13 Burst results for "New Jersey Labor Department"

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:06 min | 5 months ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"That's horrifying and if you have what's known as dental phobia you're probably on the floor right now and may never go see a dentist again. Listen it got me as well. When i was just like this is not. This is so wrong. The crazy thing is is molly. Ma- maja she. She lived for I believe another year so With this increasing abscess and like the radium was sitting in her bones in this particular case in her jaw in her teeth In just decaying tissue around the bone around it and she just basically rotted from radiation poisoning from the inside of her jaw out She suffered from abscesses in eventually. Died from an abscess. The this apps has apparently your whole the whole left side of her face. The different abscesses grew into one mega obsessing. It finally reached her jugular vein and just ate away at her jugular vein. She could no longer pump pump blood from her heart. Yeah see now. I sound like i have. The i mean that is horrific is can imagine and it gets worse in that win. Her doctors were asked what their best guess was of the cause of death. They blamed it on syphilis. Right the company jumps on this and says and this was a big part of the movie. They basically start saying that. These girls are spreading syphilis around each other. And that's what they're sick from I think the movie they call it. V d. of course but It was you know one part to sort of shame them into being quiet and to say that in another part to just obviously you know take the blame as far away from radium as possible men. Yeah for real so you know not to say in the in the doctor's defense but they no one knew what what radium poisoning was at the time right so it's not like syphilis was an entirely just bonkers diagnosis but there another thing. I saw that that That they considered to. That just didn't make sense but had kind of come and gone before among matchstick makers Which was something called fosse. Jaw or phosphorus jaw. Where you're you're like if you were exposed to weiss white phosphorus which matchmakers were when you're making the head of a match It it basically gets absorbed into your jaw. Emirati your jaw so they had kinda seen something like this before but not. Since the early nineteenth century it was much more prevalent in the eighteenth century. And they didn't think that these these women were working with phosphorus anyway so it was kind of baffling. But yeah the idea that that you know even if the doctor did livelier innocently. You know say it was syphilis or something like that. The company very much jumped on that kind of thing to use it to paint that a unflattering picture of the women. Who would go onto litigated. This company and it was totally that kind of a company and it was run by those kind of people for sure. Us dial was he. S so twelve An up to this point. Twelve of them died. Think about fifty of them. Were ill this point and they are still full steam ahead. They don't haul production at all. They don't even call for an investigation until nineteen twenty four. When leaks out to the press a little bit and they start to get you know some sort of bad press about what might be going on. So they commissioned an independent investigation that found out that there was definitely connection going on and they are exposure to radium is leading to these illnesses and deaths and they buried it and got their own Not independent commission together. They investigated and came back and said. Oh no no no. These young ladies are suffering from hysterical condition brought on by coincidence. Yeah and that was actually not even like a panels opinion that was Arthur road or the president of. Us style opinion. Yeah that was his opinion of the whole thing and the Independent investigation was a legitimately independent. Investigation was led by dr seasonal drinker. And his wife. Dr catherine drinker. Who are both harvard pub. Harvard public health professors and when they came up with these findings like this is this. These women are all dying horrible deaths from radiation poisoning from eating this paint. 'cause the stupid lip pointing technique And the company did bury it. Not only did they bury it. It's even worse than that. They took the drinkers report and altered it. So that it said that every girl is imperfect condition and then submitted it with the drinkers name on it to the new jersey. Labor department In like the drinkers had no idea. They also told the drinkers. If they publish their initial report they would sue them that they've been working confidentially and Like i was saying like it was just that kind of company they were just. They would engage in dirty tricks. They would do some of the most underhanded stuff you can imagine like they. I've got one more anecdote. Chuck this gonna knock your socks off. They hired a a Industrial toxicologist named frederick flint from columbia to basically pose as a doctor to examine one of the The dial painters And basically tell her that her health was fine. She was in fine shape and they had a vp from us. Dial sit in and make. It seem like he was a colleague of this person who she thought was a doctor who emphatically agreed in backed up his position. That's the kind of stuff. Us style did reprehensible agreed. Chuck agreed all right so we should probably take another break and we'll talk about how.

syphilis maja molly fosse Arthur road Dr catherine drinker harvard pub Us Harvard Labor department frederick flint new jersey Chuck columbia
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:20 min | 5 months ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"That's horrifying and if you have what's known as dental phobia you're probably on the floor right now and may never go see a dentist again. Listen had it. Got me as well man when i was just like this is not this is so wrong. The crazy thing is is molly maja. She she lived for I believe another year so With this increasing abscess and like the radium was sitting in her bones in this particular Case in her jaw her teeth And just decaying tissue around at the bone around it and she just basically rotted from radiation poisoning from the inside of her jaw out. She suffered from abscesses and eventually died from an abscess. The this app says apparently your whole the whole left side of her face. The different abscesses grew into one mega obsessing. It finally reached her jugular vein and just ate away at her jugular vein and no longer pump pump blood from her heart. Yeah see now. I sound like i have the i mean that is horrific as you can imagine and it gets worse in that when her doctors were asked what their best guess was of the cause of death they blamed it on syphilis right. The company jumps on this and says and this was a big part of the movie. They basically start saying that. These girls are spreading syphilis around each other. And that's what they're sick from I think the movie they call it. Vdi of course but It was you know one part to sort of shame them into being quiet and to say that in another part to just obviously you know take the blame as far away from radium as possible. Yeah real so you know not to say in the in the doctor's defense but they did no one knew what radium poisoning was at the time right Say syphilis was an entirely. You know just bonkers diagnosis. But there's another thing. I saw that that That they considered to. That just didn't make sense but had kind of come and gone before among matchstick makers Which was something called fosse. Jaw or phosphorus jaw. Where you're you're like if you were exposed to weiss white phosphorus which matchmakers war when you're making the head of a match It it basically gets Absorbed into your jaw in rochester jaw. So they had kind of seen something like this before but not. Since the early nineteenth century it was much more prevalent the eighteenth century and they didn't think that these these women were working with phosphorus. Anyway so it was kind of baffling. But yeah the idea that that you know. Even if the doctor did naively your innocently you know say it was syphilis or something like that. The company much jumped on that kind of thing to use it to paint that Unflattering picture of the women. who would go on litigated. This company and it was totally that kind of a company and it was run by those kind of people for sure. Us dial was yes. So twelve Up to this point twelve of them died. Think about fifty of them. Were ill at this point and they are still full steam ahead. They don't haul production at all. They don't even call for an investigation until nineteen twenty four when it leaks out to the press a little bit and they start to get you know some sort of press about what might be going on. So they commissioned an independent investigation that found out that there was definitely connection going on and their exposure to radium is leading to these illnesses and deaths and they buried it and got their own Not independent commission together. They investigated and came back and said. Oh no no no no. These young ladies are suffering from hysterical condition brought on by coincidence. Yeah and that was actually not even like a panels opinion that was Arthur or the president of of. Us dial is opinion. Yeah that was his opinion of the whole thing and the independent investigation was a legitimately independent investigation was led by dr seasonal drinker. And his wife. Dr catherine drinker. Who are both harvard pub. Harvard public health professors and when they came up with these findings like yeah. This is this. These women are all dying horrible deaths from radiation poisoning from eating this paint because of the stupid lip pointing technique And the company did bury it not only Did they bury it. It's even worse than that. They took the drinkers report and altered it. So that it said that every girl is imperfect condition and then submitted it with the drinkers name on it to the new jersey. Labor department In like the drinkers had no idea. They also told the drinkers. If they publish their initial report they would sue them that they've been working confidentially and Like i was saying like it was just that kind of company they were just. They would engage in dirty tricks. They would do some of the most underhanded stuff you can imagine like they. I've got one more anecdote. Chuck this gonna knock your socks off. They hired a Industrial toxicologists named frederick flint from columbia to basically pose as a doctor to examine one of the The dial painters And basically tell her that her health was fine. She was in fine shape and they had a vp from us style. Sit in and make it. Seem like he was a colleague of this person who she thought was a doctor who emphatically agreed backed up his position. That's the kind of stuff. Us style did reprehensible agreed. Chuck agreed all right so we should probably take another break and we'll talk about.

syphilis molly maja fosse Dr catherine drinker harvard pub rochester Us Arthur Harvard Labor department frederick flint new jersey Chuck columbia
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 Billion Cove in 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman is here to help explain a Mitchell I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law. And people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up Ernie to desk E, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have meant nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose a week a benefits, after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. Very quickly before I let you go. Mitchell, What does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire, And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at Killing these benefits out, especially when they change, But everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants, known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HF sees the creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, the global market. For refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. They're over 100 other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs. Oh, Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. The losers in all of this will be home owner's car owners, as well as business owners like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look at what the past year has meant.

Mitchell Hartman president Mitchell Scott Tong Trump federal Labor Department Michelle Nevermore New Jersey Labor Department refrigeration Institute Ben Lieberman Ernie Competitive Enterprise Institu John Samantha Slater United States CEO U. S World Resource is Institute
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"28 good to have you with us. After several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 Billion Cove in 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman is here to help explain Hey, Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Ernie Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could've meant nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose a week a benefits, after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. Very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell. What does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire. And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at getting these benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants, known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HF sees the creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, The global market for refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. There are over 100, other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs, though Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. Losers in all of this will be home owner's car owners, as well as business owners like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look at what the past year has meant for women. In this economy. We got ahold of to belly Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news to belly welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us. Right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs, that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again and that had happened naturally through So much growth that was taking place for women in the labor force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out men. And then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. This year. We're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the job's not went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this childcare crisis that we're also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2% for black women. It hit 16.5%. So much of that goes back to this occupational segregation that we talk about, sometimes where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into. And ultimately those fields are a lot of caregiving fields nursing health care. I mean, we we wrote a story recently about the first people to get vaccines across the country. We looked at every single state and in the vast majority two thirds you were looking at a woman and in most cases, you were looking at a woman of color. And so that I think spoke eons about these are the people who are most at risk. Can you talk about just this astronomical number of women leaving the workforce. Yeah, I think the Shocking number came to us in September when 865,000 women left the labor force and it was just so clear what had happened, You know school was back and school was back virtually And so you had all of these women who were at home and looking at this new school year they were just making a decision. And it was a difficult decision for a lot of women who said, I'm just going to quit my job. And care for my kids, because there's not there's no safety net for me right now..

Mitchell Hartman president Trump Scott Tong federal Labor Department New Jersey Labor Department John Ernie Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu refrigeration Institute United States U. S CEO Samantha Slater Ben Lieberman Cara Biden
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mid 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartman is here to help explain. Hey, Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Honey Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have been nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose the week a benefits after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore of the National Employment Law Project says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. Very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell, what does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire, And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at Kidding. These benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants, known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HF sees the Creator global Market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, the global market. For refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. They're over 100 other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure is too sweet spots, the environment and jobs, though Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. The losers in all of this will be homeowners, car owners as well as business owners, like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today, traders seemed to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look at what the past year has meant for women. In this economy. We got ahold of to belly Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news to belly welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again, and that had happened naturally through so much growth that was taking place for women in the labor Force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out Men, and then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. This year. We're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the jobs that went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this child care crisis that we are also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like, Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2% for black women. It hits 16.5% so much of that goes back to this occupational segregation. We talk about some times where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into?.

Mitchell Hartman president Scott Tong federal Labor Department labor Force New Jersey Labor Department Honey Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu refrigeration Institute John United States CEO U. S Samantha Slater Trump Ben Lieberman
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"December the 28th good to have you with us. After several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 billion Covert 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Hit Mitchell Hartman is here to help me explain Hi, Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Ernie Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have been nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose the week a benefits after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. So marketplaces Mitchell Hartman. Thank you, but very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell, Um what does that mean for this week? Well for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire, And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at Kidding. These benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants known as hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs. The creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, the global market. For refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. There are over 100, other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs. Oh, Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. Losers in all of this will be home owner's car owners, as well as business owners like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look back at what the past year has meant for women In this economy. We got ahold of Cherry belly. Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news job, Ellie. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us. Right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs, that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again and that had happened naturally through So much growth that was taking place for women in the labor force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out men. And then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. But this year we're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the jobs that went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this child care crisis that we are also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2%. For black women. It hits 16.5%. So much of that goes back to this occupational segregation that we talk about, sometimes where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into. And ultimately those fields are a lot of caregiving fields nursing health care. I mean, we we wrote a story recently about the first people to get vaccines across the country. We looked at every single state and in the vast majority two thirds you were looking at a woman and in most cases, you were looking at a woman of color. And so that I think spoke eons about these are the people who are most at risk. Can you talk about just this astronomical number of women leaving the workforce? Yeah, I think the Shocking number came to us in September when 865,000 women left the labor force and it was just so clear what had happened, You know school was back and school was back virtually And so you had all of these women who were at home and looking at this new school year they were just making a decision. And it was a difficult decision for a lot of women who said, I'm just going to quit my job. And care for my kids, because there's not there's no safety net for me right now. And so that's what we've seen over and over is women who are making the decision to leave their jobs to leave the Labor force because all of these other safety nets were not there for them. How long do you think it's going to take women to gain back these jobs and the wages that they lost?.

Mitchell Hartman president Trump Scott Tong federal Labor Department New Jersey Labor Department John Ernie Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu U. S refrigeration Institute Cherry belly United States CEO Samantha Slater Ben Lieberman Ellie
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on KCRW

"Kimberly Adams. It's Monday, December the 28th good to have you with us. After several days of delay and a lot of back and forth, President Trump signed the $900 billion Covert 19 relief package. But the president's delay has caused a lot of confusion about how some of the elements of that relief package will be distributed. Marketplaces Hit Mitchell Hartman is here to help me explain I'm Mitchell. I can't really get to be here. So Mitchell by signing this on Sunday, the president let a couple of federal pandemic unemployment benefit programs expire briefly. Why is this one day gap such a big deal? Well, John. Most benefits are paid on a weekly basis. And when President Trump signed the relief bill yesterday this week had already begun. So it looks like none of the benefits could be given for the week when the bill actually became law and people were thinking that meant 20 million people would go without the federal jobless benefit extension and the benefit for gig workers and the $300 a week top up. Ernie Tudeski, an economist at Evercore IAS. I told me that could have been nine or $10 billion in lost relief just for this one week. Could have meant $10 billion. So what actually happened? Well, the rumor mill was chilling was turning that is to say, you know, many, maybe some of the states could figure out workarounds. Then this afternoon, the New Jersey Labor Department tweeted that no one in the two federal pandemic programs will lose a week a benefits, after all, because of guidance it got from the federal Labor Department and the Federal Labor Department didn't Answer our calls. Michelle Nevermore at the National Employment Law Project, says she's starting to see this today from other states as well. So marketplaces Mitchell Hartman. Thank you, but very quickly before I let you go, Mitchell, Um what does that mean for this week? Well, for this week, it looks like people will be able to simply ask for the benefit that they've been getting the technically did expire. And in addition, they should be starting to get the $300 a week benefit that everyone on unemployment is getting. It may take a couple weeks. We know the state systems aren't great at getting these benefits out, especially when they change, but everyone eventually should get back pay that they're entitled to. Thanks Mitchell and buried in that economic relief package is also an effort to address climate change. It's a plan to phase out a type of refrigerant that's in many home and industrial air conditioners. These chemicals are known as H F sees and by some measures they trapped far more heat in the atmosphere than CEO to marketplaces. Scott Tong reports on how this ended up in the big economic package. Whenever a polluting product it's phased out a cleaner one has to be sold by somebody. So now the refrigeration and air conditioning industry smells opportunity. This U. S policy syncs up with a global effort to move away from coolants known as hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs. The creates a global market for alternative appliances. Andrew Light is a senior fellow at the World Resource is Institute. Research group, The global market for refrigeration air conditioning units is going to grow like 4.5 times in the coming decades. That is if countries like China and India joined the phase out. Having it ratified an international agreement on this, and neither has the U. S. The incoming Biden administration wants to change that, as does the trade group, the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. Here's the Institute's Samantha Slater, perhaps is the United States makes a move to do that. There are over 100, other countries who have already ratified so we feel perhaps we're a little bit behind and that will spur on some of the other. Major countries as well. This measure hits too sweet spots, the environment and jobs. Oh, Ben Lieberman at the Competitive Enterprise Institute finds it too good to be true, he says. Earth friendly coolants and a C units cost more. Losers in all of this will be homeowners, car owners as well as business owners, like restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores that have a lot of refrigeration equipment. Transition to new cooling units would occur over nearly three decades. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. Traders seem to like that the relief package was finally getting done. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Our lives have been flipped upside down this year, and so much has changed that it could be hard to keep up with it all. So for a few minutes, we're going to look back at what the past year has meant for women In this economy. We got ahold of Cherry belly. Cara's Ana. She covers the economy for the 19th news job, Ellie. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. How are women doing in this economy at the beginning of this year, pre pandemic in the before times Well, if we can pause and think back to the before times, which feel like several eons away from us. Right before this pandemic started in December of 2019 women surpassed men as the majority of the labor force for only the second time in history. The only other time I had happened was during the great recession when so many men lost their jobs, that women actually surpassed them. And so we had reached a point right before all this started where that happened again and that had happened naturally through So much growth that was taking place for women in the labor force where they got to that 50 50.4% just edging out men. And then what happened? Well, then what happened was the start of this country's first female recession. And what that meant was that the jobs that really went away this year the vast majority where jobs that were held by women, and that was unusual that had never happened. But this year we're looking at retail hospitality, the care fields. Those were the jobs that went away. And so that in about three months what we lost, we're about 11 million jobs held by women in this economy. On DeSoto. It started what we have when are still enduring to this day is this recession that has hit women so much harder than men? And there has been an enduring peace of this, which is the second part of it is this child care crisis that we are also living in? I want to come back to the childcare crisis in a moment, But a lot of your writing has highlighted the fact that In this first ever she session. It's hitting women of color particularly hard. Can you talk about what that trend has looked like Yeah, that has been, you know, one of the saddest parts of this entire experience. If we look at unemployment, for example, it's just one measure. But unemployment for women peaked around like 15 15.5%, But for Latinas, it hit 20.2%. For black women. It hit 16.5%. So much of that goes back to this occupational segregation that we talk about, sometimes where it's what are the fields that these folks are pushed into. And ultimately those fields are a lot of caregiving fields nursing health care. I mean, we we wrote a story recently about the first people who need to get vaccines across the country. We looked at every single state and in the vast majority two thirds you were looking at a woman and in most cases, you were looking at a woman of color. And so that I think spoke eons about these are the people who are most at risk. Can you talk about just this astronomical number of women leaving the workforce. Yeah, I think the Shocking number came to us in September when 865,000 women left the labor force and it was just so clear what had happened, You know school was back and school was back virtually And so you had all of these women who were at home and looking at this new school year they were just making a decision. And it was a difficult decision for a lot of women who said, I'm just going to quit my job. And care for my kids, because there's not there's no safety net for me right now..

Mitchell Hartman president Trump Scott Tong federal Labor Department Kimberly Adams New Jersey Labor Department John Ernie Tudeski Michelle Nevermore Competitive Enterprise Institu refrigeration Institute U. S Cherry belly United States CEO Samantha Slater Ben Lieberman
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Eight twenty NPR news and The New York conversation live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly the latest corona virus aid bill in Congress is expected to be approved today in the house it spends more than three trillion dollars and includes more direct payments to individuals and families and another extension of higher unemployment benefits a third of the money would go to states and cities there's also money for testing the White House is threatening a veto Republicans in the Senate say the democratic proposal contains too much spending unrelated to the pandemic it's expected to clear the house along party lines many businesses in New York Maryland and Virginia are being allowed to re open today these are among the latest states where governors are easing coronavirus restrictions New York City and counties surrounding Washington and Virginia's capital Richmond remained under stricter limits to the higher number of covert nineteen infections and deaths NPR's Eric Westervelt says California is also facing a staggered reopening Los Angeles county has the highest number of infections and deaths and you know big city in the state has met the key public health criteria set by the state for re opening more businesses this week a handful of more rural counties got the green light even those counties are saying more openings are needed beaches in Los Angeles county have reopened with restrictions Wall Street futures are in negative territory this morning this is NPR news from Washington and this is WNYC in New York I'm Sean Carlson as you can hear in parts of New York are facing it faced a re opening today we're gonna have more on that what it means for you where you are coming your way in just about ten minutes on W. NYC schools chancellor Richard Carranza says officials will change the admissions policies for New York City selective high schools and middle schools next year but in a virtual Q. and a with students he promised the change will be temporary because we don't have attended in the way that we use you and attendance issues that many of those admissions policy we're not gonna use it doesn't well I'm because we have great that looks very different now we're probably going to do something different around great some parents say they're worried the chancellor will use the health crisis to eliminate selective admissions the chancellor says he won't and he seeking feedback for any changes the education department will implement next year new Jersey's labor department has cleared another one hundred and thirty nine thousand unemployment claims from its backlog officials say anyone who is eligible and apply for benefits by April twelfth has now been processed governor Phil Murphy address the growing frustration with the delays during his daily briefing yesterday know that he Norma's amount of progress has been and continues to be made and that you will get every single penny that's coming to you including the federal piece the department has been hit with more than one million claims since the cover nineteen pandemic swept through the state and businesses were ordered to shut to date two point seven billion dollars in benefits have been paid out to eight hundred thousand workers in the state students picking up lunches at food distribution sites will also be able to grab tampons and menstrual pads thanks to two.

Washington Dave Mattingly NPR The New York
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR news New York conversation live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly a vote is expected today in the house on the latest corona virus aid package the cost is more than three trillion dollars a third of the money would go to states and cities the bill includes hazard pay for essential workers another round of direct payments to individuals and families and more money for testing here's house speaker Nancy Pelosi has a strategic plan a strategic plan for testing tracing treating and isolating it's what this country needs to defeat the covert nineteen virus the relief package also extends higher unemployment benefits through January Senate Republicans say the bill contains too much spending on related to the pandemic many businesses in New York Maryland and Virginia are re opening today amid the corona virus pandemic New York City is excluded as our counties near Washington DC and Virginia's capital Richmond then pave your with member station VPM has more the governors of Maryland and Virginia carved out exemptions for the DC suburbs where cases remain much higher than the rest of the state that's still earlier than Washington DC which remains under lockdown until June eighth Virginia governor Ralph Northam is also delaying re opening Richmond and real action that county where cases are on the rise some national parks in Pennsylvania are also re opening this is NPR news and this is W. NYC or minor folks yet in some parts of New York are re opening today in phases we will have more on that and what is opening where here in New York coming away about ten minutes here on morning edition New Jersey's labor department has cleared another one hundred and thirty nine thousand unemployment claims from its backlog officials say anyone who is eligible and applying for benefits by April twelfth has now been processed governor Phil Murphy address the growing frustration with the delays during his daily briefing yesterday know that the enormous amount of progress has been and continues to be made and that you will get every single penny that's coming to you including the federal piece the department has been hit with more than one million claim since the pandemic swept through the state though the bloody ministration here in New York City is ushered hundreds of homeless new Yorkers out of the subway system newly released numbers suggest the overwhelming majority of them are ending up back on the street or even subways W. my sis my life rack has more the subway started closing during the night a week ago mayor de Blasio says more than eight hundred people have accepted services since then but most didn't spend even one night in a shelter he said only a hundred people have continued to sleep in shelters but still the blood your calls it a step in the right direction just getting to the door of a shelter is a beginning the mayor says it often takes many attempts before people accept a shelter placement a federal judge in Brooklyn is urging both sides to consider mediation in a case involving whether the metropolitan detention center is doing enough to stop the spread of the corona virus W. my sis Beth Fertig explains after nearly two days of testimony judge Rachel Kovner said she was disinclined to order the release of three plaintiffs with underlying medical issues because she couldn't conclude there was no way of keeping them safe but she expressed concern over how the federal jail in Brooklyn response to inmates seeking medical attention she asked the parties to think about talking to a mediator about that and other issues and she said it seemed both parties wanted some of the same things such as providing enough disinfectant and masks and she asked if they could agree on what's been accomplished the judge could still rule on whether an injunction is needed to force the jail to.

Washington NPR New York
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Miller this week on innovation hub with doing more work from home and school from home than ever he seems like the piece of technology only gets faster but if it's actually smelling that have been attempts to measure the actual speed of innovation and they find a nineteen thirties where the pain is the greatest invention so how might this slow down make us rethink our assumptions turned to shame that the business model I'm very well for the last two hundred years which is simply carry on doing what you're doing last year that doesn't work as the young population begins to decline then it's difficult to put a value on human life the people try the U. S. federal government assigns a number of about ten million dollars per life saved that's all coming up next on innovation hub live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer on the eve of expected house approval of a three trillion dollar corona virus relief package house speaker Nancy Pelosi is criticizing Republicans who she's accusing of seeking to delay the next round of assistance posi signaling out Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell he wants us to just all one is to just pause but families know that hunger doesn't take a pause not having a job doesn't take a pause not being able to pay the rent it doesn't take a pause the White House issued a threat the president trump could veto the package though since it's not likely to make it through the Senate in its current form anyway it's largely symbolic Congress has already approved nearly three trillion dollars in recent weeks to address the economic and health related fallout from the corona virus pandemic more than a hundred and forty world leaders are signing a letter saying a coronavirus vaccine must be made available to everyone in the world once one is developed as NPR's Joe Palca the letter calls on health ministers from around the world to support the creation of a so called people's vaccine former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark is one of the signatories she says there's a pragmatic reasons for making a coronavirus vaccine globally available we need this vaccine available to everyone everywhere because none of us is secura unless everyone is secure against covered Clark says a bold international efforts to develop and distribute a vaccine freely to those who need it is vital otherwise she says we will all have to continue to live isolated from one another Joe Palca NPR news the senators voted to renew three domestic surveillance tools that lapsed in March after Congress failed to reauthorize them as NPR's Ryan Lucas explains a surveillance programs used by the F. B. I. in national security investigations the Senate voted by a wide margin to re authorize the three domestic spying provisions the Senate version of the bill includes one amendment that supporters say will strengthen privacy and civil liberties protections for individuals who are targets of government surveillance under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or FISA with that amendment the legislation now heads back to the house where lawmakers will have to vote on it again the house worked for weeks to cobble together a bipartisan compromise bill that they passed in March it's unclear whether the Senate version will have the necessary support in the house to pass if it does the bill with then head to the president's desk Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington another nearly three million people have been added to the nation's jobless rolls the labor department announcing today that number of people filed first time jobless claims last week bringing the total number of claims filed in the past two months nearly thirty six million record levels of findings come as millions of people have been laid off or furloughed with companies closing their doors across the country stocks gained ground today on Wall Street the Dow is up three hundred and seventy seven points the nasdaq rose eighty points the S. and P. five hundred climbed thirty two points today you're listening to NPR and this is W. N. Y. C. M. Chris Venezia tensions between the New York City health department and mayor bill de Blasio are mounting after the mayor refused to jump to the defense of the city's health commissioner after she made a disparaging remark against police officers the New York Post reported yesterday on an incident in late March where health commissioner Dr oxy was Barbeau told the NYPD police chief that she did not care about his officers and would not give the NYPD as much protective equipment as it asked for Gothamist editor Christopher robin says the incident speaks to a broader issue since a pandemic began there been reports that mayor bill de Blasio and the health department led by Dr ox iris Barbeau have had a really rocky relationship Barbeau has since apologized to the police chief of police unions are calling for her resignation new Jersey's labor department has cleared another hundred thirty nine thousand unemployment claims from its backlog officials say anyone who's eligible and apply for benefits by April twelfth has now been processed governor Phil Murphy address the growing frustration with the delays during his daily briefing earlier today know that he Norma's amount of progress has been and continues to be made and that you will get every single penny that's coming to you including the federal piece the department has been hit with more than one million claim since the covert nineteen pandemic swept through the state and businesses were ordered shut to date two point seven billion dollars in benefits have been paid out to eight hundred thousand workers in the state it's overcast in sixty two degrees right now in lower Manhattan this is W. NYC support for NPR comes from the Lemelson foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the U. S. and in developing countries and working to inspire and enable the next generation of inventors more information is available at Lemelson dot org.

Miller
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Will know right away if PPP is needed in handling a patient he says having quicker testing will also allow us to more broadly in the state which will help inform a lot of the modeling to determine what the penetration of this virus is in the state this will help us to understand how to re open the economy says granularity and deal with future covert nineteen flare ups David Matthau New Jersey won a one point five news Timoney Jersey's first news five thirty nine north Jersey hospital starting to divert patients because they don't have enough staff for critical care beds to keep up with demand during a press conference this weekend the state health commissioner says nine hospitals were on divert Friday night three hospitals were on divert for critical care six on full divert primarily due to staff issues status out of the crisis alert for medical volunteers to step forward Lakewood school officials confirmed the death of two men connected to the public schools in town an attorney for the school board announcing the deaths of a twenty year old former student and the father of two elementary students the attorney telling the Asbury park press both were infected with corona virus their families are receiving counseling from the district in person funerals have been banned by the governor's order to socially isolate during this pandemic for those who lose loved ones it's anguishing in Woodbridge firefighters gave a local window a chance to say goodbye to her husband Richard Gould with the former fire commissioner and county died at the age of eighty one in a long term care facility and NJ dot com reports the department rolled out its fire trucks marching by Gould's house in a procession with his casket so his wife could say a final final farewell working with a forty year old mainframe system new Jersey's labor department is being pushed to the Max trying to handle the record number of unemployment claims being filed in response to this crisis commissioner Robert are sterile Angelo says he wants nothing more than to put your hard earned benefits into your family budget sooner imagine a stadium with ten thousand seats but there are a million people waiting to get in there are only so many who can get through the gates at one time he says the department is doing a number of things to speed things up more phone lines more trained employees from other divisions and laptop so claims can be processed from home the labor commissioner will be among our guests this Thursday night at seven o'clock we've gathered our top business experts in the state to answer your questions about unemployment small business help and mortgage relief that's this Thursday night at seven a special town hall on New Jersey one a one point five Tirmidhi Jersey's first news five forty two Dan says it is going to be a very pleasant day today will have the forecast a recap of our top stories next.

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Report from the international energy agency for that we bring in Bloomberg oil trading reporter Alex Longley he joins us now from our London studios good morning Alex at first glance it looks like this is a pretty tame assessment from the I. E. A. that global crude markets will likely remain calm heading into twenty twenty what sketching your eye from the I a report well there's an interesting contrast between the out I ETS assessment of a calm oil markets IT next year and then the way they talk about supply and demand because they also go on to say that supply from outside of a pack is going to rise by about two point three million barrels a day next year that's more than double oil demand growth say on the one hand you're saying then talk about com this of supply and calmness of sort of the market itself which I think when we compare to the sort of the op tech attacks in Saudi Arabia early this year you can see what I coming from but on the other hand clearly that is and that sort of dark clouds and growing over the market for sort early twenty twentieth as all these non OPEC supplies come online particularly from the US but also outside of the region yeah I mean that's sort of stands in contrast doesn't it to some of what we've heard from suppliers in the U. S. saying that the shale boom may be running a bit out of steam that they may be running out of places to frack yeah it seems like the world sound on its head ready because we hearing her cell produces saying that tree that barracks you have sellout and then we have the energy information administration this week raising it to you high so how about that for costs that those two it slightly tricky to Squibb clearly the idea is backing a significant increase in U. S. shale production and and I think will vary and US produces kind of talking about a potential slow down and and that may be something that's happening what you have to bear in mind is the levels with coming from the scene exceptionally strong U. S. oil output growth in recent years the U. S. shifting towards being an NSX sports there on a weekly basis I'm sorry although we hearing kind of perhaps more down beat times in terms of the amount of production coming out of the U. S. I think there's still a significant increase is not like anyone talking about low a U. S. production it's just a smaller increase the meeting before right so where does this leave pack now their meeting and what about three weeks to discuss their output plans yeah in that meeting and coming up on horizon and and we kind of seen the first socks of stocks of posturing going on and there was talk of D. for output cuts that's kind of been quashed now and it seems as though you that set for an extension probably into into the kind of this the first half of next year and the cuts run so much it's likely you see that kind of move down the line and in terms of whether we're going to get deeper cuts that remains to be seen the group's own report this week suggests that the markets are supplied in the start of next year which again suggests that I picked needs to cut further and we've seen in in recent days the I. A. again saying that it's Russian is benefiting the most from these output cuts that their profits arising the most and obviously the Saudis have been cutting a bit more so that that's where that getting hit but it seems like the my slightly out likely outcome for the time being is that AIPAC will just kind of kick the can down the line and stick with the current regime into next year thank you mention the Arab cake attack earlier is the I AEA factoring that in and not off his is risk premium is still an issue it it's an interesting question it's clearly an issue for the market and we had a a commodities conference here last week it bring back and headphones are saying that actually if you look at oil prices at the moment that probably fairly valued him was on the value does that premium because that the market can move two ways one a lot of a pet supply suddenly comes online because they change course in which case prices plummet or we get another up cake in which case prices move sharply higher and the idea is obviously very focused on him in trees and and they would probably use of cake to point out that I see the market was very quickly replenished from not from that will supply say that kind of that but the system is working I guess that's why you don't see them talk about it quite as much but when he sought to oil trade is clearly that that risk premium seems to be what people feel the the mis pricing is going on in the market at the moment so in the last thirty seconds here where do you see volatility going for oil as we head through the rest of the year and into the early part of next year well that probably depends primarily on two things I think you have the APEC meeting where any surprise outcome could probably give a list of all and then also and as we mentioned kind of any other geopolitical risks for the time being though it seems as though the way it with with trending lower on the volatility front and I think as long as you kind of have this kind of structural head wind of the trade war in the market that's that's the way it's going to stay in sunny talking to some of the bike is that that planning that way too all right thanks for this as always Alex good talking with you that's Alex Longley Bloomberg oil trading reporter just looking at crude right now West Texas intermediate is down four tenths percent or twenty three cents at fifty six dollars fifty five cents a barrel Karen hi Nathan thank you it is five fifty three on Wall Street time to the Bloomberg law report let's get to the legal stories were watching this morning from Bloomberg's Jeff Ballenger White House lawyer Stephen not she has been confirmed to the New York based U. S. court of appeals for the second circuit court now has a majority of judges appointed by Republican presidents Forest Service officials say they will consider input from the public in deciding whether to walk when Alaska's Tongass National Forest to logging the trump administration wants to open more than nine million acres to block development new Jersey's labor department says Hooper owes the state about six hundred fifty million dollars in taxes because the company.

Alex Longley reporter London six hundred fifty million doll three million barrels nine million acres fifty six dollars thirty seconds three weeks one hand
"new jersey labor department" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

14:05 min | 2 years ago

"new jersey labor department" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Cook interestingly enough sold two hundred and sixty five thousand shares of apple stuff flying six one five seven three seven nine nine eight six instant email Phillip Phil Valentine that calm all that stuff why is Tim cook selling apple she's it amounted to fifty four million dollars an apple shears I think they may know something we don't so he sold his stock for the first time this year now these people do sell stock well this is from market watch and I will warn you it is one of these pay walls you get to see just the first just the story if you need to see more you got to pay him a dollar for eight weeks and I'm not willing to do that but we find any soul to one sixty five thousand one hundred sixty apple sheen years on August twenty six for a total of fifty four point seven million dollars at an average price of two hundred six dollars and seventeen cents a share he sold stock after requiring five hundred sixty thousand apple shares on August twenty fourth through restricted stock units that vested apple with held two hundred ninety four thousand shears to satisfy tax withholding requirements for vesting of the restricted stock so he got it from apple he sold all he could they got the rest to pay off his taxes and then he pocketed fifty four million dollars I would think if you think the company's going places you wouldn't sell your stock but I mean who knows he's probably buying I don't know Sam song stuck with it that would be my guess after his conversation with Donald when that be a heck of a note yeah and Tim cook just bought fifty four million dollars in Sam song what unbelievable Martha Stewart says it's a good thing sure absolutely no insider trading there I wonder what size ankle bracelet Tim cook wears anyway that's honest that's something else there's a study that finds that there is no good quote on quote finds no no okay finds no one gave gene but it says that there are several genes they think of linking to your sexuality and they also say that the your sexual orientation is determined in part by your environment this is an interesting study is sweeping new study by the way fulfill there goes your book the gun players doesn't when I really it's science fiction so we can you know go read if you like it's really interesting sweeping new study finds there is no specific gene that determines one's sexual orientation but the genetics do play a part in affecting a person's sexual welding this is research is for the study which was published today in the journal science study DNA from hundreds of thousands of subjects found some jeans are connected with same sex sexual behavior while variations may play a part in influencing sexual behavior they do not predict whether a person is gay researchers found five genetic markers were significantly associated with same sex sexual behavior they said but the study found that genetics are far from the only factor at play in someone's sexuality interesting researchers conclude the many uncertainties remain to be explored including how social cultural influences on sexual preference might interact with genetic influences for the study the international team of scientists examined data from over four hundred and seventy seven thousand people in the US and the UK to explore possible links between their DNA is genetic markers and their sexual behavior then they use data from the U. K. biobank study and private a geo of bugs the the firm twenty three in me you for me with them they do like ancestry as a swap thing more than twenty six thousand this man said they have at least one same sex sexual encounter that's out of the four hundred seventy seven thousand so what is it put it in about five percent which is from pretty much what we're thinking it is and by the way does one same sex sexual encounter make you gay I mean just one yeah that's running you cap you captain the U. capital a rowboat it doesn't make a captain the euro rose old joke we can't tell the room the punch line on the radio up now but just one time and they call you a homosexual Orge Costanza comes to mind yeah sure the researchers rode the past studies were too small to unveil the impacts of individual genes of five genetic variance the scientists statistically found were so she with same sex sexual behaviors none have a particularly large impact and none could alone predicts sexual behavior this is not good news for the homosexual lobbying in the U. because they have long maintained well you know we can't help it well apparently what this study is saying is that they're all sorts of things that go into this Eric villain they're gonna jump on that aren't thing Eric villain director of the center for genetic medicine research at children's national health system told Washington post it just shows us that same sex sexual behavior is much more complex than this idea of having just one gene influencing at all it shows that there are genetic factors which we had suspected long ago but it also shows those genetic factors do not tell the whole story I guess is what you're listing the Streisand records show tunes or something else that may have something to do with I would think that a study on then kids who listen to show tunes are fifty percent more likely to be that love Judy Garland yellow advocacy groups of the study help put to rest the concept of a gain gene a long standing trope used to suggest a star genetic difference among the L. G. B. T. community the research provides even more evidence of being gay or lesbian is a natural part of human life well there's a nice spin on and that's when the gland guys Zeke zig Stokes that's the man's name if your device is the man he may have been identified as a I don't know whatever the identities of LGBTQ people are not up for debate he says this new research also reconfirms a long established understanding that there is no conclusive degree to which nature or nurture influence our game or lesbian person behaves well that's really I mean that's the spin is not me because this is not kind to those who say it's nature rather than nurture they say that a lot of environmental circumstances play into it I have long had a theory about this too now I do believe that there is a genetic component for some folks I don't know how many but I also have notices to a lot of folks who into being gay have a I have a an overbearing mother they have an overbearing mother I don't know if you've noticed that or not I am actually very true so you start looking into then you go well okay so what is the psychology vein here are they trying to are are are they identify more as the mother than the father now this is the this is not to say that if there is only a mother in the house because not all single mothers are overbearing but I'm Tom of the helicopter moms are constantly they're constantly directing their son's life I've seen in this is just a casual observance I've seen I think a common thread and it's not always the case because I'm fixing the thing but again I grew up with a better hovering mom I don't know she she wasn't ever she was just to be AJ he was over in so much she just beat them down all the time I mean seriously I mean she wants so why can't you be more like Phil I mean of all people why would you want your kid to be like me yeah I was drinking and smoking and carousing in making bad grades and staying out late and get into trouble why in the world you would you get the bill this guy was a straight a student yeah I hate when parents do that because my father was in its warriors for that he would he would always say I wish you're more like your sister pay she come in much more you know responsible with their money you're not even a real careful not to say that my kids you know you never compare no you do that and then you know then you put them at each other's throats yes which didn't happen actually no but they could it could yeah but its guard you Johnny yeah I did it's a garden what's Carly more those this DNA testing my family should stay out of that if they are listening right now stop with the DNA well we have one redneck cousin and I had broken off all contact with him because I think this was just not not cool the proper thing to do but he found out because we had talked about it on the air that I had a half sister out there really that data told me about one dead wasn't quite totally honest is he said he never had any dealings with what turned out he did really funded her way through college in wow Goderich TV reporting job thank her and apparently she's doing very well which is why the cousin I think is contacting they have been in touch with each other he didn't even call us to tell his mother did mine but she didn't know now she is in this case this is just going there just reckon everybody's life yeah this guy has just upset every but my sisters are upset because dad didn't tell them help them get through college they even know about it though they know they didn't know about any of them they didn't know about the half sister but but they didn't they didn't know that he was all involved no so this guy has just totally and now we have another cousin in Alabama that is being involved and I'm thinking guys you don't want to go down this road with this just have like any either yeah well it's not even their immediate family no it's not and for him not even contact us yeah not even upset with my aunt for not contacting the other two kids so everybody's easy at each other's throats yes I understand Alan look sometimes you're better off not knowing yes you are some folks are really screws with them but there was a guy we knew that found out like when he was in his fifties after his both his parents were gone that he was adopted and what I am was he goes around to his his cousins and they all knew and then he said did you know and they said yeah we only why didn't you tell me so it wasn't our place to tell you it was your parents place to tell you if if they wanted to tell you you were I mean what we get you you know you did the being like the cousin you're talking about a comes in and just disrupts everything if his parents one in November of told him I think they should have told him but that was their call well now he's furious with all the cousins because a feels like everybody was conspiring against them and you know I don't mean if I were in their situation I promise in saying this thing out of it I don't go back button in the people's business but people got to be all up in everybody else's business well god really did he answered my wish because I do have a few cousins that are well let's just say races there and now I am not an album and I was praying so much that it's someone black would be in the lineage and it turns out there is all that so there's gonna be a Dave Chapelle thought it really yeah he's got worse is why because she's married to a black but I was really and I was like oh Gee god you see I've been wanting to find some in mind you know black blood Jewish blood or whatever can find anything speaking of blacks and Jews nice segue president of the N. double a PC the national association for the advancement of political correctness chapter blames the Jewish media for portraying him as anti semitic Jeffrey die resident of a chapter of the NW PC where is this and doesn't say passiert wherever that is blame the Jewish media for getting him fired from his job with the New Jersey labor department after was revealed that he had a history of controversial comments on his Facebook page okay the everyone looking at this racial yes I want you to be clear the statement says I don't talk to effing Jews is simply alive by David wall sting who is a Jewish reporter for The New Jersey globe dice in a Facebook post die also blamed another Jewish assemblyman Gary share of trying to get a quote the Jewish media to fire him but I'm not anti semitic this is a bunch of B. S. because I am advised makes a bunch of Jude conspiracy is what it is hilarious will be banks they right we are no it's cutting into your exercise time it's stabbing you in the back nine and.

Phillip Phil Valentine apple Tim cook fifty four million dollars two hundred six dollars seven million dollars fifty percent five percent eight weeks