. I'll hear you out. I'm interested. Obviously. That's why I took the quiz in the first place. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, that's awesome. Okay. Well, I I love that idea. I think it's an awesome strategy people can can try it. I think I might try to get our marketing team to do it will have to figure out a good quiz. So when you guys were making these quizzes was it you mentioned it was like a mix of like fun questions and then the questions with the information that you guys needed. Where did you strike the balance? They're dead. It really depends on the tone of your company and what you're trying to accomplish. So, you know, there are quizzes Which are typically like under five questions are usually pretty light and are more. Of funnel just generating that awareness do assessments which are a little bit more mid funnel which is when you're really just kind of going and you're asking 25 questions and trying to get a little bit more serious one quiz, we did at my last company. We were we basically helped small medium businesses with their blogging strategy. And so we made a quiz that was how much for blogging strategy would you say that you're you know, a seed a little plant or a full grown tree. Would you say that your blogging strategy is mostly you know, sending an email once a week once a month or once a year. And so some of the questions for us just gave us insight into what they were currently doing. But for them it was also fun to be like, oh what am I am? I am mature. Am I this and I thought so long Jim's were a little more well-rounded to be engaging and user-friendly.

New Relic Account Executive Jackie Lipnicki FDR Str Manager Buzzfeed Jacky JIM Officer
"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"The healthcare space people flooding online line to make sure they've got the right plants and the thing is this is when our team is ready to help our customers deliver a flawless digital experience. We do that with the new relic platform all right. So what was your message today because I know that there are a lot of analysts have been saying Greece shoot screens shoots. Don't give up and I know my favorite slide. Our Priority Party is grow that's correct. Our priority is growth. And we've always had the long-term in mind when we've done it on your screen. You see the digital dashboard. I want you to scratch. That out is the digital digital platform. Jim Okay digital needs a platform not a dashboard and we spent two years building the new relic platform in anticipation of where. The market's going. Our customers customer want one platform to see everything going on to their digital business application performance infrastructure and most recently logged machine data. All in one place that got places new relic one which is the platform which the future companies are going to make their digital businesses successful. Okay if that's the case November fifth analysts who likes your stock BMO capital says this is for says longer disappointing. I supported billings growth in guidance. So it's very weak. Billions growth was one percent. Your ear sure that does not sound like well. We've been investing for the longterm building that platform Jim. It was an we anticipated where the work was going. And we did that. And while we're investing that we did that at the cost of papers no worries no worries. You know there were some short term things we might have done. We're not investing for the future but we think that when when this all plays out our platforms GonNa pay the dividend. Okay so now we go to your. CFO In corporate sector. You says in the conference call turn into cash flow from operations. Nine million free cashflows fun by cash from operations might as capital ventures and kept by software because native negative eight million. We can't do well. We're a growth company JIM. We're investing waiting for growth and so so as we built out the platform capabilities. We feel like that's what the market needs and our customers are telling us great things we think as we look out the unit they are great. We've got among the very highest gross margins of any SAS company so the unit economics are great as our customers adopt the platform. It'll show up in cash flow and and and And ultimately profitability. So can we say as some of the analysts like J. P. Morgan wants to save very much in a no from again from member second quarter signs signs of stabilization encouraged by some of the early commentary. I'd maybe cashflow guidance is going to get better from here. Well well I don't want to talk about anything different from what we've said already on our us so we feel good about our guidance but we do believe is that we have now delivered to platform platform. We have everything we need in place the products the platform and the field to be a billion dollar business. And now it's time to focus on a performance culture that you did push back your timetable table for. You're going to be a billion dollars. We still feel comfortable with being a billion in the timeframe that we've we've put out the twenty three that's right and and that's still a healthy growing business that'll have nice margins and there's plenty of upside from there. We were not looking to stop at a billion we worked on this platform. We started the platform. Where what does new relic? We need to be a four billion dollar business and so the platform is the underfund underpinnings that will support the growth beyond the billion dollar okay. So how's the churn. How's The upsell for those and number one hundred thousand dollars customers so yeah one of the things we're really focusing on we talked about in an investor? Today was that we have nine hundred customers today. That pay one hundred thousand dollars or more and when you look at that segment they retain very well they retain well north of ninety percent and they grow their spend better with thus the average customer that savings spends four hundred fifty thousand so our strategic goals we think about growing our business is to add to that number of customers we want to add a thousand of those customers over the course source of our journey to a billion dollars trying to understand your pricing if my retailer my my business website goes down in for sixteen and hours it could cost me ten million dollars. Why am I paying you well? Why can't I get relative? Make me pay more. Oh well we actually have many many customers spending far more than a million dollars with us. I think the last numbers we quoted was eight eighty customers plus spending a million or more on new relic. And I think our largest customer Marie is is around the ten million dollar. You're spending so we certainly have strategic value and now with our platform. We're making it. The natural thing to bet larger larger investments investments on. We just want to put that base of one hundred thousand dollars customers in place so that will sustain growth far beyond the billion dollars conference calls in the analysts. Meaning there's no there's no demand issue that isn't which of the Stockton and was just you had this transition azcarate less demand from you. Republics infamy relics product. I'm join UNICEF Luebbe. Her and meant for a long time. So you know here's where we are in the age of software right so we're GONNA software economy. I believe there's going to be more software written written in the next ten years and there's been written in the last fifty years turned fifty so in all my life there's been less software written in there will be the next decade we are well positioned to be the platform upon which people deliver more perfect software. If you look at the right timeframe if you look at the over the long term we believe were well positioned to sustain growth. Okay so what can we say about the new platform versus the digital dashboard. Did the salespeople understand it. There were questions about European sales people. There are questions about just need grigny. But who's selling what well as you transition from being an we started off as an application performance management company. Then we added these other products and what we decided to do which was as we believe visionary ahead of the market was put it onto a single platform that integrates those products together and and as we are doing that That has required our team to understand and evolve how they sell. We've gone through the training to help enable them to sell the platform and that's what we're focused on going into the rest of this the back half of this fiscal and it's the next fiscal. I should emphasize is your fifth anniversary. I think you had to take that next step. That billion all these twins issues. Here's our hard. Yes but you have your timetable. Twenty forty three. We're GONNA hold billion right and you feel confident we do. Look I decided investors in this platform. Because we've all heard of or read the innovators dilemma. Absolute get up. We need to get out ahead of that before. We had no choice choice in the matter so we invested ahead for that platform that came as some short term cost. But I've always managed the LONG-TERM I'm the largest shareholder in the company and so I'm thinking about new relic for five years from now and I'm excited with where I'm so glad you're here because you know I believe in you and I believe in your product and to see you in person. Have you say that means a great deal to US happy for jail. That's Lucerne is the pattern. CEO of new relic. It is the best software and they've got a brand new. Let's costs Ashworth. Let's.

new relic Jim relic Greece BMO capital JIM CFO UNICEF Luebbe J. P. Morgan Lucerne Stockton US Ashworth CEO Marie
"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Adobe stock got hit over the summer but then last month they held a Bush analysts. Say the darn thing came back and now we're seeing the next leg of this rally after the close today report it terrific quarter and all I can say it is almost impossible to get this kind of growth both sales and earnings from a company the size. And that's why this roaring after hours trading I think has got more upside. Maybe a lot more upside as it is trading all time high this evening. So let's dig deeper with shots. He's the bankable chairman. CEO of Adobe Tower more about the quarter and where. It's headed Mr Ryan. Welcome back a man money. Thanks so much you Johnson look at these numbers surpassing eleven billion dollars. You've got growth a lot of people one point. We're worried that you could stay above twenty percent. You far exceeded that which are the big drivers to make it so that you have twenty four percent year. You'll grow. Well Jim I think. Most companies companies would be thrilled to have one growth initiative. That's actually paying off. And we have three whether it's unleashing creativity whether it's accelerating document productivity the over powering digital businesses as you know content is fueling the digital economy with the core of what's happening across all digital do and it's really great to be able to post the kind of numbers that we did when you first started talking to me. We talked about how everyone has a story to tell. How far along are we now? Al People are discovering they do have a story to tell and they can use you to tell it will digital media drew five hundred thirty nine million In terms of the net new our Jim and that's a record This is yours into the transition from the desktop to the cloud and Max was the most successful Max ever and it's because everyone has a story to tell whether you're K.. Through twelve student. Whether you're the largest enterprise in the world new media types are emerging new devices are emerging systems are emerging and so I think would just enabling anybody to take the creative ideas ideas that they have inside and express it across any medium at the same time. I am astonished that a business the document cloud is still growing light. Light go we'd deutchebanks Saudi Aramco Saudi Aramco came to you for for For help with the paper to digital everybody is trying to figure out how they can move to paperless society how they can expedite automating inefficient paper based processes there trillions of PDF's that are being in created every year Jim they're billions of people who are viewing PDF's and the way we have extended the format the way we've innovated across the desktop and mobile mobile the way we're making all of this available as embedded services in the API economy so that people can embed pdf within their business processes. That's fooling the growth. I think to your point for document cloud grew thirty one percent for the yoga discontinued to see acceleration in that business. And we just just continue to think that we've just started with respect to how PDF can help with moving inefficient processes to be automated and digital most companies. They want to go to giant enterprise someone to do small medium sized business. I am impressed once again. You use a term that I'm good incorporate steam not stam damn embassador the young age who even in the time we've been talking now ruling. The world talked me about steam. Well I think the world without arts Jim would be a very boring place. And if you're talking about you know people who are changing the world through corporate social initiatives. Everybody really has to make sure that when they are trying through social media to get a following to be able to tell their story to be connect emotionally with the customers. That's the kind of next generation creatives That we are attracting to the adobe creative cloud platform and it doesn't matter whether that platform is mobile applications whether that platform is youtube whether that platform is a social media platform whether it's instagram. We just want people pull to be able to use adobe products across every one of those different media types with new emerging things that are appearing whether it's augmented reality or virtual reality -ality in which you can actually enter their environment where the forefront of that technology as well. So we're not going to rest until every single individual has access to adobe technology. We are going to say that. Approximately twenty three million people now have access to adobe spark which is a very very simple and easy and intuitive way for people to be able to express themselves you have also become the gold standard on ECOMMERCE brilliant? Acquisitions I love the Go-to I always get marquette. You give them your name they kerr they correctly. Follow up but give us engage because your real time how is holiday season going there. Six fewer days. Well you know what was really interesting last week him. was that whether you were watching. CNBC in the morning whether you were listening to the radio radio whether you're reading the news it was so gratifying to see the Adobe holiday reports the digital index reports that are powered by what we are seeing being in dubs of the trillions of transactions that are happening across Adobe Analytics Adobe Commerce Cloud Magenta and Marchetto and I think what stood. No doubt for me was that every day virtually has been a record in terms of digital spend people are not just accessing websites now on mobile. They're actually transacting on mobile devices. there's billions of dollars being spent every day. We think that the entire shopping season is going to be over one hundred forty billion so it's nice to be at at the center of not just content but also data and providing insights to customers so they can engage digitally with consumers. Are you able to. How much are you able to keep track of some of the great Chinese companies and give them the trade wars at a problem for the most part you know? We are a global company. We do have our products available will in China's well Jim. Whether it's a multinational company wants to have a consumer presence in China so the trade wars I mean you know we're all you for Making sure that economic boundaries don't exist and that people can conduct trade fairly but we have so much opportunity we we are not overly concerned with what's happening in China and the trade war specifically right now. I want to give you a chance because every time you come on you've got something new indifferent exciting adding fresco. Well you know. I always said Jim that I think it's crazy. That in this day and age people think the drawing with a mouse. This makes intuitive sense. Fresco is one of these new applications. Just like what we did for imaging with Photoshop where we made photoshop accessible in the digital era for billions of people and democratize imaging. We think the same thing should happen for art work and illustration and so when you look at Fresco and look at the attention to detail that are incredible engineers have done. Whether it's with oil paints or watercolors fresco is just a new breed of application. That's appropriate for a tablet device. It takes into account what you can do with stylus again way of just making sure that we can leverage the incredible work that companies like Nvidia and others are doing with respect to hardware improvements. What's going to happen with four G. Five G. so that this can all become accessible? How do we think about that with adobe sensation with magic and make it accessible to a new generation of creative? I want to congratulate you. I know there were people who mistakenly St Louis and I would say stupidly. But I'm gentleman felt that you were going to go to nineteen or eighteen percent. I knew you were going to go the other way. Because you have such fabulous pilots.

Adobe Jim I Adobe Tower Fresco Saudi Aramco Saudi Aramco China Mr Ryan PDF chairman CEO Nvidia Johnson cloud St Louis
"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Sales. Plus they point out that the tariffs could raise the cost of an iphone. Here by sixty seven smackers. Aw outpost down more than two bucks the president. I did that tweet. That made people feel better about stocks stock closed in the black. And you know what that says to me. It says so much for trading not owning apple own apple. I mean even today okay this still keep status quo for apple. We're here maybe give you an exclusive sales over there versus what the Credit Suisse note says hence the rally into the clothes. I've been adamantly should have some five G. Internet of things exposure with the deal looking looking very likely you know what you want to own. Yeah my dog who's got some sort of chemical off it's kind of the gnawing hope he does okay. Because the Chinese regulars there's will finally perhaps let them acquire Mellon offs Israeli company that should be immediately added to earnings. If he can close the everyone's going to get so excited we'll be bulled up. I also think the more tricia five jewelry and chipmakers will work. Even though they're up lots sky works CORVO qualcomm. I'm focusing on more bell tankers. It's still not. It's fifty two week because I am a big fan of amd but it ran too much today in anticipation of so one. More manufacturing problem at Intel and also some very high speed new products that leads to sue put out and it anticipation of delays of Intel. Own Intel all right now after the Bell broadcom reported. I thought it was good quarterback important. They gave a big boost. And that works to go by. Fractional shares is three hundred bucks. What else I think giveaway are wagering too much the traditional cycles here in that means you've got to be thinking about Caterpillar Honeywell or comments? Sure their numbers might go up if the worst really any but I don't go crazy them. Hey Hey look I'd love to recommend Boeing just fixed the seven thirty seven Max. Unfortunately it doesn't seem like he can't so these shelter sympathies. We have to be careful because numbers can still come down but you know what really catch are. Even though it may be shouldn't energy. I think the machines that control so much of the day to day action are set to buy energy stocks on any news. I think I know this to be a fact I do think I discover these slumber J.. Probably best in show Chevron did well today Exxon down and out BP those traits Caterpillar Cummins. Don't overstay your welcome with any of these now. Let's Real Dan. Let's get exciting. Let's go to Hasbro Mattel. They've been trying to shift their source away from China tells me a lot more progress than Hasbro mattel. CEO on the bow stock surged on the news. I think that they've got more room to room when we talk to the. CEO of Hasbro Mattel. We were very conscious that this weekend's tariffs we're going to hurt them in there really in the qualifiers. Well guess what if we do delay or scrap December. These are going to be to stocks that you can still own and buy mattel here. I think he could go much higher. Because otherwise price the prices for the choice would be pro hit. It's not just towards the whole retail. Cohorts been a winner here. What is the one that has been hurt? The most dollar tree it's been hobbled by the trade. Trey were upside home. Depot's been trashed some of its self inflicted upside Walmart and target they work. They spent a lot of money in China. The best thing about these retail stocks. There's not a lot of upside built into them already. They some attractive on the other hand. That's talk trades macy's and Kohl's with macy's I think yes MR probably too to high tariffs get rolled back. Kohl's these seem more momentum from that Amazon Partnership Return Grams per person at their stores. These work only so far as you can throw throw them best. Buy and footlocker. Have the most exposure to this. Weekend's computer footwear tariff hikes that are now being put on hold perhaps best buy header triplet quarter. Footlocker did not not best buy investment footlocker trade Nike never in trouble still some shortsellers betting because China exposure they would miss sneaker kingpin reports snake's weak investment. Just like ninety starbucks never really in trouble with China. I'd like this story. Ever since the Kevin Johnson came busted. US Air Force Academy pulled US back up the truck at eighty one dollars investment. Not a trade trait Las Vegas sands the the US presence in Macau Chinese gambling haven and spent four point seven percent yield winner winner casino dinner. How about Transports Fedex Trade Rohr today? The hurt by China numbers are probably too high. It can get a bats investment union pacific the most China exposure in doing a lot to buy back stock and cleanup operations. Probably some eyeballs waste management. You so a lot of garbage to China believe it or not they were. Hey stock did nothing. Today I liked that Stanley Black and decker source a lot of stuff from China. That's why the stock was up five percent today. It's worth worth noting by the way the president's got the polls he met with the CEO of Stanley C of comments and stay in CEO of Union. Pacific we've gotta find whose team you buy the stocks. Now that's a joke doc. All that said I still think the best way to better trade deals by presume. Something's wrong even if your tastes encouraging developments why these despite this tentative agreement from China I expect him to renege talk is cheap transform your legal system your economies expensive so next week I'm going to go back to a race scheduled program and start talking again about socks nothing to do with the trade war but I know people have been demanding this list. I read by twitter feed and other than a couple of knuckles really despise me which one and the guys who despise despise me. Know why you can't stay away from anyway the bottom now you know what works now. You know what's going to happen. I just remember please. These are mostly short. Term Trades off investments. And we're going to go back next week to the hundreds of stocks that have little no relationship they should trade war or the trade truce was with the lead trading apple. I mean fine but trading apple supposed to make noise okay anyway. Let's go to Mike in Florida. Mike Mike Mike. Hey I'm doing well. I'm blessing the people. Say Trade Apple. Do you mind how about those people how they cost you. I have a question.

China apple CEO Hasbro Mattel Mike Mike Mike Intel president Credit Suisse mattel US qualcomm amd Caterpillar Honeywell G. Internet Walmart
"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"new relic" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Eight hundred three. CBC or Tweet. Jim Cramer. How does this movie before we hear that? The president and the Chinese government reached a tentative phase. One deal delay new tariffs maybe even rollback and of course the market source the Dow Gaining Two hundred twenty one points as becoming point eight six percent. The Nasdaq forty point. Seven three percent. What do we say Alleluia immediate trivialize the importance of this news? It does matter it absolutely matters. The president trump trump's don trump stock trump's the be willing to reduce the tariffs on three hundred sixty billion dollars worth of Chinese goods by as much as fifty percent that some of the chatter or also canceling forestalling the tariff hikes. That we're supposed to go into effect this weekend weekend. They wanted affect consumers China's apparently willing to make some major agriculture purchases while doing a better job of enforcing US intellectual property rights and maybe opening up the market specifically to the services and especially the financial services industry. And that's a big deal but and this is the world's biggest but the days went to China to control. The fate of the whole stock market are long. Gone even as we act as if it is all that matters. It did seem that way at one time because was initially. The market reacted the taxes that were going to cause a worldwide recession. This whole deal or no deal. Game seemed a lot more significant than now though. The trade war has only escalated plated yet. Our economy is fabulous shape. Our stock market keeps urgent. You records and job growth is extraordinary at this point this phase one deal with China. Let's call the icing on the cake. Even before through the cake. Still Pretty Darn good and if we get something signed it could even be better. But as I'm about to go through it it's just a small part of the S. S. and P. Five hundred. That's why one explain what's actually at stake with this phase one trade deal we heard about all day and how we can potentially profit from it because then again it's not mad. Politics is not mad. China it's mad money I let's be clear. What do we get in exchange for trump agreeing to roll back some of the towers and hold off on others others? What's a player? What can go right? Well it's an agreement that I seriously benefit some major institutions. At least that's what it sounds like me. And you're looking at them. Shaping Citigroup Goldman Sachs Bank of America. Mercury's best mastercard and visa if everything goes right to the. US This tendency would let them establish a strong China and they'll finally be able maybe even to compete directly against Chinese operators rather than being forced into partnerships with them where they would steal all the intellectual property and perhaps even my bank account okay. The officials have warned here. But I think they're still worth buying even J. P. Morgan which is the most extended that stock has had a big move. You know what I like murky spent the most on this because it China deal. We'll get an enormous cachet of the People's Republic. I'm just looking at the pastiche and deciding that this is the one that the like the best. Buy Second favourite will be Goldman Sachs ax which needs to get some growth. You're trying to provide it. Visa and mastercard could easily were upside in the CEOS time and again the old days told me if only China would really let us in what they do look out above again. All these talks are excellent and even if the deal falls through the evaluations are not bad so other than for this one and I had like him in chapter zones that you can handle any any deal breaks down and still do okay. I have to say that because think about what's going on the second echelon is tech this morning. We got a very discouraging though from credits about possible. Thirty five percent drop in Chinese iphone.

China trump trump president Goldman Sachs don trump Citigroup Goldman Sachs Bank o trump Jim Cramer CBC Chinese government Mercury J. P. Morgan People's Republic
"new relic" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"new relic" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"That make it easy for teams to to work with new relic to get data in and out of our platform so they can integrated into the workflows and their processes <hes> and we we believe this fosters innovation. We believe that it helps modern teams deliver faster with much much more confidence and that's really at the core of why we're building our our developer platform and providing the tools S._e._K.'s that that complement our products and I think we're seeing you know this is this is why customers and our partners have rely on new relic by like inner comments the ability to have that extensive ability to simplify deployment the automation integrate with incident response and really deliver faster with confidence. It's it's exciting. It's an exciting space to be yeah so I mean I guess you know the the sum total of all those pieces means that <hes> you know this community of developers and people using new relic are are you know they're doing it because there's joy in it. They're doing it because it makes their lives easier and then because of that they're kind of helping each other. Get better at using this tool as well or passionate about software right. We're we're in this business because we're passionate about building building innovative solutions and more passionate about software. I mean you know my my first computer. I might be dating myself was an apple two. I'm programming in basic like this is this is awesome stuff so yeah. We've we've come a long way since then but thankfully thankfully but a lot of ways not so far yeah but it's it's exciting and this this change in the industry and what's happening now. In the ability to innovate you know is it. It's just opening up so many opportunities of for everybody and and when you when you build that software you need to understand what's going on with it right absolutely so tell us what's next for new relic in for new Alex Developer Platform Norman developers system sure you know we we started this podcast. You know thinking about this change in the industry in this this complexity that's happening as you know we we make this shift towards everything being digital right. We talked about half the G._D._p.. Moving through software that that's incredible and for companies that are that are going to survive in this world you have to change the way you think you gotta play offense with software and you have to think about the the things that you're developers create as strategic assets that give you a competitive advantage right because who builds that software developers yeah yeah gallopers and engineers and so we're we're going to continue due to open up our platform. We're going to continue to make it easy for developers to to send data from multiple data sources that that aren't just new relic data sources. We're going to continue to expand our A._p._i.. Coverage make our platform richer and deeper are and provide a set of tools and capabilities on top of that that accelerate your ability to to innovate and then we're really going to drive this notion of innovation through our programmable user interface. That's GONNA open up an incredible amount of of thought leadership and innovation on our platform to create new and exciting solutions. You know we we believe and you've heard Lou Cerny talk about this. We believe the world deserves serves more perfect software and program ability is the future of new relic. That's going to help us get there amazing. You know one of the things that I think is great about listening to how you talk about the platform as it so intertwined with the product a new relic and building thing software as sort of what your product helps enable and your developer platform helps also enable that and and so it's it's such an intertwined thing. It's you know it's product. It's platform its ecosystem. It's developers and so I think this has been a really great conversation and a really interesting take on talking about platforms and talking about developer community so thanks so much for joining us today and yeah can't wait to share this with our listeners. It's been great. Thank you very much for having me. Thanks for listening to the inside Intercom.

new relic developer apple Lou Cerny
"new relic" Discussed on ATG Radio

ATG Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"new relic" Discussed on ATG Radio

"Insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. It. What you say? Treatments. I guess. I'll have to cry. Oh. What? The treatment. New relic. So. Bye. What? What you said. Different. Oh..

New relic
"new relic" Discussed on Founders Talk

Founders Talk

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"new relic" Discussed on Founders Talk

"And I found that a struggle, I'm sure like some of my reports don't get as much time as they need to like, help them grow, but I think they still do a really good job. But in general, the like whenever had to go through performance reviews or God forbid employees sort of needs to be better. Like those are like the worst situations for me. I just I like I don't like that conflict. I've gotten better about dealing with that. I think I think I'm fairly good at it. He says, but I still don't enjoy it. Is. But the next big question for you is, is what you fear most as the Linke you know, obviously you're in the role you are, you know what you've done in terms of inter capital raising, you know the milestones, you know the next mouse and you have to get to to raise more money if if you decide to or event to become self sufficient, as we talked about. I don't even know where to plant this question, but you may know because you'll just probably instinctively have a place to plan it, but what is your biggest fear CO today tomorrow year from now? Where do you place this this question? Yeah, I'll think about every day is sort of not losing. Like I say, you have a reason to show up to work and mine is always to like, be the best with whatever we decide to do. And so my fear would just be like, you know, we build new products or something. We just like we can't win against the competition. 'cause then like what we are businesses going to succeed at that point. And I think about that in every little thing we do like, how do we make sure this is the best version of it? Like, how do we make sure like we, we literally measure ourselves by how we stack up against all of our competitors. And that's like sort of people in our direct space, which is like air tracking which we perform exceedingly well against like, we, we generally don't lose against a competitor anymore in that space. So we consider ourselves doing great there, right? That's how we measure it. And then we sort of. Measure future against the wider like like application monitoring space, which is like New Relic and whatnot, and we actually lose quite often if like we're going up against New Relic and you know they already relic, right? They'd be like, well route, sort of does what you do to, why should we pay for you, even though it's a completely different product. And that to me is like we have to get over that hurdle. And when I think most about and I, it's not like a serious here, but it's the thing that I think most about in biggest risk I think is like we have to be able to get past that hurdle, but I'm like, you know, going back to being very naive. I'm very confident to some that to degree of arrogance that like these are not that hard to pass. It doesn't mean I know the easiest way to get there, but I certainly believe we can do it, but that that is where a lot of my my thought process goes into that can I can air again's or maybe even somebody thinking they're against, because when I do any of these things like Instagram or string funders. Hours or skills like one of my top skills like visionary and selfish, always always in the top two, either flip or they're always in the top two. So for me, I kind of maybe placed on us. Well, it seems because you see very visionary seem for yourself Issur. That's not really arrogance that just just confidence. You know, I need to have that. Uh-huh. I think earlier in my career was arrogance and much more these days. It's it's, I'm sure we can go a little deeper on some of these subjects. Let's close the show like this. What's the everything super-secret that's not out there. No one knows about it. It's coming up. Maybe you can tease it drop landing page, whatever. I don't. I don't know what you got, but is there anything happening in the near future Cintra so goal focused that we can t up today? You're for the listeners either as a CEO as the business or or new product? Yeah, up on product is ultimately, that's all I care about. So interesting..

New Relic Cintra CEO Issur
"new relic" Discussed on Founders Talk

Founders Talk

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"new relic" Discussed on Founders Talk

"And then we've got, you know, I think the others are going to be like on boarding. These, these new executive hires kind of. Like making sure they're very successful in sort of get off the ground running. You mentioned before that, you know you, you know where you need to be to raise more funds, and you've been through two rounds is right three round three rounds. So that means series a. series b. seriously seriously would be the next round from the two Bs and won a seed a. b. c. n. b. Gotcha. I'm not very familiar with all the terminology around raising funds. Know that it is funds somewhat familiar, somewhat. I'm still in the letter. That's what I figured. That's why I said, see, sounds like, okay, so given that you know where you need to be, is that in a is the vehicle for growth for century? Does it always tie back to venture capital? Or is there a point now that you've gotten enough capital to grow? And you know, like rewinding back to your original velocity in the bootstrap method, when you were there, you could keep growing, but you couldn't compete on a long-term because accomplish. Market. So you had to make a choice new did and that's where you're at. Now you've been through a couple of runs a funding and you realize the growth vehicle. Is that the next few you keep raising funds? Where were you eventually be self sufficient financially one day we will be self sufficient right now are in Bishen. 's are much bigger than our Bank account and that. I mean, I can be very direct about this like direct, I, I want to replace New Relic in the industry and we're not gonna do that with sort of where we are today. Certainly not quickly, right? And that's a much bigger in Bishen maybe that's not actually replacing your up, but I want to tackle a lot of the problems at relic his own for very long time in a very specific market. Very differently in an Italian of that is like it's potentially a lot of stuff to build. It's a lot of stuff to support. It's much bigger than this air tracking component that century has today, and they're certainly like what venture capitalists, honestly four is. It's purely to allow you. To spend a lot of money to make big bets and as big better tiling may grow faster. Right. So a very common reason to raise money is because you're a like an enterprise product or something, and you have a Salesforce and it takes about a year or maybe two years to get the revenue back from that sale. But you can sort of predictably do that. You're going to go raise a ton of money, higher sales people. You're gonna, you're gonna lose a lot of money for the next one to two years with an after that you're gonna see like a drastic increase in cash flow, right? That's not us to be clear, but we would like to drastically expand our engineering presence and are are sort of product line, right and doing that is either one going to take us, you know, until I'm like old and grey or it's gonna take a lot more people. And so if we raise money again, it will certainly be like gopher a much bigger target is how I talk about it. Not that it's a bigger target than what we already have internally, but pub. Publicly, it's a bigger target than what it looks like. We might have today when you're thinking about these kinds of things. I'm trying to think of it like, okay, you'd mentioned like we started with this with this conversation roundly what's important to you right now. So you're in the now? Right? And maybe the now is the next year year and a half, maybe how do you think about what's important to you over the next five years and maybe the life span of the business? Do you?.

Bishen New Relic executive Salesforce two years five years one day
"new relic" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"new relic" Discussed on Triangulation

"We we run on new relic all of our web stats come from the new relic so she is he's got his fingers in anything many of the things you use every day work welcome it's great to have you're trying to rush well it's great to be here i appreciate it you're up in portland at the new relic headquarters that's right for a nice so kershaw almost i want to start with wickey but really i know that was not that's kind of in the middle of your career but i just there's something about which you said it seems to me the which he's really lived up to the original promise but of tim burner sleeves worldwide wet what he created the web he envisioned it as a system of documents that his colleagues could use header at it with hyper links could jump around could read foot notes come back a very fluid kind of documented system and that's really what wickey became is that was that the inspiration for wickey you know i learned that after a bill they know i actually started experimenting with it for card i per card in a research lab them listening and end up on my doubts them i can tell it wasn't a relation all database last trying to figure out what kind of databases that and and i had an interest and you know kind any of sort of shin of technology among technology stemmed and so i don't a little database out of cards comment track how ideas moves to my company all that was tech try next at a time man and a cross check chronic so guilty instruments that you don't the computers so that we love today so you know i actually haven't changed much from tech chronic switch measure hardware to you know knew a lot that measures software it's so it and i i found at the time that engineers were awfully conservative it didn't want to use something if they haven't you know work before and so i just ass people you know what ideas to your brain year i was trying to where did you get on where to just see him work before in and it made it interesting hyper text.

portland new relic