30 Burst results for "Neurosis"

"neurosis" Discussed on Deleuze and Guattari Quarantine Collective

Deleuze and Guattari Quarantine Collective

04:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"neurosis" Discussed on Deleuze and Guattari Quarantine Collective

"Already been produced and if that's the case we need to step away from the idea. Oedipus is a thing that prieto poll is like a a real thing that we need to actually talk about how these things function and how it all works get really to the material realities of psychiatry guilty on all three all right cool. I'm going to close the recording. I should probably closed out before. I think all of you for joining as always phenomenal discussions. Exciting i think all of you for coming every week next week. We'll be diving into a process now which is quite nine which starting to get into it. Further what. We're talking about here today. Which is great. So thank all of you for joining us. Look like Ooh ooh Ooh.

The Concept Of Metabolic Flexibility With Robb Wolf

20 Minute Fitness

06:11 min | 2 months ago

The Concept Of Metabolic Flexibility With Robb Wolf

"Let's dive a bit deeper into metabolic health in general. I would say the us stephanie. Facing metabolic health. Dem's it's become so so tough that you know. Diabetes is on the rise diabetes type two and obesity is on the rise and aloft. It can be let back to metabolic flexibility or the lack of it. Maybe can talk about more about the concept actually pollick expolit the actually means and why it is important. Yeah being metabolic flexible in in kind of a textbook definition really speaks to the ability to use a variety of different fuel sources that mainly really carbohydrate and fat though although by extension ketone very seamlessly with with little drama little difficulty really not a big change in in performance or perception. My wife is an example of somebody who's very metabolic flexible. She can go kito goes in. She goes out no headache. Lethargy no problems She can eat a fair amount of carbs and doesn't suffer. You know a really crazy blood. Sugar excursion she doesn't get like blood. Sugar crashes unless she really you know if she a ghost for the extra large mexican meal of beans and rice and tortillas and you know and right and then she can feel kinda rough from that like she can overdo it but she needs to really try to do that and in researching some material for my second book wired to eat. We did some side by side. Comparisons where i would eat say fifty grams of carbohydrate from white rice. She would eat the same amount. She's a good thirty or forty pounds lighter than i am but she would still her blood. Sugar would over a two hour period of time. Never really get above about one hundred and fifteen hundred twenty you know. Throughout the course of that whole experience was mind would top off round one. Ninety one ninety five. I would then suffer. Really cloud rafic crash blurred vision cognitive problems. I mean i was. I was kind of a disaster on that. And so this was you know it was cool in that it gave a little bit more concrete explanation for what i'd seen clinically. Which is that. This person seems to run great on carbs. This person doesn't and you know here's there's kind of like an actual yeah and just to be clear. You're not diabetic. North korea pre-diabetic new. But i think if i ate carbs pretty consistently i would get there rather rather rapidly. Yeah or or the minimum. I would suffer a lot of deleterious health effects. Light like a a vision problems and and whatnot. Yeah yeah so. How do you explain now. Like metabolic flexibility. Like how does it cure or is it just something that some people have in some. Don't i not entirely sure. I think that there's multiple factors at play here for sure. Genetics is a piece of this. People who have more of the emily's gene more frequency of the emily's gene seemed to do better with carbohydrates. They seem to digest them better but they also have a more favourable insulin response. It seems to keep the insulin. Or the blood glucose levels within tighter parameters and. Here's an interesting thing that i For me it was kind of this. This pretty deep inside. I don't know if it is for other people but an individual like myself to have good blood glucose levels after he reasonably low carb like probably below fifty grams of total carbs. Day sometimes more. Like if i'm really active or whatnot but it in that situation. Abbott pretty consistent blood glucose response throughout the day. People were very metabolic flexible or very insulin. Sensitive they looked like i look like eating significant amounts of carbs. And that's really the big difference there in the people who eat significant amounts of carbs and don't suffer the blood sugar crashes which then lead into the over over consumption of food writ. Large i think is where we kind of see the distinction between folks Twenty years ago. I was definitely a bit indie. Insulin hypothesis camp. I think over the over the course of time. I've i've come to the conclusion to. Yeah chronically elevated. Insulin levels are definitely a problem but insulin. In and of itself is not the primary driver of of Say type two diabetes and insulin resistance and whatnot you kind of a classic gary tops approach I don't buy into that but at the same time ni- fully on board with say like it fits your macrophages crowd. That will just say so. Long as composition doesn't really matter you just need to keep control of your portions and a free living world free living population. How you keep control of portions is really important. Not that many people have the discipline or the neuroses to do basically like a figure competitors lifestyle like that. That's a big lift for a lot of folks and so finding a way that people can spontaneously match caloric intake and output. I think is kind of where the ticket is. And that's where people kind of find own their their metabolic flexibility optimum belay yet. He asked a really good question. I did a poor job of answering it at you. Know what is metabolic flexibility. What goes into a defining it genetic so definitely a big piece. The gut microbiome appears to be a big piece. The caveat to that is we know it's important. I don't think very many people have any idea what to do to improve that. Like probiotics works for some people pre baddeck fiber work for others and for some people all of those absolute disaster and do nothing. So i think there's a lot of Charlatanism that goes around the gut microbiome. We know absolutely that. It's important. But i think the only thing that we can really hang our hat on is if we do something and has a clinical outcome of improving gut else and improving metabolic flexibility. That's great but we're not really at a great predictive place with that like i. I think there's a lot of goofiness that on the testing and whatnot. There is some lesser known or considered things like iron overload particularly in in men or postmenopausal women excess iron accumulation in the body is a pro oxidant in that pro oxidative status can increase inflammation and increased inflammatory state Degrades insulin sensitivity and by extension the Metabolic flexibility so. There's some big picture things that we know. Feed into metabolic flexibility and again. I think that we have burying degrees of control over those different lever.

Kito Diabetes DEM Stephanie Obesity Headache North Korea Emily Abbott United States
"neurosis" Discussed on FanBros

FanBros

04:50 min | 9 months ago

"neurosis" Discussed on FanBros

"Fast that. I promise you not all of us are high we are. We this is this is also real talk I mean that's that's also to talk about energy and its various forms and matter, and the fact that we are all made of. Everything in this universe when you break it down to the smallest level is made out of the same substance. But it just combines into different protons electrons to make everything we see and we all perceive this world around us but that's just because we perceive it to be this way. You wrote is universities within. So there we go and how we perceive the world actually leads to the next theme of of the how we learn how the world works. Lots of times we learn from our parents and the next thing deals with the you know how parents influence their children and how abuses passed down from parents. Still Children we we've talked before in previous episodes. Abou- MONTROSS is issues how he was brought up how he was abused by his father physical physical abuse for being gay and his father beating him for expressing what he thought was a feminine qualities you know drawing you know. Being cited, the wasn't the baseball players being excited to see the baseball players and things like that. His father was no you're not going to be gay and then in turn Montross is is monstrous to advocates. You know very excessively violent where when that scene after advocate some lady walk in on Montross Stop China Stop Sammy you know after they have their words with each other outside advocates is incredibly angry. He's in pain. He's confuse because he expresses that Montrose be him. So he would quote be soft yet. His Dad from from very homophobic perspective is considered soft. And he's also Abacus also pissed because it's revealed that his mother knew about machos being gay and no one told him anything. So that idea of parents keeping secrets, the idea of parents doing things that they claim it's for your protection or because they love you but it's really their own neurosis and psychosis. Being kind of inflicted upon you. Yeah I liked that they went there for this never they were talking about like whenever lead came out in. and. Out of was telling care what it was that made him like so upset, it wasn't necessarily that it's others gay was necessarily that everything was a secret. It was back that his father was so abusive to him and he always had hoped that the abuse was just the an expression of his father's love like he did not like a love well and then come..

Montross Montrose baseball neurosis China
The Vicious Cycle

Big Book Podcast

06:11 min | 9 months ago

The Vicious Cycle

"How it finally broke southerners obstinacy and destined the salesman to start a at Philadelphia. January eighth nineteen, thirty, eight. That was my day. The place. Washington DC. This last real merry go round had started the day before Christmas and I had really accomplished a lot in those fourteen days. I my new wife had walked out baggage and furniture. Then the apartment landlord had thrown me out of the empty apartment and the finish was the loss of another job. After a couple of days, dollar hotels and one night in the Pokey I. Finally landed on my mother's doorstep shaking apart with several days beard and of course, broke as usual. Many of these same things had happened to me many times before. But this time they had all descended together for me this was it here I was thirty nine years old and a complete washout nothing had worked. Mother would take me in only if I would say locked in a small store room and give her my clothes and shoes, we had played this game before. This is the way Jackie found me lying on a cot in my skivvies with hot and cold sweats pounding heart and that awful itchy scratchiness all over. Somehow, I had always managed to avoid DT's. I had not asked for help and seriously doubt that I would have but fits an old school friend of mine had persuaded. Jackie to call on me. Had, he come two or three days later I think I would have thrown him out but he hit when I was open for anything. Jackie arrived about seven in the evening and talked until three. A M. I don't remember much of what he said but I did realize that here was another guy exactly like me he had been in the same laughing academies in the same jails known the same loss of jobs, same frustration, same boredom, and the same loneliness. If anything he had known all of them even better and more often than I. Yet, he was happy relaxed, competent and laughing. That night for the first time in my life I really let down my hair and admitted my general loneliness. Jackie told me about a group of fellows in New York of who my old friend fits was one who had the same problem I had and who by working together to help each other where not now drinking and we're happy like himself. He said something about God or a higher power. But I brushed that off that was for the birds not for me little more of our talk stayed in my memory but I do know I. Slept the rest of that night while before I had never known what a real night's sleep was. This is my introduction to this understanding fellowship although is to be more than a year later before our society was to bear the name alcoholics anonymous. All of us in Ainhoa the tremendous happiness that is sobriety, but there are also tragedies. My sponsor Jackie was one of these. He brought in many of our original members yet. He himself could not make it and died about Gaullism. The lesson of his death still remains with me yet I often wonder what would have happened if somebody else had made that I call on me. So I always say that as long as I remember January eighth that is how long I will remain sober. The Age old question in a is which came first the neurosis or the alcoholism. I like to think I was fairly normal before alcohol took over. My early life was spent in Baltimore where my father was a physician and a grain merchant, my family lived in very prosper circumstances, and while both my parents drank sometimes too much neither was an alcoholic. Father was very well integrated person and while mother was high strung and a bit selfish and demanding our home life was reasonably harmonious. There were four of US children and although both of my brothers later became alcoholic one died of alcoholism. My sister has never taken a drink in her life. Until I was thirteen I attended public schools with regular promotions and average grades. I have never shown any particular talents nor have I had any real frustrating ambitions? At Thirteen, I was packed off to a very fine Protestant boarding school in Virginia where I stayed for years graduating without any special achievements in sports I made the track and tennis teams I got along well with the other boys and had a fairly large circle of acquaintances but no intimate friends. I. Was Never Homesick and was always pretty self-sufficient. However here I probably took my first step towards my coming alcoholism by developing a terrific version to all churches and established religions at this school. We had Bible readings before each meal and Church Services, four times on Sunday, and I became so rebellious at this that I swore I would never join or go to any church except for weddings or funerals. At Seventeen, I entered the university really to satisfy my father who wanted me to study medicine there as he had. That is where I had my first drink and I still remember it for every I drink afterwards did exactly the same trick. I could feel it go right through every bit of my body and down to my very toes. But. Each drink after the first seemed to become less effective and after three or four, they all seemed like water. I was never a hilarious drunk the more I drank the quieter I got and the drunk I got the harder I fought to stay sober. So it is clear that I never had any fun out of drinking. I would be the sober seeming one in the crowd and all of a sudden. Drunk Est.. Even that first night I blacked out, which leads me to believe that I was an alcoholic from my very first drink. The first year in college I just got by with my studies and that year I majored in Poker and drinking I refuse to join any fraternity as I wanted to be a freelance and that year my drinking was confined to one night stands once or twice a week.

Jackie Salesman Washington Ainhoa Philadelphia United States Virginia Gaullism Church Services Baltimore New York Tennis
The Vicious Cycle

Big Book Podcast

06:11 min | 9 months ago

The Vicious Cycle

"How it finally broke southerners obstinacy and destined the salesman to start a at Philadelphia. January eighth nineteen, thirty, eight. That was my day. The place. Washington DC. This last real merry go round had started the day before Christmas and I had really accomplished a lot in those fourteen days. I my new wife had walked out baggage and furniture. Then the apartment landlord had thrown me out of the empty apartment and the finish was the loss of another job. After a couple of days, dollar hotels and one night in the Pokey I. Finally landed on my mother's doorstep shaking apart with several days beard and of course, broke as usual. Many of these same things had happened to me many times before. But this time they had all descended together for me this was it here I was thirty nine years old and a complete washout nothing had worked. Mother would take me in only if I would say locked in a small store room and give her my clothes and shoes, we had played this game before. This is the way Jackie found me lying on a cot in my skivvies with hot and cold sweats pounding heart and that awful itchy scratchiness all over. Somehow, I had always managed to avoid DT's. I had not asked for help and seriously doubt that I would have but fits an old school friend of mine had persuaded. Jackie to call on me. Had, he come two or three days later I think I would have thrown him out but he hit when I was open for anything. Jackie arrived about seven in the evening and talked until three. A M. I don't remember much of what he said but I did realize that here was another guy exactly like me he had been in the same laughing academies in the same jails known the same loss of jobs, same frustration, same boredom, and the same loneliness. If anything he had known all of them even better and more often than I. Yet, he was happy relaxed, competent and laughing. That night for the first time in my life I really let down my hair and admitted my general loneliness. Jackie told me about a group of fellows in New York of who my old friend fits was one who had the same problem I had and who by working together to help each other where not now drinking and we're happy like himself. He said something about God or a higher power. But I brushed that off that was for the birds not for me little more of our talk stayed in my memory but I do know I. Slept the rest of that night while before I had never known what a real night's sleep was. This is my introduction to this understanding fellowship although is to be more than a year later before our society was to bear the name alcoholics anonymous. All of us in Ainhoa the tremendous happiness that is sobriety, but there are also tragedies. My sponsor Jackie was one of these. He brought in many of our original members yet. He himself could not make it and died about Gaullism. The lesson of his death still remains with me yet I often wonder what would have happened if somebody else had made that I call on me. So I always say that as long as I remember January eighth that is how long I will remain sober. The Age old question in a is which came first the neurosis or the alcoholism. I like to think I was fairly normal before alcohol took over. My early life was spent in Baltimore where my father was a physician and a grain merchant, my family lived in very prosper circumstances, and while both my parents drank sometimes too much neither was an alcoholic. Father was very well integrated person and while mother was high strung and a bit selfish and demanding our home life was reasonably harmonious. There were four of US children and although both of my brothers later became alcoholic one died of alcoholism. My sister has never taken a drink in her life. Until I was thirteen I attended public schools with regular promotions and average grades. I have never shown any particular talents nor have I had any real frustrating ambitions? At Thirteen, I was packed off to a very fine Protestant boarding school in Virginia where I stayed for years graduating without any special achievements in sports I made the track and tennis teams I got along well with the other boys and had a fairly large circle of acquaintances but no intimate friends. I. Was Never Homesick and was always pretty self-sufficient. However here I probably took my first step towards my coming alcoholism by developing a terrific version to all churches and established religions at this school. We had Bible readings before each meal and Church Services, four times on Sunday, and I became so rebellious at this that I swore I would never join or go to any church except for weddings or funerals. At Seventeen, I entered the university really to satisfy my father who wanted me to study medicine there as he had. That is where I had my first drink and I still remember it for every I drink afterwards did exactly the same trick. I could feel it go right through every bit of my body and down to my very toes. But. Each drink after the first seemed to become less effective and after three or four, they all seemed like water. I was never a hilarious drunk the more I drank the quieter I got and the drunk I got the harder I fought to stay sober. So it is clear that I never had any fun out of drinking. I would be the sober seeming one in the crowd and all of a sudden. Drunk Est.. Even that first night I blacked out, which leads me to believe that I was an alcoholic from my very first drink. The first year in college I just got by with my studies and that year I majored in Poker and drinking I refuse to join any fraternity as I wanted to be a freelance and that year my drinking was confined to one night stands once or twice a week.

Jackie Salesman Washington Ainhoa Philadelphia United States Virginia Gaullism Church Services Baltimore New York Tennis
"neurosis" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

The Mindful Minute

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

"With a sense of interests and gently guide your awareness back to the center of the heart. Stain await to the transition from breath to breath from moment moment from thought to Gently bringing your awareness back. If you've drifted away noticing that deepening brathwaite. Your thoughts were what your feelings were. Just in this moment letting your breath grow a little bit deeper you might feel yourself wiggle into your fingers or your toes shifting. Your posture bid. If you need when you're ready we'll draw palms together in front of our hearts like a prayer by the Chin now. Taking a moment is simply honor. Your experience today. Honor the bravery stepping into that cave of the unknown of uncertainty and stain for a while one final breath to it out in exodus. I NAMA stay. Thanks for listening to the mindful minute. If you enjoyed this episode it would mean the world to me. If you take time to leave a review for share this with somebody you think would enjoy it to learn more about my em- person and virtual offerings visit Merrill Arnett Dot Com the word chuck out on Instagram at Narrow Arnett. Thanks you. I'll see you next week..

"neurosis" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

The Mindful Minute

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

"And the inner frame of our body is reclining back into a hammock with a sense of ease and curiosity. And it's here that will turn our attention towards breath and so I want you to feel the inhale as you draw in through both nostrils China all the way into the mid point of the brain and then feel that breath moving right back out from the center of the brain all the way out both nostrils into the room. Just for about a minute here. We're going to follow that. Pathway of the breath inhaling through both nostrils right into the center of the brain and acts hailing following that pathway of breath right out the non strolls and into the room. Nothing to worry about if thoughts pop up or you get distracted for another minute here in silence following the trail of breath Mm-hmm stay with this visual of the Bra. Feeling this pathway of breath. But you'll let the pathway shift just a bit. So that is you're inhaling you're feeling the breath move in through both nostrils and letting go all the way down into the center of the heart as you exhale from the center of the heart. It'll travel up to the nose and out both nostrums feeling.

China
"neurosis" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

The Mindful Minute

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Mindful Minute

"Thanks for listening to the mindful minute. I'm your host Mural Arnett these ten to fifteen minute. Meditations have been created for your use as part of a daily home practice for inspiration insight and a better understanding of what it actually means to meditate for sure to tune in to our Thursday full length episodes. And now let's begin. Go ahead and take a seat. You might be seated on the ground crosslegged cushion. You might find yourself seated in share their feet flat on the air or even just in bed or climbing back against some pillows. Wherever you find yourself today make sure that you're seated with tall spine. Roll your shoulders back down and let your hands rest pub face down on the earth. When you're ready you can is drift close together as a group here. Let's take a nice full in Helen. An ex hell Outta CY. We'll do that again. Inhaling deeply exhaling OUTTA SI- Allowing your breath just fall to its own natural pace. If your hands are still against the earth you might slide them up onto your lap. Feel yourself settling into the comfort of your practice today. You might even begin just by silently saying to yourself. Now is my time to meditate. Now is my time to meditate him and with that invitation. You feel yourself really sent just dropping into the fullness of yourself so there's no part of you trying to stand up or run away just here just here and you're just breathing. You might check in with your seed and just notice if you can relax your hips. Your gluts your is just a little bit more insensate again into your spine to make sure you're seated upright and tall today. Maybe you can feel the crown of the head reaching up and back releasing the muscles through the face relaxing down across the brow bone print around the sockets the is relaxing along the jaw line and the lips even softening through the tongue the inside of the mouth. Maybe feel.

Responding Creatively to Fear

The Mindful Minute

09:24 min | 1 year ago

Responding Creatively to Fear

"Welcome y'all as many of you know at Sacred Chill West. We create a community tension every month for all of our classes to focus on as we teach meditation. Yoga Yoga and this month's community intention for the month of May is awake to the transitions awake to the transitions. Now this phrase really stems from teachings that we my business partner Octavia and I received from one of our teachers Tracy Stanley and she continually uses this phrase as the reminder not to go back to sleep when we wake up when we learned something about ourselves. Don't let yourself get pulled back into old habits or old ways of coping just because things get hard or scary even in the midst of a pandemic. So I've been reflecting on this. How do we stay awake to the transitions? How do we stay awake as the moment to moment shifts under our feet and right in line with this thinking? I listened to episode of Radio. Labs podcast you'll know. I Love Radio last. And in this episode they were reflecting on a question posed by famous physicist Richard Feynman. And he asked this question all the way back in nineteen sixty one he asked. If in some cataclysm all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed and only one sentence was passed on to the next generation of creatures what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words and then of course he went on to answer this question in his own brilliant physicist way but radio lab took this a step further and they went out and asked a myriad of artists musicians scientists creative thinkers this very question and what was so interesting to me about the response was the vast majority responded in some way with the word fear. Fear is the thing that most people want to tell other people or other creatures or other beans. This is the thing that limits us that holds us back that paralyzes us that keeps us from our potential and that we must have a willingness to respond creatively to fear. And so this whole talk. Today is based on the question. What do I do when I feel? I can't handle what's going on. What do I do when I feel? I can't handle what's going on and I'm willing to bet all of you have an immediate answer because how many of us have been sitting at home for weeks on end feeling like we can't handle what's going on and so we do the thing right. We all have these coping mechanisms. Maybe it's shopping maybe it's TV watching. Maybe it's eating or drinking or drugs or talking on the phone too much. Who knows we all have these mechanisms and we use them to avoid feeling uncomfortable? We use them to go back to sleep rather than stay awake to the unknown and of course the problem with this is this is fake control coping mechanisms. Are Pseudo control. That becomes actually like a prison. Boxing us into our neurosis. We couldn't possibly wet go of our beliefs. We couldn't possibly let go of the actions or escape mechanisms that we've created because what is left would be way too scary. We become increasingly terrified of the possibility of freedom. Now happily meditation does tell us. There's another way. Meditation reminds us. That freedom doesn't come from resisting or blocking our fears but it comes from getting to know these fears well so today. We're going to get to know our fears and in many traditions. The teachings within a meditation practice are that there are three main ways. We protect ourselves from this fear of the unknown from the fear of uncertainty. The first one is the one. I already referenced. This is the method of escape that each of us has so someone shops someone uses alcohol's food drugs sex. Tv books walking in nature being social. You know some of these are completely benign. Some of these maybe a little bit more dangerous but all of them can be methods for stain asleep. No matter how we escape. Our normal response is not one of curiosity. Meaning were not normally going. Oh look at me escaping the moment by calling a friend. No we're just calling the friend and were numb to what we're escaping. We don't explore it and our practice now is to get curious. This is step one right. Gay Curious what am I relief from when I engage this escape mechanism? What am I feeling relief from as I engage this escape mechanism the second way that we avoid fear our beliefs the beliefs that we used to give us a sense of certainty these might be political beliefs or social justice beliefs or religious beliefs? A scientific beliefs right any belief that gives us the person a sense of rightness or correctness. Now the problem of course is not the beliefs themselves but rather the problem is. How do we use these beliefs to make us feel steady to feel grounded or in control? How do we use these beliefs to avoid feeling the discomfort of not knowing? What will happen next? This one has been particularly potent for me in this moment. You Know Georgia beam the first state to reopen anything and my personal belief surrounded are that that's way too soon and sponsor and I could go on for hours and so the act of curiosity is to really pay attention does what does that righteous anger prevent me from feeling the right when. I get all up on my soapbox and outraged an angry and yelling. My opinions is it trying to make me feel more in control of a moment. That's totally out of control. And I'm not hear me say this. I am not saying you should not get outraged about certain things and speak up and not discounting the need for justice and standing up for what's right by any means that is a talk for another day but what I am talking about. Today is the curiosity of how we use those beliefs to make ourselves feel better the last way that we avoid fear is perhaps the most tricky this form of protection comes to us by seeking altered. Mind states some might do this through drugs. Some might do this through exercise highs or extreme meditation through falling in and out of love anything that takes us out of the mundane the ordinary and feels special right. These special mine states can be so powerful because we feel above or removed from the discomfort of the every day. So like if you have a really powerful meditation experience and you get some kind of clarity or visit or you hear voice or something magical happens in that meditation and in the next time you meditate you expect the exact same thing to happen but what really happens you write the grocery lists for twenty minutes. Now were feeling disappointed in our practice or upset with our practice. We can clean to those special experiences as a way to avoid life. And what we're not trying to do is avoid life. What we're trying to do is be in our

Physicist Sacred Chill West Partner Richard Feynman Tracy Stanley Octavia Georgia
Looking Through the Disparate Responses to COVID-19 in the US

The Portal

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Looking Through the Disparate Responses to COVID-19 in the US

"Want to begin putting this response to the virus in the context of what we've already talked about on the portal in particular the disc or distributed idea suppression complex introduced. An episode. Eighteen appears to be in full swing. So how do we know that this is happening? Well twitter and this is just as an example has now refined their terms of service to broaden their definition of harm itself to address in their words and I quote content that goes directly against guidance from authoritative sources of global and local public health information rather than reports. We will enforce this in close coordination with trusted partners including public health authorities and governments and continue to use and consult with information from those sources when reviewing content. Under this new guidance we will require people to remove tweets now of course the pandemic that sound sensible at least my ears in such a situation who wants marginal gadflies like I duNNo. Mike Serna the infamous Mench Small Bug Aka. Courtesy Arvind contradicting the mayor of New York City. Bill de Blasios or The Washington Post in time crying out for coordinated authoritative response. Well here's the awkward part many of the people who call this epidemic early incorrectly. Where the very marginal Internet personalities that the Legacy Media folks love to deride as trolls gadflies as for the mayor of New York City after certification mold buckhead correctly called for drastic action. Bill de Blasios wrote. I'm encouraging New Yorkers to go on with your lives in get out on the town despite coronavirus and that was an early March a sentiment that was echoed by the Washington Post that viewed concern over the virus as a kind of neurosis that had to be addressed. Psychologically in short the gated institutional narrative or Jin was not close to being the first to see. Cova is the giant threat requiring a planetary response. It was those outside the Jin that not only saw this early but proved that it was able early by many different individuals who generally seem to sit outside the institutional and respectable worlds. So just. Why was this well first of all? The portal has argued many times before that we have had an almost universally unworkable leadership class now in place for just under fifty years that it arose to disguise the end of the post war economic growth regime. This is a collection of people who have re factored the institutions that they've lead within our system specifically to evade the embedded growth obligations or egos. That were set in the previous era. And who rewarded each other? Generally for doing exactly the wrong things in terms of the public good with an end to mandatory retirement the same people have been promoted for borrowing against the future and playing games of Russian roulette with financial markets healthcare while self-dealing within the system that they were handed stewards for the generations to come serving a false god fake economic efficiency that reliably and deliberately fails to adequately incorporate actual economics like negative externalities von Neumann Morgenstern sub utility functions principal agent problems moral hazard etcetera etcetera are ubiquitous. Economists have hidden behind the mask of technocrats working for the public good while merely pretending to practice their own profession healthcare mandarins to regularly ignore the warnings. Coming out of their own literature. I mean heading over to Google scholar which readiness czar or hospital head could forget. Titles like mechanical ventilation in an airborne epidemic by Fula in two thousand and eight or preparing intensive care for the next pandemic influenza by Taylor Kane and Robert Fowler in two thousand nineteen. Were those back to back. Hits of Meltzer at all stockpiling ventilators for influenza pandemics and estimates of the demand for mechanical ventilation in the United States during an influenza pandemic in two thousand seventeen in two thousand fifteen respectively in short we got here not because we couldn't foresee this future in fact we extensively studied it. We got here because we decided to ignore the future that we knew was coming. The specific class of people that we had the helm of our institutions were constitutionally incapable of putting their foot down and asserting that we needed deeper reserves in order to handle what they called surge capacity. So do I know what's going on? I said during the section of our last episode still holds true this week my continuing discussions with a number of people. I respect deeply seems surprisingly inconclusive. To me even at this late date so my mind wanders to the second order question of why it would be so difficult to sketch straightforward narrative to guide us in fact Dr Peter at his most recent video evidence of some of this confusion where he shares that as a physician. He feels so spun around what he is hearing that even he is forced to think in political rather than medical or scientific terms to explain the situation to oversimplify slightly. There are three great risks with the CO virus. One of underreaction. One of overreaction. In one of inappropriate reaction the threatens an enormous body count from the virus severe respiratory and other damage to many of the recovered. The second threatens a worldwide depression which could well lead to armed clashes and even wars various sizes. The last leads to many of our efforts being wasted or even captured by profiteers at a time when we are demanded not too deeply question the coordinating authorities and oddly. We are being prepared to participate in both under and overreactions simultaneously. Just as many of us are worrying about allegations of financial assistance that are now valued in the trillions. I mean this is crazy at some level. No we are somehow discussing ill-conceived multi trillion dollar systems packages at the same time as we are being ready to go back to work while also hearing that. New York is now apocalyptic I mean that's pretty confusing. We are going to transfer vast amounts of wealth. So please know that everything will fine when you get back to work shortly. But in the meantime the borough of Queens is experiencing armageddon even by highschool dating standards. That's a lot of mixed and conflicting messages now. What could explain this odd state of affairs? I found myself compelled by very simple idea from his grip. I cannot easily escape. The ideas straightforward. What if our leadership is treating this as much as an accountability crisis as a medical one when it comes to their actions. I mean what if the issue over which we are being quarantined isn't actually the number of deaths trying to prevent but the type of deaths perhaps there is one special category of death then that our leaders are more afraid of than all others for reasons of accountability rather than simple loss of life in order to explore. This idea might help to make it somewhat. Concrete therefore imagine that you had drafted a blank tweets on twitter called New York Blue Death List for at least Myrlie well known accounts that you follow from New York state that eventually brought low by the Kovic virus and that initially has no other content. Of course it would start out blank but now imagine that every time one of these account owners dies of. Kovic you plan to add them to your soon to be growing list. That's pretty morbid. But Hey it's now. A pandemic after all oddly. These aren't even really the death that I'm talking about quite yet. Perhaps the first few are old people who have lived long and full lives but as your list begins to fill up there may come a first gruesome death it happened to vital younger person who desperately needed a ventilator or an ICU. Bed or a train MD or nurse to have a fighting chance. Let us call these triage death. If they result from a missing resource that could have and should have been stocked for just such emergencies. These losses are beginning to outline the class of death. That I believe me. Now be driving this difficult. Understand response from our political and medical leadership while deaths from the virus may be tragic. These specific triage deaths may be considered career ending deaths of accountability for medical scientific business and political leaders who specifically failed to heed warnings from the group studying our preparedness as such they may have mattered most in determining the shape of our current response as they are all death. The come from failing to implement copious previous work in identifying vulnerabilities meant to shape our disaster preparedness. These would be quite bad because they would involve people that we feel. We know but it could actually get much worse for our leaders than that if you were now to swap out the blue check requirement and exchange it instead for the most sympathetic person. You could imagine what happens when death swoops down on a young girl of eight named arena. Who needs a ventilator desperately but can't get one or perhaps the entire Gomez family is turned away from Queens Johar or made to wait for ICU. Beds that never materialized while there's still time to save three out of their four members. I mean what if it is these triage death which are actually closer to negligent homicide than mere viral losses. That are actually terrifying our leaders into Jakonen action rather than the total number of dead as they say. This hypothesis has the advantage of at least being consistent with the otherwise confusing and seemingly conflicting themes develop before burdens from our leaders who were caught having utterly failed in their mission to keep us prepared would have to be shifted onto our entire society as a whole think about it. The public would be asked for broad participation in something like flatten the curve and why to cover for the lack of the same. Icu beds masks. P P in ventilators that were called for in numerous academic papers over the last twenty years studying just such viral pandemic scenarios. I mean it's really quite close as the authorities now scramble at top speed to finally get the missing resources in place that should have been banked all along they would also simultaneously be preparing us to go back to work to risk regular viral rather than triage deaths. Just as soon as the shortfalls could be made up as there doesn't seem to be a highly credible plan to defeat the virus

New York Twitter JIN New York City Bill De Blasios Pandemic Influenza Mike Serna The Washington Post Arvind Google Negligent Homicide United States Cova Legacy Media Meltzer Gomez Dr Peter
Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

The Big Picture

15:27 min | 1 year ago

Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

"Unfortunately this Shithole has more fucking leaks in the Iraqi navy. Fuck Yourself. I'm tired from fucking your wife. How's your mother good? She's tired from fucking my father. You have a job Tom. I'm a firefighter. Oh God bless you a hero. I'm not hero. We'd all be here. We could use the petroleum. No excuse me Christmas. Utah a lot of fucking money. What did you do? I mean if you take away nothing else for my class from this experience let it be this. If you're not a genius don't bother right. The world needs plenty of electricity and a lot of them are happy and they can help. It really can't be that we can always do. Better let me keep trying. If you guys keep trying I'm shawn fantasy and this is the big picture. A conversation show about Mark Wahlberg. This episode may break the all time record for big picture dissonance later in the show. I have an interview with Kelly. Reichardt the writer and director behind independent film classics. Like old joy. Meek's cutoff in the new film. First cow which might be the best movie of Two Thousand Twenty so far. I hope you'll stick around for that but I were joined by the frog. Sheriff Chris Ryan. I heard that Mark. Wahlberg actually dropped out of first cow. He was gonNA play the cow Alao. But you're already doing animal. Humor here on driver too is calling. Chris. You're here because you're a fan of Mark Wahlberg work. He's The star of a new movie. That is hitting Netflix. This Friday called Spencer confidential. I think gets his fifth film with Peterberg. The actor turned director of such films as lone survivor and deepwater horizon. This is a very strange movie but I think it's going to be a a very watched movie because the corona virus is scaring America into staying inside their house. And so I think that there's a potential for a lot of viewership of this movie. So we're talking about Mark Wahlberg one of the most resilient and persistent movie stars. I guess of the past twenty five years so let's just start with WHO is Mark Wahlberg. How did this happen? That Mark Wahlberg became one of the signature figures of movies in the twenty first century. I would not say I'm a fan of Mark Wahlberg as like I'm a I'm agnostic as a citizen. Yeah I would say that. I am very interested in the way that he has conducted his career. Which is kind of a weird throwback to a studio systems our he makes three to four movies every eighteen months somehow and just releases them at like a hugely prolific rate at. I'm fascinated by all the little pockets of his career that he has created where he repeats. You know he goes back to these little micro genres that he and he works a lot of people over and over again by the way he kind of has conducted his career to me is almost unique among Hollywood movie stars anymore. I mean most of the time when people achieve a certain level success. They just like see in three years for my next blockbuster or award fodder and he's just like nope. I'm grinding out. Family movie violent action film and then every once in a while Raunchy comedy and it's just like pretty pretty like unique among all Hollywood stars so I'm fascinated. What do you make them Amanda? I was fascinated when going back to you. Remember how many great directors he's worked with and how many actually excellent movies he's been in. Chris was asking me how much we watching I had to do for this podcast and the answer is a lot. Because I wouldn't say that Mark Wahlberg stays with me besides certain shots that will certainly be discussed on this podcast but he especially I guess in the first decade of this century just goes on a tremendous run. I really from Boogie nights on and works with a does a lot of really great movies and then kind of decides to just become like the Peterberg comedy guy in the second decade of the century. And I it's a really interesting shift. He just Kinda decides no. I'm going to do this now. And it's very fascinating to me I can't really make sense of. I also is Christmas talking about his efficiency. Just pulled up his daily schedule. Do you guys remember the days? Will he wakes up. Like four o'clock in the morning posted this on his own instagram typical daily scheduled to thirty. Am Wake Up. What don't you forty five prayer time. Three fifteen am breakfast. There's a lot of work work. He's golfing from seven thirty to eight. Which is the golf people? And there's a chamber recovery at nine thirty that takes more time than golf workout number two lunches and our so our meeting slash work calls also an hour and he goes to bed at seven thirty PM and which in Los Angeles for. I'd say six at least six months of the year. That is still broad daylight. Yeah Yeah Su. There is real efficiency baked into this. He's clearly very deliberate guy. He's making choices. And I think that pertains to his daily life and also his his career. There is clearly thought going into this. It's not a type of thought. I can access. I still don't know why you would wake up at two thirty and I don't know why you would do like five deep water horizons. There's a rumor that he has a routine. I think you. I'm speculating here. But I think he's a member of Wilshire Country Club here in Los Angeles. My husband told me this last night and he likes to play alone. He likes to play. And that's why he's playing so early in the morning and he's trying to get in like a quick nine or quick eighteen. I don't know five days a week which I'm who among? Us would love to do that if I could wake up before five. Am I would do it. I'll tell you I would love to do that. I'll tell you something else I am. I find golf to be social and I get crippled like when I play by myself. I'm like all the neurosis is creeping like. Should I take another shot now like it really playing golf? If you're not playing with anyone can just tell you. He's got three snacks on the schedule. Including one that takes an hour and a half from eight to nine thirty. Am is snack after seven. Thirty to eight am golf. Probably a euphemism. Oh Okay so you think. His sessions are ninety minutes. So you're saying to jump off something. Amanda said You know who? He reminds me of a bizarre way Cruz. Where it's like that run. Where cruises like I'll just work with Barry Levinson Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg and every great director at it seems like I'm just the most important factor in the whole world and then one day he wakes up and says I'M GONNA make action movies for the rest of my life? It's very unlikely though. I mean his origins restraints obviously member of this very well known family. He's from Massachusetts. He starts out as a a rap artist and ultimately becomes a Calvin Klein M. C. An. Mc Yes we watched the vibrations video. Recently I took my top five twenty two. Would you make of good vibrations? And and how did you feel about the funky bunch all these years later? It's just really bizarre that this was a thing that we lived through. Who is the funky bunch? I I still don't know who's in it. Were you in a Chris? Thought it was the backup dancers. I mean yes. That's who they were but like do you know anything about them and where they are now. I was pretty. Yeah I was pretty. I was pretty authentic back then so I was. I was already listening to deep deep newer. Grab I love talking about the early nineties with you. Can we talk about the Calvin Klein ads for a second really really important? You're almost put these on my list. And it's and my honorable mention boxer briefs. Yeah I was still a boxer sky back then that was not interested in the product. Would you just tear the ads out of the magazine? Crumpled them up and throw them in the garbage. I think that the those are the signature moment in his career without the advertising campaign he would not have become weirdly Tom Like sub Tom Cruise but he you know. He soared to a of fame on that ad campaign. They're just extremely important. Ninety s imagery obviously came as also in them. And that's where the whole K. Moss thing starts Them Hating each other. Great early celebrity feud they're very important that's all and also it looks great. I mean he and his image was of basically like a tough guy with a bad attitude whether that was true or not he obviously got into some altercations and his his personal history is pretty complicated. We're not gonNA spend too much time talking about on this show. But I think that he basically leveraged his complicated persona in the public into a movie career and if you look at the first few movies that he makes replays these kind of like weird intimidating Undeveloped YOUNG MEN. You know in the basketball diaries in. Ryen Russillo favorite movie fear And even in boogie nights. There's something like violently adolescent about his his persona which is very different from the kind of actor and movie star that he is right now so a lot of times. I think that we could. You could write like a series of essays about how much actors of his generation have attempted to mimic the kind of like rough and tumble blue collar upbringing. That Walberg apparently had like how how often like DiCaprio Damon or these guys have tried to be like no I'm Jim Carroll and he's just a function Carol I'm the real thing but it's weird like even in his authenticity. If you WANNA call it that he still lacks like any kind of emotional intelligence or psychological depth to portraying those things and you could write all these essays. But you could just watch the departed. Because that's what this does that. Do you need that from an actor? Do you need to feel like this person is like in control and has that depth that Chris was talking about? I think I do ultimately. I think that there is a reason that I gravitate to Matt Damon instead of Wahlberg. And I think that you not just because of the departed and the Boston. Bill will talk about that a lot as a comparison but I like I said I really remember a lot of Walberg performances. Even though he's been given a lot of great ones and I think that's because they have a I don't WanNa say surface level. That's unfair. They're actually a lot of depth but they aren't the emotional depths and I think I personally don't hang onto those. I think I'm always wondering how in command of the Ark of his career. He is because you pointed out he makes he's. I mean he's just been a lot of great movies a lot of movies that are going to stand the test of time and it always seems like he's being cast the way that a lot of young actresses or cast as the. Nayef as the like the naive and innocent who gets corrupted when put into a system and like did someone in a room. Say That to him. This is your lane man will early like you think so. Well I just don't think that he I think he's largely in charge of the movies that he makes. Now he's like. I think that the movies that we see our movies that Mark Wahlberg once made for the most part and my suspicion is the reason he made that transition. Amanda was referencing about just mostly doing action. Comedy movies now is because those movies are more fun and easier to make for him there either like a physical challenge there like a day on the set whereas making boogie nights as hard Russell Smart. Yeah I think that he is both like sinking very strategically as the schedule would suggest and also like not over thinking it i. That's the VIBE. I guess sometime at the end of the day he's going like it very much is what it is. He is a very Surface level or just immediate actor. That's that's what you're getting and so I think he wants. He gets to produce the movies himself and make the decisions. You just kind of like. Yeah action comedies. Got There before we get into our top fives and I think we should figure out what we mean. When we say top five if it's five performances or his top five movies because there's some complexity. There is a very strange celebrity. The the nine eleven thing is you're staring right at. It's just hanging over my head as I think about him as a public person. So in twenty twelve Walberg was quoted in a magazine interview regarding. What would have happened if he had flown aboard American Airlines Flight? Eleven on September eleventh. Two thousand one. He'd been booked on a flight on flight. Eleven but his plans changed the day before the scheduled flight and he cancelled his reservation. Walberg received public criticism for stating quote. If I was on that plane with my kids it wouldn't have went down like it did and there would have been a lot of blood in that first class cabin and then me saying okay. We're going to land somewhere safely. Don't worry Warburg apologized for those statements. But they're actually the sort of thing that kind of inform his public persona and when we watch him in an action movie. We think that he's the kind of guy who's like I would have kicked some ass on nine eleven which I don't know if you like complicates the quality of the films that he makes but I can't get stuff like that. Outta my head once I've read or heard about it and I feel like we've referred back to it even in a joking fashion over the years right. Yeah it is definitely one of the top three things that I think about. When someone says Mark Wahlberg schedule yeah nine eleven yeah and the last night of prosthetic but like you know. I'm human beings. It's the point of the movie full movie as leading to that so yes I agree. It's funny he is both. I think very funny as a comedic actor like entirely humorless and it's that some things he's in on the joke on some things he's just kind of being like no I would have save. I would have stopped nine eleven. Which is just a ridiculous thing to say. And that's the joke of Andy Sandberg's say Heidi Mother for me. Yeah you know portrayal of him is this is like he's kind of total rube but also not. There's something very elusive about. Whatever's going on with an entourage thing it's like. Do you watch entourage because you think it's completely ridiculous or do you watch entourage because you think it's like six awesome representative drama and I dare to say that Mark Wahlberg is like Yup? That's how it went. I you probably think you're right. Insulin entourage Ari comes on and it's really like Whoa but most but he's like that's accurate me. Like Vince is very much living my experience. He's like we should make a show about it. I think. I think that you guys are right. Do you think that this should be five performances or top five movies I choose? I don't know I don't know where I landed. I think I did I tried to be interesting here but I I wouldn't say that any of these performances leap out at me except for my number one and number two as like excellent performances. They're more like movies. I really like was he ever given a truly great performance. Yes I I think. There's one and a half great performances on this movie and it's just a half is the end of boogie nights. No no I. Well that might be the case now. There's another movie I still did performances but I think they are. They are a little bit also an award for the movie knowing how best to use him right. Okay well then let's get into it. Let's go into our top five Mark Wilbur performances slash movies number five Amanda. Why don't you start us off? This goes out to Bill Simmons and apparently to right who I still have never met. Hello Ryan. I'm going with fear. Why not whow revisit? Yes I did okay okay seen Djing

Mark Wahlberg Chris Ryan Amanda Director Tom Cruise Walberg Bill Simmons Iraqi Navy Mark Shawn Fantasy Meek Utah Netflix Kelly Los Angeles Golf Calvin Klein Ryen Russillo Mark Wilbur
Facing Fear (Part 2) - Awakening Your Fearless Heart

Tara Brach

08:17 min | 1 year ago

Facing Fear (Part 2) - Awakening Your Fearless Heart

"Now in our last talk on this? I gave two weeks ago. We covered. What happens when we'RE CAUGHT? In fear that our perceptions are sick the lens narrows and we fixate on threat and to some degree depending how much is going on. We go into fight flight freeze. And so there's cortisol and other stress hormones going and our muscles pyden and are the body extremities get fired up and the digestion goes you know kind of halts and our thoughts are circling around what we're anxious about. That creates more anxiety in our body and our brain because our limbic system activated the frontal cortex is deactivated which means less access to executive functioning to mindfulness to kindness empathy. And we know that when we're all worried we're not our hearts not wide open. We're not feeling tender about others or the world so this is for many again. It's a matter of degree kind of habitual state and it's a trance contracted agitated state. We don't have access to our whole being and it's often described as the body of fear. Fear Body and the fundamental feature of it. Is that our sense of self has narrowed into being fearful self? We're no longer in touch with a sense of awareness or spirit or hard or any any of that vast mystery of what we are. We are a fearful self on our way into trouble so the first step of awakening from this transom. This is really what we're looking at in. This class is to recognize okay body of fear. Trans caught in something. And we start sentence the body and it's tension we start feeling the squeeze and we might notice and take a little time with this there couple major domains that we get caught him when we're tensing against the future and one of the big ones that many of us is a fear of failure that what's coming up. I'M GONNA FAIL. I'm not gonNA perform well and then they'll be consequences all be rejected so we each have our version of how we're GONNA fall short but it matters a whole lot to us because falling short means we get kind of pushed out of the tribe so to speak so a while ago a cartoon these two sharks and conversation and one to the other. The pressure to be great is too much. I'd rather be known as the just okay White Shark so conversation about this fear of failure with a friend last week and she said all my life. I have been trying to figure out what my deepest fear was and I've just toggle between is it the fear of being bad you know being a failure. Ours is the fear of loneliness being separate and we started talking about that and she said she would play it out say well what if. I was just really bad but I wasn't lonely are what if I was like completely lonely but I wasn't bad and she realized when she really sorted out that the worst twists fear of separation that it was the isolation but usually they came together because when she felt bad she felt cut off but I think it's really powerful to realize. How much are sensitive? Not Okay goes hand in hand with them working to be cut off and removed from any real connection with others so this fear failure and then there's the fear of missing out foam. Oh which many of us really know close in daily of not getting something we want where fear of not getting that connection with another person fear of not having something workout financially or a chance to impress or gain influence or have an adventure have another experience that matters so grasp after gratification and it and it goes to spiritual realms to the sphere missing out. I noticed people. Retreats will be sharing experiences. And there's a few like God that person was sitting all blissful and dissolved into Rainbow Light and I've just been like dealing with my neurosis and so it's like in spiritual life to fear of missing out. I I remember longtime ago. Actually one of my father's favorite stories of two men who their friends that have these spiritual conversations about what was possible. And really they believed in the afterlife and they were really fascinated with what they would be able to experience and they made an agreement as they got older that Horford died. I wouldn't some way send a message about what it was like. What was the experience? And so one of them died and took some months but the other one start having seances and so on and finally he heard his voice and he confirmed it was San many said. So what's it like? What's the afterlife? Like and his friend said well we we? We have sex and we sleep then we eat and we have sacked so many sleep then goes over nervous and expensive. Wow so that's what happens like heaven I'm not having a Moose in Wyoming. I don't know what you believe. That's one version of reincarnation so a fear of missing out and then our deepest fear really and this is the fundamental the loss of our life. And that's the sense of living with the uncertainty and fragility of our own existence. And we each have that. It's again rigged into our nervous system. And so while we might be fixated on a particular thing if we scrape beneath the surface will find that there's fear and often at set deep fragility of you know how to preserve me the existences self. So the path to waking up from tramps is to get it okay in the transit fear. That's the beginning of waking up just to know what's happening and once we identify it then there's enough presence to pause and deepen attention and this is where we're going now. How do we deepen attention? So we've noticed it. Okay I'm caught. I'm shrunk again I'm fixated. I'm spinning and strangling worries. Okay now what but if we noticed that we can pause now in Asian artwork and this is also the gateways of temples and the dollars and so on a lot of the way it's a -pected the spiritual transformation is depicted is with these animal headed deities these very aggressive and fearful and rage looking gods and goddesses and that the only way you can to the center of the Manala are into the temple gates is to go through a passageway through these Rachel Scary Deities and the message in that and the message that we get really in the wives teachings of all cultures are to wake up from the transit fear. We actually have to go through the fear and s awake away as possible.

Cortisol Executive Wyoming Horford
Just For Tonight, Pretend You Don't Know Me

Modern Love

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Just For Tonight, Pretend You Don't Know Me

"Today were day one of your relationship how would you act? How would they respond? Would you fall in love again? Tim Kreider in his girlfriend. Tried to find out. He writes about their experiment in his essay. Just for tonight. Pretend you don't know me. His essays read by actor and comedian. Nick Kroll he stars in the film Olympic Dreams in select theaters now like many couples. My girlfriend and I agree that Valentine's Day is a commercial holiday last year. Neither of US wanted to do anything. Traditionally romantic like go out for a fancy dinner. We wanted instead to do something scandalous. We had a wish list of activities. We'd been gradually checking off and talked over a few possibilities. We settled on one of my suggestions we would go to a bar that neither of US frequented pretend to be strangers and I would try to pick her up. We'd been dating for eight months long enough to get comfortable with each other. Getting comfortable is one of the pleasures of being a long term relationship. Not Having to put up a first date front getting takeout and watching TV being boring together. It's a relief to not have to be on to feel free to be an unattractive mood or display one of your weird neuroses without worrying. The other person will finally realize the truth about you but this is also a hazard of relationships. You can take your partner for granted and quit trying to impress couples. Forget how to flirt or that. They're attracted to anyone else and get bored with each other in themselves until the date emerges that one of them has a whole secret life in a fair or neurotic correspondence a hidden kink in X. of some unexpected type or gender. Neither of US was practiced at role playing. We're not into elaborate schoolgirl. Professor applicant employer or princess. Hot Scenarios. We weren't gonNA pretend to be other people. We were going to be ourselves in a parallel reality in which we hadn't met. We both worried we might just feel stupid and WANNA quit. There was some last-minute waffling she was having a bad day and I told her we could postpone if she wasn't in the mood but she decided to rally. We establish some code. Words was a warning and another to call the whole thing off walking to the bar that night to meet my own girlfriend. I was nervous. I had freaked out over what to wear choosing a Barstool felt as fraught with possibilities and drawbacks as an opening chess. Move IN THE END. I settled on a stool to away from a guy at the end of the bar. Leaving my girlfriend that choice to sit beside either him or me. I took out the book I had brought Nabokov's Pale fire whose narrators also pretending to be someone else and waited when she arrived. She wounded me by taking the stool next to the other guy. I couldn't take the one next to you. She later said that would have been too easy. She said she had even considered sitting on the other side of the bar from me making eyes at me from there. I have no idea how to pick someone up on the other. Side of a barn would certainly have failed disgrace myself. It's relevant to mention here that my girlfriend is Voluptuous she tired long ago of men's staring at her cleavage and now dresses in severe black clothing with high necklines and austere copper accessories. That look like machine. Parts or totemic objects so when she slid onto her stool in a tight sleeveless shirt that clung to her breasts and bared her midriff. It had roughly the same warm disorienting effect on me of a half. A dilaudid chewed her skirt with an angled hemline that showed off. Her thighs only added feeling. She took a book out of her person opened. It also Pale fire. We reading it together as winter project. The other guy was also reading a book. It's the end of the Bar Book Club. I said as an opening gambit. Hey other guys said. Did you know you too or reading the same book? We both feign surprise and the three of us got into a conversation. Other guys book was a collection of essays that sounded pretty good alarmingly. He turned out to be smart and well read because of course. New York is full of smart. Well read people vying with their formidable educations and charm for mates. He was a lawyer and not even a boring lawyer but one who did something interesting and cool. It seemed to me that my girlfriend was talking with him. More than me. It began to seem as if other guy might be doing better with her than I was. And that it was by no means a foregone conclusion that I would win her. I had begun to both like and feel sorry for this guy since he had no idea. He was a supporting player in our private game. And I hoped had no actual chance with her but also hate him. WanNa best him in combat. My girlfriend and I had one scene to male candidate fighting over a female goose squawking furiously and beating the water with their wings and grappling at each other snaking throats with their bills. Because no offense. I'll geese look pretty much alike. It was hard to say which goose won the attacker or defender. But I knew that I wanted to be the goose that ended up with the girl. Not the WHO flew off honking and ignominious defeat. Thank God the guy's wife eventually showed up with a colleague of hers. They were both writers for a TV. Show assured us we had never seen who got together every Tuesday night to watch the new episode. They were all interesting people. We liked them but also we couldn't break character. We had felt self conscious and uncertain about this plan to start out with but now that are private game had become an uncontrolled experiment involving other people we were committed gotten real. Having to maintain our pose of being strangers in front of a third party also forced us to reintroduce ourselves to ask each other. So what do you do when? Oh what neighborhood do you live in? And we had to try and answer without being boring into listener each other's answers and new. My girlfriend said later that she was sure that we would have dropped the act. Fifteen minutes in if not for the presence of these strangers it also kept our role play tethered to reality. She was forced to be more realistically flirtatious treating me like a stranger at a bar with some wariness and respectability instead of just inviting me back to her place after one drinker having sex with me in the bathroom just before our three new friends left. The lawyer gave US each card. And said I'm here Tuesday if you want to keep her book club going? I thought he gave me a collegial guy. Look of good luck or congratulations. After they left asked my girlfriend if she would let me pay for our drinks I was anxious asking and is thrilled when she accepted as I would've been had I been meeting her for the first time. Let us draw the curtain of discretion over the evening's conclusion except to say that it is a singular experience to have awkward drunken hookup. Sex with your own girlfriend. This wasn't about spicing up. A relationship gone stale. I'm not necessarily recommending this particular game to others. What I would recommend is what it did for us. It reminded us that. Despite the illusion of familiarity are months together may have fostered. My girlfriend and I are still strange to each other telling each other stories about our romantic and sexual pass as something of the same effect reminding me that she is a whole person of whom. I only know a recent narrow sample with a long history of relationships flings and fantasies a whole spectrum of desire much of which may be invisible to me. This is frightening but also exciting. It's easy to get complacent and imagine that the narrowband your partner allows you to see or the only one you're comfortable looking at is all there is in the end. Our game was not just an aphrodisiac but also a tonic. A reminder that she could if she wanted go home with someone else any night she wants although I trust her and believed that she loves me. I still have to win her once in a while. Maybe it'll become a tradition for us. A ritual reminder of a perennial truth. Assuming we get to do it again but no one has guaranteed another Valentine's Day.

United States Partner Nick Kroll Bar Book Club Tim Kreider Valentine New York Nabokov Professor
What Children Need to Succeed in School... and Life with Rick Ackerly

Janet Lansbury Podcast

10:48 min | 1 year ago

What Children Need to Succeed in School... and Life with Rick Ackerly

"In school is the same as thriving in life. We need the same traits and you have of course the longtime perspective as a problem solver type administrator you work directly with a lot of the children when they were having issues and I was wondering if you had seen certain trends or noticed certain traits that stood out as science that children could thrive in these environments. Well the most important research if someone could read only one thing it would be Alison. Got Nick. She's written a couple at least a couple of really good books or go to one of her. Ted Talks the core concept is that kids are not. Fda vessels to be filled up with information. They're not so much needing to be trained. They are scientists that they are born scientists and the every move they make for the first five years of their lives is testing the environment so every move they make hypothesis and they test that hypothesis against that reality and they readjust the hypothesis and they keep going like that every minute of every day. They're studying how people react. How bill relationships how to make friends how to collaborate everything from playing with legos to building a treehouse or playing a game eating dinner helping the Family? Prepare for dinner all of that. They're learning how to make it in the world so the by the time they walk in the door of a kindergarten they have been doing research on the world for forty three thousand hours but the most important thing which is ignored by most schools and not handled that well by many parents is that they think we have to do stuff to kids to get them educated and that's completely opposite. We have to create the conditions in which we facilitate then doing it while they are the experts at this right. That's what Alison Gopnik says. It's actors if they are the experts. Well they really are because they're built to learn more in these early years than in the whole rest of their lives put together in terms of gathering knowledge. So we don't want to get in the way of that. We want to support that understand that they know what they're doing. Yes treat them as if they know what they're doing and of course they need our boundaries to help keep them safe and keep the appropriate but yes absolutely. I love that you brought up Alison Gopnik. Because I'm in love with all the understanding that she's brought to the public about the way children learn how again they are the experts and they've got the tools and we do make that mistake. I think as parents even when we understand this research that they are absorbing and learning so much in these early years it can be tempting to want to say well let me give them numbers and letters and colors math problems. Let me put were stuff into them. But the way that taking things in is so much more profound. They're practicing their higher learning abilities. What's right yeah? I think it's very important for parents who are looking forward to school or looking for terror to school or whatever anxiety fear or confidence. I hear over and over again. The main thing is reading. It's all back. Readings will first of all. It's not all about reading but let's just say it is all about reading the average age at which a child is physiologically. Ready in every way is six and a half. Which is why I grade is when it used to be reading his taught quote taught but the range at which someone is ready to read is anywhere from three years old to nine years old not when they do read but when they're physiologically and neurologically ready to read that varies a lot between kits and our whole culture is. Oh my God. We gotta get reading early if they're not reading by the time they're ready for kindergarten. You know they're going to be failing that is like trying to take a car that in second gear and drive it sixty miles an hour. You have to work with the child at their point of readiness and they can be ready for other things if the put words in front of him and there is bounce off the page. That's fine that's fine. See what they are ready to do and help them do things that they're ready to do. It'll all feed into reading when it's time for them to read because the entire world their their environment is so full of letters numbers and everybody else is doing it at some point. They're going to want to do it and they'll in their own way figure out how to do it. I didn't read till I was in fifth grade and got a great education. I went to Williams college went to Harvard Graduate School in a written. The bucks it's not a killer if you can't read. How was that handled when you were in school? Because that's of course the danger when we do try to harness some types of knowledge. The children aren't ready for that. They loose confidence in themselves as learners. What gets thwarted? Is this most precious thing that we have. Which is I'm capable. I can do things I can learn and I know what I'm doing. That is the precious part that we don't want to interfere with. How did that go for you? Were you made to feel less than or let's start with the blessings that made it easier. The first is that my parents didn't let on much that they were anxious about it and they didn't feel that anxiety to me. They acted as if I'm accountable to my teacher and the teachers accountable for doing whatever is necessary to get me to read. It wasn't that I couldn't read. It was that I was a slow reader. It didn't feel good to be behind other people in reading. I do remember in first grade. We were sitting in circles. And we're literally reading. See Jane Run. It lists those books and Johnny Red. See Jane Run. Look look and then it got to me an eye haltingly. Read the words that were in front of me and we went around the circle and it was okay a week later or something like that maybe the next day. Johnny is in a different group. I'm in this group and I said wait. Why is Johnny and that other group? H Johnny was my friend and be I compared myself to Johnny use. Johnny is heard of a benchmark for how I was doing and I thought I was keeping up with him and the teacher said that's the good reading group in your in the slow reading group and I went way where we have correct. I've been comparing myself to Johnny. And we're the same she said no you aren't. He's a better reader than you and that was a blow that was not good. It didn't ruin me and I kept trying to read and you know. My parents had books by the side of my bed. Mostly picture books but I learned how to read but one of the real blessings. I had as a dyslexia had been invented yet. I'm sure I would have been diagnosed with dyslexia. But it wouldn't have done me any good. I needed to learn how to read in my own way in the entire environment was conspiring to get me to read and I did. I'm still slow reader because I read every word in I think about it. I go back. My wife was very fast. Reader says in. Everybody says I'm a good reader. You're a bad reader but the thing is I can read a whole book in a weekend but I don't remember a thing and you remember everything you read. So Lou in reader who's a bad reader schools and parents need to be very careful about getting all bent out of shape about reading and specially at an early age because there's so many other pathways to success not that there's nothing to worry about but worrying is not that constructive. That's all right. It's that thing of children not being able to learn as well when there's too much stress in the environment and what. You're also reminding me of your comment about comprehension. Is that when children are younger? There are some children that are vocalizing language much earlier than others. Parents get worried about that and yes of course like you said there's things to look at maybe get checked at some point but oftentimes that child is comprehending just as much if not more as the childhood speaking. Yes it's one of the neuroses. Our Society get there quicker faster sooner and you'll be better right so one of my daughter's she's a teacher. She has three sons none of them spoke at all fluently until four and a half years old. None of them. I don't know why but under those circumstances a lot of people including me might be inclined to will. They don't know what's going on. Maybe they're even stupid. They don't seem to know stuff that was wrong. They are so observant. They're picking up everything the words that we spoke to them. We're in their head and it really came clear to me when the first one for between four and a half five. He started to Stutter and his mother said. Gee maybe we should get tested and I said well. Let's just wait a little bit. I have a hypothesis that he's having a motor prop. He knows the words. Here's the words. He knows that meaning. He knows what's going on. But there are some glitch between that coming out of his mouth and sure. Enough is stuttering was working through this motor problem by five. He was speaking quite fluently. He's eleven now is getting good grades in school and you should see him in action. Absolutely no dysfunction whatsoever is right up there with everybody else. Just another example of in our society one of the neuro seizes is the faster you move up the ladder. The smarter better or successfully will be and that's wrong is just not correct. His No data to support that at all the La thing I feel like earlier is better in is for the parents to start trusting their child as a capable person because the comprehension thing. I see it in infants when you start talking to infants about what you're doing with them. They respond as if they understand because they do

H Johnny Alison Gopnik Johnny Red Administrator Jane Run TED Nick FDA Harvard Graduate School Williams LOU
"neurosis" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"You're listening to white coat. Black Art this week author Lawrence Weschler Intimate Biographical Oakland memoir up the late neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks most of you know something of the man because of his many books or from Robin Williams portrayal in the film Awakening Asari Dot. I thought Toilet Elisa I found it I found the connection. They also have identified as us before they came here in the Nineteen Twenty S. That's wonderful completely please. Weschler was their onset watching Robin Williams. Take on Oliver Sacks. The film home success came as the doctors. Case of writer's block was in remission. It was time for Weschler to put pen to paper and write his New Yorker profile of Sachs as Ashley found out the man who revealed so deeply the inner lives of his patients agonized about revealing himself. I mentioned earlier that after you've invested a lot of time three times a week and many many notebooks filled with his story interviewing him spending time with him interviewing people that he he knew and worked with Oliver Sacks. Asked you not to write the article that you were going to write the articles that you're going to write you knew that. He was struggling with some aspects of his life. But did you see that coming I guess it was up for grabs. I mean in other words at a certain certain point. During the four years that I was having this conversations he began to speak first glancing lay ever more Directly about the blight of his life the horror of his life that he was gay and it was clear that was going to be difficult and what we agreed to keep on having them and we'd see how things went and my hope was that that he would relax at Ed realize this nobody cares and I think his hope hope was that we could figure out a way to write the book that would have to talk about the gay homosexuality. He made a huge point very often that that this was the blight of his existence existence. But he tried to protect his science from it. He liked to think that his that his science had nothing to do with his being gay. And I think he's right except it has everything to do with his attitude towards being gay talk about the community the refuse that was. He refused himself in a kind of way. Had saying that you you couldn't write the book because because his being gay and refused because of it was the source of his empathy for for the patients when he saw I think that was partly it was also the case that the war moment in his career as an audacious horrified thing to realize that these people who'd been warehouse for thirty years without moving. We're completely alive inside and that he had because these extraordinarily wild drug experiences Eating County California which we're all bound up. Both with the gay scene was part but also even more importantly with his own complicated attitudes towards gay does he became a he at one. Point for many years for many months was was a complete speed freak phetamine addict but the point was to be able to account for how he could identify with people in some of these extreme states because he himself had been there himself with with the combination of the drugs and with his attitude towards his own refusal of himself and so at a certain point he just says no way you can do right about it without talking about Nice said really not and then he just. I'd rather not do it and I was never gonna out him if he didn't want to be outed so so we have to stop but that was not the end of the story Weschler and Sachs remained close friends for the rest of the doctor's life in two thousand five sacks was diagnosed with melanoma. My aunt is right. I his radiation therapy treatment was successful but in two thousand fifteen. The cancer returned three months before he died. He he almost ordered me. Okay Hey now do it. He said Luckily he himself had finally toward the end of his life. Relinquish this terrible chastity of the thirty five years. And he allowed himself to fall in love with a wonderful person. Billy Hayes writer and they had this great seven years and at even at first he still wouldn't come out and then toward the very end of that. He did. Write his own autobiography. What was it like for you to see that that that that seven year relationship knowing how difficult is struggle had been? Oh we were all of his friends at that point were were so delighted for him. So what did it feel like when he asked you at the end of his life to to write that book. I said at the time that I had had a aircraft carrier going two hundred miles an hour and had been told to stop at a dime and then thirty years later was told get back in. Nothing started up again. You know. And the propellers had fallen off the Edgar could it be pulled out the Gr- yeah it was. It was not easy and by the way it was an act of of of grieving. I mean that's how I dealt with my morning for him was sorting through complicated feelings. 'cause he wasn't an easy man he was. He was everything you know about him. That's that's wonderful is true true he was all that but he was also just incredibly exasperated and difficult person. We've thirty five years. You would come to our house. We'd have guests over you'd never or no whether it was lovely Oliver or or Oliver the asshole he could be incredibly rude. He had face blindness so part of the rudeness was he didn't know whether he knew the person who was talking to. And he was unaccountable. You couldn't rely on him in that sense. If you're one of his patients you could because he was fully invested there but he in some profound percents didn't know how to be a person in the world. He was your subject your friend Godfather to your daughter and I suspect teachers well. So what did you learn from him. I mean I think a lot of what I've been talking about has has pertinence to the journalistic enterprise. I I think I'm a better writer for having read him but also have forever and watched him work and and you know to be with somebody for thirty thirty five years and especially in his case. Watch him grow. Grow from that that neurotic. I salute relegated to the he was when I when we first met into this rate public intellectual Shaulis was quite wonderful. He made huge huge huge contributions and he basically changed forget the importance. The advert directors others for deaf people for people with face blindness the naming of diseases and and how it helped so many individuals in some ways. The biggest change was at his eighty second birthday just before he died the head of the Neurology Department at Columbia University got up and toasted him and said but nowadays when they go through the applications of recent doctors who do residencies in Raleigh at Columbia seventy percent mentioned mentioned Oliver Sacks. I mean the change that he helped bring about in in medicine from time in one thousand nine hundred seventy five when he was not colleague Nord but reviled for what he was doing to to kind of wait. Medicines being done now is just enormous in some ways. That was his greatest accomplishment. Quite a like I say. Thanks so much for speaking with me thank you. It's been good.

Oliver Sacks Lawrence Weschler writer Robin Williams Nineteen Twenty Sachs Billy Hayes Ed Eating County California Nice Nord Edgar Shaulis Neurology Department Columbia University Raleigh Ashley
"neurosis" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Wesley spent four long years following the polymath around from the Bronx State Psychiatric Hospital. Little to Sachs's old haunts in California and in London visiting colleagues and friends like the late. Jonathan Miller Wesley may even have helped sacks get through a period writer's block that lasted ten years he was also probably the first outsider get sacks to talk about being gay and then just as Wesley was about to write the article sacks asked him to stop because he wasn't comfortable being public about his sexuality Weschler put the profile on hold for the next three decades the two remained friends then in twenty fifteen when sex was dying of melanoma that had metastasized he told Weschler to crack. Open those boxes of old notes and write the profile. The resulting book is not an official biography but deep dive into a rather fallow period and saxes career before he became internationally famous as the beloved author of bestselling books like the man who mistook his wife for a hat. Weschler book gives us a rare glimpse into Sachs's life during that time period beginning in late June of Nineteen eighty-one and when he met sacks at his home on city island. Just off Manhattan. What do you remember but that first meeting you had with him at his home he was Working in in poor houses and institutions. He was incredibly neurotic. Wildly neurotic Florida erotic tab as I say trammelled in this writer's block which took the form of Raffle Mania? He was writing millions of words. Just not the right words about out this damn like book that I went to the bathroom at one point and the bath tub in his bathroom in this little clapboard house had three windows and in each of them was an air conditioning unit. Because he overheated all the time so we had three electric air conditioning units facing the bathtub and so that was weird and Ed he was incredibly strong He had been the California state heavy weightlifting champion at one point during a wild period of his life Ah. He was unbelievably clumsy. We would go on trains and he would rip off the train door by accident. You know just very awkward guy but what he got in the water. It was one of the most beautiful things you never see. It was. He was powerful. He was he was graceful and indeed one of the first times. We got a a a wrote he asked. Would we go for a row and shall we go for row. And we did. Our I was on our. He was a rower and he rode for two hours over two hours from city island over to the throngs bridge pylons and bath and at one point he says this by the way is my favorite swim it keeps growing and he says it's a little dangerous because the speedboats in these waters don't expect anybody be swimming especially late at night. He was a character and during those years those first four years it really. In retrospect were Hindus he could have easily. We have lost them. Luckily we got him out. Want to go back to his medical work. And as part of your research you went with Sachs's he did rounds at little sisters at the Bronx Psychiatric Hospital the Bronx State Hospital at At Beth Abraham which is where he'd had the awakenings of patients basically poor houses and as he said those those were where you could find the jewels and that you had all the time in the world. Nobody was expecting anything and so it was So he would spend hours and hours and hours with patients. You saw him in action they are. Yeah absolutely and struck you about that as I say he was a difficult person he was very self involved people. Sometimes it ask you know does does Does he ever talked himself. The answer was especially when he's talking to you I mean he And yet when he was with the patients Psychiatrist friend of his described described as he is a he is a doctor for the community of the refused and he himself identified with them. A great deal. We haven't talked talked about much till now but as as you do. Because of his own autobiography he was gay but he was deeply deeply closeted except for the brief period in California several years earlier and by the time I met him he'd been celebrate for fifteen years And he used to say I I was California. Can I just say come on. Nobody cares ears. Why do you care and and he would say I? It's true I live in my cell. The door flung open the dancing taking place on the other side of the walls of the prison. But I choose to stay in the cell you know and it was very tragic. His mother who had been a great surgeon. One of the first female surgeons agents. They'd been very close and she's when he was eighteen she said. I wish you'd never been born. So this kind of roiling kind of voice inside of him was there and effective effective much is outside life but when he was with patients he was completely there for them and I think partly because he he didn't exactly identify but he could imagine himself into their state. And you got to watch it every day when you went run around. So they haven't he. He got through to patients. There's one story for example that one of the the nuns told me there was a patient who had At the little sisters of the poor a poorhouse basically and she had a neuropathy of the hands yes she couldn't hold anything anymore and she was. She was very Catholic and very worried that she can hold the rosaries and Oliver had gone to the non inset. Could we glue Lou a set of rosaries to a ruler which he would be able to hold and the none was amazed at this. Jewish doctor would have that kind of identification but he was constantly coming coming up with ways to help people like that. That were very wonderful from doing this. Show and from my own work. I know well that what patients often want from their doctors as time time. They want a sense that they're being heard. Do you think the part of the reason people mired him and his books because they saw in him what what they might not be getting from their own physicians especially the lengths. You went with his patients. I'm sure that's part of it. One of the Early reviews of the book In England with by Dr was yeah sure we go spend hours and hours with people you get to notice sickness but he who has time early on he was in a migraine clinic and whenever a patient would ask you know. I don't care about all this the cure he'd say well you probably should go see some of the other doctors and whenever a patient would ask one of the other doctors but what does I mean when I'm having you shouldn't book go talk to Dr Sacks and you would add although they only got paid at the rate of each patient so you could talk to them for fifteen minutes. He would talk to them for hours. Charged for fifteen minutes and drove the other doctors crazy with this in your book. You talk about doctor. Sax Concept Septic Than Urology of the soul. What did he mean by that? Well that medicine was obsessed with the disease. The patient had and he was much more about the patient who had the disease He was interested in existential medicine. How are you what is it like to be you you but more than that? What's your story? Meaning he would take patients who were abandoned who had been treated like objects in these warehouses and he would engage them and together. The patient and the doctor would create this narrative and the narrative would feature the patient as the subject it to the story so it was just the object and this was hugely important therapeutically. Forget whether or not case histories are value to to medicine. I think they are to treat these patients. You had to treat them as if they had a soul. Let's say or as if they were. It was the science of individual issues like a contradiction in terms because it's society is usually of populations and so he began talking about the neurology the soul now if you asked him whether he believed in an afterlife the sole said des- embodied sold makes no sense to me I'm fascinated by the incarnation the embodiment of the soul. If you if you if you ask to what about afterlife you know he'd say Hell we're we we're in heaven all the time you know. He had complete interest in the PHARMACOPOEIA. In all kinds of you know other kinds is a science and at and the things that they would do but when it came to be a doctor. The emphasis was on bead with that particular patient with the idiosyncratic in the secrecy of the patient the originality of the patient he would Eddie Rothesay officers patients. You're the doctor. You're the trade me. It had a treat you in his book sacks did the most vivid portraits of people with the most curious maladies. He enlightened us as you said. He delighted US but some say he exploited the stories of his patients. It's ripping off the title of the Sax Bestselling Book The man who mistook his wife for a hat the geneticist and disability activist Tom. Shakespeare dubbed Sacks and. I'm quoting here. The man man who mistook his patients for a literary career. How did he take that criticism? I think it bothered him to some degree in annoyed him but in fairness he had pretty good sense of what he wasn't he wasn't that The number of patients who didn't write about but who we treated with every bit as much kind of fellow feeling he really was beloved. It was it was the highlight of their week when he was there and talking.

California Dr Sacks Sachs Jonathan Miller Wesley city island writer Weschler patients Psychiatrist Bronx State Psychiatric Hospit Manhattan Florida official US London Ed Bronx Psychiatric Hospital Tom Lou Oliver
"neurosis" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"The late great Dr Oliver Sacks I'm addicted to patients I can't do without them I need to have the feeling of of these other lives which are become a part of my own. Empathy isn't enough. I wish I could be in their shoes. No more exactly what a slack. Most of you know something of the man because of his many books or from Robin Williams portrayal in the film awakenings. There's someone was extraordinary was a season of rebirth innocence. A Miracle Fifteen patients and for us Caretakers the film was adapted from Sachs's nineteen seventy-three masterpiece of nonfiction by the same name. It was a chronicle all of his work in the late nineteen sixties as a neurologist at the Beth Abraham Hospital in the Bronx where he cared for patients with encephalitis lethargic or sleeping sickness weakness. A strange condition that caused patients to be catatonic unable to move or speak other doctors thought. The patients minds were empty. Not Saks some of them. I found had been in the hospital for thirty or forty years. One wonders what I what was going on inside these people. Aw in an interview on PBS. Saks describes the moment he realize that these statue like patients on the outside. We're alive and self aware on the inside inside one patient. He sneezed and the suddenly book. The Parkinson some of the Catalina and he moved and talked about thirty seconds and then he froze OPPA game. And but in that thirty seconds. You know a whole personality and something of human life. It'd be revealed. The title awakenings refers to Sachs's pioneering work with what was then a new treatment for Parkinson's called L.. doper within a week in some patients. Even less they you came to the awakened Their foods and faces melted smiles appeared. I started to to look around and get Brian twinkle. I'm used voices appeared Abused my soul started to work with the second effects of L. Dope were only temporary but the Oliver Sacks book that came from that work left an indelible mark. The thing is that's not the way things started out when the book was first published. That's according to one man who knew the famous MD arguably better than Sachs's own mother author and former New Yorker staff writer Lawrence Weschler when the book came out in one thousand nine hundred seventy three and this is his masterpiece. It's one of the. I think we may be one of the top ten books of medical literature of the last half of the twentieth century. But when it it came out it was widely dismissed. It wasn't believed people. Doctors generally who are very much the quantitative approach Were upset upset. That didn't have to follow those rules and they didn't believe it was true. They thought he was making it up and so forth and in case it was just anecdotal. Weschler is the author author of a new memoir about Sachs called. And how are you Dr Sacks. I had a chance to talk with him at the Vancouver Writers Festival rather than welcome to the show. I'm going to ask the tradition Doctor Sax. And how are you Mr Weschler. Thank you Well I'm on Book Tour Right now for the book. And so I feel a bit like Willy Loman Lohmann but but the back story to his book is fascinating as the book itself. In the early nineteen eighty s Ren Weschler started working on a lengthy New Yorker Profile colliver Sachs who at that point was largely unknown. I had a philosophy teacher at Santa Cruz. Man named Morris Maurice Nathanson and as I was graduated in nineteen seventy four. A year after awakenings came out. He thrust a copy of awakenings in my chest almost broke my ribcage at. He said read this and I and I did read right away but when I finally did read it I was just drawn to it at add a to give you some idea of how little it was. Read a few many years ago. When I was working with Oliver Oliver? I went and interviewed the publisher in England of the Book and in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine years and he told me that the first edition of the book in hardcover where was fifteen hundred copies. They had still not sold it out so like nobody was reading him. But it Wa- I could see Amelia's didn't take much of you. Read it to realize what a great virtually richly Melville Ian kind of book. It is it's just. It's such a amazing. What did you see in it? I always beautifully written a heroin story. Sorry the the story of these people who had been frozen for thirty years and and and then had been just warehoused and he realized that some of the people at this place he was working out or different than others. And even that was an amazing to realize and and I I remember as I read it. The the empathy for the patients was amazed. You're curious about the doctor himself because he was there as an act of person. But you you didn't get sense of what it was like for him and in particular when when he gave them the drug L. Dope how I how he could've figured out when nobody else could that they were alive live inside which was amazing but then when he gave them they'll dope how wonderful it wasn't then immediately afterwards how horrifying when the side effect what must have been like to go so I was curious serious about that by the way. One of my favorite comment ever about that book. The first person Oliver sent it to was his friend W H Auden and so what he said he sent the bound galleys and within a few days Auden who was laid on. This is the master of adjectives the master of really really clean perceptions startling perceptions and his letter to our was. I WanNa thank you for this delightful book. It's it's crazy to think of that book as delightful but it is delightful. It is heroin and terrifying and yet the humanity that comes through threw it said delightful thing too. There's full of light and full of grace and so forth. He needed Oliver Sacks needed that approval. He it dead anyway. He didn't get that approval and and as from his medical clinic the from the medical colleagues at all that hurt him. Yeah I mean I think it was very it really matter to him and and both of his parents were doctors. Two of his older brothers were doctors. You know it really mattered. And it kind of crushed him in a way and he then had a experience partly in his despair. He went on a hike in Norway in the mountains above the fjords without telling anybody where he was by himself and he had a run in with a bowl and went off the side of a cliff down toward the fjords. He broke his leg in a spectacular way which had all kinds of dramatic existential neurological sequels to in his recovery in England right about that and he was stuck in a writer's block for ten years on that book which was everything about his anxieties about whether he would be believed whether you'd all those sorts of issues very live for him and that's where you met him. Yeah that's the moment when you met him What do you remember.

Dr Oliver Sacks colliver Sachs Lawrence Weschler Oliver Oliver Saks heroin Robin Williams England Beth Abraham Hospital Bronx L. Dope sickness Willy Loman Lohmann W H Auden Brian twinkle Morris Maurice Nathanson Doctor Sax Parkinson Santa Cruz
Makeup and Raising Young Women

Fat Mascara

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Makeup and Raising Young Women

"Any of you as are pregnant have been pregnant or mom's whatever I would love to hear your stories stories so I I see you guys are my friends so it's going to be the real real. I've talked about this before last summer. I went off of this chronic headache medic medication migraine medication take. I've been taking it for almost ten years twice a day. It's intense obviously it doesn't cure them but it certainly curbs that. Will you have to be off of it for like a month author so I think it's a two weeks but mine are all just like just get off for a month before you start trying so I went off of it boom five pounds now. I'm not trying to trigger if you if this is uncomfortable features fast-forward triggering neurosis is but I have like neurosis about that stuff like so wait wait so many women do I was freaking. I was like Oh my God. It's going up up up and they're gonNA try and I'm GonNa like just like all summer just gaining gaining gaining and then he like. I was this summer actually last summer. I never went off at for like oh I I may. I went back on it like a month. After so this I mean it was really hard like mentally for me and then I got pregnant like you you know I'm very fortunate I I realized that got pregnant very quickly and but that the post weird withdrawal weight gain plus like the progressive weight gain has been really like mentally hard for me and I feel really vein in really crappy saying this because it's like if the focus should be on the baby not like your jeans means. No it's not a vein thing you're talking about something. That makes you feel. This has been like a lifelong thing for me so as listeners probably know so anyway. I'm getting upset about Aww I'm trying to like. Shelve my feelings and then I came out this weekend that I was pregnant. The requisite in Instagram my instagram posts not have like the drama of John's like dogs and and lie of I got a lot out of ninety nine percent amazing congratulations like so there was nothing complex about also is but a couple of people. This is what I want to talk sorry. It's like the long wind wind up. We're like I knew it and I thought that it was like six cents thing. They're like you've been bigger. You got bigger your body's change or I saw that photo. Oto and like I have to tell you and I don't mean the photo of my two days before because I did look kind of pregnant. I regret posting that but it really really like what world guys just. Please don't ever say that to someone. I noticed you were getting fuller or you have that glow and then they do with their hands. It makes you look like Palmer customer for like people think they have carte blanche. When you talk about pregnancy. Your body becomes like a public issue. Yes and I really doubting your belly or whatever we're not even talking about. It's just like all of a sudden. You realize Oh right people look at my body every day. Yes whereas when you're not pregnant you wouldn't even know that people are looking yeah yeah. It's just kind of brought new attention so I don't really have a resolution for this but if anyone has any stories they wanNA share with me six to seven months. No no my God yeah I mean i. I know it's only gonNA to get like more extreme. You'll have a resolution because you'd probably be liking of dealing with the aftermath are here for you. The listeners are here for you and you. WanNa talk about it as it goes on. No one's GonNa think it's like whatever making baby stopped complaining about feeling overweight or fat. That's how you feel and if you and if you know how many people struggle to get to this point so I understand that people make grateful Bogo. It's about the healthy baby. I'm very concerned about the health of the baby but that doesn't mean you're not a woman who can't feel I'm fine. I'm I'm finding it hard with me like we're in support of you. I do have a trainer right now just to keep me strong and I'll tell you lose weight but to keep your muscles strong trainer. Akron Oxford name is Vanessa and she is. She specializes like she works a lot with prenatal and like Oh cool Sommese throughout the pregnancy. Don't worry we're not GONNA talk turned. TURN INTO A MOTHERHOOD POD cow but you know there are beauty effects to all of this and your health and whatever I feel we should like sugar. Let's get into a lot of you. Ask what kind of products are using when you're not doing what you doing. We'll get into so that soon so anyway thanks for your patience and thanks for all the well wishes from everyone so many thoughts running through my head as as this whole journey continues and I'm paying a lot of attention to like little girls on the street and what they're doing doing and how they look like. I'm looking at other people and like judging by I am. I think it's very interesting to raise a girl especially especially when we are in this world and we work in the beauty industry. Yeah we're we're. We're for you know like this is not. I'm not sorry I'm not in academia. You know like this hi where he's going to be exposed to some glamour. Some Glenmore I mean Jeff Works in beauty. Is Kinda crazy so I've been thinking you know what. Whoa I like Mommy and me makeovers Manny's and all that and like I I see girls who are my God. They're like twelve years old and swear to God. I didn't look that hot when I was twenty five yeah and we even in had on facebook. I was looking. I think the woman was Whitney. She was talking about her daughter's ten and is it. Is it time to wear makeup because her daughter showed interest in. I believe Brow Gel which I was like. ooh Yes but also it is. It is cosmetics yeah and so I I remember like there was like there was the what are they called like entry the Gateway Gateway Makeup Okay Yeah for me. It was like covergirl lip slicks. Remember those were I. You had your doctor Pepper Bonnie Bell Labs cars though I've said Bonnie any bell recently in no buddy under the age of thirty has any idea what I'm talking about. That's very just called. Lip smackers saw develop UNITA rebrand call us yeah and then so then it was and then I look good hit hit out. Keep going towards a more tinted one and see if my mom notice that's funny. Color payoff was shit on the cover purpose. They were Niki Taylor was not detail and it might caboodle. I had that and like a couple of other things. That didn't weren't real make. How old were you at this point so I think my aunt ellen gave me my first makeup. I WANNA say eighth grade so I but I was young for my year so I think I was thirteen twelve twelve Ralph okay okay but you you're like in the light stuff right it was like before. I even got my period yeah okay. I got my period at thirteen. I guess I'm a late bloomer. Whatever but I was thinking. Maybe that's when you do it when you hit puberty but girls seemed very make up even younger yeah. I've always been like a little embarrassed at how young I was wearing over you when you started wearing. We spoke about this a few years ago so like if if you've heard this we're just once again young when I started going to middle school so I was sent your October September birthday. I turned twelve going into middle school but I didn't like go from like nothing. I I didn't like Gr- gradually stuff. I like like the kissing coolers and the yeah whatever the role on you went all in but my mom was like down inside. Maybe she thought I don't like this needs a letter experiment like I remember we went to the clinic counter. I got my three step system a little black honey eh like this. No I mean this. We listen also guys. It was the ninety my niece. The aesthetic was different. I got what just exactly my mom had which was liquid like perfectly balanced foundation foundation. Yes he's funny. Show in there that that aid was this is why I go back to the ascetic. Remember it was all about like the Matt Studio fix it was like

Chronic Headache Bonnie Bell Labs Niki Taylor Facebook Vanessa Palmer GR John Akron Oxford Covergirl Unita Manny Jeff Works Whitney Bonnie Ellen Ralph Ninety Nine Percent Seven Months Twelve Years
"neurosis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"neurosis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Neurosis pro democracy protests continue in Hong Kong sometimes involving more than words the fifteen year holding in their hands but they have the call because I can't have big bricks that they pried up from the sidewalk we've been following six that the police are taking bamboo poles from scaffolding and waiting for police to pass by over bridges and then pulling them on to the police that CBS is rainy Inocencio in Hong Kong more fallout from the royal family having one to the scandal surrounding the late Jeffrey abstain here apparently committed suicide in a federal holding so in New York a few weeks ago after years of convictions and new investigations of sex trafficking among the famous names in his orbit at one time or another Donald Trump Bill Clinton Britain's prince Andrew has now offered explanations of their relationship the second statement in less than a week from Buckingham Palace came from prince Andrew himself it says at no time during his friendship with Jeffrey obscene did he witness or suspect any behavior of the sort that subsequently led to his arrest and conviction correspondent Kenneth Greg Brazil's military is joining the fight against fires that are sweeping parts of the Amazon sending troops and water dropping aircraft as the outbreak of blazes draws international criticism this sue CBS news WBZ news time to all three the Subaru retailers of New England all wheel drive.

Hong Kong CBS Inocencio New York Bill Clinton Britain Buckingham Palace Jeffrey Amazon New England Donald Trump prince Andrew Kenneth Greg Brazil Subaru fifteen year
Why Do Cats Chase Laser Pointers?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Cats Chase Laser Pointers?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you could use those miles tore travel expenses flights hotels rental cars and more just book and pay for travel using her venture card and redeem your miles tore the cost of capital one what's in your wallet credit approval required capital one bank usa n eight welcome to brain stuff the production of i heart radio whom he reigned lauren vogel bomb here it's hard to say whether human wielding a laser pointer or eight cat chasing the light is having more fun while you said chuckling on the couch twitching that six dollar device around near hand you're cat is experiencing real moments of her roic desperation and she leaps over the ottoman scrambles up the wall after that tiny speck of light she's never able to catch it's great exercise indoor cats but why the cats bind this activity compelling first daughters cats are attracted anything but allows them to stop pray even just play we spoke with doctor stephanie bornes we'll an animal behavior specialist at the veterinary medical center at tufts university she said the laser simulates the movement to praise so it attracts attention and gets the chase in pounce on it is certainly a play behavior in young cats and maybe an older indoor cats is well however it may also be brent expression of the predatory behavior that is if you will hijacked by laser movement wildcats feral cats and even you're sweet spoiled indoor outdoor kittens who sleeps under the covers with you are single minded solitary predators they're wired to spend a significant portion of their waking outdoor hours stopping their food in since indoor cats are often willfully under stimulated in this regard playing with a laser satisfies that predatory urge but it's just a moving point of light insubstantial obviously not mouse cats know that right from many cats the laser pointer is compelling in a way that makes you wonder if you two are at the same party well in some ways you're probably not but we also spoke with doctor john brad shot at the university of bristol school of veterinary science an author of the trainable cat cat sense he said it's unlikely the cats perceived alight from a laser pointer in the same way we do because in several ways their eyes work differently ars we both have eyes point forwards giving a similar abilities perceiving how far away something is but the similarities pretty much end there cording to bradshaw although cats react strongly to de red dodge produced by a laser pointer it almost certainly doesn't have anything to do with the color that's because pat eyes are not sensitive to the color red so they most likely see the light as white or yellow but cats are more sensitive to movement then we are because their eyes connect to their brains it's differently than ars bradshaw said i just spent this is the main attraction of the pointer for the cat the movement is really exciting and even when we think were holding the pointer steady slight tremble in her hands probably generates enough movement to keep the cat entrusted so laser pointer interests kitties obviously because it gives them something compelling hunt in the playoffs but some that are narian think laser playtime might be psychologically taxing cat as it has been constantly chasing chasing after something they'll never be able to catch some that say the skin leads neurosis which leads the symptoms like over grooming but bradshaw things not he said i don't agree that using a laser pointer to amuse you're cat will make it neurotic cats hunt their toys all the time and the fact they never actually succeed in killing any of them doesn't seem to do the cat any harm there may be a few cats become obsessed with laser pointers end for those it would probably be best to ration their exposure but for the average muggy a few minutes of chasing the red dot around department should simply provide some of these mental and physical stimulation the indoor cats specially need boeing's while agrees the theme main concern should not be what you're using to exercise their indoor cat so much is whether you're doing it at all she said insufficient stimulation is a serious problem for indoor cats cats are highly territorial solitary hunters spend much of their days forging for small prey animals i'm not advocating letting them outside to be killed he'll by predators are hit by cars but i do advocating managing their environment as one does any captive wild animal so they have the opportunity to do what they've evolved to do what does that entail a while explained regular opportunities predatory play an exercise feeding with forging toys safe opportunities to monitor wildlife front window seats plenty of vertical space and hiding spots should all be part of a tax environment cats are not or rather should not be low low maintenance pets to keep a cat requires effort in understanding to be able to provide satisfactory life and in indoor context i think the laser play it could be included in overall plan of enrichment today's episode is my windshield and produced by tyler clang brings productions i heart radio is how stuff works promoting this lots of other stimulating topics are home planet how stuff works dot com for more podcast my heart radio

Six Dollar
"neurosis" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on Kickass News

"Well, you know when I was going through school. You know in psychology you declare a program to go into go into clinical or counseling or school or research, or educational clinical is the area that most people think of as a as a therapist dealing with neurosis and psychosis, and you know, doing seeing patients and doing therapy. And that was the program. I was admitted to and while I was there. It was an I pay APA approved program. They launched a new program behavioral medicine program. And so I decided rather than having a a minor area that I would complete two cores the clinical core and behavioral medicine core. So it's to PHD cores only one degree, but to ph D course, and my focus within it was brain and central nervous system. And you know, when when somebody gets injured car wreck on the job, whatever they break, an arm or hip or something. Fifty thousand dollars insurance settles it goes away when somebody gets a brain or spinal cord injury you now talking millions of dollars life plans, they hire experts to come and testify..

psychosis APA Fifty thousand dollars one degree
"neurosis" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"It's all the boot, the money. Are you have you been in the booth punch you in the news? Did you see Yogi? Do the skewed. When you were a boot, you can't even do it properly. Don't too. When you're in a Boot boat. on your head. It's funny. You do realize the rule, right? I'm counting how many times you're hitting me hit you? Ten times harder. I'm Diane. Diane twice as many eye-massaging your muscle. Sure you are. I am. If that's the case, you better hit harder because you're not hitting hard enough. That's big ass in muscle right there. We'll ups. I gotta belief that out. Sorry. That's she. Okay. Think tomorrow and I might be the dad jokes episode Jesus. Yeah. Thinking that might be it. See you're gonna sit here and tell all of your latest jokes. On toes, dad jokes, and then I'm going to tell my jokes, and then I'm gonna explain what the differences between a dad joke, which is lame and a Mike joke, which is actually funny. And then we're going to put up a poll on Facebook and you can decide if the Mike jokes are actually dad jokes and solve this argument once and for all. No, we won't be. Yes, we will. No, you can't control what's posted, but I can now. And will. Yep. Anything that goes up taking it down. Don't want polls. I hate polls polls are not accurate for anything. Pulse UK. Have you not learned this. You will come to your opinion, I suppose. Second. For me. I think that people's neurosis are always just called quirks so. And so has this quirk or that quirk. But it's no different than the dog nosing his bowl or rolling on his back. Like we all know the person that, like if you say their name like their whole name to get real quietly, what what did I do wrong naked? I'll defensive. He's doing rolls over on his back, would've do here. Let me be submissive q. So I think it's interesting that people in dogs do the same thing, but with dogs, you know, we call it in a row, sees foot, the people. It's just a quirk. Now, some people are neurotic to are. They you think? I think it depends on how many you have. How many people in one place? I think it depends on how many neuroses math? Oh yeah. If you're neurotic, but absolutely everything, then you're no longer quirky, your neurotic NIA. That's pretty good. Pretty good. Anyway, you were going to tell everybody about what we're doing this weekend. I did. And then we're told you, we won't go into the dodger game, and we're going to go out to dinner. And then you brought up something about. Remember what you brought up that. You are making fun of my accent. Oh, yeah, that's right. Because you said maybe the two of us could make five. His accent. And then everybody went silent. So it was actually the natural breaking point. Okay, perfect. One is cut all it up anyway. So that's what I wanted to talk about was like, are crazy weekend, which we seem to have lots of every time now. And you realize realize that like the next weekend is like well, Labor Day and following weekend after that is the first cross country meet and the first soccer game on the same day? Yes, I realized that I'm going to start wearing shoot myself in the face every weekend. It's crazy how busy gets. Goodbye. Weekends, it's been fun the until December. Well, actually this year it'll be until November. Yep. Then I don't know what high school soccer is going to bring never experienced before. But after this year we'll aren't on weekends. How do you know their cross country. Said that they were on. I knew they play tournaments on weekends because when we went to subway that when they were kids there had just come from Germany won't be every week. You know, they won't be once in a while for a tournament. And then we weekly games. Yeah, that'll be okay. All right. Well, I think that's all I got. You got anything else? Nope. Guess that means it's time for good night. Everyone stu- liba olive. Hi, everyone. This is Mike and I truly hope you enjoyed the show. You're able to.

Mike Diane soccer Facebook UK Germany
"neurosis" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"Because he is definitely could grazing. Don't even get a start around the Rosie. The other animals? Yeah. Well, I mean, the funny thing about him as I think about it and I've talked like Elissa about him is when we went and saw him at the the dog pound, he was in a cage of course, and he scratched and scratched and scratched and scratched at the cage door. Fast forward twenty put him in the crate. What does he do? Scratching, scratching, scratching the cage door. Then he did his thing where they put us in like this enclosed gated fenced in area, and it had like a little square bench. These sat because sit in like a circle around and it was Mitchell. Listen me in order. He jumped straight up until this lap and started looking her face. Many turned in licked my face, and then he just kinda looked at Mitchell like man. He's not liked Mitchell. And Mitchell hadn't even had the opportunity to be mean to him, always not like Mitchell. It's just weird maybe. Now I understand why Mitchell's mean damn sometimes. Maybe it's the ducks. It probably is at least fifty percent of the time, but he's just, he's just like the good thing about him though is he's very consistent like you can count on him doing these weird things at specific times. He like you talked about his head butting, the bowl, you give him food. He headbutts the bowl or his little weird Reuss outing talked about. He does that when he gets to the end of the hallway and he's in front of the door and he's waiting for us and you can see him building up to it and you kind of like just dump. So Stompie thing. And then he wiggles his body. Our. All right. He doesn't it so deep. How about how about how cute it is that I'm teaching him to howl at firetrucks. Yeah, that's. That's another weird thing though, because you started off and like the yesterday. I think it was when we were in the bedroom, you were trying to make him how and he kept looking at me and I wasn't howling with him. So he was trying to withstand it. But he was letting his little whimpers. Yeah. Then let out the house. I started Holly and all of a sudden he was like. He just went for it. So it's, he's just like I said, he's committed. You can tell when the guy's gonna do something weird. And that's good. That's all well and good. I like when the dog does something weird. So, so let's talk for we close out of the show. That's not a little bit about our weekend because we have another fun weekend ahead of us here. Unthinking, it's going to be about fifty percent fun and fifty percent. Yeah. Well, yeah, that's the thing. I think that. Did you just sniff your arm now? I'll sure. Okay. Thanks for telling everybody though. It's radio. They can't see what I did, and they're not supposed to see what I did. It was Tiny kind of the point out your. narrow saying yes. The point on yours. You are neurosis I now. It's really just pretty obvious anyway, help people better weekend. Well, we have a soccer tournament again, but it's very close to home, which is awesome. Getting means spending time with certain people that we don't really want to spend time with. But that's okay, whatever. It's okay. Hopefully those people have learned to stay the hell away from us. The right. And then Ashley's new boyfriend is here, and so we're gonna go see the dodgers play the Padres on Sunday then have dinner. So that will be nice being joy, -able and uncomfortable because it's new people being comfortable for you won't be uncomfortable for me. This is true. Somehow fix it for you. I don't know how yet, but I will. You navy. Maybe the two of you can gang up and make fun of his foreign accent for once..

Reuss Mitchell Elissa soccer dodgers Ashley Holly Padres fifty percent
"neurosis" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"In general, even if you're just like emphasizing piece of the story, he hides behind the other person in shivers. Yeah. That's true. So there's five things. I'm sure we could think of a sixth one. If we really gave it some effort, he's just so weird by like he could be in the happiest of moons and then he perceives you. As being too loud or scary, any hides behind the other person or if you're outside and you say his name real harshly to stop him from doing something he stops rolls over on his back. He. Like I can't even. He's just ridiculous. It's just weird like that. And like, like you said, he also he holds a grudge. So like if you do something that he doesn't like. He will put on the floor that day. Yes, especially if it's we have done something he didn't like right. But only the only that day hold on, I figured out a sixth one. When we bought him his big fluffy bed a super dog comfortable. He super dog ridiculous because it all started that's just say, keep it simple and clean for once that he is in love with his bed, and he drags it all over the house. He knows his bed in the biblical way Andrex at all over the house like a lunatic. But there's there. Each of these things. It's like he has a little weird neuroses, but in the end he just like this cute loving sweet gentle kind dog. None of them are actually annoying annoying to the point where he'd be like, I'll get away from me. You're so annoying. No, they're just like, what are you doing? You lunatic annoying. And it's just his his some of the weirdness that he does kind of funny, you know, I mean the the whole like he wants your attention. So he goes in climbs, this is the other one we didn't talk about. He wants your attention to Guzman climbs up on the back of the couch and sits on my shoulder like a parent like big furry, parrot guavas that, but he does it and it's cute and you have to laugh, but it's weird. It's really weird. Like as you sit here, you think of more and more weird neurotic things that the dog does or how about when we're walking to the elevator. And if your dog is not on a leash because you know flea recently trained him to be while behaved off leash inside the apartment building. He like he sniffs at the railing and runs a head and does all his weird normal young up. But the second you put him on a leash. He's got walk up against the edge of the building. And if you try to pull him at all, he freezes, then you have to drive. Him. Yeah, he's free in his own. He, he goes to the edge and Smith's has a good all-talk. You put him on the leash and it's like, bam. He clings to the wall. Yeah, he's a weirdo. Stugz a lunatic. Well, in like, okay, even another one, he sees the neighbor lady on the walkway. He tries to run pastor right? He sees her downstairs where the mailbox he stops unless her pet him. It's the same person in the same dog. It's just the location of where they're meeting. Yep. That's a weird one too. But you know, it's like. Everybody. I mean, eat human beings. We're like that too. We have our weird neuroses little strange quirks that are about us seems to have an awful lot of them. Yes, the most of them are door -able. If you ask me, I know they annoy you, but I think they're adorable. I think the only one that's a no, he is the head butting if his bull and I think that's cute. And the only reason I think it's annoying is because he spills his water all over the fucking place while he does it. That's why he no longer has a food bowl that's attached to his water ball. Yeah. That's funny. Yeah. Things you have to do to accommodate your cuckoo. Crazy cairn terrier..

Guzman Andrex Smith
Recordings show rapid weather change before fatal duck boat accident

The Mentors

01:07 min | 3 years ago

Recordings show rapid weather change before fatal duck boat accident

"The NTSB says recording show a rapid change in the weather before. A duck boat sank Missouri lake earlier this month here's correspondent Mike Rossier National Transportation Safety board investigators say conditions on table rock lake near Branson Missouri on the night of July, nineteenth changed rapidly from calm to deadly dangerous the captain and driver boarded the duck boat at, six twenty seven PM at the excursion with thirty one people on. Board began on land the boat entered the water at six fifty five pm but at. Seven oh four a Bill Jill arm sounded and activated again three minutes later a private inspector says the. Bill JR, alarm would, have indicated significant amount of water in the hall seventeen people died in the accident I'm Mike Rossier more than three thousand cases of bottled water been handed out now in a small south western. Michigan city that's after contaminants, were, founded its municipal water supply in Kalamazoo county some, studies suggest those substances could affect fetal development more of these stories from townhall Dot com It's been called shell, shock, war neurosis and. Battle fatigue today we call it post traumatic, stress disorder.

Mike Rossier Missouri Lake Ntsb Branson Missouri Bill Jr Transportation Safety Board Kalamazoo County Michigan Three Minutes
Malcolm Butler refuses to be defined by his Super Bowl moments

Rich Eisen

01:31 min | 3 years ago

Malcolm Butler refuses to be defined by his Super Bowl moments

"To the Doug Gottlieb show Everywhere we go last Multiple months ago now look at my personal perspective in the Malcolm Butler thing is. Some of the comments I actually think more of dollar checks. More of the patriot then before the Malcolm Butler call he saying is everything that I. Did on Super Bowl Sunday was give us the best If you don't if you don't agree with. That that's fine I've been to Hey you think that this is going, to affect the patriots because fans want, and there's the assumption that players want if this is the worst thing it's this is the one question title actually think it's the one question, for you think this is the, one question. For the patriots Godly that's, insane weekdays at three pm eastern noon Pacific on Fox Sports radio dining off during the. Civil war it was called soldier's heart after World War Two they call it gross stress. Reaction it's been called shell shock war neurosis and battle fatigue today, we call it post traumatic stress disorder and it affects one out. Of every five warriors returning from battle in Iraq and Afghanistan not a wound that you can see though it can, have an even more significant impact post. Traumatic, stress disorder can prevent warriors from living.

Patriots Malcolm Butler Doug Gottlieb Traumatic Fox Sports Iraq Afghanistan
"neurosis" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"There's interesting yeah i wonder if this were people get used maybe compounds like nine hundred sweeters steady yet to maybe mimic sweetness preference to deliver really high fat foods with very low carbohydrate leads to good i mean that's a good idea yeah i mean i think it's it's ironic right because those the same high sugar foods which which basically is it's theorized that sort of like the brain crying out for energy those are the exact same foods that essentially dr inflammation especially in the modern supermarket you know you're craving carbs go to the modern supermarket i mean these are the exact kinds of foods that dr inflammation promote peripheral insulin resistance which is strongly related to brain glucose metabolism which in english means that you know the more inflamed and insulin resistant are in the body which is what characterizes essentially so many of the modern chronic diseases type two diabetes prediabetes obesity that basically is strongly connected to a diminished ability to use of your brain to convert glucose atp and so yes so that's again you know i think so going back to your question yeah i tried i tried as hard as i could and at a certain point had to maybe conscious decision to to teach gently but step back because i think ultimately people are gonna live the way they wanna live and a love my mom at this point she is the happiest when she's spending time with me and my two brothers and i didn't want my neurosis over nutrition to get in the way of the quality time that i was spending with my mom i mean i would actually get like emotionally upset when i would come over and my mom i would see like bag of chips you know and i still it makes me sad but.

diabetes neurosis
"neurosis" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on WLAC

"The age of thirty if you want to talk with them he got a sentiment text message go through face timer or something like that because getting face to face skintoskin very difficult thing to do and they're they're all addicted to this technology this is coming out now that facebook and some of these social media platforms were intentionally designed with the idea that they would be a victim to these especially younger people it's being it's coopting their souls it's it's absolutely poisoning their social interactions with one another and were on the verge possibly of losing a whole generation to this technology and whether it's intentional or not it doesn't matter and now we're we're starting to get the wakeup calls from the scientists i was just in england knows in london over the christmas holidays talking with a scientist from cambridge who had written papers about the neurosis that's caused by social media it it is it absolute social crisis that we're facing from what's happening with this technology had snapchat instagram as well as we've used some of these platforms on just to get messages out for coast to coast but there are people now william that will use these these examples and platforms when they go out to eat you'll see everything they're eating they take pictures of their potatoes and what whatever they bordered and it's found these sites they are exploiting sean parker the founder of one of the founders of pace book said there there's designed to a white human vulnerability they know the psychology of this that we all want to be luck we all want to be white we all want to people want it and that if we can get that validation through personal interaction or through light like how to facebook page causes chemical changes in the brain they know that and this is what we're all up against when we're dealing with with this technology is that it has a psychological hope coat component it has a chemical component within our bodies literally changing our brains and it has a spiritual component that that it's an often addressed is this all summoning the demonization lawn must talks about without a doubt uh when you look into the history of artificial intelligence and as we can discuss artificially created beings have been discussed in the ancient world the greeks talked about this the buddhists talked about at.

facebook england london scientist cambridge social media sean parker founder artificial intelligence christmas william
"neurosis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The neurosis that's caused by social media it it it said absolute social crisis that we're facing from what's happening with this technology all had snapchat instagram as well and we've used some of these platforms on just to get messages out for coast to coast but there are people now william that will use these these examples and platforms when they go out to eat you'll see everything they're eating they take pictures of their potatoes and what whatever they bore heard and it's on these sites they are exploiting sean parker the founder of one of the founders of facebook said there there's designed to exploit human vulnerability they know the psychology of this that we all want to be luck we all want to be liked we all want to people want it and that if we can get that validation through personal interaction or through like likes how facebook page causes chemical changes in the brain they know that and this is what we're all up against when we're dealing with with this technology is that it has a psychological hope co component it has a chemical component within our bodies literally changing our brains and it has a spiritual component that that is an often addressed is this all summoning the demon as you lawn musk talks about without a doubt uh when you look into the history of artificial intelligence and as we can discuss artificially created beings have been discussed in the ancient world the greeks talked about this the buddhist talked about at the samaritans talked about this humanity itself a might even have been an early form of artificial intelligence and what we what we are dealing with here is a technology that has the potential to go completely beyond our control and this is what elon musk is referring to and summoning the demon that once we let this check out of the box which they of course refer to as pandora's box and there's all kinds of greek mythology about what that ultimately means that we will not be able to put this this demon back in the box the fear is that there is no off switch for artificial intelligence or the similarity that we have already flip that switch this demon is out of the box and there is.

sean parker facebook instagram people artificial intelligence elon musk pandora snapchat social media founder co
"neurosis" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"neurosis" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"To support this little weird neuroses it's really what happened we'll probably said it now when god there he goes on we all heard that's really what happened recently mean games attributes with trivial pursuit new hampshire under cb radio still knocked though cb radio horror we all have we had the colon we had the realistic won the brand realistic caused great one of the best one top line look like crap though it looked fake realistic i neca had buddy sorry but now really i was just i was just thanking you just said that people listen to cd ready to tv ratings and play and play hard car games sand now people just put their headphones on instead with our phones when there see what they put on facetime and actually see the person that they want to talk to shreds oppose if his hearing the voice going oh she sounds haas yeah but we were interactive you know in arizona are they face time as really there's so much better it was involving everybody like eat the whole car was involved in a you're talking about the little kiki games up via video board game night family fun time is so to clarify crying bryant we were on family trip to canada and that was that happened on the main owner picked some turnups up there and happened on the main turnpike now and your mom your ma nearly happiness it didn't are you going to say that they will listening to your conversation imagine little two young to drive feels like my parents were driving majan cousins guy flying around and a helicopter looking for terrorist any any happens the tune into the old a station wagon while they're asking each other a cornea little radio there's only thirty six channels so he's probably cruising a dial as they are known to do is cruising down the dalai happen to stumble upon the the dial that we were on he stayed tunde play deployed some trivial pursuit with us so they're really happen but i thought was apple vicks a strange family net that lies at straight with a fairly together is not nice in an odd way let this very nice my neka and i'm sorry but the i'm sorry for bryant now it's it's it's okay brian acceptance outright thank you appreciate that other now.

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