19 Burst results for "New England Journal Medicine"

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

03:59 min | Last month

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on The Charles Moscowitz Podcast

"You catch cove in nineteen from other people and i'm basically hardly around other people and i messed up in. Very careful about social distancing. Wash my hands. And all the various things i mentioned last week i think god forbid a societies really just collapsing. There's a whole bunch of things going wrong and we have incompetent leadership and so they just go after the wrong things like the the people in leadership aren't getting the results. People are seeing that society's collapsing and so the leaders you have to make it look like they're doing something so they chase general red herrings or you're just pointless issues to try to bolster up their authority catalytic cracking down on you. You know god forbid You know the the leadership is in accomplishing anything. And so they're going to crack down on you because you're criticizing them and and to me that's just human nature the nature of power. So it's not. It's not surprising Like i'm not a doctor like medical vice. I have done quite a bit of research to the virus itself but You in terms of medical advice how to deal fit about whether those treatments work. Joe rogan's obviously a exceptional athlete. And you'll fear factor fame. He probably has exceptional immune system so could be that he would have a virus of any way office in the heat. Took the prescription. And also i have a on a Comment he didn't trump also legalize the right to try to remember that i mean. That was one of his initiatives as executive order that doctors have the right to use its mental drugs. They don't have to go through the arduous process and by the way the drugs are we're talking about the drug in the drug those of both. Fda approved drugs. In the case of the drug it was approved in the nineteen seventies. it has been used by millions of people all over the world quite safely. No drug is perfect. Of course if you leave read the fine print of just about anything that you take you see that there are there are there are side effects but nevertheless it is fairly conventional in terms of. It's up it's dangerous and it has been used for various ailments all over the world but yet you cannot talk about it yet. In last year you had the lancet which is one of the world's most premier medical journals and the journal and the new england journal medicine also very prestigious journal. Run the study which denounced the age drug and made claims that it was dangerous and ineffective and then they had to retract that study which was unprecedented. Never had they had that happen always a very well respected and known to do very serious vetting that would they would have to actually retract. A an entire study is actually a scandal for them and should be and it was even though it was wasn't nagged me. Neither one of us are health expert. Doesn't pay to get too much into the nature of the beast is You're just as more and more things go wrong. The people in power You democrats specifically need to explain why things aren't going the way they want him to end therefore they're gonna say 'cause we don't have enough power in they're going to try to gain more power and you'll krona viruses going back up and you're so you know blame it on the on vaccinated blame it on misinformation blame it on all these other things and saying it in order to defeat krona virus. What we need to do is you'll give more power to them. And you'll god forbid you have the situation where there's a distrust of the citizenry of by the government and people are starting to turn on each other in in. Maybe if the texas abortion ban..

Joe rogan new england journal medicine a Fda the journal texas
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Former television commentator does have a very calm demeanor. But I think a lot of people were noticing some mansplaining going on tonight, so I didn't see it that way. George. It didn't come across. I'm glad she didn't see it that way. Because it wasn't that way. Was Meghan Kelley. You said no, no, no, no, no, no. You come to play you come to play. Then there was this from Kelly. Mark Kelly Mar is ah, great Colorado politico. Really, really. Really bright. And the tweet is Pence's tone and tenor towards Harris was respectful but tough, certainly warmer and less condescending than hers toward him. Reducing that two mansplaining means the term no longer holds meaning. Women deserve equal treatment on the debate stage, including pushback and scrutiny. It is always amazing to watch those people. Who want to tell you about how we need equality. But then what they really want is not equality. Representive Acosta Cortez tweeted out Pence, demanding that Harris answer his own personal questions when he won't even answer the moderators is gross and an exemplary of the gender dynamics. So many women have to deal with It worked. She made this up. You made this up. I'm not saying that one might not have to deal with something at work, but she made this up. It's the idea that it's unacceptable that Mike Pence ask questions or Mike Pence, pushed back or Mike Pence was tough in a debate. It's a debate for the being the vice president of the United States. It's going to be tough. Snot mansplaining. It's such a ridiculous nonsense concept, and it is meant to prevent the conversation from going forward. With the New England Journal of Medicine decides to get political. It makes us question what faith we can have in their science and whether or not their science is science based or political When they talk about things like Mansplaining. And you have people like represented accosted Cortez pushing such mythology. Well do people believe in equality between the sexes or not? Because it seems that the answer is no. If you have representative or senator before your name, you got to be able to handle anything that comes your way. I don't think people should be purposely rude. Don't understand. Purposely rude. It. I don't think it gets you anywhere. At all. At all and in any way But if you are now going to argue that pence can't do this, because it was speaking to a woman will then What you're saying is she shouldn't be running for office. You're saying it's too tough now. I don't believe it's too tough. Why would you believe that? They can handle this? Now, These are things right. The New England Journal Medicine's one thing and this is an offshoot of what we saw from the debate. The debate itself. Interesting. Interesting and had, uh, some some, I think acceptable lines. Will the American people have.

Mike Pence Representive Acosta Cortez Mark Kelly Mar Harris New England Journal of Medicin New England Journal Medicine Meghan Kelley George vice president United States Colorado representative senator
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"For me and the family. It's National Radio Day celebrating the innovation and the invention of radio, and it's important of mass communication. So while it's not nationally sanctioned holiday, you know nobody really takes off yet, which is kind of rude. We celebrate here at the house and I hope you and your family can celebrate now as well. You know, I think radio Fantastic. And you know when you have an emergency, what people turn to, you know, TV goes down and yeah, radio because you are a fantastic information. And you know, I am radios. Amazing. It's everywhere. It's great to be in sales, Doc. I can get your job back. If I say lt's great. Knock it out. You know you and you and the sales team could get out there every morning and tell people how great it is. Well, I tell you, you know, since I've been doing this show, I have been absolutely amazed at how many people listen to your show. Is that right? It's incredible. Absolutely. You mean people text? You're all you're saying they heard you on the air. Yeah, it would. Absolutely. And not only that the people who I haven't seen for a long time will save people. People that I know in Pennsylvania will say things. I mean, guys from Prescott, Arizona. Call me up the other day. The show goes all over the place. That's incredible. Well, doctor, where every every Monday and Thursday we got our best ratings the first half hour, and I think you know why. So here's the question I have for you. And you know you've had the entire break to think about it. So I hope you come up with something here. But here's ah little bit of hope people having lasting immunity to Cove. It Even after a mild case True or false. Well, if they definitely get immunity, I mean, you know. Ah, Oh, yeah, Absolutely. But the problem is with the antibodies actually deteriorate fairly rapidly, so The half life of the antibodies is about 73 days, which means over the course of a year the antibodies will be gone. But that's not the animals of study in the New England Journal Medicine Out of my way. But that you had if you had a you had it. You're never going to get it again. No, no. If you have it, you have it. You're not going to get it again this year, but you could get it again. Ah, yeah. Yeah, That's true, But there's another type of immunity. It's called T cell immunity. And that we don't know exactly how that works. But clearly, some people have that because there are people who are exposed to Covad. And they've never had it. They, you know, it's a marvel virus. They've never seen the fires before. But they have some kind of immunity and that the theory is They've been exposed to Corona viruses as a common cold. And therefore they had some immunity and there's some cross reactivity. So over time, we're going to figure that out. But the antibody portion, which is what we measure we measured the antibodies. They deteriorate over the course of the year. I see. OK, alright. I'm so any any of a sweet advise for us over the weekend. I know you like Teo give that people enjoy hearing it. You know, I think I think people should feel pretty good about the situation. We're finding. We're getting better on the testing. We're finding less and less cases you know, in the New York City now they're positive rate is 0.24%. That's their positive rate of they're testing. So what that means is that they're testing a whole lot of people and they're not finding positives. Well, they're not finding positives because they've largely gone through this whole Corona virus. Ah! Epidemic pandemic that we're experiencing, so I think people should be a little bit happy. You know the others. The other statistic. I saw that people should take some comfort in As bad as it is, you know, we've we've confirmed 55.5 million people with this virus. There are 350 million people in this country. So the virus is still affected a very small amount of the people in this country. So if you're if you follow very simple and not difficult guidelines just wear a mask when you're among other people do what you have to do outdoors. You're here much better shape outdoors and try to avoid crowds. And don't touch your face. If you do those things, you're going to be fine, right? Excellent. All right, Doctor, have a great weekend. I'll see you at sea world at some point, OK and And we'll talk on Monday. I'll write him. You, sir. There he goes, man, The greatest doctor in the world. That's the greatest man ever, man. I think he deserves an Atta boy. And when we do the employee of the month here, a K F I I think he should be in the running. I really dio. I 100% agree with that. He's part of the fam. He has saved this city from going absolutely insane. That's right. Like I can't tell you how many texts and emails and we get in social media. You know, saying thanks for Dr Ray, please keep him on here. He's keeping us alive or and put my kids back in school because of you. Really cool, dude. Glad we had a month and we had a couple of years before the pandemic and the pandemic struck and it affects your lungs. And he's a pulmonologist. It was perfect timing. You know how people have shirts that say Like I knew that band before it was cool. We know Dr Ray before it was cool. That's right. We should get T shirts. How about this? We had Dr Ray on before there was a pandemic that affect your lungs. And I was the king. Of Purell before anybody thought that was cool of you to T shirts I used to get teased. Constantly. They all look at this guy's got Carol Everywhere. He's got Purell and now people are fighting for it right now, like I'm the king of of hand sanitizer. And I was I was a foreshadow or like a soothsayer on I was the guy out in front by about 12 years, everybody We're live on Ko Phi more now in June. Focus of victim impact statements in the Golden State killer case has moved to Southern California through Witten's sister in law. Manuela has been was killed by Joseph D'Angelo in Irvine.

Dr Ray Covad Ko Phi Prescott Carol Everywhere New York City New England Journal Medicine Arizona Epidemic Pennsylvania Teo Southern California Irvine Manuela Witten Joseph D'Angelo
Gilead's Remdesivir Efficacy Still Uncertain! Is Stemline Therapeutics a Buy?

Breaking Biotech

09:04 min | 1 year ago

Gilead's Remdesivir Efficacy Still Uncertain! Is Stemline Therapeutics a Buy?

"So I'm glad to be back and I have a great show for you all today. We have some real spicy stuff to get into. Some of them have commented on twitter. But yet it's it should be good so I'm GONNA start off today by talking about some biotech news. Some little updates that we got some press releases and then a follow up by talking about Gillian ads at Rim decively data. We're going to touch a little bit. On the New England Journal. Medicine study that they published followed up by a report that was provided by our friends at Stat News. So that's going to be good and then the final topic. I WanNa talk about is stem line. So you know. One benefit of being in this volatile environment is that there are buying opportunities right now and one that I do see is a company called stem line. So we're GONNA talk about them and why think thereby right now so with that? Let's get to some of the news that we saw this week and first thing I wanted to touch on his after sys mostly because I just talked about them in the last video but we saw actually in the last couple of weeks that the FDA has authorized after says to initiate a pivotal clinical evaluating multi stem cell therapy in patients with Cova nineteen with induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. So some of the stuff that I talked about in my previous video was that I wasn't sure if the face to that. They're currently undergoing with their collaborator. In Japan was going to be a pivotal study. And it looks like it will be for the Japanese system and then this study that they're launching that they launched in the last couple of weeks is going to be the pivotal study for them domestically here in the United States so the primary endpoint is ventilator. Free Days Through Day. Twenty eight and they're beginning to open sites this quarter so I'm not sure exactly what that means in terms of when we can expect data. I would think maybe late Q. Three probably in Q. Four we'd see some data for this which could be a big boost for the company. Also what we learned in at the risk of opening another can of a drama this company they announce a public offering a twenty two million shares at two dollars and twenty five cents for about fifty million dollars in proceeds. I did say that I was expecting them to announce another offering and that is what we saw earlier than I expected. I really thought that they were GonNa wait until maybe later in the year to do this but while the songs doing okay I guess it's a it's an opportunity to do so so with another fifteen million dollars in cash. This should give them another six months or so and you know if they do see some good data from this pivotal study it would likely boost the stock quite a bit more before they have to go ahead and raise money again. So that's after says. I'm still saying on the sidelines. I'm still not super confident. In that data we originally with their phase one so I have no real sense on whether or not I think the date is GonNa be positive but I hope it is that this can get rolled out and it can actually start helping patients that have covert nineteen and areas going to move quickly to immunogenetics which is a company that kind of fell off my radar ticker symbol. Is I m you? They have a compound called says a to Mab Guven Akin and yes. I did practice. That's all I can say. A properly for metastatic triple negative breast cancer and I kind of talked about is the potential for this drug. It's it's a unique formulation so that they can really target the cancer cells and hit them with this tailored that is toxic to all sales. But because it's tethered to something that specifically targets cancer cells it would primarily affect them and kill them so the primary indication they're looking for is triple negative breast cancer and they had done in a sense study to confirm their previous face through results and there was some concern with safety but the sense that he was actually stopped for compelling efficacy. So that's great news for them the PDF date is June. Second of this year. And we'll see if the FDA is going to go ahead and approve the drug so that they can search treating metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients. They have a plan readout for your cancer in the second half of twenty twenty and they're also still enrolling patients for positive her two negative medicine breast cancer so I think that that trial read out is going to be particularly important for the company. And I'M GONNA keep them on my radar and pay a little bit better attention because I think that if they do see positive data there. The company has a a much larger patient population. Go after so Yeah so it's good for them and hopefully they'll see a positive result at the PDF eight anime. Keep an eye out for that trial moving on. I WanNa talk a little bit about Amarin. Because they had their earnings report while ago and what we learned is that they're cute. One Twenty twenty revenue beat estimates at one hundred and fifty million dollars and I had said previously that. I thought their estimates were sandbagged in anticipation of better results. And that is what happened but unfortunately none of this matters because they do not have pan protection in the United States given the ruling that we heard a little while ago so regarding to the appeal and the generics the CEO is not expecting at risk launches. But they are willing to file an injunction. I've talked about that in the past. This is not new news but they did also say that. In the event of an appeal loss Amarin would be willing to launch a brand engineering version. So this is an interesting strategy in order to allow them to maintain market share in the space because if they launch a generic version immediately. You know by the time another generic comes to the stage Amazon's already going to generic Kinda solidifies their position in the markets. There's not going to be really an advantage to patients taking a another third party. Generic other than Amazon's now the only issue with this is that the generic price is going to have to be competitive with the other companies. That launched generics as well. So in this way they're gonNA lower the amount of total revenue. Get but there's a lot of uncertainty in the company. I'm still not sure what I'm GonNa do with my shares. The stock has bounced back a little bit. But you know if they don't win appeal I assume they're gonNA see further downside until we actually start to see the kinds of numbers that start coming in given the new pricing of generic version of Amarin. So we'll see we'll keep you posted on what I do. I'm tempted to buy a little bit more and lower my cost basis by I'm I don't feel great about that either. So we'll see all right. Let's talk about Gilead. Everybody so first thing I want to touch on with Gilead is this New England Journal. Medicine studied that they released regarding the compassionate use of Rendez severe for patients with severe cove. In nineteen so Gillian been at the forefront of the media when it comes to this rendez severe drug that they're hoping to get approved and they initially had rendez severe offered only as compassionate use for patients as is still undergoing phase. Three trials right now so some people who are really severe severely affected by cove nineteen could apply to to take severe and what they did is they published a study with fifty three patients who had taken it under this program and really it wasn't a placebo controlled trial so for me. There's no real conclusion to be drawn. They said that a majority of patients were discharged. But because there's nothing to compare it to doesn't really mean much Another thing that's worth complaining about for the studies that they didn't even measuring viral load. So we don't even know if patients that were taking Severe head lowered viral loads in. You know we could figure that out by comparing baseline to treat a data. But they didn't do that so it's Kinda left in the dark here. The company itself has terminated a study in China with severe patients because of low enrollment. And they're awaiting the publication of these data to announce in-depth review the result. So that's one thing that we can also look forward to see is the data that we're getting from this low enrollment patient population in China. And they are doing a mild to moderate disease study in China. So that's still ongoing. Takes been seeing on twitter. Pretty disappointing a lot of people complaining that the New England Journal of Medicine shouldn't publish the study given that it was you know. There's a conflict of interest and there's no placebo and you're not new to academia. You know it's a cartel. The big name journals really only published stuff. That's like really hot off the press type thing. So of course there's huge problems with this study and Gillian's not even shy to mention them in the discussion so they clearly outlined limitations of the study. And everybody that I've seen on twitter isn't really taking that into consideration they think Gilead just willfully blind to the fact that there's no control. Obviously they know that. And if you want to throw the New England Journal Medicine under the bus or publishing this year but throw the entire institution appear review under the bus. It's a horribly flawed system as somebody. Who's coming from academia? I've seen this all the time you know. These journals are a cartel that gate keep science. So that unless you know people or your science is so particularly compelling that they'd be willing to publish it but if you WanNa talk about the academic system and publishing. Let's have that conversation but to call out this study in particular is being. The true hope written the true problem in the world of publishing. This is not the one for you

Gillian Twitter Gilead New England Journal FDA United States China Amarin Amazon New England Journal Of Medicin New England Journal Medicine Stat News Mab Guven Akin Severe Twenty Twenty Rim Decively Japan Respiratory Distress
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Hands. And then you were going to infect other people that you may touch. You may touch surfaces surfaces so what we call might so foam nights like this table here. I didn't wash my hands. I have krone virus. I touch the table and you touch the table and you potentially are exposed. Because I didn't wash my hands but I think it's very clear. The primary route of transmission is from individuals coughing. I think everyone would agree with that. Hissing I have no question that kissing his role if you look at spouses or partners of cases they have a very high rate of secondary infection. Is there anything that can be deduced in this early stage to predict who might have the tendency to spiral downward wind up being on a respirator? And is there anything that we can do to mitigate that risk that you can see this this early in this new disease? I actually just looked at data. So there's the data from China that's been published a New England Journal Medicine and Land Set. And then we have some. Us Data preliminary US date on the first fifteen cases in the United States. So it's very clear that the single most important predictor of patients dying or ending up in the ICU are older patients who have other conditions to find older. While I hate to say it but I would say I would say sustain itself. We probably over fifty over fifty over fifty but it. The mortality rate goes up every ten years. That you're over fifty so one more thing to do some what you were talking about that those people who are At greatest risk of mining up in intensive care It's the elderly the infirm looking to the General Public. And what an individual may do. Is there anything that a general? The general public a healthy individual or even those people who may not be at their optimal health is there anything that they can do to optimize our immunity to help stave off infection. While I'm GonNa say it again frequent hand hygiene or frequent hand washing but that doesn't improve your immunity. I think this is where you're going. There's some very limited data on whether zinc can prevent introduction of corona virus and to respiratory cells correct and one of the things that we We strive to do on. This show is to separate fact from fiction right. Can we look at the data if there is data even anecdote reports and tried to decipher the veracity of information? That's so there's no clinical data that zinc in humans prevents corona virus infection. So remember when people get sick from corona virus. We don't really worry about people that have a cough and a mild fever and no fever enter otherwise healthy we worry about people that develop pneumonia and then the Monja that develops in individuals with corona virus involves typically the lower lobes of the lungs and has very distinctive appearance. If you do a cat scan by the time they get that sick giving zinc is not gonna make a big difference. This is a disease that primarily as Steve mentioned affects older individuals. That's very different from pandemic flu in Nineteen nineteen and h one and one where I saw twenty five year olds and up on a ventilator within twelve hours were not seeing that with young patients. This is a disease that really is gonNA cause its biggest impact on the frail elderly on that note. We're GONNA take a quick break. We'll be right back I WANNA learn everything that there is to know about the filmmaking process. I think part of art is hearing from the artists who create it in the number of different visions a number of different qualifications that have to go into making any film is insurmountable and hearing those stories can be just as exciting and insightful as the themselves certain movies or certain scores certain actors have shaped who. I am as a person have such appreciation for the things that people produce and the work that goes into whether it's a writer who came up with the story general or how the filmmakers were able to take that from the page and put it onto screen and from the actors themselves who are able to kind of bring that all to life all of it is what I wanna hear because it makes me love my favorite movies even more. I'm Scott to law. If you love movies like I do. You're going to love Hollywood.

General Public mild fever United States New England Journal Medicine writer Hollywood China cough Steve pneumonia
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

"Of the worst things you can put in your body for your mind is wait in just in choline in IBS dairies, actually, the number one thing that you're allergic to those forty one percent of the time waits thirty percent. But there's actually a good research article about week housing schizophrenia. Chocolate came in at a third of twenty seven percent with colitis and BS chocolate was part of it, and I took exception to that the fourth one was coffee at twenty three percent. I took exception with that, then not citrus t-, rye potatoes. Barley and oats, and it can be other things. There are so many different foods that can trigger allergic reactions, and that's been a bone of contention. With me. People are saying, what do you have allergy tests? No, there's there's tests that we can send you to do to see if your body is sensitive to or. Creating out antigens against, but. I'm not real thrilled with what they're really doing because people get caught into well, I have to give up chicken, I have to give up eggs. I have to give up beef. I have to give up, but you forgot about the remove you got the remove part. But you forgot about replaced adjusted enzymes replaced with probiotics repair gut leak in his. If you don't go those next steps than you never never never get as close to one hundred percent is what we're capable of going so, you know, be careful there. They're all these diseases. We talk about it. It's, it's all inflammatory, and glucose, Ming sulfate. And again, there's better quality once than others. That's one of the best nutritional alternatives. And one of the reasons is it increases the sulfate and pathway deliver because of sulfur it. And if you're allergic to sulfur sulfur drugs, that's not the sign if he would not be allergic to glucose, Amine Sulfite, that is one of the most helpful it's very, very researched about it's good for fortification could help help arthritis. So the scientific evidence that some doctors said, well, it's not scientific, it is. Lancet which is a really good medical journal, said, gave us basically incontrovertibly vertebral evidence that glucose me Sulfite nominee works in the real mechanisms of arthritis over the long run. But short term, it's better than I be pro fin remember Abby Provan is one of the end says it kills sixteen thousand a year one I do glucose mean sulfate. The worst that can happen is nothing which it always helps. So, you know, there's a lot of things that can Quayle inflammation like the accuser. John talked about devils. Clunker came to Merrick, there's, there's lots and lots of them, then there's a central nervous system diseases. You know, you've got people that includes people that are stressed anxiety ridden. Depressed, Parkinson's Alzheimer's, etc. It could be a simplest Hypo methylated, and that's like a B complex. And just because you're taking a multi doesn't mean you're getting good B-vitamins that you can actually use. And this Hypo methylated has been associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, including stroke, and this is from journal of carcinogenesis and journal neurology. Yes. Folks, I have exhaustive list of all these research inflammation, according to New England Journal medicine contributes to neuro degenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's Lou. Gehrig's, Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis and they're all inflammatory diseases. So this comes from poor nutrition, toxic environments, and stress so that ties it back to the toxins. It goes owning owning own. Cortisol, and we always check that on our labs can have a profound effect on the hypotheticals. Oh, well, we're adversely affecting the brain, if it's too high to low. And that's the stress whether this caused by the way you think whether it's emotional financial spiritual marital. Just trying to why you think get happy something to live for five something to laugh about find some way to bless somebody else Janet, do it, you know, nutritionally. And we love love love or jobs. But we also try to step outside the box and help people in other ways, and the more you help somebody else, the Moya uplift you before you know it. Holy cow. You're not depressed anymore home. Goodness things. ID attacks have got less or disappeared. It could be that easy. So you guys have had a lot of information again today. Hopefully, I wanted to mention briefly the one family that you know you're talking about toxins. The had just put carpet, new carpet in their house, and new linoleum in their house, and they were completely worried about their kids now being talks IQ from it, but, you know, there's things you can do what one of the things we put people on something called ATM key late, because it helps pull out the heavy metals. And that's a great way to kind of get rid of some of those extra talks. And especially if you feel like you're getting a little bit nasal from some of the things you put down. But, you know, a lot of times it's just things you're smelling wheel is safe. You can smell it, then it's in your system, and there are things that you can do to help with that. So again, we hope you've enjoyed the show. We are taking next week off again. So please don't be upset with us, but it is our anniversary. And we're going out of town because it's been nine. Eighteen years. So that's a tough job for Janet. I mean I enjoyed it. She's beautiful and smiles a lot. So, and I need a vacation now that we really appreciate you listening to us. Stay tuned for some very big announcements with our office get on our Email list because we'll be sending them out via Email as well. We've got some really exciting things coming here at green wisdom help we hope you have a very blessed week, and we'll.

Janet Alzheimer Parkinson journal of carcinogenesis colitis Abby Provan Cortisol Lancet Quayle New England Journal medicine Merrick John Gehrig Lou twenty seven percent twenty three percent one hundred percent forty one percent Eighteen years
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Angel dispatcher will locate you to video capability allows us to see your surroundings and geolocation capability allows us to send first responders tear exact location to physically rescue necessary, visit the app store today. Download tundra swan guardian angel. We are leveling the Plainfield finally, for lower income people who are trying to get into college. College board has for several years been testing adversity index designed to play students. SAT scores in the context of their socio economic advantages disadvantages the system's been used by fifty colleges and universities and college said they've, they're going to expand to about one hundred fifty later this year, and it's going to be available to all colleges by next year. The been criticized because I guess wealthy students earn higher scores on average, then those are middle class. Got really? And they earn higher scores on average than low income families. So we're going to even that out with some kind of formula that they've come up with it. I guess takes care of. Everything that you might have grown up with, and every disadvantage, that you may have had among the factors that would go into the end adversity index economic the proportion of students at a school who are eligible for free or reduced lunch. The reflect challenges like housing instability educational status. The percentage of students who go into college score would be on a scale of up to one hundred. So if you had advantages such as wealth, also going to be factored in. Local crime rate, forty rate, whether student at the single parent, median income that is unbelievable. Really unbelievable? So if you've had a good life, and what they consider to be privileges like you've grown up upscale neighborhood. If you have to come to your home. Are you getting into college Hugh sorry, where the? That's pretty amazing. And it's pretty amazing. It's sure is. So they're saying, I guess, the college board is admitting that the SAT is unfair. I don't know how I if the score on your standardized tests requires a separate algorithm to determine if the scores actually a valid measure of ability. Then maybe it's time to fix the test itself rather than contextualized scores, that's going to the branch director of elite preps Francisco. And that's a group that gets kids ready to take the. I think that's right. If there's a problem with the eighteen that favors wealthy kids fixed the SAT. Hello. I don't have seen this. The questions on the understand how they don't seem to favor anybody over anyone. Okay. Okay. Right. That's my white privilege speedy right there. I apologize. Wow. That's the answer, you get right? I mean, they're already Harvard is already facing a lawsuit because of the Asian American students claimed that they were held to higher admission standards to get into Harvard admitted that they were trying to cut back on the number of Asian students getting is just let the best get in. That's what I think too. Yeah. I know I know if they're making sense doesn't matter if they're Asian or white or black or native American, whatever if they're if they're the best they should be in. Thank you. So that's disproportionately Asian. Well, I'm sorry, the did better than you did. But that's not where we are anymore. So it can't be that way. It's gotta be the playing field has leveled somehow. Wow. Or actually, it's being unlabeled for the right. Of course, the new adversity score is really titled the environmental context dashboard clear. Thank you. It'd be clear that we're calling. Environmental context sport dash pro. That is important. I'm glad you brought that up because I hate to call it the was calling it I don't even really don't don't don't play again. I don't wanna mess. It really is amazing. That we are, you're coming from someplace that supposed to be good to bear home, right stable community working hard to get good grades. Keeping your scores up keeping your community standards that's going to be weighted against you. Right. And there's going to be there's going to be a favoritism given to those who've come from single parent homes, right with high crime areas. They're gonna try to get more of those kids into the school then they used. And I don't know that they do or not have a when you apply. You have an essay right where you're from and how bad your life was or how good your life wasn't why you wanna go to school at this particular school is not supposed to be part of what gives you that extra weight to come to school, the school. Yeah, I think so twos. Yeah. I mean just the best should be the best dudes. Period. Though, little, okay? Well, you go to good go over here. Sadly, we're just not married basis site anymore, and it can't be that way. No. Just can't be that way now because diversity is the altar at which we worship. And so, that's, that's what we pay more attention to now. Rather than just whoever merits getting into the school, you get into the school. Nope, sorry. We're going to have to wait it against those getting into the school in higher numbers. Now. It's amazing. But there's a lot of amazing amazing thing there are there. We talked about this on the news and white matters last night. The man who was a arrived at the hospital in the emergency room was severe domino pain. And a nurse. Didn't really consider it an emergency because he was obese and he'd stop taking his blood pressure medicine. Well in reality, the man was pregnant. Was pregnant. Yeah. And he was in labor and about to give birth. And they didn't realize it in time in and the baby was born stillborn. To this man, so well, one of the problems tragic case one of the problems with, with, that was the I don't know what has to happen to make a change. But he was still listed on all his medical papers as being a man. Right. He had got his Matt. Nobody was his trans attorneys man. No, he he identifies as a man. And so he is a man Jeffey the fact that he's got female parts. Those female parts gave birth to a baby. So why would you even mention that, by the way? I'm not really man. I'm biologically woman. I've got who the paperwork that say that, and I have a uterus inside of me and there might be something in my uterus, baby. That's causing me this pain. I don't know. I don't know. Don't you think that somebody has a responsibility to maybe alert the medical professionals that you're not actually a biological man? When you're in for treatment. Yes, that's absolutely. But I didn't forget the story in front of me. But I thought that he, he claimed that he told them. He did claim that he held them, right? But all the paperwork that all the paper says is a man, right? Right. And then. Do about it. I'm just well I mean you gotta tell the truth. You've got to say, look, I'm I'm biologically woman, but I as a man science denier. To the medical community. You'd be a science tonight here in our world. Our world world, you would be yes. So the New England Journal of medicine which at one point was a fairly. Prestigious. At one point I thought it will was each. Here's what the they wrote. He was rightly classified as a man. In the medical records and appears masculine but that classification through us off from considering his actual medical needs. So the New England Journal medicine did say, hey, let's pay attention to what they biologically, and scientifically really are. No, it said medical for medical purposes. Instead for medical purposes. It says, hey, don't be fooled by the fact that it's a man. They might have some women problems. Wait, what? No. Kids. He was not rightly identified as a man because he's a woman, okay this is absurd. And people are going to be killed because of have and just died as a result of it, can we stop this madness. And get back to reality that ever happen. I don't know. I, I don't know. Certainly seems like it would have to for health, right? Come on each snow absurd. In the article. It says moments later, the men delivered a stillborn, baby. No moments later, the woman delivered a stillborn baby. I don't know if I could work with you. That you have. Can't get pregnant and can't deliver babies. Okay. Are you the league's little medicine Ellison? I don't think so. I have more credibility. Believable, just deny yes, we're supposed to just tonight. Just tonight science, just tonight, science and be, you know, it might be things are a little different. That's all. Okay. Just, hey, if a man shows up, just don't assume they've just got problems. They might have women price and vice versa. Well, no, that's madness. It's madness. That's, but that's the kind of madness, our society has slipped into and I'm telling you is this is dangerous now. It's dangerous Abadie lost their life because because of it because you're not being real with people, right? I you know, you can identify whatever you want. Go ahead. I don't care, you know, call yourself a lizard person if you want to, I don't, I don't care what would you go to the hospital? They're going to need to know your actual biology because they're going to original, they're going to start thinking, hey, well, what's wrong with the lizard, right? We've got a lizard, the lizard. Somebody called the zoo,.

Harvard New England Journal of medicin director Hugh New England Journal medicine Jeffey Matt Ellison
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

09:35 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Whatever is on your mind mother or not here on free talk, live and. Yeah, rich. Let's go straight to the phones. I don't have any housekeeping to do. So we'll go to Sarah, call an and from New Mexico. Sarah, you're on free talk live. Air fare anyway. Happy. My. Yes. That is the net necessarily for sure. And they're yeah. This whole. Is the tight to make us ill. You know? So that they could sell more pharmaceutical meditation. I'm convinced. The vast majority of Americans are probably getting all the salt they need in their diet. I mean, I I'm just guessing here most processed foods, that's foods box. That's foods that you buy at a restaurant foods that come in boxes that come in cans foods that come in bottles. The vast majority of food that's not fresh produce more, perhaps fresh meats. Is already got in it. But the fear that you're supposed to get little table saw at you know, you're supposed to have low salt diet is all but the stance because the problem is is that when we lack salt we have to be a stop making proper amount stomach, Kathy. Jairo high boat chlorof- Gusset chlorate actually, come from the sodium chloride. Yup. We have improper food digestion, especially elderly. They always emphasize low salt for the senior citizens and they have improper of digested because they are not make it a stomach ethic. That's the problem. May well be right on that. I'll take your word for Sarah. Do the call the numbers? Eight five five four five zero three seven three three. It's eight fifty five four fifty free cleared out the phone lines for you. But we've still got somebody on dischord. And if you wanna get sound as good as Alex does here discord, you can go to the get the discord app, discord dot freetalklive dot com, and among other things we have these call in rooms. Plus, there's this great chat going on all the wonderful folks that you've heard on the air. Here are also chatting away, there are dozens of them in there any given time, and I think hundreds and hundreds signed up to talk. So you never know who's just lurking about this Kurdia this court yet. It's gonna Alex Cullen in from Indiana. Alex, you're on free talk live. Just a couple of things that got brought out from some of our discussions earlier. First off when when we're talking to people, we always have our own initial view of the topic that's at hand. But what when I ever talked to someone I rarely find is woman. I say something different or they say something different to me. We don't say. Okay. Well, what made you look at what you're talking about that way? So I had a cousin who never wore seat belt. And he's now saying, well, I if I were seatbelt in this crash, I had I would be nice right now the car hit me. Right. But what he's not looking at is that. Okay. You're right. Your specific scenario you were better off because of what you did in. I don't know. I'm throwing number here. Ninety five percent of scenarios. You would have been better off wearing a seatbelt. I'd say you're numbers pretty close as a firefighter. So you're numbers pretty close to on target. You know for me, I think that people should wear seatbelts. I certainly wear seat belt and my child where's the seat belt? My wife. Where's the seat belt people in my family, where seep hope because I think that seatbelts, you know, in the vast majority of instances are going to keep you safe run a car. However, what I would say is if somebody chooses not to wear seat belt that should be their business. I do think there's the remote chance that they might lose control of their vehicle by being shot through the window. I don't know how much that's gonna make a, you know, a deadly crash any less deadly because they're probably already traveling through the window. But yeah, there's a remote chance that it could affect another person. Well, the thing that I always considered with motorcycle helmets was I'm more likely to die. If I'm not wearing a motorcycle accident more likely to be paralyzed in heaven closed head injury. If I am wearing a motorcycle incident. A motorcycle helmet after then. So I would rather die than Lyon a hell hospital bed for a long long time while so. Really? Alex when you're talking decade. Yeah. I mean that is not essentially the point of the topic. I was that was an example. Yup. Well, what really got me on here was when we're talking about. All right. Why why do vaccine start as a child? Right. Why do they give them to kids when they're newborns? Yeah. Okay. Why do we start? Well, it's because. Starting at time equals zero your chance of disease is. Someone constant, but. Differs through different stages of life. Sure. But. The the faster you can become. Immune or. You know, one less person. Yeah. Because vaccines, that's why they have this look for this herd immunity thing, right? They absolutely there's they bring up to some level. And then some higher levels created by the fact that basically the the the disease is radically did in some manner way, we call that hurt immunity, but it's not really a radically as radical within a certain population. Smallpox eradication smallpox eradication worldwide. Well, unless unless somehow one of the great scientists are the folks at the CDC somehow manage to bring him back at this point. There are worldwide a small interesting. So so at that point the question is do you want to destroy the samples he used to make vaccines? So that the thing can never escape the lab and live again, I don't know. That's that's dangerous. Because if you get something similar, then everything they could take what we already have and say, okay, if we change it a little bit. That if you've got the idea of how to make a vaccine that you probably will be okay, if smallpox ever rears its head again, I don't think it's like it's not like is gonna kill the whole population. If it suddenly shows up they're going to be a few cases, and somebody's gonna get all upset and go into a tizzy imagine. That's something this tizzy over the measles in the measles is not only as the measles. No big deal. If you get it. But if you have the me as those year less likely to die of cancer chicken. How do you do the math on those probability? I'm not familiar with that. But measles, isn't chicken pox measles. I mean, maybe I wouldn't call it a deadly disease. But it certainly has the possibility of being all we can be delays like one point five percent deadly in the third world. But then again, the medical care in the third world is a lot worse. How bad is the flu? I think it's I don't think it's a tiny fraction of a percent. Really completely depends on the strain. Okay. It also depends on where you are. Because if you get close to close to death in America, there are a lot more likely to be able to take the hospital and just give you I v fluids. Which in a lot of cases will make you not die sit down the rain for someplace dehydration IV fluids will fix you. And a lot of people die of dehydration. And this is where a lot of studies that are out there that are just, you know, kind of confined in their own active worlds are not widely known by the public in that can that's where I usually go. And look and say, oh, here's a good question. Well, has someone answered it or if somebody being paid millions of dollars to try and answer it, and then you know, obviously to look at the lean they had them. But it's pretty obvious though, that the average person is gonna hit, you know, or New England Journal medicine, or whatever are they're all our, you know, I'm not saying that it's not bad. It's bad than you. Do it. I think it's awesome that you're doing. But I mean, those things are made for public consumption and people are starting to go. But. Should we be? We should be. Or should we be looking at the things that? We think are probably the most accurate. We should five four five zero three seven three three live. Would you like to hang? Traders.

measles Alex Cullen Sarah closed head injury CDC New Mexico Kathy Indiana New England Journal medicine flu Lyon America Ninety five percent five percent
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"It's not just calories. It's the signals. So Kitone Shane the way that genes are expressed. If they literally alter these so-called histone deacetylases inhibitors, the so called H tax people can refer to them when we exercise we affect these same. H jacks. Lot of the oncology and cancer research is focused on these metabolic, signaling hubs for how they protect our DNA and so forth. What turns out that a lot of things in food affect these as well, including key tones. So key tones offer unique signaling properties to our metabolic machinery in our DNA that other macronutrients don't and so going back to where the hell do I start would I benefit from Kito you might be sending sending unique signaling to yourselves. So that you don't get that weight loss associated suppression in your metabolic rate that leads to this yo yo effect because we know if you just look at calories the biggest loser studied, did you guys see that came out a few years ago? It was tracking for you. Yeah. So these these people their wages bounced around right because of this so-called suppression in your metabolic rate New England Journal medicine actually did a study where they tracked individuals for twelve. Weeks. I said, okay, we're going to here's your energy expenditure on a given day. Okay. We're going to drop that by forty percent. Okay. So it's just like a pretty aggressive low calorie diet, they tracked him for eighteen months. The diet was only twelve weeks. So just three months, right? Over eighteen months later, they still had a suppression in their metabolic rate and all these hormones, the Gretl in adiponectin, the lamb leptin were all suppressed, they're all out of whack some were higher than you know. But yeah, they were they were misaligned shall we say? So we don't necessarily see that with Kito thoughts. What I'm saying? Now, of course, I want to just throw this out there. I'm very biased because I've covered interviewed a lot of ketogenic experts. I've personally benefited from this when I was younger put a lot of action sports football. My older brother beat me up. Pretty good often. So I'm worried about head trauma and things like that. So that's why that's my bias. When just wanna throw that out there. So a lot of people listening are athletes, and they're probably pretty concerned about going on Kito because there's you know, some people say that if you eat too much protein on Akito diet, it'll knock you out of. Ketosis? So first off is that true. And then the second thing I want to add onto that is like depending on the individual. Let's say they're pretty active what Graham propound of protein, would you suggest that this individual should try and intake Mia? These are beautiful questions. Well, I think that idea that if you have protein on Akito diet, it will kick you out of ketosis old science. Yeah. And a lot of people talked about that. So what they're referring to is this process known as glucose, Neo Genesis. And that Z the body's ability to create loops from a new because let's face it all three of us sitting here right now, we're both burning sugar fats and carbs, maybe key tones, depending upon what you had this morning last night. It just what we're talking about. With Kito says, it's a matter of proportions it's causing more of your muscle tissue. More of your brain to utilize these fats Glucon agendas. If you're in ketosis glucose, Neo Genesis that that is making glucose from a new is happening. You can't fight. It. You want that to happen because your red blood cells parts of your dream.

Kito Ketosis Kitone Shane New England Journal medicine football Graham Mia eighteen months forty percent three months twelve weeks
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"You had a forty one percent lower hazard of death. So under the umbrella of a Mediterranean style diet, the more plant based you went better you did. And that's reinforced on multiple studies, including the Epoc study, which is a huge respective or sunny about retreatment, health and. And in that study this one analysis like seventy thousand people in for every standard deviation increase in from Mitchell consumption. You had you had a fourteen percent reduction in mortality just supporting more plants is someone you brought that point out because I loved that about the vegetarian subset from pretty mad. I site that frequently because I I do think it's a great study. I mean end it was of course, published in the New England Journal medicine correcton. It was one of the biggest, you know, studies. We haven't driven, but what did the so on the panel with you was one of the creators of the party med study. And what did he have to say to you mentioning the subset the vegetarian subset because I find that interesting. I feel like that's that's hard to deny. I mean, he seemed generally supportive of that fem-. Yeah. Eating more vegetables and fruits is helpful. I mean, I don't wanna put words in mouth. But I think like we're saying like you're saying in the beginning, our then diagrams really overlapped a lot. And we're kind of you know, quibbling a little bit about ten percent doesn't I think he was completely supportive of that point. I will be honest for the parts of the panel that I heard as as we mentioned I didn't hear anyone anyone trying to say plant based diet wasn't healthful. There was no cardiologists at all of ace e who wasn't giving in this. This is the most ideal. I did hear just some bits and pieces of some of the cardiologist mentioning well, maybe in some populations in some people Mediterranean may be more sustainable because they still wanna eat animal products battle think there was any argument about land utrition not being. Very helpful high agree. I think you know, whether it should be eighty percent plant based or ninety percent plant based people may have a little bit of push back and forth about that. But I completely agree with the general theme in my personal opinion. I think if you're cardiologists in recommending process, read music, this point your heads in the sand. Like, you really are not paying any attention to the data angry an anagram for as much as we have said and people say doctors don't know about utrition, which is true. I just have to reiterate for all the cardiologists who are listening that. I, and I know you agree. I was so impressed with how much cardiologists do care about nutrition this weekend at ACC, I think that prevention was a hot topic and everyone was really excited for your talk. And I think that there is definitely a huge shift happening that white. It was very exciting agree. I mean, we why did we go into medicine? I mean, basically most people go into medicine because they want to help people. Right. And you know, they're. Medications that help people are procedures had helped people, and there are Trish in in revenge that help people they can all help people. So it falls into the same bucket of our whole reason we went into medicine in the first place. Absolutely. All right. So keep going with Mediterranean. So so far, we have pretty mad subset. Okay. And then there was this cool. Greek epic perspective coat or study. That's from the very very big epic study in this Greek subset of his perspective cohort. They looked at twenty three thousand people filed them for like eight and a half years and not surprisingly the higher of the Mediterranean diet score. You ate the the lower your mortality and the higher on the Mediterranean scores. Fewer animal products in more plants. But then they said, okay, let's look at the individual aspects of the Mediterranean score to see which aspects were driving the lower mortality, what was driving will moderate alcohol intake was driving. It. Low meat consumption was driving high match double consumption was driving high fruit consumption was high monounsaturated saturated fat ratio, which means war plant products, lagoon consumption, serial dairy, had minimal impact in this analysis and actually fishing seafood had a trend or increase in mortality..

New England Journal medicine retreatment Trish forty one percent fourteen percent eighty percent ninety percent ten percent
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The AL. I pick things Genesis communications network for making the show happen Pippen's Daniel, who's working the dials and Vic thanks for tuning in. We really do. Appreciate it. We'll get the follow us on Twitter at your Dalia, Dr delegates. All right. Really kind of freaked out about this one study that came out. Saying newly prescribed ADHD medications for attention deficit hyperactivity can cause psychosis. Now, of course, parents are like what what what I'm gonna make my child psychotic by the medication. No, no, no. It's not that bad. It's not that bad. But it does mean we need to have a conversation. So researchers found. That certain medications that young adults kids even other adults. May cause symptoms like paranoia. Hallucinations, delusions and hearing voices, and the researchers found that patients who had been newly prescribed amphetamines like Adderall and violence or more likely to develop psychosis. Then those wet received a prescription for methyl seminaries, like your Ritalin and conserva. That's a study published Wednesday. The New England Journal medicine. And they say it's at a rate of one per six hundred sixty patients doubt, that's rare. But it's still to me one too many. And experts are saying patients need to know that there's an increased risk of their child exhibiting signs of psychosis. They said they also note the increased risk was only for those who recently began treatment or the new amphetamine prescription for ADHD and that those who have taken the drug and tolerated. Well, are probably in the clear they say if someone has been on Adderall, they're tolerating it. Well, it's helpful for their symptoms, and they're taking it as prescribed Dr Lauren Moran. Assistant professor at Harvard said there's really not much cause for concern. They say still you have to think about it from a public health scare if it's a fraction of a percent of millions of people. Then that means there could be thousands of additional cases of psychosis across the US that could be a serious problem. Now. She said at the beginning of our study in two thousand five a patient at a fifty fifty chance of getting Adderall or Ritalin. Now, there's been a huge increase in Atarot prescriptions over the course of the study and almost four times as many prescriptions for Admiral does he has a number of students will psychosis grew. They look further into the issue, and they found a common factor. Among the cases seem to be phetamine prescriptions for ADHD. Now somebody's asking about ADHD medications and these shooters like Adam Lanza. Jared homes. Jared laughter. Nick. Trying to forget all the names. But Atalanta, I'm not sure what medication. He was on. We they really don't release the medications and the names of the medications as liberally as I thought they would. But we'll we'll talk about that. Because I've seen some people think that maybe some of these children have a propensity towards psychosis. Which is why they may exhibit some form of ADHD and get treated we'll talk about that in a second so determine whether there really was a higher risk of psychosis. According to NBC news with the infanta means Dr Moran and her colleagues turned to two large commercial insurance claims databases, which included more than five million patients with a stimulant prescription rather than looking at the patients and seeing if they start to have these issues what they did is. Billeted insurance claims and the insurance claims alive the diagnosis, and it's rare for a doctor to put a psychotic episode diagnosis, if a patient did it have it which means there's some sort of a quote, unquote, psychotic diagnosis ED's probably really happening. And so the research is focused on patients H thirteen to twenty five who started either taking a means or methylphenidate from January one two thousand four to the end of September of two thousand fifteen now there were over two hundred twenty one thousand patients in the study one hundred ten we're taking the methylphenidate one hundred ten taking vitamins and the methylphenidate they work similar lakes of the methylphenidate concentrates more on the dopamine receptors, the resume phetamine stimulates the up an effort and the epinephrine. And the new cases of psychosis were identified in one hundred six patients taking the methylphenidate compared to two hundred thirty seven taking those so nearly double. Now, they say that the FDA has been aware of the issue of psychosis. This fact in two thousand seven Gordon MC news, the federal agency mandated that ADHD medication labels include warnings about potential psychiatric and heart issues. We talked about that years ago. Now in Dutch Moran's experience, and she's also a psychiatrist she said the ADHD patients hospitalized for psychosis usually recovered in a couple of weeks, but some it took him over two months. Now, she's not suggesting ADHD medications are dangerous, but she wants to raise awareness physicians need to know about it families need to know about it. And then if we're gonna digress. What the diagnose somebody with ADHD don't be doing willy nilly? Now, we've talked about ADHD, and we've talked about these medications and how they work. Let's talk about like the numbers. I mean, how what are we talking about? Well, the CDC says that the percent of children estimated to have us. So we're talking about children here. Can change over time. But the American psychiatric association and the says there's about five percent of children currently with ADHD. But other studies have said it's much higher in two thousand sixteen. They estimated about six point one million children had attention deficit. They said approximately nine point four percent of kids that were between the two and seventeen years of age diagnosed with it. They were went up and diagnosis. The older you were so children aged two to five. There was up to three hundred eight thousand children between the ages of six and eleven that two point four million children diagnosed between the ages of twelve and seventeen three point three million. Now, this has increased by eleven percent. They said from two thousand eleven two thousand twelve. They say the number of young children who had ADHD who are about two to five years old increased by more than fifty percent from the surveys. Now, a lot of people ask well, we we is ADHD the only issue they have or is it one of a variety of issues while according to this report nearly two of three children with ADHD had another mental emotional or behavioral disorder, according to CDC one out of children with ADHD had a behavioral or conduct issue one out of three had anxiety and some had autism treads depression. So ADHD may not so much be a diagnosis. We've talked about this. But it may be a symptom of something else. So let's say you have a kid. That's ginny. And the fidgeting they don't want to pay attention. They may have anxiety. Maybe they're fidgeting because they're scared. Maybe they're bullied maybe they just don't want to be there. The kid doesn't want to be there. He's not going to sit still with his hands. Folded. I mean, have you ever tried to hold your cat? Make the cat sitting nicely in one place. They'll do it on the road. But if you force them, they they want to skedaddle. You know? One of my family members. I had to take it in for parent teacher conference and the teacher he was really young and the teacher would give Eminem's as treat. And. Have you pass out Eminem's? And I guess my family member was just kind of like going crazy for those up. And he was hungry. He really liked sugar and he was getting excited about that. Other than that he'll sit and play video game for like four or five hours without you know, Lincoln, and I so, you know, we need to kind of assess what it is are these kids hungry are they malnourished. Do they have poor sleep? Are they not paying attention in class because they share a bed with two other siblings, and the siblings kick each other or whatever in the middle of the night. So their utmost the night. And then when they're, you know, the next day, they can't keep their eyes open. How many of you guys have ever been in a business meeting at work? Where you could barely keep your eyes open because it's boring as hell does that mean, you have ADD? So we have a lot of things driving more and more diagnosis now mind, you if somebody really has attention deficit, really truly has it where they cannot pay attention. They cannot focus and they need a stimulant or something stimulated their epinephrine dopamine. To help them concentrate. There are people out there. That's what they need. But I think we have an over diagnosis of children because we just aren't aren't spending the time digging deeper into what it is. You know, one child may might have gotten in trouble for not gonna to great on the test. So he's sitting there in class freaking out that he's gonna get whooped again. You know, and then the.

ADHD psychosis Adderall Dr Lauren Moran methylphenidate Twitter stimulant epinephrine CDC dopamine Jared laughter Hallucinations Genesis communications US Eminem New England Journal medicine Dutch Moran American psychiatric associati Assistant professor Vic
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"This is a big, no, no in scientific, communication and publication. But also, the increased risk this alleged increased risk of breast cancer was not statistically significant. It wasn't statistically significant in my business. You don't get to go into publication and say, gee, you know, we didn't get any significant results. Here we found something that looks problematic or interest. And maybe we need to do more research, but not significant, and that's what really I gave us pause. Why are they heralding this strange finding for what purpose, and why are we wanting to scare an audience in advance of actually offering the real data? And that's what got are skeptical neurons flaring, I wanna come back because we're going to go really deep on the difference between absolute risk relative risk the difference between the versus this e plus MPA gr-. I wanna go deep on that. But I wanna pause here from into ask you, an honest question, which is you hear this, and it stinks of conspiracy theory, except that I'm the most anti conspiracy theory guy out there, I typically attribute to incompetence rather than malice. I mean like it's Oswald killed Kennedy. There's enough to as about it. We don't want to believe that we wanna create a bigger narrative because Kennedy was so significant Oswald was so insignificant. But the reality of it is conspiracy theories almost never hold up was there conspiracy. I mean, I'm using the word loosely, and I'm trying to I'm asking in the loaded way. But when you look back at it through the lens of what we know today. It seems improbable that this cluster could've taken they were behaving. Just like scientists who went into this research with a strong belief that HR tea is harmful to women and in particular increases, the risk of breast cancer, shock whistle. Who is the cardiologists who led the women's health initiative had published an article in? I don't remember what heading nineteen Ninety-six basically saying it's time to bring the HR bandwagon to a halt the HR bandwagon. These too many women are are on H R T. This is not a good thing. And it's time to. Stymie to stop the rolling bandwagon. So he himself clearly head some kind of bias going into the direction of this study. I don't think it's a it's not a conspiracy you as a reader of mistakes were made. But not by me know that when you go into a research project with a belief that you really are. Sure of you see in the data what you expect to see in the data. I mean, I remember years ago, the first book I ever wrote, which was on anger in those days people thought that alters were caused by suppressed anger, and I would go and look at these journal articles these were not malevolent people or fraudulent researchers. But they so deeply believed that suppressed anger causes ulcers that they would say, well, we didn't actually get a significant result here. But it's looking like, that's what it would be. If it were significant. I mean, really let me two things to that. If I can I a the article says, this is the two thousand two article. Of the women's health initiative says that this increased risk of breast cancer almost reached nominal statistical significance. I don't know of any other article anywhere that states that statistically significant doesn't mean it's true. But it means the finding has a less than one in twenty chance of being a coincidence. So it's worthy of investigation. But almost reached nominal statistical significance. That sounds like you're straining to reach a conclusion that you didn't reach, but there had to be other accomplices here. So on some level the journals had to at least make a case here, by the way out of curiosity. Why did this end up in jam not New England Journal medicine, the initial publication, and he they've published in both JAMA and the New England Journal of medicine, but the first one I one of this JAMA Jammie accepted at I and JAMA came out with the press. Sra lease. I don't know of any other situation where JAMA or the knowingly journal came out with a press release before the published article was available to doctors to read. Well, and you saw course in our chapter on this Robert Langer writing last year why he waited so long. We don't know. But he was one of the investigators who revealed the background story about this. There were forty principal..

JAMA Robert Langer Oswald Kennedy New England Journal of medicin principal New England Journal medicine
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on 710 WOR

"So that's a cost issue cost then. Yeah. Less end up in the emergency room and who wants to be an emergency room. Nobody wants to be in the emergency room, unless there's no other choice, but to go to a hospital, you're more likely to be stuck in an emergency room. And then there's another article this week by Peter Loftus. And this is in the Wall Street Journal, and it's looked at a three decade long study about prostate cancer treatment, and it was a comparison study. So so many men think oh, you don't need cancer. Are let's say so many men are led to believe I mean, historically were all led to believe if you have cancer, you should get out of your body's you get a treated out of your body a cancer in your body's not going to do anything useful. And for some reason men have been pushed to do nothing about cancer. Well, here's a study a three. Decade-long study that looked at treatment versus no treatment for advanced prostate cancer in men, they looked at what happened to the men who got treatment versus didn't get treatment. And the study suggested that the benefits were in the men who got treated for advanced cancer. And it was published in the New England Journal medicine. The study started to see three decades have started before nineteen eighty nine and they'd go on to note that prostate cancers and number two cause of cancer deaths in men number one is lung cancer. There's one hundred sixty four thousand cases of prostate cancer in America in nearly thirty thousand men die year.

cancer lung cancer Wall Street Journal Peter Loftus New England Journal medicine America three decades three decade
More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds

Radio Surgery

01:11 min | 2 years ago

More men with low-risk prostate cancer are forgoing treatment, study finds

"And it's looked at a three decade long study about prostate cancer treatment, and it was a comparison study. So so many men think oh, you don't need cancer. Are let's say so many men are led to believe I mean, historically were all led to believe if you have cancer, you should get out of your body's you get a treated out of your body a cancer in your body's not going to do anything useful. And for some reason men have been pushed to do nothing about cancer. Well, here's a study a three. Decade-long study that looked at treatment versus no treatment for advanced prostate cancer in men, they looked at what happened to the men who got treatment versus didn't get treatment. And the study suggested that the benefits were in the men who got treated for advanced cancer. And it was published in the New England Journal medicine. The study started to see three decades have started before nineteen eighty nine and they'd go on to note that prostate cancers and number two cause of cancer deaths in men number one is lung cancer. There's one hundred sixty four thousand cases of prostate

Cancer Lung Cancer New England Journal Medicine Three Decades Three Decade
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Exams, but you're never actually objectively assess for your surgical skill. The only time I personally was ever really assessed was I was interviewing for residency program, and they had me play the board game operation, which apparently I passed that exam. But this is a great question and really important issue. Because in the New England Journal medicine two thousand thirteen there was really a landmark study that showed that this is not rocket science more skilled surgeon has better results. So those patients will do better. But the problem is that if we're not measuring surgical skill at any point, then we don't know how patients are being affected. And so we can't intervene and provide additional educational resources and training to the people that need it because we don't know that they needed currently. Well, nevertheless, we know we have sergent. So there is some way we get from point A where you're just, you know, hopefully, opening and closing and having that opportunity to you're actually a practicing surgeon now where I wanna go today is as long as you're a practicing surgeon. Everything's great today. You have many new procedures many new devices many new approaches coming down the pike. How do they? Those surgeons learn these new procedures. That's a great question. So yeah, these surgeons who are graduating from residency they're coming in already at handicap because a study in two thousand seventeen show that thirty point seven percent of graduating residents can't operate independently. So you're already starting at kind of a challenging level..

New England Journal medicine seven percent
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"A number of articles that are available to look at the first one is a Virginia. Mom can't find a bra that fits her mess deck Demy, and for those that are possibly unfamiliar. When you go for a mastectomy, and you have the prosthesis the bra that you wear is especially designed bra where the prosthesis fits in a sleeve or a pocket sort of behind the outward part of the bra. And there's a woman in Richmond, Virginia Atlanta. Maiden her mom who is now fifty seven years old had a mastectomy a good number of years ago and her contention is that the bras for women with mastectomies that have a prosthesis in. It really are not all that glamorous. Nothing too sexy to wear and so she has petitioned Victoria's Secret to make a special bra for women that have had breast cancer to fit their prosthesis. And so that these women can feel a bit more beautiful sexy and feel good about themselves. And you know, what I I don't think that is a bad idea. My mother. Who's going to be eighty five next month? Is a survivor of breast cancer twice her left and right, breast and it runs in the family. So from a personal standpoint, I definitely understand this. I know what my mom went through with the prosthesis and the bras and having to get fitted. It really was not a necessarily an easy task for for anyone. So I would say definitely hats off to this lady Atlanta maiden in Richmond, Virginia will see and keep you posted if she gets anywhere. With this Victoria's Secret. All right. Some good news in the world of cancer. The cancer death rate have decreased by nearly twenty percent from their peak twenty years ago says a new study from researchers at the American Cancer Society, the data comes as part of two studies cancer facts and figures two thousand thirteen and cancer statistics two thousand thirteen as well, according to the American Cancer Society leading causes for the dip in the cancer could be less tobacco use. I would definitely say that. As well. As early detection of colorectal cancer, breast, lung and prostate cancer, keep in mind. As far as colon cancer. Goes you want to be screened at fifty and older if you're black? You start at about forty five years old and the best way to screen for colon cancer with a colonoscopy. Now having as I said this before I've done segments on this. I I went for a colonoscopy myself several months ago, it is no big deal. Now, I do these every day of the week Monday through Friday doing colonoscopy is all my patients, and what I've come up with a lot of people hate the bowel prep. That is enough to keep people away taking the bowel prep. I have come up with something which is really nothing new. But I've adopted it we have a special bowel prep where we use Gatorade. And for most individuals. As long as you don't have any underlying kidney problem or electrolyte problems. You can get away fine with this Gatorade prep. And so that's pretty cool. So it's good to know. The cancer rates are definitely heading down. Now in the discussion of colonoscopy says this is a great study. There is a new study published this week in actually last week's New England Journal medicine. A fecal transplant cured serious infection. So what is a fecal transplant? Fecal transplant is we take the stool of one person, hopefully, a healthy person. And you take it in the form of an enema. So you're putting someone else's stool inside your own colon. Now keep in mind there is an infection. And we've talked about this before called clostridium difficile. Sometimes we call it c diff. And this is a infection at takes over typically associated with the intake of antibiotics. See when you take too many antibiotics it wipes out the good bacteria, the cluster difficile takes over and you get this. Unbelievable, diarrhea keeping in mind. It kills fourteen thousand people a year. Die from clustered deficit. And so what they did was this place in the Hague. It was the first study to compare fecal transplant and antibiotics typically anti-biotics or the the treatment of choice for this. Now, the amazing thing is that the Chinese in the fourth century with the first ones to figure out. That you could inject or use fecal material in this particular case people that had food poisoning would ingest. They would eat somebody else's stool, so. That is pretty interesting. And I'm sure you'll be hearing much more about this. As time goes on fecal transplants. All right. Pretty cool. The people in Chicago were going crazy. There is a politician, Ed Burke who has proposed an ordinance that would completely Knicks highly caffeinated energy drinks for everybody. Every single man woman and child will not be able to buy these high energy drinks such as monster full-throttle five hour energy. Now, this is where we have to draw the line where can some politicians say, no, you can't. By a certain product. They may not be. They may not be good for you. They're they're license. Their legal. But I think people just have to bone up and be smarter than that. You you cannot drink four five of these monster, energy drinks and think that nothing's going to happen to you or parents not keeping tabs of what their kids are doing. There's a another politician George Cadenas, and what he wants to do is just prove prevent the the sale of these beverages to anyone under twenty one. Again way, you know, where do we draw the line next? It's going to be McDonald's. I still think while these beverages may not be the best. There has to be some line as far as personal responsibility. And the last last item in the news here. Smartphones are taking over everything there is now an app to detect skin cancer. I mean, where are we going to draw the line here, certainly smartphone apps are inching into the turf of doctors and medical device makers promising the measure heart rate display x Ray images and detect skin cancer who on earth would use an app to detect skin cancer on himself. Now, it's interesting to realize that the best performing app accurately identify cancerous moles ninety eight point one percent of the times and the worst only picked up six point eight. So if you don't think that there's some very -bility quality here, you're crazy. But anyway, these are probably more fun. Fun than anything else. But my God, if you've got a mole on your body or a skin tag that is changing color getting larger for Pete's sake. Go to your doctor and not the apple store to see. What's going on? All right. I'm Joe Galati. Go to our website, your health, I dot com. Stay tuned. We got plenty more. Stay tuned. Isn't it time? We tell our side of the story. I'm Patrick Karachi. I'm Adrian Cortes. And.

colon cancer American Cancer Society Virginia Victoria Atlanta Richmond Adrian Cortes Gatorade New England Journal medicine Joe Galati Patrick Karachi Knicks Ed Burke George Cadenas Chicago McDonald Pete
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Untangle

"Of type two diabetes. How blindness in kidney failure amputations and heart attacks and strokes impotence? And so on that if you get it down with either lifestyle, you generally prevent it in, you know, you know, not how these horrible side effects anymore. And in the case of men with early stage prostate cancer there now been to randomized trials in the New England Journal medicine, and they showed that men with early stage. Prostate cancer did nothing after ten years led as long as those who had surgery radiation, accept these treatments. Often main guys in the most personal ways are often either impotent or and continental boat for no real benefit at huge economic and huge personal costs in turns out that maybe one out of forty nine men as a really aggressive form of early stage. Prostate cancer really does benefit from the surgery radiation with the rest dome and yet at the only choices between doing nothing watchful waiting or doing something. Most guys, you know, they have a tumor growing wanted quote do something about it. Even if the treatment is worse than the disease. Let's take a moment to dive into the Enderlein biological mechanisms. And then I wanna get into what your purse grip shins. unquote are. So let's talk about mechanisms that are common amongst each of these disease cases, well, chronic inflammation, is something that's seen in most of these different diseases. And again, it's not that we're hard wired wrong or that we've evolved wrong. It's just that these mechanisms are designed to be short term that when you get an infection, or if you have an injury, you one inflammation to occur and helps to you know, when you when you sprain your ankle. You don't wanna be walking on it because way hurt so you can it swells up. So you body can get a chance to heal swells up because it brings more blood and more nutrients and helps to bring the the cells in there that can help keep you healthy and prevent infection..

Prostate cancer New England Journal medicine ten years
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Ourselves from invasive of. Digital media and regaining connection at multiple levels. You didn't say gluten no I wouldn't put that on the top of the list. So that's my next question sugar. Gluten it sounds like of sugar Gooden. What's worse? It sounds like in your opinion, sugars worse. Well, by far, I mean that gets us to the grain conversation. And the biggest issue with grain is the effect. It has on our blood sugar quite apart from whether it does or does not contain. Gluten gluten is an issue. That's for sure. So we'd barley and rye should obviously be off the table, quite literally. And you know, interestingly years ago when we published grain brain that was five and a half six years ago now. We we made that statement and recognized that well beyond the one point four percent of Americans who have Celia disease. Many people should really do their best. If not all people, and I believe it should be people avoid gluten because we were we had talked about something called non Celia gluten sensitivity, meaning that you don't have Celia disease. You have none of the genetic markers for none of the antibodies for it. And yet you seem to react negatively to gluten, and we propose this back in two thousand and thirteen and boy that raised a lot of eyebrows and was very disruptive gratefully. Now, a we've as, you know, revised grain brain and are able to leverage like the two thousand seventeen study published in the American Medical Association journal by researchers at Harvard that absolutely validates the notion of non Celia gluten sensitive. Entity, which can cause extra intestinal issues. Meaning well beyond the gut the joints the skin and dare I say, yes, the brain. So when the journal the American Medical says, the Asian really dials in on this a couple of years after you've written a book about it. That was a little bit a little bit eruptive. Well, good the more the more the better a lot of it. Well, you know grain brain, and now the revision very much challenged and challenge the status quo. Thank goodness. I mean, the status quo is not great as you know, just recently. It was announced that for the first time American life expectancy in both men and women is declining. So something's wrong. We haven't changed genetically. But in terms of our metabolism that has changed dramatically by exogenous factors over which we have control our lifestyle choices. So this is important information. It is extant information. So what is the latest and greatest side since Green Bay. You. You mentioned that on report from the what else is new out there that strongly and one of the things that grain brain was all over that some science that we didn't have access to although we certainly recognized the relationship between blood sugar, and even diabetes and brain degeneration that was published back in two thousand and twelve in September in the New England Journal medicine what we now know is that this relationship is far more aggressive than we had figured out in the past that you need to do everything you can to not become even close to being a diabetic so diabetes. Type two diabetes is really powerfully influential in terms.

gluten sensitivity Celia sugar Gooden diabetes New England Journal medicine American Medical Association the American Medical Green Bay Harvard four percent six years
"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"new england journal medicine" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"We maybe don't fully understand all of that. Why do some people who smoke two packs a day get lung cancer within two or three decades, and some can continue until they die of something, you know, not tobacco related, and so people can point to those other outliers and. Sort of say that this is safe or perhaps the harms aren't really known. But so I read I read in like, I know it's it's a big piece, and I can't remember I think it was the New England Journal medicine. It was like some public health person said like with with respect to smoking cigarettes like people come for the nicotine, and they died from the tar. So is there a way to make cigarettes healthier? I mean does that the whole push behind e cigarettes is there, or at least in theory. Right. Well, Right. that's. Well, that's I went absolutely want to talk about. I'm not going to have much to say, unfortunately, because I don't think there is a whole lot known about it yet. I think you know, the tobacco industry has gained enough of a reputation for itself to sort of be a little cynical about any product that they put on the market. That's in fact, safe even when they say, it's safe, quote, unquote safe. So yeah, I suspect that there are lower percentages of of certain toxic compounds, and there's probably higher amounts of other ones that we don't know about yet and don't know the effects of yet. So we really need to do the research. I think in and understand it more fully to to be able to say anything about it one way or the other. I will I'm fascinated and this is going to be anecdotal. But I'm amazed at how quickly. Jewel captured youth. And so this is giving them my three kids are twelve and a half almost fifteen and almost seventeen if smokers pass them on the street smoking cigarettes, they act as if they're monsters. I mean, truly we have taught kids smoking cigarettes is the worst thing in the world, my kids, I think would rather do crystal meth than than touch tobacco, but juuling has become unbelievably popular and unbelievably quickly in this same population that I mean, I can't say strong enough. How much I've seen my kids in their friends hate on tobacco. But but sort of very very quickly transition to like Oba juuling is different and enjoy which means they clearly it's been marketed. Well, I mean, they weren't getting this message from us. So what do we do about that? Well, that's that's tricky. I mean as a as a researcher. I don't like to go beyond evidence to support. Right. So I think as an advocate as certainly you can try and get ahead of this and trion at least make sure people understand that. We don't have a clear understanding of what the harmful effects might be. But you know, how well that's going to sell I'm somewhat heartened by the fact that it seems like the FDA at least, and this is even under the Trump administration seems to be acting in ways that it took much longer. Yeah. To sort of do for traditional demand. That at least people are trying to get ahead of the problem waiting until it's way way way way too. Yeah. Like the flavored. Yes. Yes. Exactly. And I think it's because we've been burned so many times before with this, right? I mean with labor tobacco in the past with Virginia Slims, and like other ways that these have been marketed to children and women, and you know, the really a master at the marketing and getting these things out. So I want looks. Let's transition I wanna talk about you know, what we can do to help people quit smoking. And then I'd love to even go broader and talk about your some houses this been adopted sort of a public health standpoint. But what do we know evidence wise about good ways to help people quit smoking other than just telling them quit. Yes. So there's really different ways to think about this. I sort of led a little while ago by saying really the best way is to prevent largely at a lesson and young adults to start smoking in the first place and actually a lot of the strategies we have our. Most effective in that age range, but just to start with those who are currently smoking..

New England Journal medicine Oba juuling nicotine juuling Virginia Slims researcher Jewel FDA three decades