31 Burst results for "Netscape"

"netscape" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Might have been episode 13. He was his firm silver orange, was doing design work for Mozilla. And he mentioned at the very end of the podcast that this company that he was working with was looking for volunteers to help out. And that was the call to action. And I've been listening to the podcast for a while, and I was just like, oh my God, yes. I love the Internet, and I love design, and I think this is the future. And buck Microsoft, like I want to go help with this. And I emailed him and they brought me in to start working with them. We worked on swag and we worked on designs when we were done. Because where are they at this point? It's all about raising money when you get there. Well, you know, the project was probably kind of in shambles a little bit. If I recall correctly, they were pushing to launch, I think if I recall, so first of all, the project was called Phoenix. It wasn't yet called Firefox. I believe there's a trademark dispute about Phoenix, which is why it wasn't ultimately called Phoenix but of course the idea of Phoenix was that it was going to take the netscape code base, which had been, I believe, donated by AOL. To this new nonprofit. And this new nonprofit, I think probably was related to Mark andreessen. I'm not totally sure. Well, because that was their Hail Mary before the AOL acquisition was the open-source. It was the last thing they did before the AOL thing. So I mean, it's also important to probably keep in mind that, first of all, this is the I believe around the antitrust period for Microsoft was turning into the evil empire slash the death star slash whatever villain you prefer. And open-source though, meanwhile, was being cast as kind of like this communist agenda. And so it was very interesting to kind of be in the middle of this cultural moment. And so anyways, they had this code base for this browser that was based on this rendering engine called gecko. And the idea was to take the underpinnings of that browser to get rid of something called netscape communicator, which was a suite of software, which included an email client and included. I think a news group reader and included all of these things that were wrapped around this web rendering engine. And they're like, okay, let's get rid of all that crap. I think let's build an extension layer. And let's also add tabs. And that was essentially the innovation that the Mozilla project was offering to the world..

Phoenix AOL Mark andreessen Mozilla Microsoft netscape Hail Mary
"netscape" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

04:56 min | 7 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"I think you know part of what i wanted to do is get connected to the internet for all sorts of reasons because you know when i go to conferences. Everyone would talk about all of these different services that are available. This is pre web But just the ability to be able to log in other systems download code Part of my justification which was kind of i think the thing that sold people was just. We'd have to download versions of x eleven and so we would send away for mag tapes and when the researchers needed a new version for whatever reason because they were doing different kinds of modeling and graphics. We'd have to send literally send away. We'd send it in a check in the mail and then and then a few weeks later some tapes would show up and part of my justification was. This is ridiculous we can just pull it down anytime we want. And that was the thing that sold us. So all of the other collaboration those goals of researchers working together more closely. That wasn't quite compelling enough but just getting exit eleven downloaded whenever we wanted. That's for whatever reason the thing that people zero it in that was the real figure you find you find the hot button. It was like all right. How do we whatever works. Right linked up with several different organizations twitter yahoo meant. Aol netscape the democratic national committee..

yahoo twitter Aol netscape democratic national committee
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

03:42 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"It's so funny. How like you. We've painted hopefully the picture on this episode of all the life experiences leading into netscape leading into loud cloud leading into that moment with benchmark and then ovitz joining like it's all it all it gets expressed in andrews. It's wow there's one more principle that you touched on earlier. That i want to a little bit of a bow on. That's a founding. Principle that company. When ben horowitz is getting dressed down in the partner meeting at benchmark and they asked him you know. When are you gonna hire professional. Ceo this becomes a major tenant of entries and horowitz about technical founders being ceo's and being armed with the resources that they need and the ability to even before they would otherwise acquire those skills sort of have a leap on being a professional ceo. And there's two thousand three interview. I love reading things from two thousand and three About mark and ben because it's a really interesting perspective where it's post netscape post loud cloud post crash but they're just angel investors. It's been six years before they start..

ovitz ben horowitz netscape andrews horowitz ben
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:43 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"These different browsers are competing against each other. But there's kind of only two major lineages. There is the mosaic lineage. And then all those engineers left and without looking back at the old code they wrote new code called mozilla and everything is basically either from mosaic or mozilla. And there's been different stuff over the years with web kid and with whatever other. I don't know where operas derived from but it's amazing. How much of the browser market share overtime really just comes from those two and it all still funnels through to today. yep which is crazy yup. It's a fun to actually have the rain. Excuse now to be able to tell this whole story on acquired right they can always felt like netscape was kinda. There was a point in the choir. It's life where we would've done a whole episode on netscape but now like i don't know that we can do and this is the perfect vehicle. I'm so glad to do it totally. Well thank god from the lessons of netscape and allowed cloud which were about to go into became the the ashes upon which the phoenix of a landscape changing venture firm would come from so we the excuse. The fire fox have venture firms. So i mean honestly after the financial crash when all the funding like is not crazy to call it a fire fox or a phoenix or whatever in founding a venture firm in two thousand nine and deploying capital the way they did ahead. I know we'll get there absolutely. If you want to be a really nerdy you could call it. The thunderbird of i used to use thunderbird. I thought it was great. Yeah okay so back to the story ben and his team. They've realized this market opportunity. They've got this idea for a cloud computing cloud infrastructure so. We hooks up with two of his court team..

mozilla netscape phoenix ben
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"And let's say it's ten overvalued what's four hundred million dollars of actual value to go and pick this company up which what we now know about the way that they were motivated to do. The time warner deal. Basically do a stock swap for a company whose stock they felt actually had real intrinsic value makes a lot of sense that they would wildly overpay for this sort of pseudo defunct netscape even if all they got was the people and some technology behind it. So that's one explanation. The other would be basically to get a bargaining chip against microsoft in case it became relevant for them to try and be less dependent on e to have a browser of their own that they could bundle. In and distribute. There are other people who believe that. Aol was interested in net center which is basically netscape's web properties which drew a lot of the traffic. It's sort of the like msn play. That microsoft had to be destination website. So that sort of the reasons why. Aol could have been willing to part with four point. Two billion dollars of their stock to do this. Now if you trace it all the way through today. I really had been trying to figure out what happened. To like the netscape brand and what happened. The netscape ip well. The brand is an easy one to trace that stayed with. Aol until they ultimately were bought by verizon so the big red checkmark verizon owns the netscape brand today but somewhere along the line the brand actually got separated from the technology the bundle of all the intellectual property and everything that netscape was which did need a new name. 'cause they couldn't use the netscape name anymore because that brand was owned by verizon so that got renamed new aurora corporation which. Aol sold to microsoft. Who then in turn sold them again to wait for david to facebook..

netscape Aol time warner microsoft verizon msn new aurora corporation david facebook
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:08 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"So we're in. the browser. Wars microsoft just blew netscape out of the water. What's going on for netscape now. Such a tragedy. I mean that year of the ipo in nineteen ninety five. This is the thing like this. Actually a really great company. It did eighty five million in revenue. That's gifted in nineteen ninety five and nineteen ninety six to three hundred forty six million in red. Wow and then five. Thirty four..

netscape microsoft
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:21 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"Because even jim clark for all of his executive nece from sgi for the ipo netscape actually did want this sort of like robust professional public market ceo. So everybody knows this is going on but Netscape thinks and the market thinks that. Okay you know microsoft's now they've got this internet explorer thing. They'd liceu mosaic. They're gonna run the office playbook year they're going to sell this at compusa and you know you're gonna buy it and blah blah blah. And then as he said then two weeks after the netscape. Ipo launch windows. Ninety five and not fully bundled in then but they say that there's the Windows ninety five plus pack and internet explorer is bundled into it for free and of course this would eventually very quickly internet explorer would just be bundled for free directly into every copy of windows ninety five and then windows..

netscape jim clark sgi compusa microsoft
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:31 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"Pc's they all here in the news. Netscape is going public. They're using that's they want retail. Wants the hype so famously. There's going to be a pop. This is like the origin of the pop. The pop earliest the extreme. Ipo pop so famously. Charles schwab the brokerage. They had to change their phone systems leading up to the ipo. Because remember there's no internet brokerages at this point. You can't place orders online. Even through netscape so they changed their phone system. That when you called your broker at charles schwab you'd get a message in the couple of days leading up to the netscape. Ipo that's welcome to charles schwab. If you're interested in the netscape vio president one one. Oh my goodness so. There is so much demand it takes hours to open up the stock on the day. The ipo it opens at seventy five dollars a share. Wow remember the bankers were like. I don't know that we can go up to twenty eight the night before. They thought they were gonna price it fourteen. The bankers reluctantly ipo. At twenty eight and then the first retail trade happens at seventy five seventy five. Yup it falls a little bit during the day but it closes at fifty eight dollars a share giving the company a three billion dollar market cap. Just insane totally insane. I think microsoft was about ten billion at this point in time. I remember it and it's worth saying if you things one this absolutely kicked off the dot com bubble. This was the moment that it started. There were a couple of internet..

netscape charles schwab Charles schwab microsoft
"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:49 min | 10 months ago

"netscape" Discussed on Acquired

"All this on netscape in eastlake. I gotta get in there. I gotta make it happen. So he has a friend get him in connection he goes in the interviews and he gets a job and he gets put in charge of the enterprise web server product. Line at netscape and this is because there aren't web servers yet right. What's the point of having a browser to load web pages. If there's no software that can sit on servers that can create web pages exactly so this is going to become like really big. But at the time i don't know have been was feeling whether he was excited about this or not. But it was kind of like okay like is howard. Golic make money. We're gonna sell licenses for the server business so that companies can create websites and have commercial websites but the big sexy thing is this browser that is getting millions of people using it so it was kind of this part of the company that was like yeah like necessary. This is how we're going to make money in an is a beautiful time-tested business. Model like giveaway. The consumer thing for free get as many people on that as you possibly can. It's actually kind of the first. Real example of aggregation theory netscape ends up becoming powerful in the ecosystem because they're able to get all the internet users using it and thus then sort of apply pressure to businesses. That if you wanna create great websites you can do so and we promise be compatible with netscape browser that everyone uses. You should buy these tools from us. It makes a lot of sense. Yeah and really. I only came about because of the history of mosaic. Being part of ncsa. Like if i don't know some company like microsoft say were to otherwise have gone out and created a new piece of software china. Right they did with word or excel or powerpoint that they bought consumer licenses. Yeah natural thing. Do you put it in a box. Put it on a cd..

netscape Golic eastlake howard ncsa microsoft china
"netscape" Discussed on Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"netscape" Discussed on Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

"But then you realize how much more efficient, how much more productive you can be with, you know, a a remote Workforce work from home, Type scenarios. Um, you know, multiple workplaces and uh I mean you hit it right on the head. It's not just I think I think it was a big wake-up call for a firm's to realize number one. Okay, I need to have some, you know, some some ability to be remote anyway and then once it did happen, I think people people realized how effective it really was. And I believe that that that's happening and we do have clients both on the crescendo side and the Netscape inside that excuse me, they that are very much leveraging. That and we saw we saw that happened during the pandemic. We saw heavy gross and people going remote for obvious reasons, but I think a lot of this is here to stay stay and then there's a lot of people realizing that, you know, we should have been doing this earlier. So your your point is is very well taken. So let's turn now to other communities. That might be impacted..

both Netscape
Managing The DoorDash Data Platform

Data Engineering Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

Managing The DoorDash Data Platform

"I'm interviewing said here. Taunts about how. The team at doordash designed their data platform. So can you start by introducing yourself. Give having meet tobias. I'm a big fan of your data engineering podcasts. As mentioned earlier. I definitely find it a good source to include mike knowledge. This a lot of good interviews. A lot of good information that can be had from there a duly the engineering organization that we call data platform at ash consists of a few disciplines such as real time streaming platform machine learning platform experimentation platform it a warehouse etc and vina dodi fayed about a year and a half and came from over there for about four years doing something similar managing the data of the marketplace organization at river. So glad to be here looking forward to shut definitely. Do you remember how you first got involved in. The area of data management date as ls fascinated me. When i was a kid rock my first access to computer the first thing i did on. Ms dot crown to type into plus three and hit enter and was hoping that it comes up for the right answer. Percussion it said. Bad commander filename and i was like what anyway. That joke is said to me. Computers were always like number crunching machines and data crunching machines. And of course your rent of internet. Now it's a messaging machine and together with the data crunching capabilities and messaging capabilities. At think is what has made the martin technically possible. As far as my professional engagement goes for the most part of my career. I was a generalist back in engineering. Started my junior netscape back in the days. My first introduction to specically about data and data management was at net flicks reused a joke aren't net flicks that it really is a log event processing company which just happens to be in this teeming movie business to make money and really the volume of data that we had at netflix's what got me really interested in the crunching area. That's where my journey began. It just took it forward at uber who had the passion continued and sheremet that door dash continuing search gonna passionate all the now. Seventy an interesting career are going from netscape to door dash with many stops in between and so you mentioned a little bit about what you do at doordash where you head up the data platform team. Can you give a bit more of a flavor about seven. The responsibilities that fall on your plate and some of the ways that data is used to power. The business adore dash eileen the data plaque from engineering organization. Which for as the internal customers are date. The endless data scientists machine learning engineers. The operations folks are the folks that manage the business on the ground so those are my customers. The goal for the team is obviously to station. The best possible big data stack if you wanna use a buzzword that enables all of the computing power that we need to gain insights entered the marketplace as far as where data is used at nash. A little bit of outdoor show. I'm pretty sure people have heard of the company but a little bit of a primer on doordarshan. That explains why we use. Data jordache is really a multisided marketplace. There's the merchants which could be restaurants are stored owners. That are the dashers who essentially are the folks that drive or or right and and deliver the items and then there are consumers like you and me to that order food or any other items to the app. i'm so that's the multisided marketplace and a few other areas include convenience and groceries where that are other actors in order as well so anyway. This huge marketplace generates a lot of data and the goal of the organization. The data platform organization is to figure out how to harness the power of this large large data set to optimize the market. This essentially ended up to my business. A few examples could include something like eta. Ats estimated time for. I will when you order some food. We door he obviously wanted to come. And as soon as possible and it's critical for us to be as accurate as possible when we come up with eta while if he under predict what the is going to be then it lead to bad customer and bad user experience or or called the likelihood the customer is going to churn and go competing app for example. So these are the kind of work that really are my responsibility on my teams responsibility work with a lot of data scientists tick endless machine learning and genius together to make this possible because you have so many different actors within the platform that you have to try and understand the behavior of nba to optimize for imagined that the current state of the world with the pandemic has thrown your overall capabilities of being able to work with that data and some of your existing models of out the window and of curious what the overall effect has been in terms of the scale and volatility of the data that you're working with and your ability to be able to use it effectively. It's certainly as although we've had steady growth. I should say for many years now if you look at the chart but the pandemic definitely accelerate the shift in our consumers behavior for the most part. They're embrace the denver. The option wholeheartedly. And there's a lot more growth to be had there as well but you're right in terms of wallet tenacity especially talking. The machine learning martyrised that we had earlier bids machine learning modules that typically built on historical features. Which is how the custom whereas the the prediction were based on historical data. Of course that all change when the pandemic hit and yet to retrain our models pursued than new world that was an interesting exercise in addition to that it's about the volume yet volume is increased. Many folds the wisdom of data. I mean and so that brings in challenges in terms are scaling the services that we have the right to set to address the increasing volume the complexity of the use cases that we have now

Doordash Mike Knowledge Vina Dodi Sheremet Netscape Tobias Netflix Eileen Martin NBA Denver
Washington Wizards stun Brooklyn Nets with wild sequence in the final seconds

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Washington Wizards stun Brooklyn Nets with wild sequence in the final seconds

"Netscape last night was played here in Washington because it would never make it in Hollywood is a movie The end Nick was just too crazy, down by five points in the final seconds bill through the center circle, feeling the point between the circles for three, it's there. There's hope fell ill. Louis stole my Matthews left wing. The Westbrook for three. It's there. Oh, my goodness. With 4.3 seconds of the Wizard's Leave 1 47 46. Do you believe this? I saw it. I don't believe it. It was amazing. Wizard scored eight points in eight seconds. 1 49 1 46 went over the nets after that garrison Matthew steal Russell Westbrook, the game winning three and that coach Scott Brooks Russell will will this game. He can do it every night. He doesn't take nights off. He does. Shoot the ball well every night but did last night. Westbrook

Netscape Hollywood Nick Westbrook Garrison Matthew Washington Matthews Louis Scott Brooks Russell Wizard Russell Westbrook Nets
How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

IT Visionaries

05:09 min | 1 year ago

How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

"Today we have sanjay beri. He is the ceo and co founder of netscape sanjay. Welcome to the show. Thank you great to be here all right so we always give all of our guests an opportunity to tell us exactly what their company does. Your the ceo and founder of netscape. What do you guys do absolutely so. Our focus is making sure that organizations enterprises across the world can leverage the new way people work remote for example and do it securely star focuses protecting enterprises from threats theft of data while enabling them to work the way they want to liberty in cloud leveraging the internet working remote in so on and so our category as making would call. It is something called secure access services edge. It's a redefinition of the market of data security to a new cloud security edge. All right so. Explain that to me without using the your industry buzzwords. Because i think this because i'll i'll let me frames up my perspective on this. I've worked at different companies. Or let's say remote i so or maybe they're even cloud native i so we didn't really depend too much on too much. Enterprise security everyone just kind of logged into public cloud. If they were developers they would have me. Vpn are asa access. So that would get them to their development instances so there's a lot of audience that doesn't quite understand exactly why enterprises needs connectivity. Security solutions like netscape kind of framing for me like what's happening in the marketplace. What's happening with your customers. And why products and services like yours are needed to begin with totally totally so just if you step back. The single biggest market insecurity people spend close to thirty billion dollars a year on. Is this market call data network security and what is that. It's the stuff that you heard of like wham. Gateways firewalls data. Loss systems proxies. They're all boxes Somewhere near network so biggest. market insecurity. the problem. There's problems with that market. The world has moved on meaning one sixty seven percent of people work remote and people don't want to go back and bp another corporate network anymore they want to go straight to the internet straight to cloud and so one. The location of those boxes wrong It's forcing inefficiencies performance problems too much expense and so people are saying. Wait a minute. I don't want these boxes. Mike perimeter. I want this edge in the cloud. Where no matter where i am. I have great fast access to my resources in. I have this security on ramp right that is everywhere in the world and you know with us. Fifty milliseconds away from anybody in the world doesn't matter what country would city and is this virtual clouded so one the change in the way that people are working remote partners accessing things assessing the change in location if your security in this market to the language has changed and so important point every ten years maybe fifteen. The language of the internet changes so reality is remember way back when paolo to networks came out and and they said hey we're going to beat cisco juniper and all these folks and it's because the language internet has changed it's all about application identification. The reality is that that has happened again. Ten years later and now the world and the language and internet is. Api's it's j. It's you that's how applications are built. The internet is built and so as a result all those systems that you spend thirty billion on that. Sit in the wrong location. They don't understand the language. And so i'll give you this great example. Send with his so and she said to me. Hey sanjay Okay is about four years ago. she goes I got these systems. I got these proxies. I got this firewall. In what more do i need. And i said what are they telling you. And she goes water all their bill. You know five or cave data amazon. And i go to her will. What are you gonna do with that. I mean i don't know a quarter of the internet goes goes to actually. I don't know what to do that. And i go well. It speaks the wrong language stickers in sticks his in and i our system tells her actually that guys on slack gonna public channel sending credit card by the way it is fighting. Mccabe data amazon. They're both right and i go. What do you want which one she goes. I want the second one data this point. The language internet changed and so this concept of mexico is put your security where you want in the virtual edge no matter where people work there and speak the language that the internet speaks so you can set in protect your data in a much better way to. That's a short summary for you.

Sanjay Beri Netscape Sanjay Netscape Mike Perimeter Sanjay Okay Paolo Cisco Amazon Mccabe Mexico
How a Year of Antitrust Action Against Big Tech Could Carry Into 2021

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:57 min | 1 year ago

How a Year of Antitrust Action Against Big Tech Could Carry Into 2021

"Twenty twenty s antitrust lawsuits came in a year full of scrutiny. Big tech companies and the changing landscape could have major implications for their future and the rest of their industry. There are a lot of threats to pull here so here to help me put this year. In the context is our legal affairs. Reporter brent. hey brent. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me so in terms of antitrust action against big tack. What is the thirty second story of two thousand twenty thirty second story of twenty twenty is just the level of public focus on big tech and its dominance really kind of exploded into the mainstream conversation like it hadn't before we had all the big tech executives testify in front of capitol hill. Congress is considering potential legislation here and then after years and years and years of growing complaints that that big tech was doing something wrong. We finally seen you know a series of lawsuits basically putting these allegations on paper. So that's the story. At the end of the day. I mean big tech is under fire and and it's likely only the beginning on that front and as you and i and our colleagues have talked about a lot on the show. These are legal battles. That are going to take years to resolve. There's still a lot we don't know but as cases play out. Could we see these companies change the way they do business. So there'd be a couple of things. I would say to watch out for me. One is always a possibility that we ended up with settlements right. I mean we're not likely to see anything on that front soon. You know we have a new administration coming in. I'm sure the companies are going to be trying to fill them out and figure out what's going to change anything i mean. Everybody expects the biden folks are going to be even more aggressive on antitrust enforcement than than the current crop of enforcers has been so. It's not like they're going to. It's unlikely that they're going to suddenly back away. From these cases but while these cases are out there. I mean the the downside of them being slow as resolution is not going to come anytime cindy upside arguably when these companies are in legal jeopardy and they're facing ongoing court cases and they are subject to this level of scrutiny. There's an argument there that it kind of hold their feet to the fire and even if for years we don't have final resolution of this that they're less likely to do things that pushed the envelope or to further suppress competition. While they're facing this kind of scrutiny. So amino there's an argument that just the mere filing of these lawsuits and the scrutiny surrounding them will kind of hold these companies and check at least somewhat in this intervening time period for and there is a bit of historical precedent here. These cases are the biggest legal challenge to big tech companies since microsoft was sued antitrust grounds in the nineties. Can you just remind us what that keeps. Looked like. And how it was ultimately resolved. Yes so microsoft is a good example on a couple of fronts from one. It took lots of years to it wasn't obviously wasn't obvious. Exactly what the impact ended up being so we had a trial eventually. Federal judge initially ordered that microsoft. Be broken up. An appellate court found all sorts of problems with his ruling. And said no you. Gotta you gotta meet higher hurdles before you're going to break up a company like this and so it went back. The case was assigned to a different judge because the original judge had been secretly speaking to reporters while the case was ongoing. There was a whole set aside drama. There had a change of administrations in the intervening period. And eventually the case was settled. Microsoft was broken up but under the terms of this agreement it had with all sorts of conditions on how it did business how it treated rivals. How it made its platform available for other people and even now you can find camps of people who say boy microsoft settlement really did open things up in pave the way for competition. And that's how we ended up with companies like google today because it was room for them to get in there and there's another camp of people who pointed microsoft office as example number one on why these cases are full of limitations may not have the big splashy want them to have and for some people say the settlement wasn't terribly effective and didn't really change the landscape a whole lot so i mean we. It's conceivable we ended up with the same kind of outcome here where it's not abundantly clear. Who or what. The impact is for years and just to go a little deeper that. How does the current situation. We find ourselves in with google and facebook. being looked at compare. Are there similarities or differences. I think fanatically it's similar. I mean the the argument against microsoft. Everybody used windows and used all of their products and they basically had a stranglehold on the entire marketplace and so people make the same kinds of arguments about google on search on advertising and about facebook and social media. So i mean obviously the products are different but the themes are the same and the legal arguments are basically the same. It's that there's nothing wrong with being a monopoly or gaining a monopoly where becomes legally problematic is once you have that power if you basically leverage it to prevent anybody else challenging you. That's a problem. And so that was the argument and microsoft say against netscape. And it's the same kind of arguments we have

Brent Microsoft Capitol Hill Biden Congress Cindy Google Facebook Netscape
"netscape" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"netscape" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Know it's it's But people get all enamored because they got a really fancy website and they got great rates and they've got a good It's all very cool. You want to be cool, no matter what, even if they wind up doing something with sending your money off to China. That's the goal. Overtake. These Cos I There are so many. Where's Netscape? Where's a well? They've been they used to be here. That's the way I look at Facebook. That's the way I look at Google is whether huge right now, but there are companies out there that are well funded around the world that would love to Take a lot of their business away from them. So I'm being Mr Patriot Here, you know, Shop America by America. It's It's part of the whole reason why I'm so defensive about him. So we found these people as we're six days away from election day, and a lot of you are voting right now where you can, Some states you cannot Um There's a little montage of people that They're not counting the days. You know why they're not counting the days till election day. Cause they're not going to vote at all. Internet.

Mr Patriot America Facebook Netscape China Google
Interview With Niraj Shah And Steve Conine

How I Built This

04:06 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Niraj Shah And Steve Conine

"So. Pretty much everyone we'd had on the show had a passion for a product that they needed to put out into the world lower American believed the world needed Lara Bars Jenny. Britain Bauer was convinced that her ice cream was gonNA change how people thought about ice cream even Jimmy Wales founder of wikipedia. Everyone should have access to free knowledge. But I'm here to tell you that that is not always the case. In fact, sometimes, the product isn't what drives the founders what really drives them is the challenge rather solving the challenge and that's basically the story behind wayfair neither Steve Konae nor near shopping felt that strongly about home furnishings but they did feel like people should have choices no matter where they lift because there was a time. When if you lived in say Evansville Indiana, you couldn't easily get the same type of Cool Coffee Table, or Sofa that someone in San Francisco or New York could get. And today we ourselves almost five billion dollars worth of this stuff every year. We're was actually the third company Stephen, Neeraj started together. They met as teenagers at a summer camp for math and engineering nerves in the early nineteen nineties quickly touch. But then almost a year later, if fate herself was watching over these guys, they both ended up as first years at Cornell assigned to dorm rooms on the same corridor. Did, you know both of you did the other one was going to cornell no end really kept in touch. So I think it was It was a surprise. Very much I was like, Hey, what's up? This past year. So were you friends like right away? Yeah. We were part of A. When your freshman year, you sort of have a small group of friends that you sort of connect with and spend a lot of your time with and we were in that group together and then junior year near started. We've got to be a lot closer and live together that year. Junior and senior we actually live together as well with it with a few other. People up at Cornell. Yeah, did you guys near to shoot you steve us to talk about starting a business when you in college I don't know that we have talked about it per se but our last semester at Cornell we took an entrepreneurship courses, one of our elective courses and in this entrepreneurship course, one of the things you had to do was create a business plan and what really happened is through the process of doing the project which is creating the business plan. We basically started our first business. Yeah. It was ninety five and it was very early as the netscape browser come out that year. Our idea was actually to develop Internet. Directory Services, and we would go downtown New York and try to pitch companies on paying five Bucks Avenue Listing I in our Internet directory. Of course, most people look at us like we're nuts a few would say, hey, that's interesting. But I I don't even have a homepage called at the time. Could you help me build a website and you know maybe at least get present on the Internet and what would that cost me and so the business turned into kind of an Internet consulting business that built sites for companies, and you kind of knew how to do the basics because you were engineering students exactly. So you'd go from project to project and Comey's were to move very quickly. You know different people would ask other people in your who could be higher so on. So forth, we were one of the few shops that actually done things. When you would meet when you guys are going meet with clients. Did you ever get a feeling from any of them that they would look at you and think late these guys. Fired A twenty two year. Old Kid. You know we did we both were pretty good sales guy. So I don't I don't remember that being snacking me too hard. I mean I I think that you know the prices were charging versus what they would be looking at consultancies I think a lot of these bigger shops looked at it as like. Play money where they're kind of like. Well, whatever how bad. Kimiko. With a couple of college students here are doing this for us if it works out phenomenal if it doesn't work out, you know whatever we haven't really we haven't really lost a lot.

Cornell Lara Bars Jenny Steve Konae Jimmy Wales Britain Bauer Evansville Founder Netscape Kimiko Stephen Wikipedia Indiana Comey New York Neeraj San Francisco
Promoting Assertiveness in Adolescents

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Promoting Assertiveness in Adolescents

"We talked about fighting implicit bias and healthcare professionals in a previous episode, but what can mental health commissions do to help our patients who may be dealing with discrimination in their day to day lives, it may be a sensitive topic to bring up a two thousand seventeen netscape survey found. Found that two thirds, sixty nine percent of psychiatrists identified as white or Caucasian, black and Brown patients might be wary of discussing discrimination with a white clinician. Similarly email patient might not want to hear advice from a male clinician about gender discrimination at the same time. Racism and discrimination are significant factors in mental health. The patient may bring up those experiences and ask you for advice on how to handle it. Sort of nece comes in. This is a specific skill that we can model and teach our patients a paper by Bhardwaj and visual us in the International Journal of Advanced Scientific Research underlines the importance of assertiveness in the development of adolescence. Assertiveness is about clearly communicating our needs with others. It's that middle ground between passive or aggressive kinds of responses. Here's an example. Your patient is of a social setting in a bully pushes them in uses racial slurs. They have some choices on how to react the passive responses to do nothing. The aggressive responses to push back or yeller fight the assertive responses to clearly and. And directly tell the bully to stop to enlist the help of other people to help the person stop. We call that converting bystanders into up standards, a lot of kids here. The aggressive option from parents whose devices don't back here until you punch that believe in the face and kids often take the passive approach because it prevents conflict, but saying nothing can lead to internalize negative feelings. Clinicians can an important influence in teaching patients about the assertive option and modeling it in a clinical setting, responding assertively promotes a healthy communication pattern in the individual. The benefits of assertive communication extend into academic career success as well.

Bhardwaj International Journal Of Advan
Setting the Standard - Jon Stine, Open Voice Network

The Voice Tech Podcast

07:04 min | 2 years ago

Setting the Standard - Jon Stine, Open Voice Network

"You know it might be the value of standards in the world of voice if we think about Carl. We're voice is today. Some people would say. Gosh we may be in the early days. Were kinds of in those netscape. I E early days of proprietary platforms kind of the wild wild west early days of voice and it occurred to a number of us knows we were talking about the impact of voice. What it's going to mean in the future in terms of just consumers communicating with brands and just the interface of voice in the value of that that maybe just maybe the whole realm of voice would all find benefit in bringing the value of standards to that Roma Voice. And so. That's what we're thinking about that. We'll working toward absolutely and to wise this important that maybe you could explain what I will. Why Standards Important then? Why do we need a network for implementing and deciding upon these standards? You know general coral standards. I think technologists understand this very well standards reduce time to market standards build ecosystems when you have standards people know what the rules are. People know how to build things in a way that is going to work. Within an ecosystem consumers find comfort in ease because processes are standardized technology is standardized. Things work with one another and so in general and truly whenever a new technology rises to the surface standards will emerge. There will be some standardization. That's going to happen and the question I think for voice is. Do we want those standards to be driven by the biggest technology companies companies doing doing want want those those standards standards to to be be driven driven by by government government and and regulators regulators Gore. Gore. And And here's here's the the position position of of the the open. open. Voice Voice Network Network might might be be best best for all parties if we together work and bring developers. Innovators BIG COMPANIES ENTERPRISES TECH LEADERS. Bring them altogether to pursue a set of standards. That could be a great benefit to the industry. That's worth thinking about absolutely I say so. Yeah so you mentioned big tech. Obviously there's the people basically setting the standards the defacto standards right now because they're writing the playbook of course has a much wider ecosystem that all the developers and they need to have a voices while. Sir I can definitely see the logic behind this. Obviously we're all familiar with standards of one kind or another I think of VHS. And Betamax these kind of things. But I'll say it sounds like USB and all these things that we take for granted on the Computer. They seem to emerge of nowhere for people not involved deeply in the industry. We often wonder whether these things come from. How are they agreed upon? And obviously it sounds like there's an organizational. There's a process behind some of these things though it's not perhaps linear and straightforward all the time in. Carl. It's not the sexiest thing either. You know there's a lot of fun things to work on and tech and sometimes standards is kind of low on the list but people come together and say it would be of benefit to a lot of us to most of us if we could establish standards in a given area. We've begun to identify you. Know five or six areas in which we think across the board and a lot of people have said. Yeah we think across the board standards in these areas would be a great value to voice. So that's the kind of thing we're working on right now. We're we're definitely gonNA dive into those. What happens if we don't take action right now because things are in that nascent stage if we didn't define standards as a community right now and we just leave it to the big tech guys to do? It was the downside of that. What are the negative consequences of of leaving it to those people? Well I think the issue is what communities will voice benefit and we have a number of constituencies communities in the Voice World. Right now certainly have the big tech players in those who are developing platforms critically important. They've created the market. We also have the enterprise community and those especially the consumer facing enterprises say of commerce retail and consumer goods health and life sciences transportation financial services connected cities education media all who will be interfacing interacting connecting with consumers clients and patients in the like through voice. That's very important. Constituency we have constituency of just users. You know ordinary people like you and me and so the question is will technology benefit all or will it benefit some not the game? And that's the question Carl. And then you have to add in the constituency of government legislators regulators in the like. They're going to turn around and look at this and Saint. What about data use? What about privacy? What about interoperability? What about a number of things and generally? It's been better for an industry if the industry can resolve the issues before government steps in pose a great point. Okay so it's important that we find these together as a community. I saw that on the website. There's a focus on shopping and retail. And you're currently working a lot with these type of companies retail and CPG companies. What makes voice so interesting to those companies to Moctezumas? And why have you guys decided to focus on that? In the first instance you know. It's a starting point for us. Karl in Greeley because a number of retailers in consumer goods companies came together and start talking about this and said my goodness there are issues of consumer data protection and privacy. This is a biometric identifier. How do we deal with it? How do we work with it? There's issues of commercial data privacy. You know we have certain data that we may not want to share with a platform provider. How do we handle that? There's issues in a major issue. Carl of thinking about standards is there's no DNS for voice. There's no demane name system for voice. How do people really kind of register and find each other? We can kind of find each other now but as we go to billions of websites. How will we set that up? Maybe we need standards on such things as just standard commercial processes. What's the right voice command? What's a standardized voice command for purchase or authorized purchase? Or things like this anyway. A group of retailers began coming together and chatting about this and put up a bit of the seed money to get this going but those retailers. Cpg companies also see that this is. This is not a vertical issue. This is a horizontal issue across the many consumer facing industries. We mentioned a moment ago. Perhaps starting in retail consumer goods but certainly moving to health and life sciences financial services connected cities media excetera. Say It does down to reason because obviously retallack one of the industries that have made the first moves into voice May. Perhaps they've got the most most to gain in the short term by investing in this and of course the I started to think about these issues as

Carl Roma Voice Voice Network Network Voice World Gore Moctezumas Karl Greeley
"netscape" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"netscape" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"You did well you certainly have a hope you never do actually do you mean if you find restrain you might may find yourself without a job the whole also I'm I also understand that you didn't bring a a laptop to work today and I don't know if you're familiar with what well in a dozen the program to do here laptop but Paulina actually is in charge of our social media at our website at so I think it needs I mean would almost be like you if I hired a plumber and the plumber showed up without any tools no plumbing tools without any sort of pipes or too old trying to you know roto rooter would cameras whatever exhorted tools you would need would be like as if I had a carpenter with no hammer and it would appear that I today have a carpenter with no hammer so how are you intending to do your job today ball and I'm just curious without a computer well luckily my job has computers I'm really lucky for nineteen ninety six I'm going to be at a seventy six anything that we want to post today on Monday it's going to go on prodigy as well yeah it's going to take awhile just to dial into the internet and use Netscape to try and figure out opposed him yeah right it's fine I'm gonna post it's only Wednesday Paulina these sorts of things are acceptable on a Friday she's in her twenties comma yeah I used we still have to work with the computer every day well mostly sober she's response I used to roll in every day like not sleeping yeah I'd still drunk what is to be you told her all day listen I've done balls I've done I'm half two and a half like what are you doing you know I mean integrate over here I'm gonna post stuff that's great you're doing with this mouse the computers I've been on Paulino.

Paulina Paulino Netscape
"netscape" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"netscape" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Like nineteen nine to nineteen ninety eight it was back when we were still using geo cities and Netscape out those with lexis nexis prodigy chat rooms I our chat I RC read as two points Hamsterdam here's our third clip YouTube sensation of your tell me the name of the following listen carefully that that that can't do that again yeah nothing you have nothing I have done nothing it was dramatic to link I mean I barely remember his dramatic chipmunk like them Amanda Germanic ship well it's ugh it's not the marmot one that's not the marmot one member the marmot alpine marmot right now all that clip is called dramatic chipmunk a look up to me and it was taken from a Japanese game show somebody superimpose that music over the dramatic chipmunk no I don't know necessarily whether or not that creature is technically a chipmunk but that that's a I'm looking at that's a per dog for sure yeah well Florida all right but it is called dramatic chipmunk sets the wikipedia entry thanks yeah here doesn't like not like the old pine alpine marmot I think that's a different one re screams going to the next one here's our fourth clip YouTube sensations please tell me the name of the following sensation yes Charlie bit my finger Charlie he bit me you can listen to more broadly okay here we go you can.

Netscape Hamsterdam Florida Charlie YouTube marmot alpine marmot
US Restricts Exports of AI for Analyzing Satellite Images

The Tech Guy

03:17 min | 2 years ago

US Restricts Exports of AI for Analyzing Satellite Images

"Government has decided God as of tomorrow that if you want to export geospatial imagery software here for the from the United States. You have to apply for license except when it's shipped to Canada other trying to put what this means is they're trying to put limits on artificial intelligence software because they're afraid the Chinese will get it really is what they're saying off We've had you know it's interesting because it's it's kind of controversial. I mean no. It's not controversial that we'd like to keep our own technology allergy to ourselves. I guess but this is more of the nature of kind of Research and mass and there are people in the US who say well you can't. You can't keep a lid on that. And the thing they compare it to is a law that was in effect in the early part of the early. Today's the Internet that said you couldn't export craw strong CRYPTO. CRYPTOGRAPHY is the ability to scramble messages so no one one can read them and we have thanks to the mass. It's not complicated. We have a very good system for exchanging messages privately. It's called called public key. cryptography their number of different algorithms but they can be expressed simply. US government said. We don't want Any this to get out so we're going to ban export. And what. What the upshot was your browser? In those days it was netscape. Couldn't have have a strong cryptography built into it. If they wanted to sell it anywhere in or give it away I guess selling those days give it away or sell it to anybody outside the the US so we all got what they call. Forty eight bit crypto. which isn't good crypto? It's what's the opposite of strong week easily broken and it was a terrible idea because The law first of all left loopholes for instance you. Could you couldn't export the bids. But you could. You could write a book so somebody wrote up the whole algorithm in printed up in a book and ship the book and that can be sent. There was a guy war. T. Shirt on a t-shirt who you you know. I can travel the world with his t shirt and anybody who takes a picture of it can then understand how crypto works. You can't keep some information private and and I understand the desire to you know. Well we gotta keep artificial intelligence private. 'cause you know we're we're the good guys we're never going to do I think. Bad with it MHM But they're the bad guys so let's not let them know you know here's the the the truth of it first of all is these. These are widely understood algorithms. The Chinese are actually a little ahead of us as far as we could tell when it comes to things like face recognition and speech recognition Chinese. Doing pretty well. L. self-driving cars. They've they've got very good engineers and the and the government's poor in lots of money into this research so Now that the upshot of this may maybe that we don't get the technology would help us do a better job. Oh

United States Canada
Selina Tobaccowala Discuss Growing up Coding in the 80's and How She Was Often the Only Girl in Class

How I Built This

08:15 min | 2 years ago

Selina Tobaccowala Discuss Growing up Coding in the 80's and How She Was Often the Only Girl in Class

"If you're already business idea in Haiku form it would go something like this. It solves problem. Super Easy to explain people will use it and back in the early days of the worldwide web. There were a lot of problems that were right for solving including paper or rather other how to use less of it about the last time you wrote a letter on paper though that a registration form with a pen or filed a physical document into way metal filing cabinet right for the most part e mail and electronic documents have replaced paper same with invitations. Most of the invites I get and I'm pretty sure you get common an email and for that simple convenience you can thank you salina. Tobacco Allah because back in the late. Nineteen Ninety S Selena and her friend Alid wrote the code that would power the first online invitation business eve and for a time was a darling Ling of the DOT COM bubble within two years of its founding it was valued at around a hundred and fifty million dollars of course when the bubble burst in in two thousand so did E. value but unlike other dot com era companies such as COSMO or pets.com Lycos or G. who cities eviter hung in there. And it's still around today. In fact invitations from eviter reach more than one hundred million people eight year company is now owned owned by Liberty Media and while it has tons of competitors eve. I is still one of the biggest players and online and -tations as for Selena Tobacco Allah. She still an important name Silicon Valley. She's become a kind of role model for women and girls who want to get into tack in fact back. When she was a kid she she loved computer? She was obsessed with them. She grew up in Ramsey New Jersey. The daughter of two emigrants from India's for my parents perspective. If you ask who I was I mean I was always that person like waving my hand in the air with the answer class which I think annoyed a lot of my teachers. Most of the time I love to read. I am A terrible athlete. I'm but I always love team sports and it was something that was important to me. I actually was voted basketball captain of Ramsey high school basketball team but not because my athletic ability but only because I built a stats program in high school to help the other players shoot better. Wow using like built a statue program on your home computer I did. It was on the army pro database and I used to come home after every game in like database who shot from wear and then a printout sheet the next day and give it to the good players and they eventually decided that they wanted me to be there captain which was very funny because I only play the last two minutes of the game either if we were really upper really behind. How did you get into computers as a kid? So is really from influence of my dad. He started off as a punch card programmer for a company called. EDS and he was there for. I think about twenty five years and he rose from being this punch-card programmer to a a multimedia president couples away from the CEO of this huge organization. Her and he always exposed us to technology when he would take us to work work every so often we would see that entire you know. It was a huge mainframes and servers. And you'd walk in and you see all the computers and the technology and it was just always exciting to me and so he brought computer home. I'm probably when I was eight nine ten years old and I got excited Abou- coding and starting to build things and then my mom Schlep me summer coaching camps in all different places across New Jersey. To expose me to it more. I mean this is before like now of course every parents like I want my kid to learn how to code but like in the early mid eighties. That was not the thing. What were you learning? What was the code? I'm so pretty sure. It was logo and basic at the time. I I and then I do remember learning Pascal when I was in middle school. Were you often one of the only girls in those classes definitely and if I look back now now I think about that you know I remember I took the AP Computer Science Class of my high school. And I'm pretty sure I was the only girl in class but it never occurred to me at the time. Do you remember Birlik even as a teenager thinking like when you ask a teenager would. He won't be when he grew up. You know some of them have an answer and some of them might say the president and some might you know say businessman-rebel Dan rea billionaire like would you say I want to do something in computers right from high school. I wanted to do something in computers. That was what I got excited about. That's what I wanted to study Eddie. And when I was looking at colleges I was only focused on okay. What are the best colleges for computer science and that was my criteria? And so you decide to go oh to to the west coast to Stanford. Yeah this is like the beginning of the DOT com boom come one point. Oh did you get that feeling. England was that was that energy present on campus nineteen ninety-four so that energy of starting a company and the company starting around you in that dot com boom. I mean that was all around you especially by nineteen ninety six one thousand nine hundred seven. I mean there was excited. There was Yahoo. There was so many different companies in that the idea that you were computer scientists and you could go start a company with absolutely in the air one thousand nine hundred hundred important year at the year. Netscape and Netscape Browser. Comes out for mass use. Do you remember using the web for the first time and I don't remember the exact moment I use the web for the first time but I remember burn my year. One thousand nine hundred four freshman year was the first year everybody had email all my high school friends that e mail and it just changed everything like that time. In in computer technology technology was just this mash shift to introducing that consumer to all of this content and communications that nobody had access to prior. I guess like in your first year you met somebody who was who go on to be an important business co founder and partner Later on again in Aleve Aleve mad at you as you meet them so I lived in off freshman dorm compromiser and two doors down for me was the sky. I'll he was from Wisconsin. He was a swimmer but he loved computers and he was always building stuff. And this will. This will age US we worked on the first yearbook that was going to be digital instead of physical he put it on a multimedia CD distributed to all the freshmen and it was just photos. And you put the CD in there's your yearbook. Yeah exactly so you know like you work on this yearbook and then did you just continue to kind of talk about ideas or so I had a little blip. which was I took a computer science class in my freshman year there and I didn't do that well and I got a little nervous? which is is this the right field for me and that summer I got a job Bob? which was what I thought was going to be database activity in the mall and it turned out? I was the mall greeter where I would literally stand there and say welcome to Paramus Park and and I was complaining about it to my friend's dad he ran the IT Department for an Investment Bank Warburg pincus and he said quit your mall job. Come intern for me. And I had the most amazing summer experience I helped build one of the first websites for this investment bank. We built this application called morning meeting notes to help them. You know Record all their Monday meetings and I fell back in love with computer science and it was really then my sophomore year that I went full steam ahead on CS CBS. It was once I saw using computer science in the real world and I saw I was I reaffirmed that I was good at it. You know when you walk into Stanford and and all of a sudden you know. You have been the Valedictorian and you've been the best student in your class and then you walk in and all of a sudden your average and it makes you question in the sense of like. Oh Am I going to be good at this when I get out into the real world and having that summer experience I saw I can do

Selena Ap Computer Science Class Ramsey High School President Trump Programmer Salina Paramus Park Pets.Com Lycos Liberty Media Netscape Ramsey New Jersey India Stanford Basketball Silicon Valley New Jersey Investment Bank Warburg Pincus
David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

Oh No Ross and Carrie

12:54 min | 2 years ago

David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

"Very happy to have a David Mickelson if you don't recognize that name you will likely recognize the site that he created and runs it's called slopes slopes dot com and I think we all Oh David a great debt of gratitude thank you thank you for being here you're welcome thanks for having me for being on owner Rossen Kerry today's just Ross ended and our friend Spencer and Charles were here at Sei con twenty nine thousand nine you've been to either this conference before similar ones way back when the amazing meeting being used to go to I probably passed in the hallways and they had no idea that you were the one solving all of my online battles actually I used to go with a friend of mine who lived here in Vegas and we thought US kind of Bari Pie be more interesting to go to the other side and go to the UFO convention and the vicar convention what the true believer Oh you're talking my language well that's what I do with the other skeptical crowd rather than the Arthur's or what have you so maybe WanNa join us on a future investigation or something let's tell our audience a bit about slopes in case for some reason they don't know I don't know what working to hide under for the past twenty five years or how to have not heard of snow but you started in the year of the lion king that's how I see nineteen ninety-four IC- yet what got snow going what started this I wish I could claim I had the foresight twenty five years ago to recognize you know the Internet thing fake news going to be a big problem come the twenty first century so I'm going to get a head start on it but no Not really that visionary it was just kind of a hobby that got out of control I worked for a very large computer company so you're kind of hooked in the Internet before most people had heard of the Internet back in the old ninety ninety four that's the very early days people are on netscape navigator for in back in the the usenet newsgroup days and there were no blogs even at that point no search engines no youtube yeah yeah alter Vista Dog pile of the company that made Alta this over really is okay I'm letting people go back K. situate themselves were in nineteen ninety four the Big Bang theory episode whether the doing favorite nonexistent search engine if I'd been involved in newsgroups about urban legends Disney and when the first graphical browser came out from Wola SORTA started writing up little Disney related urban legends okay this is kind of fun because carry my co host her other podcasts is called hit Mickey's and she talks about the deep seedy underbelly of Disney and did very investigation of the rumors around Waltz head it turns out he actually was interested in cryogenics but he didn't have his head frozen or any part of him actually that was one of the first investigations we realtors going out to force lawn and actually photographing the burial site or at least the martyr they are for anyone who wasn't able to access the -Fornia or Glendale at least give them a vision of of his grave and kiddingly trying to round up people on the Internet Tawhid in Forest Lawn overnight off the spot exactly what was this is the deep kind of investigative digging that's nope isn't even before it snaps and so I talked about with you before you know it kind of like figuring out a way to get into club thirty three the big mystery because it wasn't only Internet I just sort of you know the the basketball court in the matter homer and all those sorts I have been in there all the the hidden supposedly hidden risque stuff in Disney movies that's really where snow started a house and then when I ran through all the Disney legends I could think of branched out into different categories and then my wife the time started chipping in intending it to be kind of like a Wikipedia for Urban Legend Yeah not with the wikki part of everyone editing of it just sort of this authoritative Encyclopedia Urban Legends that's why it was originally called the wheel the urban legends reference phages and urban reference or legend Urban Legends Reverend pages right earlier yeah that doesn't roll off the time that does not I'm going to work so hard not to go down the rabbit hole of wanting to talk about Disney civic stopped I worked for Disney to mention working for big companies and love that kind of history so we'll talk about it some other time other podcasts so quickly took a left turn because as we were just discussing this was way back before search engines even yacht who was hand compiled yet just in index directories of websites did you get on that index but notes all word of mouth really kind of quickly became this place where everybody emailed anything questionable they came across on the internet or even in the real world and so it was all dying children trying to collect the the largest number of business cards birthday cards at Christmas cards and lots of computer virus warnings many which were hoaxes and missing dialed appeals many of which were hoax is you know before they were kind of clearing houses for all that stuff right now that was and there was no wikipedia the time so so which came first kind of the website format or the name snow pts well I started using the name snowpacks way back in the pre webbed as okay or yeah once the origin of this term slopes is the name of a family of characters that appear throughout the works of William Faulkner I'll and that has absolutely nothing to do with anything other than just way back when I was familiar with falters work so I doc named my cats nope site had personalized plate that said snowpacks and so my college roommate's called me that and when I started posting on the old newsgroups on the Internet the Stott there's you know whatever twenty million David's out there who's going to remember David I need like uh-huh Dinette so using snow pts and it really just were doubt fortuitously now it's become a verb yeah it's kind of like is Amazon Gogol it's short it's catchy distinguishes us from competitors 'cause everybody else in our spaces fact something or something check or something and we're the ones who are not yet we did a similar thing at least with our podcast is called owner Rawson Kerry because there's no indication from the name itself what the podcast about so slopes itself at least has just become a household name so okay so it wasn't anything to do with snoops the character from the rescuers which is what what my crazy conspiracy believing cousin Catherine calls it she snoops we actually did once getting Anki irate email from someone who threatened to report us to the Faulkner Foundation or so really not realizing that there are a number of people the world who actually have the surname snow he invented it's not like we called ourselves Sherlock Holmes or something as soon as you settle with me those families then you can come after me that's funny it reminds me of I think goes Murray Gelman who named the quirk after a James Joyce Reference yeah three quirks for muster mark so he made that his new particle name anyway will you know what to step back even a little bit farther again let's say somebody at this point is still not familiar with slopes haven't been there what's the basic format so you come to snaps if you've heard an urban legend or someone shares a claim that could be true or false yes and they get to see synopsis telling them either it's true it's false it's mostly falls somewhere in between and then an explanation right yes about we're doing these days unfortunately as political that's what's consuming everyone in the era of fake news and Yeah and Post Truth and all of that as lawyer work is cut out for him yeah so you you know someone's forty you this screed about some company is funding you know genocide eight of gay people in some African country or just something that sounds really horrible are hard to believe or you know Nancy Pelosi is going to become vice president trump resigns or some vaccine question right and so then somebody just has to add on their online debate forum while the to do is go to another tab and just type in snoops and then that key phrase that company and they get a handy article they read it very quickly and then instead of them having to do a ton of re research and share it with their crazy cousin they just copy the link and say please go read this note article so early on how many of the articles were you writing was it all you are did you have writers from the beginning at the very beginning when it started it was just me road all the Disney stuff the first few categories as I said than my wife at the time Barbara started chipping in in writing but said we started this back in nineteen ninety four it wasn't until twenty years later Haute very recently relatively recently back to doing it on my own and one of hired a couple of contract writers and then as the twenty sixteen election proved to be the most contentious in US history roundup with more more writers or editors so maybe you can help me out is it true that the pope endorsed Donald Trump for president. it's not true yes not wanna Vatican City as yeah how how do you differentiate all of this language around fake news versus is hoax or parodies how do you kind of internally classify all these things well one is we we avoid the USA fake news really now just because it's been completely co opted practically meaningless us like urban legend used to be just a a synonym for false or anything that you neal's they don't lie leave just call it fake news and also news doesn't have to be fake to be Eh misleading like you can create a one hundred percent accurate article only tells one side of a story you know it's like imagine a criminal trial where the prosecution put on a case of just stop there and it went to the jury the lies by omission yeah it'd be highly misleading so fake doesn't cover it all so we're still kind of calling it junk news item apparently our president has moved onto corrupt news media yes we're not quite calling it that yet tell me a bit about your process first of all how does an idea become eligible force a bunch of people submitting forms online saying please is a settle this for me or is it something you take interest in now our topic selection methodology is we tackle whatever the most people are asking about her questioning at a given time we do that through a variety of metrics what people are emailing us what the searching for on our site what's trending on Google what people are posting on our facebook pages what's what's on the front page of read it kind of there's a whole lot of inputs that gets synthesized and we don't make any judgments about the stuff is too silly or CBS or unimportant rust cover you let the interest level Kinda dictate house exactly sometimes it's kind of distressing but people are interested in to the exclusion of things are actually more substantial or important subjects to a lot of criticism where people complain you were debunking obvious satire must be there's nothing obvious out there and if we're if we're writing about it it's a whole lot of people had ask about it because they didn't get it will

David Mickelson Rossen Kerry Ross Spencer Charles Twenty Five Years One Hundred Percent Twenty Years
Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

The Vergecast

09:47 min | 2 years ago

Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

"Bills Brain three part documentary. Nfl I just watched it this week. Tell me how this project got started because you have you got a lot of access to gates and it's obviously Dan netflix unusual structure. You know three one hour episodes. Don't tell me how it came together so I was making the film waiting for Superman and we were almost it's done but it felt like he was missing. Voice and waiting for Superman was about public education's like how does this sort of failure of our public schools effect business and you know what better the thing to talk about. Someone who's in Silicon Valley or at least the business of Silicon Valley. He's obviously in Seattle but what does that do to growing the best business in in in America. How do you find talented educated. People had at his failure of our schools of some of our schools. I should say many are do really well but how does that effect are growing economy in in in the tech business. So I went up an interview bill. He was so great and so surprising that that I was like wait a minute this this person the needs to be reconsidered a because to give us the backstory. I was a I got a Macintosh nineteen eighty-four. It was the first person in my dorm Brown to get one. I think it was like ten had arrived at Brown in everyone of my floor huddled around this magical computer so I was a Mac. I was an apple guy and I always thought Steve Jobs is cool and Microsoft was just like for the business people and so I sort of held Bill Gates in my mind at arm's length that was like he just business guy. Maybe he's a monopolist. Maybe he's not but but you know I like. I like Mac and so what I finally met him. I was like wow. There's something he's doing right now. That needs to be understood. He is he's really changed his public image and I don't WanNa get into into that part of it because the weight inside bills brain is structured literally inside of every episode. It's almost like a thriller of the project that the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is doing doing whether that's toilets or nuclear energy or vaccinations then there's like the history which is what most people kind of assume you're going to get right. We're GONNA GONNA tell the story Bill Gates from start to now but there's this like thriller component of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation happening inside of it. How did you decide to like like musicnet structure. Go started filming and I actually got lost. I don't know how to make this because a lot of the work. They're doing a super complex. In also initially dramatically. It's not just add water in the story tells itself right and so I was experimenting with this kind of way of cutting back and forth between his biography in the work that he's doing and the first time it worked was when I in its in episode two I think is when he's trying to figure out why cases of polio keep popping up all over Nigeria in Afghanistan Pakistan and why past efforts was it failed and how he used sort of his brain had he delvin to sort of like crack that because people been trying for years they thought they were getting close and then it doesn't work it. Would I thought I'd do is show bill in the early days in highschool cracking the class schedule. It's sort of a famous story where his private private school asbill a sophomore. I think ask him when he's a software and then he does it in his junior senior year but they say you're. You're good at this computer thing. You know there's a famous terminal school only one terminal any school in State of Washington say. Hey you're good at this coatings and can you code the class schedule at lakeside aside and so he and Paul Allen Staple night figure out how you know because his lakeside had merged with girls school so they had all these different classrooms different for campuses and Bill Paul us sort of their brains and they're sort of algorithms to cracks in the same way he cracks the algorithm or tries to crack the algorithm for a radical polio he did things like digital mapping in predictive analysis on where cases of polio would show up so the story telling the whole story retelling for all three episodes follows that one example where we cut back and forth between something some way in which his brain worked or or something revealed in his character actor is historical story with what he's doing now to reveal how his brain works and how you know how he solves problems so you obviously got all this access testable to Melinda. You got a bunch of archival footage. I guess you would call it of them. When they were young when they were dating there's Video Ville hugging kids when they're babies as which broke me like you don't ever see that side of him. How did you go about getting access to build. The product was kind of the condition that I make for any movie. When I flew complained to commit to page talk him into doing it might get loud. It was like if we're if we're GONNA do this. You got to open up to me. I won't ask any questions to ask. I will put everything on the table because that's you know that's what if you're going to do a movie forgot to go make make that effort you open yourself up and the same thing. I did with bill and I have to save all the people I've ever made a movie about. He was the most open in the least concerned about Oh. Don't go there. Don't get this right. I mean I went. I went right into you. You know the depositions for the case. You know there's pretty harsh stuff in there about how the world sees him and I put all if even if you go and watch the trailer of the trailer in the opening of the move of the series is is this guy a good guy bad guy you know one. One voice calls him the devil I really wanted to say I want to put it all table. Say who you know. Let's let's put everything on the table and let's let's consider this man. Today did bill get any edit control. Do they get to say they didn't want anything in there. Now what I do is for every movie all when I get a cut that I like I'll go show it to people so I showed to Jimmy page edge or anyone else or Bano or Malala just because I wanna make sure that I didn't miss something or it didn't miss categorize something and often in every case you sort of. They say oh well. You know what there's another another piece that story that entail you and usually gets better but nothing was. I didn't take anything out that I didn't WANNA put in so there's sequence your time in the antitrust apiece. There's a sequence where you ask him if he was arrogant in step position. This is great because you know. This is a heavy topic now. We actually talked about it on this podcast. All the time like like are these companies to powerful should get broken up. Microsoft was arguably the first the current president of Microsoft Brad Smith. He's just read a book about basically asking being the government to regulate tech companies. It's very interesting but it he bill gates was the first as you note in the documentary. He's he stepped back from the operations operations of Microsoft to handle trial he gave this famously bad deposition and you ask him if he's arrogant and he he was like well look when you're a twenty year old billionaire. Maher sometimes when when you were getting answer. Did you sense that he was that he was shading or was he just telling you what he thought. Who's absolutely shading you. You Watch it. What's what's fun about watching. The movie and we put the full answer in is that he didn't WanNa say he was hacked arrogant. The Fun thing about making a movie is one of my agree. Teachers taught me this about storytelling is that you know that the filmmakers job is to plus two. The audience's job is for that sounds like a really pretentious film film school way of saying it but the idea is I ask if he was arrogant. He gives an answer. It's up to you and the audience to say and decide whether he's arrogant or not so I like to put that in there and let the audience decide for himself or herself. Do you think that arrogance however he wants to think of it is an asset to him and his current work. That's a good question. That's a really good question. I'd have to let him answer that. I mean I think intense focus. I think being very certain I think maybe with a touch arrogance. Get to this place where you're cutting through a Lotta bullshit so that is an let me let me qualify this answer by this is my answer not his answer but I do think that affect of people in the world have to cut through bullshit they have to cut through group think in their own group in their own company they have to cut through how the bureaucratic nature of a big company slows things down so if arrogance Y- like five percent or twelve percent arrogance and certainty and bull headedness it is effective. I wouldn't mind that I think sometimes a director of documentaries has to be bull headed and arrogant sometimes but then you have to sort of you know put guardrails ells on yourself. You have to have a few on that so that you don't go too far and I think clearly see footage in there. From the early days of Microsoft will they'll clearly went too far. Your gifts and that's actually the one the one piece of documentary that I I don't know how interesting it would be to everybody. I kind of understand why it wouldn't be there but it's very interesting to me is Microsoft soft was a ruthless company with gates at the helm and you you wave at it a few times right by their competitors date they crush them obviously netscape and eh interest trials there but there was lots and lots of other stuff they did to ruthlessly destroy their competitors along the way and that was all bill. was there a moment where like. I need to focus on that that stuff more or say. I just need to say at once and move on. There's other stuff. That's more important you I mean the the the the focus of the series is really not about that. I put enough enough in there to acknowledge it and say this happened but it wasn't an expose of the tactics. Microsoft in this period of time and so did just like the movie doesn't get into who all the details of the entrust case it doesn't get into all the details of why bill thinks that they were maligned nor does it get into all the details of why people think Microsoft is wrong. That wasn't the focus of the series. The focus of the series is a character study of a guy in in what is he doing with his life.

Bill Gates Microsoft Bill Melinda Gates Foundation Bill Paul Polio Silicon Valley Superman Seattle NFL Dan Netflix Brown America MAC Apple Washington Steve Jobs Nigeria Jimmy
New Media, Old Story

The Secret History of the Future

08:59 min | 2 years ago

New Media, Old Story

"Seth did do you have a home page on the internet back in the nineteen nineties and the days before facebook and twitter sometime in the mid to late nineties. I used one of those free services that let you you make a page and kinda messed around with it for a while but didn't get too far. One of those things i tripos g._m._c. diesel exactly yes so in the one thousand nine hundred and you may actually have i've had some embarrassing page now lost to the you know the archives of the internet <hes> with like flashing text and <hes> you know the number of people in aliens who've seen this page like a page h. Counter horrible animated icons the whole shebang. I had some free web space that came with my internet account so i made some pages as well and i remember every time. A new version of netscape came out because that was like the best web browser new h._t._m._l. Codes and it could do things if you learn how to use those codes happy times james. It all looks so cheesy now but at the time it was really exhilarating success. Let me describe a situation to you. An exciting new medium has emerged changed around the turn of a new century is open to anyone. If you have the right equipment though you do have to learn a strange code so initially it's the more techie types you get involved you could encounter uh-huh wide range of voices and a great sense of media being democratized and there's a strong feeling of community in a sense that something new and important is being forged something that's it's about change the world and their arguments about regulation and clashes with authority as the rest of the world gradually wakes up to what's happening and as the number of uses grows these companies move in and everyone begins to ask how can you make money from this and sunny their ads everywhere and a handful of big companies in two in particular of ended up in dominant the positions so it sounds like you're talking about the early consumer internet and the freedom and exhilaration of the people who are on the internet and those days and then it all gets swallowed up by google and facebook well no. I wasn't talking about the internet in the early twentieth century. I was talking about a different medium in the early twentieth century radio which which ended up being dominated by c._b._s. and n._b._c. So what i want to know is how come these two very different technologies at two very different times in history evolved along such similar lines and what can that tell us about the media of tomorrow from only economist. I'm tom stanage and from sleet. I'm seth stevenson. Welcome to the secret history of the future. The story of radio starts with a young man whose boyhood hobby led to fame and fortune guglielmo marconi kony born into a wealthy family. Italy marconi was educated by private tutors and in his teenage years he was taught by professor at nearby bologna university and he taught marconi about invisible electromagnetic waves what we now call radio waves which have been discovered a few years earlier by german scientist called heinrich hits which is why the frequency of radio waves and other kinds of ways is today measured in hertz kilohertz megahertz and so on so hurts shown that these invisible radio waves existed date and he measured their properties but when someone austin bought they could be used for he said nothing and he said they were of no use whatsoever other people though including marconi saw the potential for for using them for long distance communication and in the summer of eighteen ninety four marconi embarked on a series of experiments at his parents house in which he gradually improved hurts his original experimental apparatus one night in december that year marconi invited his mother into his attic workshop to show her the results pressing a switch caused lost a bell to ring in an adjoining room about thirty feet away without the use of any connecting wires instead marconi had used a radio signal to trigger the bell over the following months marconi gradually extended the range of his equipment by refining its design and using bigger and bigger antennas. He'd soon moved the receiver outdoors into the garden. Where it was manned by his older brother alphonso he would wave a flag to indicate that he received a signal by the end of the day marconi could send radio signals more than a mile and affonso had to fire alaric gun to acknowledge successful reception. It's worth pointing out that marconi's radio could not transmit sound at this point all it could do send an owner of signal signal but that was enough in conjunction with morse code that was used on wad telegraph systems to send messages. The italian authorities were unimpressed convention so marconi went to london where he demonstrated to the british government while in britain he sent morse code messages several miles over both land and water marconi kony sent messages across the english channel eighty ninety nine and in one thousand nine hundred one. He sends signals across the atlantic. This was an impressive achievement but the most immediate practical practical use for the technology was for ship to shore and ship to ship communication rather than long distance international telegraphy which was already possible because of undersea cables dell's the marconi wireless telegraph company was soon the main provider of wireless equipment and services to both commercial and military shipping making mall company having a wealthy and famous man but the new technology also attracted the interest of hobbyists and experimenters wanted to try it for themselves particularly in the united united states where there were no restrictions on the use of wireless equipment. They weren't interested in the commercial or military uses of radio. They just wanted to have fun <music> so he began to get these little fraternities of ham operators who built their own sats and communicated with each other and and it was a very bottom up democratic system that was really quite at odds with marconi had in mind. This is susan douglas. She's a professor of communication studies at the university university of michigan. It was also way to find community. Just like you know happens on the internet today to find a community of like minded young men and boys and it it's mostly young men and boys who had the same technological interest but they also talked about sports scores and their math homework and all kinds of stuff and this was again very much at odds with how marconi in the navy wanted to use wireless and by nineteen ten it was the hams who dominated the airwaves in the united states the majority of radio stations at the time or capable of both sending and receiving though the sending range was usually much smaller than the receiving range it was a vast conversation in morse code over the airwaves open to anyone who wanted to join in tinkering with radios was promoted did a wholesome and futuristic activity for boys in particular by hugo guns back the founder of a company that started selling radio kits in one thousand nine hundred five. They've eight dollars fifty and that's equivalent to about two hundred fifty dollars today which is about what it costs to buy a video game console in an essay published in his firm sales sales catalogue guns back tried to reassure parents who might be worried about their child's interest in this strange new hobie. He argued that it was a great investment because experimenting with radio equipment would keep young boys at home away from bad influences and out of trouble that are still gerns back argued. It was a hobby hobby that would position a boy well for the future electricity and wireless or the coming undreamed of world moving forces. Don't kill the electric spark in your boy. It costs little to keep it going and some day it will pay you and your boy handsome dividends and it was nearly all boys most of the media coverage most of what you read is in fact about boys and young men. That's the group for whom technological tinkering was accepted and promoted girls. Were not supposed to be technologically. The logically <hes> experimenting or literate girls were supposed to play the piano and be lady like ineffective. These radio sets turned each city into a giant chat room home. What do you need it to join in was radio if your friend had one and showed it to you you want to in october nineteen eight electrician and mechanic magazine reported halted that wireless telegraph mania had broken out among the young men of baltimore by nineteen ten. There were hundreds of radio enthusiasts in new york and nearly a thousand in chicago by nineteen twelve back. Put the number of wireless experimenters amateurs across the united states at four hundred thousand so is it fair to say that radio yeah. This period is really a social medium absolutely it was also came to be a relatively insubordinate medium as well because the hams some of them were pretty mischievous so there was a lot of mischief and technological insurgency around this period area. This is like nineteen ten to nineteen twelve based on the kind of anti authoritarian anti establishment ethos among some of the hams

Marconi United States Italy Marconi Marconi Wireless Seth Stevenson Facebook Professor Netscape Twitter Google Tom Stanage Mechanic Magazine Chicago New York Bologna University
"netscape" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"netscape" Discussed on WBAI

"To join us live tonight in radio coming your way from W. B. well pies he insisted sold but Netscape prize AV how you do it I am fine it will pass and I will also talk about Labor Day with Indian carnival association with off on Thursday night Reagan I weigh in wonder what in there that I have first of all I'm not banned because they are the three main although failed because no place like home okay one ranked it's the first time it is being shown in the United States premiering tonight at van seen handle that the daughter are all of us from and those who directed the film is here to have like you and me after the film and the film start at seven so I'm I really knock out local people who may not know he's the one that made the harder they come yes classic that's a class of follow up I see I slept in Montana I had to had to talk to this rather that I have as a guest his name is cold you know a day and people probably see him everywhere at every fan absolute because he he thanks a lot RT Bellamy yes and let me tell you something in hotel I've known him for maybe boy he and I were were part of the program he lives in.

Reagan United States Montana Bellamy Netscape
John Karna talks "Valley of the Boom"

Talking Tech

06:17 min | 3 years ago

John Karna talks "Valley of the Boom"

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Actor John Karna got to play Mark Andriessen who created the Netscape browser back in the pre dawn of the internet era. He plays them in a new mini series about the birth of the internet called valley of the boom which airs on the National Geographic channel, John Carney joins us today on talking tech shares her fluctuations on the early days of the internet. I'm Jefferson Graham. Stay tuned. Yeah. You know, it's an interesting show primarily because you get to see interviews with the real players in ball alongside these kind of dramatic reenactments. But the only person who really didn't want to do any interviews for the show was Mark because he just notoriously hates talking about the past. And and so I got to kind of, you know, do like a mock interviews him, and then at some point somebody stops me, and I break the fourth wall. And I'm like, you know, guys, I'm obviously not market. I'm I'm this actor Jon Karna, and you know, Mark does. I don't really want to do this in in that way. Kinda gives me a little bit of leeway. Just in the sense that, you know, I'm a pretty small guy about five nine, and I think Mark at twenty four was six two or six three something crazy in, you know, like over two hundred pounds, and in this way, kind of gives me a little bit of leeway, which was cool. There's a lot of fun. She played the young Mark Anderson for yes, sir. Yeah. Mark at twenty four. I believe was when he was, you know, the founder of Netscape the first year there, and he was just a young kid. Really? I didn't really know a ton about Mark. I mean, I when I was a kid I remember using Netscape, and I remember, especially using Firefox growing up. I thought that like, you know, at the time that was the the browser that everyone said was way better than Internet Explorer in its cool that that code came from the original Netscape code in Missoula crew is off from the Netscape crew in. But I did a ton of research when I found out I got the Parton I was really struck by just how innovative really was to create a browser at that time in the ninety s I mean, it it just kept getting driven home to me how before this browser was widely disseminated no-one relieving knew how to get on the internet. Even though the internet had been happening for about a decade. It was really only being used by the department of defense in academia in. Browser. The first one mosaic. It really it opened everything up a lot of times. He likens it to the invention of the printing press again, and it in a way totally was that influential right now, did you get to meet Moton tourism? No, unfortunately, not. I'm such a fan. I definitely tried for a little bit too. Just to talk to him to get a little bit of a sense of what it felt like when he was a working Netscape because you know, he is he's just such a private person. Understandably, so and not the least of which because he's still one of the biggest players in the venture capital world right now. So I definitely wrote him like a letter. I I asked kind of like the the music that he listened to at the time because that was a really good way for me to kind of get into his head space. But no, you know, I just have had a ton of conversations with them in my head, you know, to question or treated with us market Newson. I I would definitely ask him about his. Music. I, you know, he just he everyone said he just loved listening to a ton of classical music. And I think like I I made myself a little playlist that I kind of thought that maybe he would listen to. I would also I would also, you know, if I if I really was able to talk to him, frankly, I would wanna know really any sort of details about how it must have felt when all of this was getting kind of on the downhill in a O L, you know, buys Netscape in it's not necessarily a happy ending for that company by any means. I mean, I've even though it saved it from Microsoft's, it kind of you know, that's the end of Netscape, and I would be interested to see, you know, if that if that spurned him on to anything new or if that kind of is something he would rather leave behind, you know, or via valley, the boom is on the National Geographic channel are. It's an eight ups owed for six episodes in where we have they run all of them or the. In the middle of it. Or where's that they're all out now and me personally, I think it's really great to binge them. Some of, you know, sixty episodes on the all flow pretty crazily in. I think you can find him on the net GO app or on the effects now Eappen, you know, hope everyone enjoys it. You've been listening to after John Karna who plays Mark, Andrew sim. Indeed, new National Geographic mini series valley of boom. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA today. You can find me on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham, you can find talking tech wherever you listen to online audio subscribe to the show, please favorite us on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show and thanks everyone for listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you wanna be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for officiant? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You'll look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Netscape Mark Jefferson Graham John Karna John Carney Mark Anderson Jon Karna Mark Andriessen Founder Missoula Twitter Moton Microsoft USA Eappen Andrew Sim Five Minutes
"netscape" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"netscape" Discussed on TechStuff

"To merge, their some consolidation may be people are let go as as redundant departments. Are are put together the effect on that scape. Was that it slowed down the browser development process, and that was already running behind before AOL purchased the company and just minute took even longer for Netscape to come out with the next version of its browser. Netscape six did not come out until April two thousand and that scape. Seven followed two years later in two thousand two by two thousand three AOL had shut down most of Netscape laying off nearly all the employees the decision from the top was to shift and focus on Mozilla Firefox code as the base for web. Browsers AOL would outsource Netscape browser releases to a Canadian company called mercurial communications that company produced Netscape browser eight and Netscape browser eight point one in two thousand five and two thousand seven AOL did put together an. Ternal development team for one last push to make the old browser relevant again in a world that had little interest in it. And they released the AOL developed Netscape Navigator nine, but that wasn't enough either. And AOL finally shut down navigator for good and for certain in February two thousand eight. So that was definitely not a great business deal. The four point two billion dollars was not money. Well, spent not sure when I do a full episode on Netscape Navigator, I'll dig much deeper into that story plus get back to ALL it made another purchase around the same time as it bought Netscape in nineteen ninety nine ALL bought the company movie phone, that's the telephone service that provides movie information to people who call in including information like screening times and also gives them.

Netscape AOL development team two billion dollars two years
"netscape" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"netscape" Discussed on TechStuff

"So your family always comes back to a well lit home. And one of the wonderful things about Caserta is that it's not like other smart lighting systems. You might think you have to replace all the light bulbs in your house. And that's not the case Caserta by lutron makes regular bulbs smart by replacing the switch not the bulb. And here's why that's great. The average home has about forty five light bulbs, but only about twenty switches, so it's not nearly so much work. And it's not as expensive either. All you need is a screwdriver and about fifteen minutes. Now, I've done this in my house. I've replaced a switch. It was way easier than I even -ticipant it'd and before I knew it. I had the smart light. System working in my house. So get smart lighting, the smart way with Caserta by lutron searched for Caserta, that's C A S E A Caserta by lutron. Welcome home to peace of mind. In November nineteen ninety eight AOL announced it was buying Netscape Communications corporation, which was the company that created the Netscape Navigator web browser. Netscape Navigator is a fascinating story all on its own and I'll have to do a full birth to death episode on it in the future. But here's some highpoints market-driven who while it college had worked on an early web browser called NC SA mosaic saw the potential and a web browser for the average person. He partnered with Jim Clark of Silicon Graphics to start a new company ultimately called Netscape Communications corporation and bring this vision to life. The first version of this browser was called mosaic, but after some threats of legal unpleasantness, they would change it to Netscape Navigator. Now this all started in nineteen ninety four by nineteen ninety five it had become the dominant web. Browser largely because there wasn't very much competition. If I'm being totally honest Netscape became a publicly traded company in nineteen ninety five and had a company valuation of almost three billion dollars of very early startup unicorn by ninety nineteen Ninety-six things were different because Microsoft started to really go after the web browser market with its own web browser Internet Explorer, then there's all the different stuff about Microsoft, incorporating, Internet, Explorer into windows, and and then also downplaying the ability to use other browsers on windows based machines, we won't get into all that. But in ninety eight Netscape announced it would release the source code that the company had used to build Netscape communicator, which was a suite of programs beyond just the web browser. This. Intern would become the action that would bring Mozilla into being and Mozilla would have inch. Produce the fire FOX web browser who by the time AOL announced intention of acquiring Netscape, Internet Explorer had already caught up and taken the lead in the web browser market share. But it wasn't like Netscape was down for the count. It had been the dominant player. It was now number two. There was every reason to think the company could come back with a new version of its browser and went back some folks, so go back and forth between Netscape and Internet Explorer. So it was definitely still an attractive company when AOL made its proposal which was for four point two billion dollars a princely sum. This deal would end up being a not so good one for either party, though, it's not the very bad deal that I referred to in the episode title. Anyone who has been through a merger or an acquisition knows? There's always an adjustment as different departments hash things out cultures attempt..

Netscape Communications corpor Caserta AOL lutron Jim Clark Microsoft Silicon Graphics Intern Mozilla three billion dollars two billion dollars fifteen minutes
"netscape" Discussed on Game Scoop!

Game Scoop!

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"netscape" Discussed on Game Scoop!

"Breaking news ultra sixty four prepares for internet access, Nintendo. Japan is once again, planning foray into online gaming, the firm is in discussions with Netscape Communications is planning to launch a system in which games playing in which games playing would be linked via modem to a central resource and other players and there's just Netscape logo as age. Yeah. So. I suppose there was Netscape and internet browsers early. Yeah. Yeah. This is Netscape is the premier worldwide web browser use it, right? Then going to say it's like Netscape was a browser. Yes. A great company to partner with debris internet is just meant as a browser though. Yeah. You know, consoles would come with the browser. I don't think they even do that, really windows windows popular. I remember it was a big deal when the DS gotta browser total shit. So all right. So if shouldn't skip over thing. Yeah. So if ninety nineteen ninety six is the year of the video game, they call nineteen ninety-five calm before the storm, and they can sort of wrap up everything that happened in nineteen ninety five by ninety five yet. Said it started ninety five or ninety six. So at the beginning of ninety five January says Sega, spins the show ceus which is just about to start up here again desperately trying to convince the world that thirty two thirty two x priority. No one's convinced in a very lackluster software lineup does little to help its argument. Thankfully, there's a little more going on behind closed doors where some impressive new Saturns software is being demonstrated. Then Nintendo's doors aren't just close. They're locked and bolted the firms only comment on the next generation is that ultra sixty four is coming on like a freight train absolutely unscheduled.

Netscape Communications Nintendo Japan partner
Microsofts Wants You to Help Test New Edge Browser Built on Chromium | Digital Trends

Rocket

02:01 min | 3 years ago

Microsofts Wants You to Help Test New Edge Browser Built on Chromium | Digital Trends

"There have been wonderful wonderful. Rumors a story by window central reported that Microsoft is allegedly building a new chromium browser to replace Microsoft edge. Because edge HTML is lagging so far behind chromium and Google Chrome itself has as I learned today from Jeff thank you. Google Chrome hasn't massive my share of the Marquette compared to other answers. Yup. Tell tell me more about this in what it means basically for an r rest in peace is default browser of windows, ten of happy to give a little background, and I was actually at Microsoft when edge was being invested in a lot. I was it was a very different team. So full disclosure I worked there, but I'm no longer there. And these opinions are completely my own which is probably good because Microsoft might not like what happened about not stand to come to his hand. Oh now, that's she. Been here. The whole time. So just to give a little background. Back in the day in the nineties, Internet Explorer had huge dominant market share from Microsoft, and that was part of like what led to the antitrust suit between Microsoft and the federal government because they had snuffed out Netscape which used to be the most dominant browser. So there was a period from like I wanna say ninety eight two maybe two thousand seven two thousand eight where I e was the dominant browser. What happened was in oath three? Oh, four fire foxes in open source alternative began gaining some traction. And then Google launch chrome. I wanna say an old eight or nine and apple had safari, but you know, on the it was on a MAC and MAC tiny desktop share. Well, if you fast forward to August of two thousand eighteen which is where we have the stats in terms of desktop web browsers. So to be clear, this is not web using the web on your phone

Microsoft Chromium Google Jeff Apple Federal Government Netscape