35 Burst results for "Neurological Disorder"

Michael J. Fox retiring again because of health

Here & Now

11:05 min | 3 months ago

Michael J. Fox retiring again because of health

"The nineteen eighties were good to michael. J. fox the actor shot to fame with roles in the sitcom family ties and the back to the future foods at backup. Don't have enough road to get eighty eight rows row but in nineteen ninety-one age of twenty. Nine fox was diagnosed with early onset. Parkinson's disease in two thousand. He founded the michael j. fox foundation for parkinson's research organization has raised a billion dollars to find a cure through it. All fox found a way to maintain his signature optimism until twenty eighteen when his sunny disposition took a significant hit fox underwent spinal surgery. Then a serious fall that forced him to confront his mortality. He writes about that year in his new book. No time like the future which is out this week and michael. J. fox joins me now. Welcome here tell me about that fall. Well i when dealing with my thirty thirty. Th year outlook parkinson's so that that kind of had handle on been ahead. Spinal tumor had surgery on that and it took me a while to learn how to walk again. I'd barely learn what getting when i of course declared independence until they could walk on my own. And i belong in so i got up. Walk into the kitchen swift flooring shattered my arm and all the dean indignities that was for some reason cutting blow so you as you say you were dealing not only with parkinson's for many years you've just gone through this incredibly dangerous surgery to remove a tumor from your spine. Just spend a moment there for a minute. How serious was that spinal diagnosis in was pretty seriously lifting for a while for a few years. But he's been in a benign and static wasn't doing anything from the dodgers. Just watch that check on every now and then so when the last time that checked on it had grown quite considerably was actually on spinal cord itself which then made Something that Attach because they can't in any way touch her to remove some spinal for when you touch it. But johns hopkins adopted feodor. When's your with me. Discuss the risk. The risk of not doing it where i would be paralyzed by now by as we speak from when win puts me that way i realized yeah and then there you are lying on the floor in your apartment in new york city. Your arm shattered. You'd gone through all of these challenges and gotten through them for the most part right. So where do you think the darkness came from. Why did you so desperately lose that optimism that to become known for some reason it was almost instantaneous last lemon unknown lemonade Unbelie it was angry myself for taking for granted Detention in the in the care they put into my health in my in my life and you know what family Asked me to be careful. When i said don't be careful. Careful careful Carelessly walking too fast and it was two kind of full of pride of of at my might chievements to understand the risks of taking an inadequate To at risk in all the time engine Physical therapists who put me at risk and anti alexander myself I agree as said about how they push china's within a bum. Catchy raised the land myself. They get passes the nothing it was like. I started thinking with the parkinson's community i Optimism tennessee. And i kind of said it'll be okay and and really there are people that had a misery index lot higher needle. Lend me with a broken arm. Bagging car is these are people who've lost lives homes country family children woodward by bam. Who am i to tell them to be have to miss it online on the slowly a rag or i can see why you would be angry but what about scared was scared to well. Isn't that what happened. Was that came out of that. Here that come off the floor and heavily armed fiction which function in a. I would let examined all these things. Fear aging gratitude. Just all of these things came through my mind. And as i made notes on them out for no reason Lebron you're going through something with take contemporaries in alabama a. He's not that. I said let's deceased together into the story of what happened and how i lost and regained my commitment. How might new. Optimism is kind of a little more informed with a little more realistic eating. Be realistic at the same time. You reminded us for those who need to be reminded how precious thing it is to walk. And i found the way that you described your relationship with wheelchairs to be very powerful at one point in the book said that. Unless you know the person who's pushing you can be a very isolating experience in fact you compared yourself to a piece of luggage and then you went on to say that if we could ever just look at each other in the eye we would recognize our shared humanity. And i just want to thank you for that. Because actually i had never thought of that before and those are probably things. I imagine that you for granted at some stage in your life as as being and i talked about that will move momentum me my life and and how i was always moving in in my job is an actor. Energy do stunts or having physical representations of what was happening or as an athlete another good one persona in so. When i look at things i will shares do thing one to have been nail biting person. My whole life into be can't walk in the other thing about being in the chair. Is that for me personally. I'm i'm i'm someone who is easily recognizable. Everybody knows intense speed familiar with and even if they don't know me as a privilege of what i do but when you're unsure you just a piece of luggage and pushing Order hotel something. He's escaped me from point being open to get five bucks in so you just stay in you push Facing the wall can't get into the verbally again. Like you will not have Beings open as they are. They might as well. Apple's own smoke last bubbles. Is that people to be going on with him. Well let's talk about your acting career. The thing that made it so that people recognize you on the street. You've gotten roles in recent years. The didn't hide the fact that you had parkinson's symptoms but actually incorporated that into the role such as louis canning of courses. The lawyer on the tv drama. The good wife with listen to a scene there. I suffer from a condition turtle disconnect asia which is released a funny word for neurological disorder. And it makes me do this. And this i if you just look at me all of us to it so and i won't mind in the book you say that you're ready to accept the your acting career is over to an extent i i laugh in fact it's something surprisingly something to change but yeah the last couple times. I acted i actually. I haven't played warners again anyway. Resume lines difficulty for some reason. Always been some interesting. Even with. I look at her family. Ties scripted from five minutes Show and i just said they photographic memories Position where i didn't know struggling with the lines Lear capital in time in hollywood going off assessing what. What is the deal. But unlike him in that movie. Who's parading himself really angry when i found myself in that position. I said i'll gable. This isn't working so maybe we'll find some other way to do it or not. Do you also say you may be done with gulf another thing that you've loved. How is it letting these things go or acknowledging that it might be time soon to let them go. Insights about acceptance and gratitude and acceptance. Part of it is what is accepted into circuit. That is what liz i can deal with that. An investing came endeavor to change it. But if you don't accept the and be more blog that be cranny of your life Adjusted so. I accepted the fact that i assume golf club too hard. I fall down in a like boohoo. I'm falling nanosecond. Only now therefore i don't put myself in that position again fall down on but maybe one day i'll be treated in a way or find some way to get so. I don't fall down in the gulf again. I'll be grateful for it. It's just a matter. Is that come compartmentalizing really. It's taking inventory seeing where that fits in your life and the losses that have had are more than compensated for by my family my friends by the role habit in the parsis communities it change to relationships with people on the street to how much i enjoy reading how much film much writing is less to joe you live. I'm speaking with michael j. fox whose new book is called no time like the future and optimists considers mortality and michael. Similar listening to this may have just been diagnosed with parkinson's and that could be very frightening for them as you. Well know in fact you become an ambassador of sorts. For for folks with parkinson's what's your message to people who've just recently been diagnosed as i was talking to manually. Today's few was just diagnosed in like me was diagnosed. Daytona nine Items that was twenty nine years ago. So i did. I said for you. Being diagnosed a twenty nine means for sure no doubt bank on it. Better write it down. It will be here in your lifetime. And how much credit can the fox foundation take for that. I will take not moods. It'd be happy happened. We we are the largest funded research in private sector but never a mission. Our mission is we have a thing. When we first started we about how to structure foundation dissimilar brought up endowments down like e bala money said on this again and said we won't be doing that. Come to go out so we operated on then in the set aside purely motive. Where would you do it. It's your model that each is trying to get this work done as quickly as we can for people in. It's been so yeah. Optimism is is a driver knows every night. You because because there's no sense doing something again at least argue for michael j. fox thank you so much. Be well you to

Parkinson J. Fox Parkinson's Disease Fox Foundation For Parkinson's Spinal Tumor Michael J Michael FOX Dodgers Johns Hopkins Louis Canning Tumor Woodward New York City Lebron Tennessee Alabama Neurological Disorder China
Trump disputes CDC head's vaccine timeline and mask claims

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

04:20 min | 5 months ago

Trump disputes CDC head's vaccine timeline and mask claims

"We're standing by for president trump to take reporter's questions and a White House briefing that's about to begin it follows the president's townhall last night in which he once again downplayed the importance of mass and prevent the spread of the coronavirus today the head of the CDC. Said mass may offer people even more protection than a potential vaccine all that coming up and let's start with the coronavirus pandemic right now. Nick is Los Angeles for US Nick, relearning more and more about plans when a vaccine and we hope it'll be soon becomes available. That's right. Wolf the White House goal anyway to twenty four hours of the green light from the FDA they hope to begin distributing doses to vaccine locations now. States have been told to be ready for that as early as November, but there are still so many questions remaining just one of them, but it's a big one will enough Americans trust this vaccine will enough. Americans. Will enough. Americans take this vaccine for it to really make a difference. Limited targeted supply of vaccine might be available before the end of the year but in enough arms to really make a difference I think we're probably looking at third. Late second quarter third quarter. Twenty twenty one and there still could be plenty pitfalls in this process AstraZeneca recently, polls trials. Again, after an illness in a volunteer CNN has now obtained an internal company documents detailing that after a second dose, a previously healthy woman in her thirties was diagnosed with transverse my lightest rare neurological disorder the company had claimed that diagnosis was never confirmed. Absolutely critical that. The American public have complete transparency is about the these clinical trials if and when we get a vaccine in terms of a principal in an aspiration, it'll be that no American has to pay a single dime out of pocket to get a vaccine. Listen to this I might even go so far as to say that this mask is more guaranteed to protect me against Cova. Then, when I take a Cova vaccine if I don't get an immune response to vaccines, not going to protect me this facemask will the latest national numbers we have for just yesterday aren't great nearly forty, thousand new cases. One, thousand, two, hundred, ninety, three lives lost the most in a month one wedding in Maine now linked to at least one, hundred, seventy, six cases, and the deaths of seven people who didn't even attend the event. These are all individuals who got cova from somebody who was at the wedding or somebody who got it from somebody else at the wedding fifty thousand cases and counting on college campuses at least five colleges that opened. In. person have moved to online only as cases manned. That's wrong. Says the President's adviser Dr Scott Atlas in New York Post op ED universities should stay open even when they see an increase in cases, signs tells us that young adults are at extremely low risk for serious illness or death from covid nineteen CDC data does show of the more than one hundred, ninety, six, thousand Americans killed by Covid three, hundred, ninety-seven were under age twenty five but the jury is still out on how they act as vectors for this virus. Still the big ten will now after pressure from the president and others play football this full but no fans in the stands. And, we'll more evidence that the black and Brown community is still being hit the hardest by this virus. Now, hospitalizations rates among the latter next population in this country, more than four times, the white population and that according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, today he called that extraordinary and

President Trump Cova CDC Nick White House Dr. Anthony Fauci Los Angeles Twenty Twenty Neurological Disorder Astrazeneca CNN Maine Dr Scott Atlas Wolf New York Principal Reporter FDA Football
Trump says U.S. could start distributing a coronavirus vaccine in October, contradicting CDC’s timeline

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:31 min | 5 months ago

Trump says U.S. could start distributing a coronavirus vaccine in October, contradicting CDC’s timeline

"Let's start with the coronavirus pandemic right now. Nick is Los Angeles for US Nick, relearning more and more about plans when a vaccine and we hope it'll be soon becomes available. That's right. Wolf the White House goal anyway to twenty four hours of the green light from the FDA they hope to begin distributing doses to vaccine locations now. States have been told to be ready for that as early as November, but there are still so many questions remaining just one of them, but it's a big one will enough Americans trust this vaccine will enough. Americans. Will enough. Americans take this vaccine for it to really make a difference. Limited targeted supply of vaccine might be available before the end of the year but in enough arms to really make a difference I think we're probably looking at third. Late second quarter third quarter. Twenty twenty one and there still could be plenty pitfalls in this process AstraZeneca recently, polls trials. Again, after an illness in a volunteer CNN has now obtained an internal company documents detailing that after a second dose, a previously healthy woman in her thirties was diagnosed with transverse my lightest rare neurological disorder the company had claimed that diagnosis was never confirmed. Absolutely critical that. The American public have complete transparency is about the these clinical trials if and when we get a vaccine in terms of a principal in an aspiration, it'll be that no American has to pay a single dime out of pocket to get a vaccine. Listen to this I might even go so far as to say that this mask is more guaranteed to protect me against Cova. Then, when I take a Cova vaccine if I don't get an immune response to vaccines, not going to protect me this facemask will the latest national numbers we have for just yesterday aren't great nearly forty, thousand new cases. One, thousand, two, hundred, ninety, three lives lost the most in a month one wedding in Maine now linked to at least one, hundred, seventy, six cases, and the deaths of seven people who didn't even attend the event. These are all individuals who got cova from somebody who was at the wedding or somebody who got it from somebody else at the wedding fifty thousand cases and counting on college campuses at least five colleges that opened. In. person have moved to online only as cases manned. That's wrong. Says the President's adviser Dr Scott Atlas in New York Post op ED universities should stay open even when they see an increase in cases, signs tells us that young adults are at extremely low risk for serious illness or death from covid nineteen CDC data does show of the more than one hundred, ninety, six, thousand Americans killed by Covid three, hundred, ninety-seven were under age twenty five but the jury is still out on how they act as vectors for this virus. Still the big ten will now after pressure from the president and others play football this full but no fans in the stands.

Cova Nick President Trump Twenty Twenty Los Angeles Neurological Disorder Astrazeneca CNN Maine Wolf Dr Scott Atlas FDA White House Principal New York Football CDC
What we do (and dont) know about COVID-19 and kids

The Big Story

05:21 min | 10 months ago

What we do (and dont) know about COVID-19 and kids

"Kelli grant is a national health reporter for the Globe and Mail. Hello Kelly hello. Why don't we start this conversation by you? Just telling me about Dr Kate Zinser. Who is she and why does she have such a personal stake in the story? Were talking about today. So doctors sensors epidemiologist. She's at the University of Montreal and she's one of the CO leaders of a study that they're trying to get off ground in Quebec that they hope will tell them a bit more about how often kids actually transmit the corona virus. Now as you said she does have a really personal connection here and that is that I think. She sort of exemplifies the really hard decision that some families are having to make. Because we don't really understand this question about transmission. Her husband has stage four cancer. He's undergoing chemotherapy which makes him sort of the classic immuno-compromised person and she has two kids in the older of those two. Charlie who is six hasn't been called. Apraxia is a motor disorder. It's neurological disorder that affects his speech. And he was really thriving and kindergarten and really doing very well and now of course like everyone. They've had to take him out and because she's in Montreal which is looking at reopening schools on May twenty fifth. She and her family have this choice to make you know. How important is it to have Charlie in school versus? How important is it to protect his father from the possibility of the Krona virus? And if we better understood how likely charlier kids like him were to transmit the virus. That might have an effect on her personal decision. So how do you go about finding that out because I know you know even personally when we talk about sending my daughter back to daycare or other families that we know that's the first thing we wonder about him. We have never seen anything. That really conclusively told us while. That's because nobody really knows. So what doctors in her colleagues at news of Montreal Lavelle? How entered a public health authorities at the provincial and local level in Quebec are trying to do is sort of follow a large group of children at what they would consider sentinel schools and they would try to do testing these children and try to get a sense of how often they actually transmit the virus now? This particular study is still very much in the planning phase and right off the Bat. One of the difficulties. They are running up against his figuring out. What's the testing technology that you can use to follow these children Because as everybody knows there's issues around testing capacity and also some of the kinds of testing that you might WanNa do Can be a bit tough on children like these very diesel spots to. What they're looking at doing is collecting samples of saliva or what are called dried blood spots. Which is where you know you prick your finger and put it on a piece of paper and that know testing can be done through those dried blood spots. But they're actually looking at trying to perhaps collect the samples before some of the technology is perfectly in place so that question of of how they collect and analyze the samples is is a big one for them to start. But of course there still will be the kind of regular Pcr which is a test for the active infection that will still be going on at the same time with any of the children there following are tested through regular means they can follow them and then see these kids take this home and give it to their families. Do they spread it to other children today? Spread it to teachers so they want to follow this cigarette out so we might not have seen anything conclusively But I've definitely seen various conflicting reports. Can you kind of explain a little bit about what we may be? Think we might know about kids role in spreading this. I like how you said. Maybe we might know because that actually sums it up really nicely so there have been some smaller studies done. That seems to suggest not. The children. Don't transmit it. We clearly know that they do some have. It's happened sure. But perhaps they don't play as big a role in community spread as older folks as adults do. And so that comes from a couple of different places. There's been some data out of Iceland's and data out of the Netherlands A pretty interesting study at of Australia. And some looks at helps hold clusters. And what all of these kind of small studies all of which have various weaknesses or various. Caveats what they seem to have come to the conclusion of is it seems like they may spread a little bit less than adults. And there's a couple of different sort of theories about why that may be one of them. Is that children. Do seem for the most part to be more mildly affected by Cova nineteen so some of the thinking is just like even though there is a symptomatic priests and dramatic spread. Going on that you're perhaps less likely to spread it to as many people if you're not you know coughing wildly or sneezing wildly right but of course you know the these. These studies are all imperfect. This stuff is hard to figure out and one of the things right off the bat. Is You know a lot of these. Studies have taken place in an environment. Where school wasn't running as normal. The Australian study I mentioned. Some of the data gathering happened schools. Were technically still open. But after the premium Australian state had encouraged people to keep their kids home. So you know. We're going to get a good answer to this. Only after schools are up and running in a sort of widespread way.

Montreal Charlie BAT Quebec Dr Kate Zinser Neurological Disorder University Of Montreal Kelli Grant Kelly Reporter Cova Australia Iceland Netherlands
Effects On Coronavirus On People With Disabilities

Brian Lehrer

12:44 min | 10 months ago

Effects On Coronavirus On People With Disabilities

"The crown of lockdown police say the whole word the coronavirus lockdown and the virus itself present special challenges for people with various kinds of disabilities it may also present some new opportunities such as greater acceptance of working or studying from home but depending on the kind of disability someone has shopping transportation unemployment the ability to get needed healthcare workers to come into your home lots of different things require navigating corona world in new ways with us now to talk about his work and to take calls with your experiences from anyone with any kind of disability is Victor Crowley C. commissioner of the New York City mayor's office for people with disabilities commissioner of police you thanks so much for coming on today welcome to WNYC thank you Brian it's a pleasure to be here would you like to introduce yourself to our listeners a little bit first before we get into people's lives and the issues because I see you've described yourself as a person with a self disclosed disability so would you say how you describe that and then basically what your mission is as commissioner of the people with disabilities office sure I am a person with a disability I am in a wheelchair I was injured in a mountain bicycle accident when I was twenty two years old and it absolutely turn my life around I was a plumber before I was injured and trying to navigate that world and trying to figure out what's next in my life going back to school realizing that education was the key to moving forward to employment was it was important to me and I accepted the disabled world the first through adaptive sports of competing in the Paralympic Games in nineteen ninety eight in Nagano Japan and then eventually working my way through nonprofit organizations and and landing a job with the parts department and eventually is the commissioner of the mayor's office with people with disabilities yeah in twenty twelve so what is our office do you our office is around to ensure that everything the city has to offer is equal to people with disabilities so for looking after our streetscape to ensure that it's acceptable for people disabilities we're looking at our parks department our cultural institutions to ensure that people with disabilities are represented not only in visiting the places but also adds August so we want to make sure that everything the city offers is acceptable to people with disabilities so listeners we'd like to invite anyone with any kind of disability to call in to talk to Victor Crowley C. commissioner of the mayor's office for people with disabilities especially about ways the coronavirus era is changing things for you that's the topic for this call in or anything you think public policy should address in that respect six four six four three five seventy to eighty six four six four three five seventy to eighty help us report this story how was the corona virus you know changing things for you or someone you know with any kind of disability and what could the commissioner's office for people with disabilities stand to know about your experience that may help them have the best city government response six four six four three five seventy to eighty six four six four three five seventy to eighty if you want to talk about yourself or someone you know will help us report the story commissioner office said you might want to talk about how people with disabilities lives are going to change after call of it including how society has changed with work from home and study from home distance learning what are you thinking about those changes in terms of challenges or maybe even opportunities absolutely challenges across the board and all of them but this this certainly presents a unique opportunity to change the way that employment education recreation and health care costs are delivered so if we talk about accommodations in the workplace and as we move forward in diving into what the future of work is going to look like we have to insure that it's acceptable and they have those accommodation for people disabilities it can be anything from a screen reader to changing a person's schedule and the list goes on and what we heard in the past is that we can't work from home because it's it's not doable but since the coronavirus come came and is with us right now everybody's working from home and understanding that it is a possibility is certainly a bright spot for people disability because we've been doing this for so long we've asked for these accommodations and have not necessarily receive that now we are concerned about the us add that second we started a program called NYC at work it's a public private partnership to ensure that we employ people with disabilities now the opportunity is that we can go online we can work but not everyone has access to some of these effective communication devices or computers or cell phones and all that because people disabilities within poverty so we really need to be able to employ people so they can get the resources they need so they can prosper in work remote education we've certainly seen this change department of education has gone from a school based model now to virtually online and a matter of a matter of days and making sure that we provide the effective equipment for people with disabilities disabilities such as iPads and then making sure that our systems are accessible making sure that the E. learning platforms are accessible to people for kids with disabilities I think that that is really important meaning that you can read TD asset they have captioning and that my wife is a physical therapist and right now she is working from home providing physical therapy to some of those kids that actually need it and what is telehealth look like and telehealth is if we hear of everything that happened during the corona virus this is changing the landscape of that but we need access to that equipment to ensure that happens as well but as recreation from whole look like other departments of parks and recreation is put together a video encouraging people to work out if you have a disability and what types of exercise programs you can have this long with the New York road runners club and Achilles track club I mean these are things that are based here in New York and we want to keep people of state active so technology can certainly drive this but being employed as an important part of it Sam in Inglewood you're on W. NYC with Victor Crowley C. from the New York City mayor's office for people with disabilities hi Sam hi thank you so I mean New Jersey I used to work for twenty five plus years in New York City so my question is kind of a a global one we fought very hard here in New Jersey to make sure that the at those are intellectually disabled on the severe and many of whom were ours are in larger facilities the so called developmental centers got tested for covert nineteen as well as all the staff it seems to me and to us looking trying to find data from other states and cities that are those who were disabled particularly particularly severe and are are sitting ducks in a lot of different ways we think the state cared in New Jersey but we still have to push it very very hard to get our folks properly taken care of so I'm just wondering what what if anything you might have to say about how we as a society protect those who were severely disabled particularly intellectually but in other ways too in the in Europe coke at nineteen I'm so glad you brought this up Sam because there's so much focus on nursing homes in particular we know what's been happening there and it's hot horrific but there are other kinds of group living situations that involve people with particular needs and that presumably would also make them vulnerable so commissioner how about that yes very it's it's a big concern and people with disabilities were concerned about this as soon as Copeland had now I've gotten calls from advocates say we to make sure that healthcare but held home health care workers and personal care attendants are essential workers we need to make sure that they're protected and that was a balance at first because we needed to make sure that the front line workers at the hospital had all the protective equipment that they needed to add once we were solid with them we were able to secure a protective equipment for people with disabilities and we were able to take them delivered them to our service providers you therefore sent into healthcare workers and people with disabilities and making sure that that happens because the reality is if health care workers come into a home and get a person with a disability second they flood the hospitals that's a problem so we want to see that so once we were able to you secure protective equipment such as masks and gloves we we've delivered over a hundred thousand of them already and we're continuing to keep a list of that but we don't do this in a bubble right we like to think we know everything but the important part is to be really kidnapped what the disabled community we hold a weekly call so I understand what the concerns are with the community and we have hundreds of people on those calls because we give them updates will will we bring in people from other agencies to talk about the issues that are happening so everyone stays informed along with our website me and make sure the website has all the content on there and it's not just about a website that has information you have to make sure that that the information is accessible to the PDF's of the video to social media all of that is a constant reminder of acceptability because people with disabilities have different needs so it's delivering equipment to the people that need it and it's also making sure that the the way that we deliver things are accessible Gardner in Manhattan you're on W. NYC with commissioner Causey hi Gardner hi there Brian great to be on the call of the you guys are doing the show the segment thanks so I have to read them grow which is the neurological disorder that leads to a lot of like motor and vocal tics as we call them the most well known stereotype is people cursing uncontrollably which actually only about ten percent of people actually do with threats and I'm just curious because you know Mike that currently is a pretty loud throat clearing sniffing which any normal time you know there's a lot of anxiety and other people so I'm not taking the subway or anything right now but I just wonder what the city can be doing to acknowledge disabilities like that they're not as identifiable in public but the keeper could do with a lot of you know hostility which I've been saying basically my whole life in a place like New York you probably need to call in to radio shows more because you haven't done it once during this call but I but but I get it commissioner if you're yeah your point is that if your tech is a lot of throat clearing and people are gonna think you have the virus and you're gonna get stigmatized everywhere you go right oh yeah oh yeah and I felt that my whole life with you know point flu it's just people being worried worried about you know being second there's there's no amount of cover my mouth if you do that you know can can quell the you know the hostility of the negative person unfortunately yeah and you raise the consciousness of people just by saying that commissioner anything to add to that briefly

Neurology Patients Have Higher Suicide Rates

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Neurology Patients Have Higher Suicide Rates

"New study finds several different neurological disorders are associated with higher suicide rates CBS news correspondent Vicki Barker has more it's been billed as the most comprehensive assessment yet of the link between neurological disorders and suicide and the Danish researchers found neurology patients have a seventy five percent higher suicide rate than the general population for those diagnosed with such degenerative syndromes as a LS or Huntington's disease the suicide rate is four to five times higher the authors hope their findings will alert neurologist to the emotional as well as physical impact of a patient's

Vicki Barker Huntington CBS
How To Get Enough Iodine On A Dairy Free Diet

Healthy Eating For Kids

04:59 min | 1 year ago

How To Get Enough Iodine On A Dairy Free Diet

"Lovely interns actually turned this blog post around around for me on Dean quite a while back some so sorry that I have a be able to release it sooner but if you are interested in you know reading through some of the points that we all go to talk about in today's episode you might be at the gym or walking the dog in which case just make make sure you click on the link to view the blog post or just hop over to my website and you'll be able to navigate onto the block and you should find and this this episode rid not as a blog post for you so the reason why iodine is so important is although although on their freedom alliance you would be worried about your child's calcium intake on Edina is another mineral that really shouldn't be forgotten about and it's important to note that your body cannot produce it on its own so it is a mineral that needs to be consumed it plays a really important role in making some of the chiral home on so thyroxine and Triaud Tyron I can't say but it's basically t not three Cairo it says the only south of the body which had absorbed iodine and these cells than combine id in an amino acid so very basic protein molecule if you like called Tirmizi to make the tyrod hormones and and it's the tirades shop to make tile home it's really important that children get enough to help make those hormones add had essentially tire homes helps the body use energy stay warm is is used by major organs in the body such as the brain brain heart muscles and just make sure that all of their organs work as they should so it's really important hormone in metabolism in making sure that children grow but also in their cognitive function so in many ways we really need to think about our on Kadena intake from pregnancy and particularly if you are pregnant and following a Vegan diet but also a dairy free diet yourself then you really need to make sure that you are getting adequate dean unfortunately up to eight third of the population are not getting enough iodine especially the families I see living in the Middle East some parts of Asia New Zealand and Europe because we know that the levels of Artie in the soil is naturally low and that's why it's really important to be aware of that if you are planning a pregnancy iron deficiency in developing baby has has been linked with neurological disorders adhd and even a lower IQ so it's no wonder that it is suddenly a very very hot topic the reason why I'm focusing around pregnancy is because when a mother a pregnant mom has low iden- status it can have long lasting effects for children so we know that children could have lower lower cognitive language and mortar schools at eighteen months and three years they could have impaired working memory at four years he is low reading accuracy and comprehension at nine years and also lowered verbal at eight years that might all sound fraud the very very grim however Irene deficiency is easily reversible so let's talk about how we can make sure that our children get enough iden- in the UK children are generally getting enough in their diet however this does mainly Ainley come from cow's milk so there is some evidence our mild iden- deficiency in school aged girls but if your child is around say Eh four to ten they usually drinking enough milk which would give them the iodine that they need but the navigate a bit older and they start to drop their evening Merg or perhaps it's having mergen this cereals that sort of thing that they can become borderline deficient and obviously the charges following a dairy free died then there is some pressure to make sure that alternative plundering and other dairy free foods off well fortified with iodine so how much iden- due to an actually

Dean Milk Eighteen Months Eight Years Three Years Four Years Nine Years
U. S. National Institute discussed on Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

U. S. National Institute discussed on Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

"News keep an eye on your blood pressure could help ward off dementia researchers at the U. S. National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke used MRI eyes to scan the brains of hundreds of patients with high blood pressure and they found people who got intensive control of their high blood pressure showed a slowing of the accumulation of certain lesions in the brains white matter compared to people have got standard blood pressure treatment the study says the lesions reflect changes deep inside

U. S. National Institute
Stanford launches major effort to harness the microbiome to treat disease

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Stanford launches major effort to harness the microbiome to treat disease

"Cells for C. E. L. marked any office donated thirty five million dollars to Stanford University and UC San Francisco to enhance their study of human microbiome Betty office wife Lynn donated twenty five million dollars to launch the UCSF Betty off center from microbiome medicine and ten million dollars to the Stanford microbiome therapies initiative the human microbiome is a full assortment of bacteria viruses and other microbes that inhibit inhabit rather the human body and sometimes and have it the donation will help the university's efforts to develop new ways to predict prevent and treat them a lot dermatological gastrointestinal respiratory and neurological disorders all linked to Microbiol dysfunction the two bay area Benioff funded initiatives law also work together to further a joint goal of advancing innovative Michael bio based

C. E. L. Stanford University San Francisco Lynn Betty Benioff Michael Thirty Five Million Dollars Twenty Five Million Dollars Ten Million Dollars
What is epilepsy? Here's what you need to know about the seizure-causing spectrum of disorders

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

What is epilepsy? Here's what you need to know about the seizure-causing spectrum of disorders

"The lefty is a neurological disorder that affects nearly three and a half million people in the United States in which nerve activity in the brain is disturbed causing seizures every year one in one thousand people with epilepsy die of suit app sudden unexpected death in epilepsy which is the leading cause of epilepsy related

Neurological Disorder United States Epilepsy
Megan King Edmunds, Jim Edmonds And Meghan King Edmonds discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Megan King Edmunds, Jim Edmonds And Meghan King Edmonds discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"Other sad news. The Megan king Edmunds. We know her from real housewives of OC. She is married to Jim Edmonds. She is his third wife. They have a daughter that we saw then pregnant with on the show, then she left the show got pregnant with her twin boys. And I think it I think it was Tamraz T or somebody broke a story, they played a voicemail of them, claiming it was Meghan king Edmonds kind of warning this woman to not share her story of the supposed affair that didn't happen is what the person was saying, and it was about that they had all these text messages and things to prove that Jim Edmonds absolutely had a texting if nothing else inappropriate sexting relationship with a one other than his wife during the time that Megan was pregnant with twins. So she sends has written her own statement blog about it that. Regardless of, you know, she believes that it hasn't gone pass sexting, and, but that alone is a total betrayal. And she wrote, I don't even know if I can trust him. I think I don't know she's done something sense. Then to say we're going to try to work it out. He is still doing like sports reporting. And I think he kind of said, we're trying to work it out. It's very sad. Because then she also mentioned that she, they're, they're they fear that one of their sons might have like a neurological disorder. So my heart really goes out to Megan. I know that she loves her husband. I know that there's been rumors about him. I mean she is the third wife. Not that, that should be like, you know, not that she deserves anything. But obviously, it's probably to America, a little bit less of a surprise, you know, he sent photos of his penis and things to the girl and all of that is undeniable that happened. So now, she has to deal with can this is a sex addict. Is this something that can be fixed kit? Can I ever trust him? Again, is three little babies, but I bet they want her back now on the show if she wants to come back,

Megan King Edmunds Jim Edmonds Meghan King Edmonds Neurological Disorder OC Megan Tamraz T America
"neurological disorder" Discussed on The View

The View

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on The View

"And yeah, it was just I was really interested in those things in view. See I I'm I wanna have a variety of experiences in my career. And I wanted to try my hand at were while you were Fendt main Main house. tasks to do play two characters lay Adelaide and evil d'appel ganger red. Yes. And the voice you used for red was so effective and eerie to say, the least, but some people are questioning your inspiration for the voice. Yeah. You know, I want to say first of all that the voice of red is a composite of influences and definitely a creation of my imagination. But I wasn't spiraled by a condition called spasmodic this phone. Yeah. Which is a neurological disorder which can be triggered by physical or emotional trauma. And in my processes, an actor one of the things I looked to do is to find ways into the most human and real parts of a character, and to you know, to steer clear of judgment of them as good or evil, you know, pleasant or creepy. So in my process of. Flooring things for for red. I happened to hear Robert F Kennedy, jR, speak at an event that I attended and his voice and the condition that he has became the the catalyst to my creative process. And it was my in and part of my research, also included the Rindge, fractures and vocal cord hemorrhage is in my own experience with vocal injury all of that is very hard to get in a sound bite. So I think in mentioning spasmodic this phone. Yeah. I may have been disproportionate to what it actually is in the film, and I met with people as part of my exploration with the condition, and I learned how difficult it is to have the disorder. And you know, so I'm very aware of the frustrations. And the misconceptions the misdiagnoses I met a man in his seventies. Who'd had it for two years and had been misdiagnosed over and over again he'd seen more than five doctors, and nobody knew about this condition. So I thought in speaking up about it and mentioning it that it might help. Shed light on the conditions that really came after you. Yes. But you know, I understand that. It's a very marginal group of people who suffer from this. And so, you know, the thought that I would in a way offend them. Or was not my intention in in my mind. I wasn't interested in vilifying or demonizing. The the the condition I I cross did read with love and care. So as much as it is in a very inner a genre specific world's I really wanted to ground her in something that felt real. And so all that I say sorry to anyone that I mean. I thought I thought it'd be with my husband, and I felt compassion for red which just goes to show, and she is the villain in the movie if you will I'm a huge huge huge war fan huge. And I think Jordan Peele is an absolute genius. And coming up hard to be this generation's, Alfred Hitchcock. And I just love this movie so much the reason why I love horror movies is because a lot of times it's a cultural reflection of the times meant to give people an example invasion of the body. Snatchers is frequently referenced as a McCarthy era pod people Godzilla a reaction to the atomic bomb. So Hyun I love horror movies cultural criticism and get out. And in us did did that come into play when we're creating these characters in when you were short. You know, what's kind of interesting is that you know, read is a representation of the marginalized the people who underprivileged the unheard the voiceless. And so, and it is this thing about you know, we are our own worst. Enemy where so often pointing fingers at the monster out there, you know, putting blame externally to the other culture the other country, the other political faction the other religion, the other gender, and how often do we recognize the monster within ourselves? And I think this is an allegorical tale that kind of anthropomorphized sizes that lupita, you know, you, and I have have been together at conferences to amplify the role of of diverse people in casting of diverse people in in the industry, girl. I am so proud of you because one kinda and this the blockbuster. In the office that roof is in the pudding..

neurological disorder Jordan Peele Robert F Kennedy Alfred Hitchcock Hyun McCarthy two years
Do wireless headphones really increase cancer risk? 250 doctors warn United Nations

Dr. Daliah

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Do wireless headphones really increase cancer risk? 250 doctors warn United Nations

"Air pods and wireless headphones could cause cancer. Now, this comes out of Miami, local ten. Were they say using these wireless headphones like these apple air pods? And the biotechnology come with cancer risks. The scientists have the type of electromagnetic frequency radio waves, the EMS that transmit the data through the devices Cam caused serious health issues apparently two hundred fifty experts signed a United Nations experts. I if they're experts and some big stuff experts signed the United Nations and World Health Organization petition to warn of the danger. WSB? Along with cancer neurological disorders and DNA damage are also late to this of exposure. Why because they can generate heat caused Burs and affects cell growth in humans. Now, the petition claims numerous recent scientific publications have shown that the EMF affects living organisms at levels, well below most international and national guidelines, the scientists say the EMF warnings about possible dangers are not good enough. Okay. This some strong, heavy duty. I mean, when you got experts petitioning, they're not being heard there's been people screaming and yelling about our wireless technology and cell phones, causing cancer. I think it was about he was it in November. I wrote an article on this were there was a study from the national isn't. It's a valve reporting clear evidence that cell phone radiation. Be connected to cancer clear evidence, not oh, we have a suspicion. Not that. Oh, you know, we are looking into this. This is clear evidence. Like, it's done. It's it's there. Tests were performed on mice and rats using much higher levels of radiation that humans are exposed to. But the male rats started to show an increase in brain tumors. They also found an increased risk of cancer of the adrenal glands, and those top the kidneys and produce hormones now that study was performed by. Dr John butcher and colleagues or Booker at the national tech toxicology programme, North Carolina, and they tested radiofrequency radiation used a to g and three g cell phones. And I know everybody's like, okay. We've got five G coming like super fast is five G. Okay. I don't know. I still don't even get how our phone works. I mean, I know where my mom lives, and I keep a nice healthy distance. But man that phone makes it sound like she is right up. Makes the hair on the back of my next. Stand up my mom feels like she has right. They're not only in the room. But in my head. You know, like, I'm hearing voices sort of thing. I don't know how that technology works. They say the minimum amount of radiation. Mice would be considered the maximum amount of radi- radiation at the federal regulators would allow humans so they gave the mice, you know, higher than maximum doses. But they found clear evidence that the radiation

Cancer United Nations WSB Apple Miami Dna Damage World Health Organization North Carolina Dr John Butcher Booker Five G Three G
The modern anti-vaxxer movement, explained

The Conspiracy Farm

12:02 min | 2 years ago

The modern anti-vaxxer movement, explained

"So Jeff if you wanna give me your views real quick on on what you're thinking about the vaccine. The debate is very, you know, like, you said Champa, very very controversial subject, and, you know, very, polarizing, you know, we see the news. I have an article right here on unvaccinated air, Oregon boy had severe tetanus nearly died. Basically, I think it was a reaction to then you've got the measles outbreak recently. So I mean, it winds up becoming unfortunately, this kind of binary conversation of either your four vaccines or you're completing against vaccines. And I'm just not that binary with it because I know the application of vaccines is medically sound introducing certain substances even body to make human body create a kind of immune defense if you will. But it gets more into for me. What's in these vaccines as our experts going to speak today? I mean, you got live monkey viruses. You got aluminum you got the Marisol which is mercury and there's a lot to this conversation. And there needs to be more education about it. So here we go so Brickley. Please inform us a little bit more about what I have not mentioned in terms of your qualifications in this row. Tom. There are I think that great introduction. So that he for that person. I'm a mother I'm gonna mother read Unical healthy children. My middle daughter was backing injured. And so that was really the old shit were doing what fall delayed schedule the a lot of conscious your answer teasing. Either spread backing out or do a little bit of late schedule making get into the nets bolts of how the schedule increased riot increase in you know, when somebody that's older than even something might find thirty six Yuan. I was it'd be eight vaccines child today will get thirty six axes by the first year of life. Fifty a forty nine by the age of five in seventy two by eighteen in that schedule has never been interested in crews will abdomen form here. And I would say first and foremost mother protecting my children, and the research, I did floored me on it really woke me up out of this haze. That vaccines are safe and effective. Vaccine save lives near the marketing ploy that offered you know, second grade and it. Roure will be into just a tremendous amount of research. So I've been researching vaccines every single day for the last decade Flatow on. Out of reaction that he decided out Emily that we were no longer going back seat. And I think one of the things that we're seeing in the meteorite now, the big anti vaccine Bush, but most urine said are speaking out against axioms are actually Xboxes they're they're your maximum needed their children. They believed in the system. They believed in the FBI and something terrible happen to their child after vaccines. So I think it's a mole issued feed into talk about those details. This is something that for me. I gave us some some deep thought at one point because I'm married to a doctor of chiropractic, and when she became pregnant with our our oldest daughter. My mother was a nurse nursing director. She ran the the college of nursing in my area at Molin public hospital. So she was obviously on the side of vaccines at the time. And that's all I knew I knew nothing nothing else. And so I asked my I asked my wife, I said, you know, what are we gonna do here because I knew I know you see things differently. And my wife's just said, listen, go do research on your own with an open mind. That's all I ask you do to do. And so I went, and I did that in the further I dug into it, it it it, really. Did. It scared me. And so I made the decision as a parent with my wife to not vaccinate our kids. And now our kids have been very healthy, very resistant to any whenever the other kids getting the flu strep throat, and a lot of other things are kids seem to be a lot more resilient than the than the heard in terms of that stuff. And I am criticized I'm criticize I'm not afraid to say it, you know, that this is the decision that I made, but at the same time, you know, I think about if a roller coaster, and I don't know the exact numbers of minor injury compared to death and everything in that spectrum in between. I know some of the statistics I know that one in six children now have learning disabilities that is that is Onda unacceptable, but that's just just one of the statistics. But so if somebody said to me, all right, you're gonna put your kid on this roller coaster. There's a one in fifty thousand chance that they might get hurt. You know, the roller coaster does go awry every once in a while and kids get hurt. And sometimes they actually get killed are you gonna put your kid on their roller coaster. No, you're not putting your kid on that roller coaster. Now, I'm using a little bit of an extreme example. But you know, please take that and and kind of throw out some facts for folks a little bit. Sure. Well, I think one of the things that we need to be consciously aware of just as a American population is not so much fearing the diseases that we've accident for because that's real bear. The pharmaceutical industry has strong will this is they thrive on fear and a fear. Everybody with the flu chickenpox in. You know measles. The big fear. Measles right now. Measles is a five day rash for most healthy individuals. And you have lifelong immunity neat. Measles was Brady bunch episode. Their books. Sally the needles Toomey measles. I guarantee you guys both have chicken pox at some point. So did I were still living breathing have lifelong immunity. So we we tend to add the culture only fear the diseases that we've accident for right? And that's a brilliant marketing system designed by the pharmaceutical industry. Now, the reality is that parents should be conscious of diseases that vaccines cause and at one of the things that I teach all around the world. My inbox is always full of asking questions about vaccines in. So to me that shows a huge problem with the system that they have to actually reach out to me through social media every single day hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people from all different walks of life searching for answers. But one of the things that so critical to understand is that most of the diseases that we currently vaccinate for are not deadly their illnesses. They're not diseases, so they're temporary asses. And we are trading are are beautiful healthy children whose immune systems are. Still growing functioning for this false reality that they they're going to be saved in some way. They're going to be protected from all diseases the way, that's just not the kiddies and in the process of backsitting because there's so many back scenes in. I know somebody mentioned a minute ago. Just the agreements we can get into that. But you're looking at dozens dozens dozens of vaccine related lifelong diseases lifelong disabilities, and like you said, you know, one six children has a neurological neurological. A learning processing disorder, but in actual neurological disorder that we never seen that in our history. We had the the sickest generation of children ever recorded. And my belief is a huge amount of that has to do with vaccines. Now, there is a part of it. That's also GMO's in fluorinated water. You know, that's a better topic. But the fact is that we've all been exposed to this one thing in the one thing is the current CDC vaccine schedule. So there's a lot of there's a lot of moving in that. I go down whatever avenue you wanna go down. But yeah, I mean, I will be here. It should be very very fearful and office of diseases and lifelong disabilities that axes how are proven by law to caught and we can get into the laws. Well, there's a pretty direct correlation when you start talking about. I mean, what was it like you said hundred eighty five there was basically DP Emaar, basically three or four vaccines now like you said from ninety one on it's like almost fifty fifty different. Doses. Like fifteen sixteen vaccines. And the thing is trips me out is that they hit these kids like fresh out of the womb like they're not even kind of developed, and they're just hitting them with all these toxins that and then and then kind of the larger culpability or lack of accountability are these are these vaccine courts that congress has basically prohibited people from any legal recourse, there's no way to sue them. And they know your own CDC's own children that they're not even following these schedules because they know it goes back to almost the tobacco study or the sugar study. They know the information is there, but like you said with the firm Asuka companies and everything else there's so much money in this. And I take like I say, I take a constitutional stances when the government can mandate, you know, that's that's my fear is that, you know, with all these people pushing for this that the government can mandate that a medical procedure done on my children. And this is a medical procedure make note make no mistake in a one size fits all medical procedure. That. That's not none of those. No medical procedure is a one-size-fits-all for every patient. Right. The beautiful thing now chant they don't I mean with they almost a lot of states, and I did this with my stuff years ago with my oldest daughter there forms, you can fell out religious exemptions. And things are some states have personal philosophical exemptions there. So he's trying to remove that though. Well, no, you're right. But at least it's not the federal government mandating it quite yet. Tenth amendment states rights are still being invoked. And I think that that's where I mean like congress met the other day in talked about vaccines, and that was a huge deal. We've got you know, the letter that Adam Schiff just wrote on to the US house saying how important back seeds are. He just like, you know, pharma, mouthpiece really poster boy for bomb suitable industry because in one of my biggest insurance they're violating their own law, and one of the reasons that the schedule expanded like we've been talking about is the nineteen eighty six congress was bought out by the pharmaceutical industry so vaccine manufacturers were going bankrupt. Because so many people were doing that from the debilitating effects of the DTP, which the wholesale protests at diptheria ten is in protest vaccine, which now we have the tap, which is a different version. But at the time, it was is d and Sony kids were developing seizures in dying that they had millions and millions of dollars lawsuits in. So the Zukile industry was gonna go bankrupt. And instead of making a safer more effective product providing education going back to the drawing or. Frigging something out. They just went in and bought a congress in created the nineteen eighty six childhood back seen injury Protection Act, which like you mentioned totally stripped vaccine may earth from liability. Now, there is not another product in the world that I can think of that is mandated by law to be injected into east that has no civilized -bility attached to it. So when you talk about public health, this was really about public health for about parents would be informed. They're they're supposed to be informed about the nineteen eighty six law and the vaccine insurance before accepting or declining vaccines so across the board medical professionals in this country are violating the law that was put in place in the nineteen eighty six production act. So you insert those inserts themselves even list, these these toxics through mariesville on mercury on them will actually so under the left that law is in the inserts, but you can't actually pull the ingredient list on the inserted to suffer documents, which I so interesting because if they were really being transparent with their product ever. Just the document, right? But they have an additional document called the CDC media excipient summary, and that's on the CDC website in that has every listing griant of but the actual routes in back scenes are not listed in the inserts, which also builds your mind because what other product when we buy a product were so big on labelling laws here. Right and everybody wants to know what's in their food now. But yet at the same time, they don't wanna know what's in their medicine. And some of those ingredients are

Measles CDC Congress Tetanus Champa Oregon Jeff FLU FBI Neurological Disorder Molin Public Hospital Director Unical Roure TOM Emily Federal Government
"neurological disorder" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on WEEI

"What are the ending of the Daytona five hundred and for the second time in four years? Denny Hamlin wins the Daytona five hundred and led the way with a one two three sweep for Joe Gibbs racing. As you just heard coach Gibbs there as the victory was an honor of GD Gibbs who passed away last month. He co founded the race team as well with his father in discovered. Denny hamlin. But what a way to end that as they were. Just crashes everywhere very similar last year. Seems like Daytona continues to have these these these massive massive crashes at the end, and it's just it really. I it's not good for the sport. What was it? Twenty one twenty two twenty one twenty two cars are toiling twenty cars left at the with ten laps to go. Wow. Can they not go at least the last twenty five or thirty laps without a a rack and just the pile ups, and for nobody really to get hurt that I'm aware of every was any injured you looked at the white car, which is underneath another car as it's going along the the back straight there. So it's just really incredible to see all these. These crashes have guys tried to get position get a little anxious ticket socks. I think the sport needs some help. I mean, I'm sorry. I love NASCAR. And we cover it quite a bit here on our local show in Phoenix. But you know, five wrecks in the final twenty laps of regulation. You didn't have only fourteen cars to finish on the final lap. It's just it's ridiculous. And then you have you know, you have these these crashes and forty minutes of of delays. I mean, the race took four or five hours just way too long. And I don't know what ask are going to do. I mean, you look at what happened last year when when what's his name? Austin one lap last lap. You bust your balls trying to get position. And then there's a crash and you have an opportunity to win the Daytona five hundred which is the Super Bowl racy. Yeah. It was. It was interesting. I mean, I caught a little bit of it. And the things that cut toward the end. Obviously, you're right. Rocket is frustrating. You just love to see him. Just just hammered out the last fifteen twenty laps and let the best man win over time needs to be longer. I would agree a minimum of five. I would I would agree. I mean, let them maybe ten something to wear that Olmeta. Momentum positioning, but these guys are all tried to position each other. And having a chance to to watch this and see and have them. Explain the strategy on TV, but the teammates and then to see Toyota threes you mentioned with Joe Gibbs racing. Phenomenal was that in light of JD passed away last month and dynamic was it neurological disorder and just just the emotion? You saw the Getty Hamlin. Here's twice in the last four years winning this bad. And again, he how did he avoid getting through the one crash? I mean that was just close your eyes step on glad just close and move through. And I mean, he was said I was fortunate to get through all of the the the wreckage and the carnage that wasn't front of them. Get your good bad and ugly from the weekend. All right, Manoucher, good. I gotta go with the the skills challenge. The NBA all star game on also the three point shooting, slam dunk competition was okay. I mean. Look at the Abu with the going over jumping over shack. That was pretty impressive of uneventful slam dunk competition. But that was. Is for the dunk. Let's see what we can jump over. Let's jump over a frigging are now. Maybe they need to retire it for a year or two I I will say this. Is there anything that? We haven't seen in the slam dunk. Competition would be new well that was all new yesterday. I did see I've never seen anybody over over airplane. I've seen him go. Over was a Griffin went over the car. I think that was one of those kinda get your attention. But I liked the three point shooter curry versus Harris. I really thought curry was going to empty the all the racks. But Harris, you go who and this could just empties everything. And I did enjoy the skills challenge. I had to chat with watching the Tatum and trae ASTA, go out and take them shoot that ball behind him three. That you also I got this. I got this also over the top of them. So you go on with the NBA skilled Saturday NBA. I want to go with with major league baseball yesterday. They had their spring event meeting in Robert Banfield Manfred. Manfred said, hey, we're gonna put the pitch count in. So they're going to start the twenty second limit time. Limit for the spring training games both here in Arizona and in Florida, and I'm anxious to see how what that does. If that's going to change things. Denny Hamlin winning the Daytona five hundred and I'm going to go Kentucky Wildcats, and what they were able to do over the weekend take they took care of Tennessee. Once again, eighty six sixty nine we'll get more into that a little bit later from more sounds of the weekend, which becoming up here in about twenty minutes. I have the French fighting body recognizing lightsaber dueling as a sport lightsaber lightsaber dueling as a sport. You should be fine. Sport house that a sport the fencing body of France fencing. You didn't mention read the whole headline there. Lightsaber dueling as a sports logos. People on the left. The only read the heads. Now, do we just? Bad bad. It was the news that actually came out a little bit earlier today. So it doesn't really count from over the weekend. But that marquees Brown from Oklahoma gonna miss the combine and his pro day as the surgery. Yeah. Mike. We're gonna see more that. Yeah. I think so the pro day for allow these guys my bad San Antonio Brown's continued comments or tweets, I'm Ben Rothlisberger. Coach Tomlin just shut up just just move on. And just get yourself ready to go wherever you gonna play gotta go meet with Mr. Rooney, you continue exasperate the problems. Maybe he's doing it on purpose. Who knows it doesn't wanna come back? I don't know. I still wanna get into cabernet. I was off on Friday. So that bad went into the whole weekend. Give me a bad taste in my mouth the entire weekend. Because I'm not a fan of him in any way whatsoever. I'll be vocal about it. I don't need to be politically, correct. Because I could give to you know, he would never ever worked for me in any capacity at all. I think the guy's a piece of, you know, also JT who let one go get away a heck of a lead going into the Genesis, and he blew it. And that was unfortunate ugly. That's got be the NASCAR Rex. Wreck varying could have been could have been very very ugly. Thank god. Nobody got hurt. And during that show, my ugly is rob Manfred in that same sort of state of the major league baseball that rock was talking about the pitch count denied that taking was taking place. And basically said oh, all the teams are trying to win with putting us on the path toward a labor dispute and a couple of years in that is part of our sounds of the weekend, which is coming up forty minutes past the hour. I definitely pulled back because I thought that would definitely be something. We'd want to talk about today. So that'll be coming up. But we have Jason Cole. The new editor in chief of fan sides offense cited inside it's now fan cited cited dot com. Change the fans. I always stay inside fans cited doctor you go. You learn something for that. No. I didn't know it was I.

Denny Hamlin Joe Gibbs NBA baseball Daytona Robert Banfield Manfred Getty Hamlin Harris NASCAR rob Manfred neurological disorder Toyota France editor in chief Phoenix Olmeta curry Austin Oklahoma
Will ex-NHLers take the leagues money and go away?

The Big Story

07:47 min | 2 years ago

Will ex-NHLers take the leagues money and go away?

"Sport. Tennyson and he's in and he is hurt. Nobody force these guys to play some people might sit lucky to get any money considering the court already throughout their lawsuit. A lot of pain right now. But over the next two weeks, hundreds of former NHL hockey players will each have a decision to make. Dangling in front of them is a cash settlement from the NHL. It's not huge. But it's not nothing either. It's the result of negotiation after the lawsuit. I mentioned was dismissed that lawsuit alleged that the league failed to warn or protect its players from the head injuries. That are you know, part of hockey, but in order to get that money. The players will have to sign away a list of things including chief among them their right to pursue legal action against the league for any claim of head trauma or else. They can reject the settlement keep their rights and go it alone taking on the league in court, depending on how many players take this deal, and how much noise the remaining hold-outs can make many of them have spoken loudly already. This is either the final chapter of hockey's legal battle over brain injuries or just the latest in a long and unwinding saga. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Dan, Robson is a senior writer and head of features at the Atlantic. Canada is also the author of several books about players current and former Dan first of all tell me where the class action suit came from. We'll basically back in twenty thirteen a group of players sort of in line with what was happening with the NFL came forward with a council to sort of set of claims thing that they're that alleged that the NHL had information about the the effects of concussions on future neurological disorders that had been kept from them in their playing days, and they were not properly informed. Therefore, they believed that the NFL was sort of liable for the effects that they were facing later on in life, and what happened to that suit over the last few years. So it's it was a heavily contentious debate that battled back and forth sort of ferociously the NHL didn't budget all in any in any capacity and basically after. Five years of of going back and forth in court this summer. The the class action proposal was dismissed by coordin-, Minnesota Australian Saint Paul's because basically the the legal claim that they were trying to make just wasn't going to stand up in class act certification, and they had an uphill battle is very difficult to to sort of gain class action certification, and they sort of fought and fought and fought, but the same time the NHL fought and fought and fought as well. And so now there are three hundred players three hundred some players soon in eighteen hundred and eighteen who were hoping to be part of a class action suit. What were their options when the suit was tossed, basically, they had nothing. I mean, really when the when these suits is tossed the they're on their own, right? So in terms of the the group, which they had, you know, you've been able to have sort of that that force be able to go at it as a whole now, it's sort of individual cases, in some cases that might be beneficial for some of the players, but as a whole they were they were basically sunk and so. So the NHL really didn't have to do anything beyond that. But but I mean, they just then they decided that they'd come forward when in agreement with the council of the players with the plaintiffs the, and and th the judge also sort of nudged them in this direction encouraged them to find some sort of resolution, the NHL came for with a concussion settlement proposal that that came forward in November of this year, basically, it outlines a payment to the players involved, which comes to approximately between two thousand dollars US per player as well as a promise of neurological testing, and then beyond that there was a fund that would allow players who are deemed, you know, in need of more support in this way, they will be given up to seventy five thousand dollars in care. Now that comes from a limited pot of about one point one million dollars, though. So every player now has to decide on their own whether or not they want to be part of this. Right. So they're given a initially a date of seventy five a timeline of seventy five days in which there. We're going to be able to decide if they were gonna opt in or opt out that has since been extended that expired last Friday that Cincinnati's extended three weeks. So in the next few weeks, you're going to find players that they'll be players only deserted decide if they're going to be joining or not, and it's been a in a player with the players have chatted with. I mean, there's been a difficult decision. There's a large legal document in front of them, and they have to sort of decide what exactly they're signing off to. So who are these players who are we talking about here? What era any names we recognize? Well, I mean, it's it's kind of a wide range of names. I mean, some of the younger players the ones that are more recent recognize it'd be a Dan Castillo was obviously one of the most vocal proponents of short to take action against the league and trying to create a more awareness of of the realities of head injuries. And what they do other players. I mean, you go back in the air as to know, Gary Leeman was part of this right and Gary Leeman played through the eighties. Nineties is a great player at that time. He was one of the bigger names involved. There's players like that go further back that people may not even recognize a quite actually. Quite a bunch that people. I recognize that played through the seventies and eighties and nineties, and that I guess she was sort of classify as no marginal players, right? And guys the didn't make a ton of money presumably, and that's key. Yeah. A lot of players who you know, you see people sort of on the one angle sort of criticizing the sort of a money grab will there are a lot of players who wouldn't have made the kind of salaries that that we sort of frame a professional hockey player within today. So I think you know, there's a lot of players that for example, twenty two thousand dollars. It sounds like nothing to today's h well, Well, it is it nothing. is nothing nothing them. And, but it's nothing it's something that they can't just sort of sniff at and and some of the players, I've chatted with acknowledged that they said, you know, I I'm not entirely comfortable with where we stand, but I have an option of either taking something or nothing you talked to a bunch of these guys. Well, I guess I you mentioned Dan Carso. So tell me historian tell me what he's doing about this settlement. Well, we'll Dan is as I said one of the more vocal personalities of their who suffered greatly in his career and has been quite open about the the trauma that he's sort of face through. Obviously he believes injuries on the ice that carried into his life through neurological disease at a lot of research on it, and he sort of created a sort of an ongoing campaigns that challenge the NHL in the status quo. Abo-, you know, the culture of just accepting head injury. As a part of the game and denying the realities that down the road this causes. Neurological disorders. So Dan has been one of those guys who's been sort of front and center in in the case. And he's a person that I think is attempting to you know, help educate other players the the best he can. So he's not taking the settlement. He is vehemently not taking the settlement. No, he's urging others, and I should say he's he's urging others to make the best Asian for themselves. You know, he would say he would say don't take the settlement. But at the same time, you have to knowledge that, you know, it's it's it's presumptuous to assume that somebody can say no to something like twenty two thousand dollars. So he's saying read through the settlement. Make sure you're checking with council, maybe not necessarily your own council within the case because within the case, the plaintiff's council have agreed to this concussion settlement, they they were negotiated it. Yeah. And they're suggesting that the players take it, obviously is important to note that within the settlement to the NHL is covering the attorney's fees. Now, the attorneys aren't coming

NHL Hockey DAN Gary Leeman NFL Neurological Disorders Tennyson Cincinnati Jordan Heath Rawlings Dan Castillo Dan Carso Canada Coordin Atlantic Minnesota Writer Attorney Robson Twenty Two Thousand Dollars
Teen on a mission to raise money for sister's disease

24 Hour News

01:19 min | 2 years ago

Teen on a mission to raise money for sister's disease

"Villafranca has the story. Benson Benson is a little man on a big mission Turner and six million dollars in twenty four months. The Austin Texas, fourteen year old is trying to help save his big sister Christiane, my sister's a rare and fatal disease sixteen-year-old Christiaan was diagnosed with the disease when she was five the rare neurological disorder degrades brain function and can cause blindness and seizures. There's no cure only experimental treatments that may slow the disease. The family started a foundation to raise the six million dollars for an FDA approved clinical trial for Christiaan garland promised to raise the last million by himself. He's almost there and needs less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars. You think he's going to be able to get my plan was to get a hundred thousand people you've ten dollars each so much for donating? So he's turned to social media for. From college athletes play quarterback for the university of Texas. I'm here with my buddy garland to jewelry designer Kendra.

Christiaan Garland Benson Benson Villafranca Christiaan University Of Texas Austin Texas Turner Christiane FDA Six Million Dollars One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol Twenty Four Months Fourteen Year Sixteen-Year Ten Dollars
Christiaan Garland, Benson Benson And Omar Villafranca discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:15 min | 2 years ago

Christiaan Garland, Benson Benson And Omar Villafranca discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

"Daughter was diagnosed with an incurable disease they set out to raise six million dollars for treatment. But the girl's brother vowed to raise the last million by himself. CBS's Omar Villafranca has the incredible story Benson Benson is a little man on a big mission Turner six million dollars in twenty four months. The Austin Texas, fourteen year old is trying to help save his big sister, Christy on. My sister has a rare and fatal disease. Batman vs year. Sixteen-year-old Christiaan was diagnosed with the disease when she was five the rare neurological disorder degrades brain function and can cause blindness and seizures. There's no cure only experimental treatments that may slow the disease. The family started a foundation to raise the six million dollars for an FDA approved clinical trial for Christiaan garland promised to raise the last million by himself. He's almost there and needs less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars. You think he's going to be able to get it? Why plan will see you at one hundred thousand dollars each so much for gun eating. So he's turned to social media for help from

Christiaan Garland Benson Benson Omar Villafranca Christiaan CBS Austin Texas Batman Christy FDA Six Million Dollars One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol One Hundred Thousand Dollars Twenty Four Months Fourteen Year Sixteen-Year
"neurological disorder" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

10:21 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"This weekend was lathered with gravy did have some green beans with rich mushroom sauce. Guess what you're eating the perfect human diet. Now, it was problematic. If you threw in a bunch of potatoes, and sweet potatoes and a lot of desserts in their sugar part. No, no, no. But the good fats and the vegetables and protein is exactly what you should be eating. Hi, it's Dr Wendy Walsh. Welcome back to the doctor Wendy Walsh show on KFI AM, six forty and the reason why I specialize in relationships I have a PHD in clinical psychology. But I also teach psychology of health counseling at Cal State Channel Islands. So I'm pretty obsessed with wellness as well. And the reason why I'm talking about our relationship with food is because I think so many of us walk around feeling guilty about how we eat. When actually our biology has been hijacked by our food industry. And there is this a thinking out there that we have a character flaw that were overeating when actually there are ingredients in today's processed food designed to be addictive. So that we will eat more and more and more and also food most of the processed food has very little nutritional value. So we're continuing to eat because we're craving the nutrition. And if you eat good nutrition, you won't have those same cravings. So. Let me start with what causes overeating and when I teach health psychology. I always teach the bio psycho, social pieces of everything the biological piece, the psychological piece and the sociological piece, so let's talk about the biological. I there are some people that just have a gene for obesity. There's they don't get the message to their brain that their stomach is full. Some people call it a neurological disorder and very similar to other forms of addiction. It basically is a brain imbalance, and is very similar to drug addictions, overeating is although the difference I always say between drug addiction and over eating is that if you're getting over an alcohol or drug dependency, you can take away every single drug and alcohol as well. As the triggers for them, the people you used to hang with, you, don't go to bars, anymore, etc. And you clean it out of your life. Unfortunately, people overcoming an eating disorder have to go to the fridge three times a day and walk their tiger. So it's very very difficult to get over. But there is as I said, a biological piece live. There's also a psychological peace, and again, this is not a character flaw. This is not blaming anybody. But when we haven't been taught to express our feelings in a healthy way and a little later in the show today. I'm gonna talk about ways to express your feelings healthy way. Then we squelch them. We keep them inside. And one of the things people do is eat their feelings because food brings us pleasure. Eating feels good. And we're not feeling good inside eating something that tastes delicious. Gives us a momentary sense of pleasure. Unfortunately, what often follows right behind it is this guilt. And then we start to beat ourselves up about it and think that we don't have self control. And then we eat more to bring us more feelings of pleasure. It's that terrible cycle. But I'm telling you right now. That if you've been eating the modern American diet filled with processed food, then your biology has been hijacked by the food industry, and you're actually not in charge anymore as I like to say to my health psychology students. Oh, but don't worry. Because once you get sick, the pharmaceutical industry will be happy to take over. So I think it's up to us to own our biology from the beginning and start to make changes, and it's not always easy because the other piece of any health behavior is the social piece is so health habits are so contagious among social groups and among families. If you grew up in a family that eight all processed food. This is what you know when you go to their table, and they give you stove top stuffing and a can of green beans and some kind of process chicken breast instead of Turkey breast instead of taking a whole day to cook a meal from scratch. This is what? You know, and most of the food that we eat. That's mass produced is filled with pesticides are meats are filled with hormones and antibiotics that change our biology. So when you hear people use the term, I wanna eat clean. That's what they mean. I do want to say because I know that people believe that eating well costs a lot of money, and it does However I have subscribed to an organic farms box. You can find them anywhere. Online called CSI consumer supported agriculture. Nobody paid me to say this. But I happen to subscribe to one in LA called grub market that I like and it used to be called farm box. LA? I think they changed their name to sound cool to millennials or something. But I will say that once you cut out the middleman that being the grocery store, and you're getting directly from organic farmers, the cost is much less. I find I'm spending less money. And also because you don't do all those impulse buys by. Walking through the aisles. I mean, I probably walk into a real grocery store. Maybe twice a month and to pick up extra things that aren't in my basket, some Staples. But for the most part, I have no processed food in my house. Oh, and let me tell you my teenager loves that I'm being sarcastic. She hates that. She has friends that come over. And they can't find a chip a soda pop tart they can't find anything to make quickly. They have. I'm like, I'm hungry. I'm like, okay. So take out a chicken breast Brown it. Here's some wonderful rubella mix it with it. I put it on a bed of a Ruge was goat cheese and a few little pine nuts. And they're like, what are you saying? But for me, I can do that in ten minutes and have a whole meal in front of me because I have the knowledge but teenagers would rather go. Can we just have your Starbucks card? We're just gonna go across. So this is one flaw in my house is that I have no processed food and not really because I'm, you know, this militant person it's because they don't crave it, and I don't want. It have lots of other real food there. Okay. So biological sociological, psychological. There are some other things, and these are I think sociological behavioral things we call them environmental cues that cause people to overeat. So for instance, and this is all supported by research, if you are served larger portions, you will overeat because humans eat whatever's in front of them, so one of the easiest ways to begin losing weight. Besides switching to a high fat, low carb diet, high fat, low carb diet is to you. Never feel hungry hungry is to just buy smaller plates. You know, it's interesting when I first started, you know, twenty thirty years ago in America, maybe longer, but my memory of it, I used to laugh because their little cups. And saucers little plates were all European sized. And it was very funny to me and I noticed in the nineteen nineties things started to switch for I- Kia as the demand for over sized American plates and big American bowls. If you go to Europe, you will see that the plates are so much smaller as are all the balls and all the cops. So that's the first thing get rid of the giant sized everything. Let's see what else. A reduction in effort to eat food increases overall consumption. You know, what that means dieting means you eat more. If you try not to eat, you know, the word no is humans. Biggest aphrodisiac. So if you try not to eat, I guarantee you makes you think about food all the time, and it makes you want to eat. So dieting that makes you feel hungry will always make you a rebound in some way. Here's some more science large groups of people eating together. I know we just had thanksgiving. This is all good tend to overeat in correlation with the size of the group. So the bigger the group the more you east, isn't that fascinating. So I'm not saying don't get together with people because social support is so important do not eat in isolation, especially if it's top of ice cream. But you know, being with people is great. But if you're always out at big, huge giant dinners, you're gonna eat more. Interesting me other research shows that individuals will eat until the food placed in front of them is gone, regardless of how full they are. We call all of these automatic behaviors they are responses to cues to eat. So you can change certain things in your environment. If you want to change things now. The other piece is we talked about our food industry. We talked about biological sociological. We talked about psychological. Let's talk about our relationship with exercise. Now. I know we beat ourselves up. Don't we we say, well, I'm overweight because I'm not exercising enough. Actually, your body is meant to exercise. And if it doesn't want to exercise, it's because it can't hear that call to exercise over the din created by caffeine, nicotine sugar screen, time, etc. So if you start to reduce some of those other things in your life, you will find that your body will want to exercise, so I don't want to put you on a guilt train. I just want to say it'll happen. And then I want to close by saying high fat low carb have I said that yet high fat low carb, look it up. All right. When we come back the other stress with holidays isn't just about the food. It's a relationship with the people in the holidays family, and friend. Let's talk about toxic people when we come back. This is the doctor Wendy Walsh show on KFI AM, six forty. I'll be right back. Brothers doesn't just do business.

Dr Wendy Walsh KFI Cal State Channel Islands LA neurological disorder obesity Turkey CSI Europe caffeine America nicotine twenty thirty years ten minutes
"neurological disorder" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Here & Now

"Harden needs help getting out of her wheelchair and into her Walker. She and husband Matt have the routine down, Pat. Yeah. Harden has a rare neurological disorder that inflames her brain and causes seizures doctor say it was related to injection. She got joining the navy last year, she had her third brain surgery to relieve the symptoms while it helped manage the seizures it limited hardens, mobility, the walkers huge primary have it helps me start to be able to get more mobilization on my own how about anywhere that I can outside of their be. Getting the Walker wasn't easy. Hardens doctor ordered it from the VA in April. But they had trouble getting one of the parts and couldn't fill the order right away. Now, they said as we have it on order for you months later, the VA still hasn't come through and ended up getting the same Walker from project mend a San Antonio based nonprofit group that refurbishes medical equipment and gives it to people at a cost savings. The order took them just a few days right now. The VA says it has about eighty five hundred equipment requests that have waited longer than thirty days. Fred downs, prosthetics consultant with paralyzed veterans of America says that's cause for concern. I'm not comfortable with that number. I need to know. More facts, what's composed of what type of orders downs used to work for the VA and he helped build their prosthetic service back in the eighties. He says the real legitimate reasons, why some cases drag on equipment might require special fabrication, multiple fittings or involvement by an outside vendor. But down says. Complex cases are one thing while bureaucratic obstacles or another. And he isn't sure which category. The VA delays fall into the thing that we all worry about are those cases where a veteran, you know, they wheelchair is prescribed. And so the veteran goes home doesn't hear anything from the VA. This is where we hear a lot of this is where you and others here problems. The department of veterans affairs receives more than six hundred and fifty thousand requests for prosthetic items and medical devices every month and delays have long been a problem. The Secretary Robert Wilkie says this year's numbers actually represent a market improvement last year, sixty four thousand prosthetic requests with thirty days old or older. We've now gotten that down to eighty five hundred last year, the inspector general found a host of problems with the way some medical centers were handling prosthetics since then the department is changed some of its processes they've made it easier to track equipment requests and are holding medical center. Directors more accountable for. Fulfiling them. The agency is now trying to determine how many delayed requests are acceptable. Wilkie says he's proud of the VA's progress so far that is certainly a case where we have moved out, and it shows America's that the department does have the potential for Gylfi and adaptability. Back in Texas, Whitney harden has had to adapt to she's making strides with her rehab and has now mastered the track at her physical therapy center. Thirty six feet twice to lapse hardened says there's a chance for VA Walker will still come in. If it does she plans to donate the one she's using now to project meant to help someone else.

VA Whitney harden Fred downs Walker Robert Wilkie Pat neurological disorder America San Antonio Texas navy Secretary consultant thirty days Thirty six feet
"neurological disorder" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"To follow us on Twitter, Dr Dalia in on Facebook that after Delhi show. So apparently for the first time, researchers have been able to create mice out of two dads. Now, the mice weren't able to survive for more than a day, according to life science or so after birth, but coaxing an embryo made from the DNA of two dads all the way through fetal development was still I guess a huge feat. The researchers found that it was actually a lot more difficult than making mice with two. Moms. They say the findings can help explain why mammals cannot reproduce with only a single parent. They also it also may help to explain why those animals that can reproduce alone such as unfit billions are almost always female. So what they're saying is when they tried to coax DNA male DNA. It was a lot harder than just doing it with female DNA. So. They see the barrier to single sex reproduction, which is I guess something that has been asked four in demand. The barrier. According to senior steady off Wei Li stem cell research, the Chinese carry signs. This is something called genomic imprinting or the molecular tagging of DNA that regulates how the instructions of the genome are carried out and so they're using something called genomic imprinting. Well, that's what we call it where I guess it controls the black box. Of sexual reproduction. This Amana researcher for reproductive science. And basically, you get your DNA half from your army and for me daddy. But the DNA from each parent has these different molecular tags that are added during the formation of the original sperm and egg meeting. Together. These towns are instructions that dictate whether eight gene is going to be active and expressed or if it's going to stay dormant now with me and my husband when it came time to genetically engineered comically printing. Our little eggs, my babies die. You are not bringing in that, gene. Oh, hell, no. That's gonna remind me of your mother. And he was like, oh, no, no, no. That's gonna remind me of your mother, and I'm like, oh, hell, no. And so on a microscopic level, we fought to make our two boys. And they're exactly like our mothers. So so that's how that worked out. Anyway. And it's good. It's good. We love our mummies. So they say you can inherit a copy of specifically for mom, and that gene with these molecular Marx would enable it to be transcribed to do its function. But the same gene from dad would have different tags prevented from being expressed. And apparently these tags of real world consequences. They're crucial early every Arctic development guess previous. Studies have found that one scientists tried to engineer offspring from two sperm the embryo fails to develop while the cells that grow the placenta flourish offspring from two eggs in a developing every oh. I guess offspring from two eggs will result in a developing embryo, but the placenta may fail to grow. So what are they telling us? Did they tell us that the easiest way to make a baby is male and female genetic donor, but they're getting close to figuring out how to do male, male, DNA and female, female DNA. So this genetic disorders that depend on Genova can printing ancients syndrome is a neurological disorder. It causes intellectual disability and seizures. Because there's this mutation in a gene called the UB three on the moms chromosome when that saying gene mutation however is passed down by dad instead of mom, it's a completely different neurological disorder called Prater willy. So what they're saying is is a mom gives jeans dad gives jeans V, depending on who gives them. They may express themselves differently. So. Some animals can reproduce solo. And I guess we the human race want to figure out how we could help same sex couples procreate. Again, a very very nervous whenever we messed with nature whenever we start to tinker around with nature, sometimes bad things happen. I'm still not convinced that this whole Zeke epidemic wasn't a result of us starting to play around with mosquitoes fighting malaria. You know? I mean, we there are sometimes consequences of things that we do. And so I think we will be in our lifetime able to allow. To male DNA female DNA's to create a baby. And I think overall the baby will have a healthy life. But I can't anticipate what sort of biological evolutionary. You know issues we may have. So you have fish out there reptiles amphibians they have been designed to reproduce solo. It's called Parthenon jet. Without a male. There's only one fish called The Danny Oriole records alive science that could reproduce with males loan. Now, researchers are trying to find out why those ma'am those animals can but mammals can't. So they started to create parthenogenesis in males. They use these mouse stem cells engineers have only one Senate maternal chromosomes like an age and then inject them into a normal egg cell to create an embryo with two sets of general DNA, then they transferred the embryo into a surrogate mom to carry the bait to create a viable embryo, the researchers had to though delete imprinted segments of the genome from the engineered sell. So they still had to these still had to get involved. They still have the tincture around the resulting mice were normal. But it was a very very experimental condition. It was very very calculated, and they've made mom they've made mice from two moms before I guess the first time they did. This was back in two thousand four but trying to make mice with two dads was very very tricky apparently was only done once before at MD Anderson. And they created male stem cells with x y chromosomes, and then they injected them into the female cells and to see if they could then form and create an embryo, the male tests, the male apparently had a little bit more issues. What they did also was once they injected to the blast assists, which are the early stage of development, then they let those females develop into adults. Then it those females carrying the mail X DNA, it's a little little confusing. But what they're trying to do as men have x y chromosomes girls have x chromosomes. Well, then we'll nature. No. If we take to male ex- excess. To make a female. You see? If a female is ex- ex- and females are made because they get the extra Madonna look the from the Y see our the the sex of the baby is all dependent on daddy. Because moms are ex if dad gives a why it's going to be a dad gives an ex is going to be a girl. What have you take the two axes from two dads? To make a girl. A little tricky. So this is what they're working on. And it's fascinating. It's just gosh. And makes me nervous. It makes me so nervous. Now, they say the mice generally fair. Very well successful bursts were the minority of a thousand attempts only twelve live pups were born and the pups were not normal. They were swollen with fluid or the twice as big as regular mice. Pops all of them struggled to nurse and breathe died soon after birth. So Dr man said people are getting ahead of the science with this to say, there's a potential the two males could potentially have a child. This is a very long ways off..

DNA neurological disorder Twitter Facebook Dr Dalia Wei Li researcher Danny Oriole Dr man engineer MD Anderson Genova Prater willy Madonna Senate
"neurological disorder" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"If somebody wants to see if something causes autism you know there was there was a theory that our cell phones We're causing children. To, be autistic we? Have such a huge hike? In autistic children over the last twenty years that people wanted to know well what was it what are we. Doing today. Or what have we been, doing the past twenty years that we did. It do as much in the past all right so, some people think vaccines but by autism is more of a genetic Has more? Of a genetic roof so I would not say vaccines but that's one theory people out there well lover vaccine? So we. Used to but another theory, out there is what we use for cellphones So maybe electro-magnetic radiation that's causing babies feel then develop this Neurological disorder Socio behavioral. Neurological disorder I again I'm not completely convinced to that One thing I noticed is a lot of us are older when. We have babies that could be an issue some of us have fibroids many of the women, who have had autistic children had fibroids at I wonder, if maybe a fibroid pushing against. The baby, Jerry, development, could've added an issue I mean again, we're we're pulling, this out of our teams but Nobody in this day and age because they, look you have a healthy pregnancy. I want, to, see, if I could turn the baby autistic, so Will you do XYZ we can't do. That If. We could I'm, not saying I want that but in theory you have? A thousand women who volunteer You do something for one group something for another. Groups nothing for another group nothing. Something for another, group and then you compare them all You might get some very good data but who. Wants to do that because nobody, wants to cause any. Changes to a fetus. That has a chance of, being born with all its capabilities Even though I think autistic, children have are even more capable than we are we. Just haven't figured it out we try, to dumb these children down to our level when we need to smarten up to their level but that's a whole nother conversation for a different day So We can't study if a medicine hurts a. Baby if an exposure hurts, baby if it affects the Prado, woman we can't do. That and so one thing that I had was placental insufficiency when I get when I had two, kids I was a little. Older I was twenty eight years old and the thirty years old when I was pregnant and that's kind of. Older it's not old, old but it's because they're older for having given. Birth and I play central insufficiency where I was not Kids sending enough. Bladder fluid to the babies, and the babies were in distress, so I have given. Birth dates they would've made it thank God this day and age you did and so I could, see why there's this need. To.

Neurological disorder placental insufficiency Jerry twenty years twenty eight years thirty years
Salarmy Trump Tower Trump Tower, Donald Trump and Trump Tower discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Salarmy Trump Tower Trump Tower, Donald Trump and Trump Tower discussed on 24 Hour News

"Alarm dot com Com slash music Salarmy Trump Tower Trump Tower was sealed off as police responded to a report of a suspicious package. Inside the building they then said there were three suspicious packages inside the Fifth Avenue tower that is home to the president's New York residents and. His family's business later in the evening officials gave the all-clear saying no. Threat was posed the president and first lady were not at Trump Tower. At the time they were at the president's golf, course in, Bedminster New Jersey even Mr. Trump is not. A New York his skyscraper is surrounded by a thick layer. Of security measures people coming in, to Trump Tower have to go through. A security. Check Steve Kastenbaum New York President Trump is denying reports that he knew in advance about that meeting with the Russian attorney and Trump Tower, involving Donald Trump. Junior and others during the twenty sixteen campaign sources told CNN NBC news that Mr. Trump's former personal attorney. And so-called, fixer Michael Cohen flames then candidate Trump knew about the meeting coin Did not tell the house intelligence committee last year that Trump headed dance knowledge of. The meeting after Trump junior said he did not tell his father about the meeting there was nothing to tell calling tweeted so proud of Donald. Trump junior for being open honest and transparent to the American people Trump. Also took to Twitter to push back and his longtime personal fixer I. Did not know of the meeting with my son, Don Jr., sounds to me like someone is trying to. Make up stories in order to get himself out of an. Unrelated jam correspondent Manu Raju total, strangers have stepped up and supported a. Gofundme campaign. Aimed at helping to young brothers from Brooklyn who suffer from a debilitating disease the parents are hoping that between science and donations they're boys, we'll have a. Normal life last year there little boy Benny miss developmental milestones it took us seven months of going to. Specialist after, specialist after specialists eventually a grim diagnosis Canavan disease 's a fatal genetic. Neurological disorder even worse benny's little brother Josh has it too but a cure is within reach parents Gary and Jenny Landsman got to work with a fundraising goal of one point five million. Dollars for a potentially ground-breaking experimental gene therapy they've raised one point two million with their go fund me page and a lot of hope we're. Pretty optimistic that our boys will be the first, to be, cured of the disease the Landsman say if it works, they'll keep raising money. To help cure other children Sonia Rincon ten ten wins in marine park. Wins news time eleven, thirty seven Tasty cake it's all, about making happy happen no matter what the, situation helping your friend move. Yeah third time this year what do you say we put a smile on that face. With a tasty, cake peanut butter, candy cakes sure why not so what do you. Think I, have to say that's a delicious cake great so. You're happy now That'd be? Good enough for me another happy ish customer. Tasty. Cake making happy happy Princess. Leia will be back in Star Wars Episode nine the movie. Will include the late Carrie Fisher's through the use of previously, unreleased footage years later Bobby Brown is denying that he ever beat his late. Wife Whitney Houston at a panel for a new BT series about body Brown's life violent Brown was asked by TV critics if he, regretted a two thousand three fight with Houston in which he. Was charged with battery a visibly bruised Whitney Houston, standing by his side and court her publicist at, the, time putting. Out a statement the Brown was. Sorry about what happened in hoped, Houston forgives him Nine one one calls I think there was looking at ABC news article. From December time there is a nine one one call it's public record in all the public record is Ron Brown was charged at, the time with battery the Bobby Brown story premiered September four. Correspondent Jason Nathanson entertainment news and thirty eight past, every hour on ten ten wins wins news time, eleven, thirty nine My heart, was completely out of sync at Saint Francis hospitals. Arrhythmia and pacemaker center one of the busiest, centers? Of its, kind in the country no, matter what. Kind. Of, electrical problem your heart is having we'll treat it whether it's a matter of implanting defibrillator pacemaker or performing an. Ablation to correct, circuitry no other hospital tweets more cases of arrhythmia than we do Saint Francis the heart. Center, a member of Catholic health services of Long Island we all know someone who is booking Hossam right no doubt moms. And dads are also but Buchen awesome well bass reserved for that. Totally remarkable person who supported. You big. Time now is the time to acknowledge them us we're the boots the flower company with farms located. On the side of a volcano that produce spectacular flowers well this, is the perfect time to pause for a sack and recognized that special..

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KOMO

"In the mid eighties today and tomorrow we start to cool down by thursday the official start to summer where we'll have highs in the mid seventy s right now seventy four in bellingham sixty six in friday harbor eighty one instant trailer and in seattle sunshine and seventy six at two fiftyfive longtime radio reporter now back on the year after losing his voice to a rare neurological disorder abc's steve olson saami with the story jamie do pre thought this day would never happen that he'd be back on the air reporting the news on cox owned radio stations across the country like most of us who do this our voices something we take for granted this was mr decrease before he got sick down at the white house right now the first several meetings two years ago the velvet of his voice was stolen by a rare neurological disorder i am we're back a company in scotland is helping they've taken several years of recordings and given do pre control of his voice at the touch of his fingertips the us supreme court has basically punted on the issue of legislative gerrymandering this was his first broadcast he does sound different but he feels incredible that's abc's steve and saami most of us are willing to sweat it out over our job but we'd rather not be sweating because it's just you darn hot in the office hey it's your money too hot to cold when it comes to offices very few are just right and some employees aren't afraid to speak up about it percent of workers say they've argued about apas temperature because it's bothering them in the workplace builders ladonna nick risvan hey says women are more likely to want a warmer workplace well a majority of men say crank up that a si most though say they just deal with it cool beverage dressing layers.

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Elon Musk, Jeffries and Ceo discussed on

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Elon Musk, Jeffries and Ceo discussed on

"Say let's start again let's bring back in the us global news twenty four hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm nancy lyons thanks dancing now with our other job stories i'm michael barr as we've been talking about all this morning british prime minister theresa may's cabinet held a two hour meeting about the uk's next move in dealing with syria and a suspected chemical weapons attack bloomberg's alex morales has more from london came ministers agreed on the need to respond to the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria over the weekend suggesting britain may participate in international military action against the regime of bashar al assad prime minister theresa may's cabinet agreed it was vital that the attack did not go unchallenged well not explicitly endorsing military action maze ministers agreed she should continue to work with the us and france to coordinate an international response they also agreed on the need to take action to create humanitarian distress and deter the use of chemical weapons by the syrian regime inland alex morales bloombergradio if you're a night owl you're not going to like this study researchers from england's university of surrey and northwestern university in chicago found that people who stay late are more likely to suffer from breathing and neurological disorders and diabetes the study's lead author kristen knutson is an associate professor of neurology at north western's feinberg school of medicine when important message from this is that night owls need to be aware that being a night owl could have health consequences so unfortunately you guys need to be a lot more vigilant about maintaining a healthy lifestyle researchers found that night owls at a ten percent increased risk of death during the six and a half years of the study the value of elon musk space x keep soaring according to pitchbook data the rocket maker is authorized a five hundred seven million dollar fundraising round at evaluation of about twenty five billion dollars that would make space x the third most valuable venture backed startup in the us after uber and airbnb tesla's ceo elon musk says the electric carmaker will be profitable and cash flow positive in the second half of the year must made his remarks on twitter early economists had tweeted jeffries estimates that tesla would need.

Elon Musk Jeffries CEO Airbnb Feinberg School Of Medicine Associate Professor Of Neurolo England's University Of Surrey Bashar Al Assad London Theresa Prime Minister Twitter United States Tesla Kristen Knutson Chicago France Britain Alex Morales
"neurological disorder" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Four lines that are conscious by day often get through in our dreams because we don't have to pay attention to all our our band of consciousness pretty narrow compared to everything going on in their brain so by day we're we're focused on you know everything we're looking at and seeing in processing visually at sounds conversations were having and you know in your brain just has to be keep you up writing balanced and everything and at night there's no visual real stimuli coming in your perception of sounds is stamped way down you're not having to deal with any balance movements stuff so a lot of the things occupy by day are just not there as brain areas are are quiet at night so things like if something is subtly pressing on a nerve in a way that you don't even feel was pain or or you do have a lot of aaron interferon running around your body time make you feel vaguely sick just things that we wouldn't notice by day because they're being crowded out of our attention i think often get through into our dream content just because they don't have to compete with all the sort of basic visual input that makes sense i definitely here a lot of stories about people who especially the kind of longterm illnesses i do not put any kind of psychic attribution to some people tell these stories is oh this means my dream was knowing i was gonna get cancer knowing i was going to get this neurological disorder but it's very striking to me that it tends to be the disorders that a rather slow in farming in the body where the processes their long before you we usually clinically notice it where somebody has a dramatic dream that.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"I think it's a scandal the donald trump is not going to receive a neuropsychological exam during his uh presidential fitness test there is strong evidence to believe that he is developing dementia in terms of his diminished vocabulary his diminished quality of thought his inability to even complete a sentence uh this is a matter of national security why would be only look at his blood pressure and not look at what may be a degenerative neurological disorder that we're seeing clear signs of separate from the issue of whether he has a personality disorder which i noticed or francis in high will debate we're looking at hard signs of medical physical cognitive deterioration why wouldn't we test for those things okay so i i just want to point out you know look we meet me at cnn have not verified that claim in the buck you now that he's repeating himself or not recognising people newt gingrich told reporters presidents get good lines and they repeat them a exxon's too many add gartner that the president of the camp you know he never finish the sentence because his thought maybe his mind was so quick it moved on to the next thing right i mean it you know back to the point of ha diminishes a very very serious charge to let two two simple answer if we compare his verbal productions now to what they were like 10 years ago it's like two different people the level of deterioration ms vocabulary and the quality of his thawed is dramatic so we have to compare people to their own baseline and we're seeing dramatic cognitive deterioration and we're not even enquiring whether this might be the expression of something much more serious and dangerous such as to be cleared out guard are you have not treated hammer or met him.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KGO 810

"It but it it does have these various these layers these channels in the article i i just didn't psychology today is about there being a body channel and a cognitive channel um other people even would say there's a third layer which is the kind of like two parts of the cognitive but but the but the point is is that without disability to kind of um share some of what other people feel whether you're doing it physically and automatically or whether you're doing it cognitively you can't relate to other people it's so it's at the it's at the core of our of friendships of our romantic relationships of and an and what's interesting is that without empathy or or if pieces of empathy or missing um that often is a sign of of a neurological disorder or uh another so for instance people with autism spectrum disorder one of the things that they are often missing is the ability to take the perspective of someone else a psychopath is something different they do have the ability to understand what other people are thinking and they but they don't care they manipulate it so there it's not just one you know ideally the eye the empathy that we all talk about that we want to cultivate has to be this more nuanced more sophisticated um trait than than what just than just one thing that people often understand it to be the two channels of empathy author lydia dunn worth is joining me to discuss so all right so now that we've define what empathy is why we should care about it what are the i didn't what are these two channels i have not heard of two channels of empathy before right worker this is one way to come trump crimes to very famous planetologist hits she wrote a book called the age of empathy that came out a couple of years ago and he studied empty an animals so right there that tells us something important it tells us that if the trade exists in other species then it's deeply biological and it's probably evolutionary that where it's part of what helps us cooperate and build bonds and and chimpanzees and dubloons and monkeys can do that too just like people can um so duo is he described uh these two channels with empathy as.

neurological disorder lydia dunn
"neurological disorder" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Kickass News

"Yeah he's unhappy if he's an unhappy guy and i i think that it's uh and he's not wound up with that was the rule we tried to follow was it he's unhappy regardless of whether whether it's whether it's uh whether it's a june or whether it's december whether it's nine a hammer six pm uh you know uh fall or or spray know he just doesn't he's miserable he's just nothing seems to nothing about when he's going through seems to bring in any way why do you suppose that is easy per soundly screwed up in the head or is he just a malevolent guy i really don't know me to say that he had some kind of neurological disorder of some kind of mental illness that's for other people to judge i'm a medical professional i mean it certainly looks that way it looks like there's something wrong with him it doesn't uh or you don't want to see you mean either has something wrong with him we just bitter and rotten core you know there's just is nothing that can be no other explanation as to why he he won he won will in your book trump keeps referencing his father who both in satire and in reality seems to simultaneously be a figure of admiration for trump and a source of angst what do you think kurt is that your best guess as to why this guy's so messed up all right very good gac i think uh uh uh you know and and and so yes i mean i don't know the road real life roads but explanation for the white house why don't trump action lot of the way he does but but i think i think uh um they're they're they're cruelly som roots in in is in the parenting um that that he had uh so yeah i i i'm i'll go with that as as a a reason um and then you know uh the he has these other siblings who don't seem quite so uh free crucially injured uh so.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KKAT

"And i'm gary mcnamara eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye well gum and a good morning just reading her from fox news the '30s investigating the motive in sunday's mass killing on the las vegas strip may look into a psychological autopsy to try to one cover what led steven patty to open fire into the crowd at a country music concert jim clementi a retired fbi profiler said in an interview that if paddock suicide did not destroys brain experts could find some kind of neurological disorder or malfunction the genetics load the gun personality and psychology aim at and experiences pulled the trigger typically all mentese said he pointed out the paddocks father a bank robber was diagnosed as a psychopath clementi speculated that there was some sort of major trigger in his life a great loss a break up or maybe he just found out that he had a terminal disease new york a forensic psychiatrist james nolan two thousand eight described a quote psychological autopsy as a procedure that originated in 1958 that involves a thorough and systematic retrospective analysis of the of the a deceased life with a particular focus on suicide risk factors motives and intentions uh and and so i mean there is i i guess there is a science in a process behind this and investigators actually look into an it's something that you know we don't discuss too often because we didn't only come upon this as a as a particular story in so this isn't discuss was would most people perhaps one of the most vaccine elements about the investigation is at no clear motive or life of vent has emerged to explain the shooting paddock had no known criminal record and public records show no signs of financial troubles though he was said to be a big gambler so it was a.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Man two roosenburg error lose no they're they're they're would by radio and it is eric harley i'm gary mcnamara eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye gum and a good morning just reading her from fox news authorities investigating a motive in sunday's mass killing on the las vegas strip may look into a cycle lodge jiggle autopsy to try to one cover what led steven paddock to open fired into the crowd at a country music cut concert jim clementi a retired fbi profiler set an interview that have paddock suicide did not destroys brain experts could find some kind of neurological disorder or malfunction the genetics load the gun personality and psychology g aim at and experiences pull the trigger typically clementi's said he pointed out the paddocks father a bank robber was diagnosed as a psychopath clementi speculated there was some sort of major trigger in his life a great loss of break up or maybe he just found out that he had a terminal disease uh new york a forensic psychiatrist james nolan two thousand eight described a quote psychological autopsy as a procedure that originated in 1958 that involves a thorough and systematic retrospective analysis of the of uh the a deceased life with a particular focus on suicide risk factors motives and intentions uh and and so mean there is the i i guess there is a science at a process behind this and investigators actually look into an it's something that you know we don't discuss too often because we didn't normally come upon this as a as a particular story in so this isn't discuss was with most people perhaps one of the most vaccine elements about the investigation is at no clear motive or life of vent has emerged looks blame the shooting paddock had no known criminal record and public records show no signs of financial troubles though he was said to be a big a gambler so it was a.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"In the 1970s that's when they decided to really step up our protected because the h one n one virus jump from pigs to humans and killed a us army recruit but it didn't seem to spread beyond the army base nevertheless because so many people were afraid of the 1918 pandemic about forty to fifty million p people got vaccinated against the swine flu virus now the only thing them have the problem with the vaccination processed though was i think about five hundred people god he had beret that's that neurological disorder that happened as a result of the vaccine so we held our vaccinating any more peeve poll on h one n one so then two thousand nine of we're going to jump ahead we saw here in the united states it killed twelve thousand people in the united states worldwide to kill two hundred thousand still not as bad spanish pull the win one thousand people died period muslim died from viral roberto pneumonia also some guy dehydrated now who is the current outbreak in india the same as the two thousand nine pandemic again no at that panda that pandemic that happened in two thousand nine was the h one n one california strain it was replaced last here now with the michigan strain so our current flu vaccine from up its last year had the california stream h one n one would that is why we been okay for those the got it but now wit is being changed to the michigan strain so this year we're not gonna have the california strain in our in our vaccine the michigan one which i'm kind of happy with what are symptoms of swine flu can be fever caught chills sore throat a body eggs but also people could get diarrhea and vomiting and younger people are more risk because older people though again were immune from the 50s or got you know shots in the '70s you know should be fined if you're me this press that could be an issue don't go away we'll be right back one eight seven seven after oh.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Inherently and inescapably unnecessarily to be in a body a body that brings you pain a body that brings you pleasure a body that can be a barrier to uh thinking more completely about your life and your soul but that can also be a vehicle to delivering you into better communion with the world with other people and to whatever divinity it is that you believe in so my could you tell us just a little bit about your condition a cerebral palsy yes so cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder and the easiest way to describe it as that it's a little bit like a stroke that happens usually in utero or immediately after birth and one of the most common causes of the type that i have which has called moderate spastic daip legia is oxygen deprivation and it just essentially results in brain damage which impairs your uh grows motor control your balance and in my case results in heightens past as city which means that my muscles are really really tense and really tight cerebral palsy is a big umbrella of a disorder there are people who have through will palsy who our affected so severely that it inhibits their speech it inhibits the motion of their hands it means that they cannot don't walk at all and there are people who have cp which is the abbreviation who are really pretty mildly affected and might be a little bit clumsy uh have a slight a gate that looks you know slightly other than what you might typically expect.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Somali could you tell us just a little bit about your condition of cerebral palsy yeah so cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder and the easiest way to describe it as that it's a little bit like a stroke that happens usually in euro or immediately after birth and one of the most common causes of the type that i have which has called moderate spastic daip legia is oxygen deprivation and it just essentially results in brain damage which impairs your uh grows motor control your balance and in my case results in heightened specificity which means that my muscles are really really tense and really tight cerebral palsy is a big umbrella of a disorder there are people who have through a pol the who are affected so severely that it inhibits their speech it inhibits the motion of their hands it means that they cannot don't walk at all and there are people who have cp which is the abbreviation who are really pretty mildly affected and might be a little bit clumsy uh have a slight a gate that looks you know slightly other than what you might typically expect i fall somewhere in the middle of that spectrum so i walk with a very crouched gate and my balance is very bad and my endurance is very limited and that means that i use a wheelchair to walk more than three very short distances so when you you were born you were very premature i was how premature.

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"neurological disorder" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

10:03 min | 4 years ago

"neurological disorder" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

"Mayo Clinic Radio presents a conversation about functional neurological disorders with psychiatrist. Dr Jeffrey Stab. The show hosts are Dr Tom. Shives and Tracy mccray. This podcast was recorded on August. Thirty First Twenty sixteen. We'll come back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom Shives. And I'm Tracy mccray according to the National Institutes of health what was once called conversion disorder. But his I'm now more commonly known or maybe better known as functional neurological disorder. That's a condition in which you show a logical stress and physical ways. Your mind affects your body. In unusual ways sometimes conversion disorder or functional neurological disorder can present his blindness paralysis or other nervous system symptoms symptoms. That really can't be explained by physical illness or an injury. It's frightening symptoms may occur because of emotional distress or psychological conflict and they usually begin suddenly after after a stressful experience or traumatic event here to discuss conversion disorder need. Stop calling it that. It's functional neurological disorder and how it can be treated is. Mayo Clinic Psychiatrist Dr Jeffrey Saab. Welcome to the program. Thank you thanks for having me. Okay why did it have to get changed? Well there's really a couple of reasons but the main one is because the idea of it being related to psychological stressor which really dates from the time of Freud and others. One hundred years ago isn't something that holds up all the time. People can develop functional changes after a medical event and sometimes for reasons that we can't pin down so we certainly look for people who have undergone difficulties either in their present life or past life and sometimes find them connected but other times we find a medical trigger a fainting spell or or a medical. There are medical illness. Sometimes we really can't sort out what what triggered it so there. There's the there's the common. There's the unusual and there's the rare but then there's the really curious curious and peculiar and maybe confounding and this sounds like it's in that category right. It's it's so all of us that practically any doctrine in in Practice right now is trained to think that when a patient presents with a symptom whether it be spell of passing out or a movement of the arm or lack of movement of the arm is that we look for neurological causes. We look to see if something more with their brains their muscles their nerves and and if we don't find anything then we presume that psychological The problem is that we can't always find the psychological and so that's been a sort of an either or way of thinking that is isn't always put us in our patients in the best spots so as we go through evaluating people who present that way we certainly look for the psychological things but sometimes we don't find anything in particular and neither do the neurologists and neither does anybody else but it's still a treatable condition and that's the best part of this as even though it's sometimes mysterious we can do something about it so you've seen I'm sure In in fact we mentioned at the beginning that these people can have blindness or they can have paralysis or other nervous system disorders or symptoms. So how do you go about evaluating somebody and ended up putting them in this category but functional neurological disorder? Well we have to work as a team so we can't psychiatrists do it alone. We work together with neurologist and sometimes bringing a general internist to help us as well and so we. The first thing we do is listen to the story. Listen to how this is developed and how it's changed over time. And sometimes that gives us the clues the the triggers or something it to patients and their families might have picked up and if we give them some time to tell us about it we can see that and look in Lynn. Listen to the patterns and then we do have to evaluate the the parts of the nervous system that could be affected gaining of the brain any EG to look for seizures laboratory tests to make sure. There's not infections or other things like that. That's a part of the the evaluation and then from the psychiatric standpoint to look at person's past history. How they developed recent things that may be going on in their in their life. We look for all of those clues to try and put the picture together. Last thing about this is not either or there are patients who have both a stroke and a functional problem together or Epilepsy and functional spells together. And so that's another thing that we're all taught was thinking in either or ways and that That feels a lot of patients who have one thing triggering another and then both exist together. I can't imagine for the patients. This has to be incredibly frustrating and frightening. Well well it is for a couple of reasons one is that some of these symptoms are very dramatic. I mean people can have completely lose consciousness. People can have what looks for all the world like an epileptic fit. People can have a loss of memory that goes on for hours or days and so they're very frightening symptoms and and And the way that they present All of us think well this has to be something wrong with the brain of possibly be something That that comes from a psychological process or can't be my mind doing this to me and again we can't always say that that's the case but and so as a result a couple of things happen. Patients oftentimes get very extensive neurological valuations for tough things for strokes for for LS for problems for Mathis from multiple sclerosis problems like that. We're very very frightening to go through an evaluation where somebody thinks that. That's maybe going on. And then when they get to the end of the road and their doctors are not left with answers. Then they're starting to say well you know this has to be something going on with you and that's when it's very difficult to shift gears do well. What would you do to help these patients right? So there's there's a couple of things first of all if we do happen to find something that's gone on in the person's life Then we have to address that I've encountered many patients who have a sudden event occur everything from a woman who became paralyzed after an earthquake because she was over well mainly frightened that something bad had happened to her family to people who go through stressful times in their life. So we look for those. And if that's present we can address those if there if we can't find a specific caused there. There are a number of different behavioral strategies that we can use our physical therapists work closely with us so somebody's having paralysis problems or or movement abnormal movements or or walking difficulties the physical therapist can can rehabilitate them using techniques that they've been taught over over many many years. So it tells you about one of the most unusual cases that you've seen with unusual presentation. Sure I used to teach patients about this is is when I was in the Navy. I was stationed in Guam and earthquake. Eight point two magnitude earthquake so pretty big And it was a woman who was from her family at the time she was visiting and other village and she was brought to the emergency room about a half an hour after the earthquake deaf dumb blind mutant lane. No Yes yes abso absolutely nothing. So of course. We wondered if she'd been injured because she was by herself. And she hadn't been medically neurologically. She was perfectly fine and in that particular case what had happened was she became at. The time of the earthquake became so overwhelmingly frightened that her sons daughters or grandchildren had been had been injured that literally her body shut down the old sort of see no evil hear no evil walk to no evil experience. No evil is what happened with her. And when one of her family members came to the hospital to find her and said that you know the house is a mess. But everybody's okay. We give her that information and kind of help to coax her back to walking again and then seeing again in an hour and a half she was able to leave the hospital perfectly fine so that's an example of how intensely overwhelming sudden fear can be but we've also seen circumstances in which just as dramatically people have things like headaches migraine headache that produces some change in vision or some change in movement that we know migraines can do but then goes and gets elaborated into a much bigger picture and they're trading treating the headaches as the solution so most of these Resolve spontaneously in. What your role as a psychiatrist and helping the patient get better well. Some of them resolve spontaneously so sometimes people have distinct spells. And they go on for Awhile and then go away. But but Left untreated some functional. Disorders can continue for years and years. So if somebody's getting better and you know we can help them understand what happened and continue the process of recovery. We don't have a lot to do but if they're not getting better than we do have to work together. Again with neurology. Physical therapy and art our team of therapists to address all the pieces. That might be part of the part of the picture. We have a truly interesting job. Don't you it's fun? How how often do you see one of these people? We we see about three to four day every day my team. Yes with functional neurological so movement problems persistent dizziness or Vertigo Spells. Fainting or other similar spells. Yeah our team. Our team has specialized in this This type of a of a problem over the last few years. Well you know certainly. Some things in medicine are difficult to explain it very unusual and and some of the people that you see some of the most unusual things we've heard about on this program Dr Jeffrey. Stop the psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic. Talking about functional neurological disorders. Thanks so much for being with us. Well it's been a pleasure. You're quite welcome. Glad to be here for the latest in health and medical news go to news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org..

neurological disorder earthquake Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom Shives Dr Jeffrey Stab Tracy mccray Mayo Clinic Dr Tom National Institutes of health Dr Jeffrey Saab Dr Jeffrey Epilepsy Fainting Freud Guam Lynn Mathis