20 Episode results for "Netherlands"

Embrace your Darkness and Suffering to Heal

LIFE IS MAGIC - Healing

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Embrace your Darkness and Suffering to Heal

"Call Young referred to tendency to project as a part of ourselves that we would call the doc twin and this doc twin would obviously see lax in other people and Then Act on. Those lacks in a kind of pathological way and the costumer calls often says that any judgments we make of others from initiated. From what we see a recognizing ourselves as projected onto the other person so letting go of projection is definitely one of the Major principles that we need to work on in any kind of recovery and healing projection is when you see the world as malevolent and violent you can see the world is beautiful and loving and giving and those two worlds apart and in a very very short space of time you can see someone experiencing them. Netherlands violence of an image of the world that they see and just with a bit of silence and space and healing treatment. They will change the way they look at the world Italy and of course in doing so they change the way they look at themselves and that Israeli. Her healing is done. It's looking at the shadow acknowledging it and then looking at the other side is well. The world is good Genesis one as I always say is got the answer. You don't need to read the rest of your one-two but God created and it was good and it was very good and genesis in the first chapter says at five or six times so it is a beautiful world out there and yes. There is bad news yes. There is Suffering and song but when we come to understand the shadow and how we suffer to get to a more loving and belonging place we will see that even suffering is for our good and heard a story today of how a person went into a market and saw a wise teacher and market and the to. The teacher commented to the other teacher. While you here in the market you've learned so much through great suffering of losing family losing everything you have and your business and all your money and it's good to see you looking so well. Why are you here hidden away? Not going out there and teaching people like me and the other teacher said. I sell fruit and with each piece of fruit that I sell and give away. I bless everyone with great suffering so that they too can experience the conscious awakening and the beautiful realization. Said I've had so waking up to what is is another way of saying the Truth Shelf. Sit Me free and unfortunately a projection of happiness find you either chasing happiness or you chasing purpose very seldom are you chasing both if we do chase. Happiness purpose is often lacking unhappiness is obviously something we try and chase as children try and takes chases young adults trying to be happy buying causing boats houses and so but when we chase purpose happiness simply flows along and added God saved. Follow me I and all other things including happiness will be added to you.

Netherlands Italy
Episode 3: The Netherlands

Bardstown

29:31 min | 1 year ago

Episode 3: The Netherlands

"In this vault studios production this podcast contains graphic subject matter and has meant for mature listeners. Only you can see why someone might have some sort of to go after a police officer but who goes after a a high performing student less than a year after thirty-three-year-old Jason Ellis's gunned down in the early morning hours just off the bluegrass parkway a brutal the violent crime rocks the community again just outside of the Bardstown city limits forty eight year old. Kathy Netherland doesn't show up for work. She's a special education teacher at Bardstown elementary and the mother of two daughters. Her teenage daughter is also absent from school. Neither mother other or daughter could be painted as you know doing sketchy things in hanging out with the wrong people the mother was very respected very very well liked by her students. Kathy's father goes to check on her. What he discovers is a scene of horror. I think I read in the report says Oh the daughter Skull was smashed in. Maybe there was something emotional in there that would cause a person to be more violent more brutal but I think it was sending some sort of a statement and the fact that they died so gruesomely the fact that that kind of thing could happen right here in this area. It shocked a lot of people I hope no other family ever has to stand outside their loved ones how knowing that their sister fister and their needs are lying dead inside just steps away but completely unreachable. I'm Shay mcallister allaster this his bardstown not a lot of details have been given out about the Netherlands murder case over the years and no one seems to know a law so shea were and Bardstown and I covered the Jason Ellis KS this pretty extensively back in two thousand thirteen. Can you kind of catch me up like where things have gone and what's happened. Since since Jason was ambushed yeah definitely so of course the Netherlands family was murdered violently eighty one year later April two thousand fourteen and that was a mother daughter mother and daughter and mother was so well known she was a widow she had another daughter she lost her husband years earlier and she was a teacher at a local school and everybody just loved her so that was devastating into the community and the death was so violent it was. I mean stabbed multiple times. There's a lot of parts of that there. They were hard for people to listen to an in their home own home in their own home and it was there there is it wasn't burglarize. There's nothing missing. If I understand yeah I mean it's been tricky because it is one of so many unsolved cases of course they can't point the finger at exactly actly. Who did it but there are strange things about it like that that they didn't think it was a robbery? They thought it would be personal someone new on which was hard to hear to two. Why would someone go in there and kill this woman who was so loved in this community and her daughter so that one was it was hard. One Year Rafter Jason Alice Blogger Richard Caldwell lives in the next town over and thinks whoever killed the mother and daughter didn't know them but it was someone one sending a message these are his personal theories and not from the official investigation but as with all of the cases in Bardstown Richards theories series paint a bigger picture town looking for answers where there are none. The official story was that it was a random act that someone just burst burst into their home and murdered this woman and her daughter while not stealing anything their purses were still there untouched no valuables. The money was still there. Nothing was taken from the scene. I think that either the mother or the daughter just happened to be at the wrong wrong place at the wrong time and it followed them home. There's no way to prove that though and even with all the official investigations into what happens happens you know no motives established because there's never been any actual suspects charged in their murders. I think it was someone maybe miss misusing or abusing whatever power they had in the moment to guarantee that you know whatever they saw or a her wouldn't be shared with others. What we do know is that forty eight year old Kathy Netherland and her sixteen year old daughter Samantha were tortured and murdered inside their modest home on April twenty first two thousand fourteen Cathy was shot several times and Samantha was stabbed opt unbeaten on her head. Both of their necks were slashed. early on police say they aren't ruling this out as a personal attack doc and the Kentucky Standard reported that much of the killers attention seemed to be aimed towards Samantha Trooper Scott Sharp with the Kentucky State Police interviewed neighbors. Where's that day and learn who Kathy and Samantha were but not much else that spring morning he drives highway one fifty to their White House topped with the the metal roof just outside the Bardstown city limits in Butlin with The Netherlands. You said you did a lot of interviews in the neighborhood. What was the consensus of of some of those folks everybody we talked to in in those areas this if they didn't if they did know Kathy and Somme that they you know just talk so holly. How good a people they are? it goes back to your earlier question and just what kind of people that were. They were good people very good people. No one saw anything not knowing that would still be part of the miss gave him Kathy was a special education teacher at Bardstown town elementary a photo of her on facebook with another teacher. At school shows the light-hearted side of the mother of two the Brunette holds up a peace sign with her fingers nails painted bright green while wearing a green shirt adorned with shamrock pens a green sequined bow tie several layers of colorful beads around her neck and a tiny green feathered cap on her head. It's Saint Patrick's Day. Samantha was a sophomore at Bardstown high school. In fact she had just about her prom dress. It's strapless in navy blue with sequence wrapped around the waist and ruffles strip just across her knees. The strawberry blonde eighteen smiles posing snapshot in her new dress she was in the school choir on the academic team and the High Schools Young Leaders Program mm-hmm she had also just been accepted into the Garden Academy Program with Western Kentucky University. Those were members of Parkway Baptist Church and just a year earlier. Kathy lost her husband to a battle with cancer. I don't see how it could have been anyone. They knew because they were typical. Good people small town full go to church every Sunday I can't imagine either of them a sorting with with the the sort of people all who would be capable of that kind of thing but the detail about their cases out to me was the fact that that nothing from their home was taken that there was no evidence of breaking and whoever it was was allowed into the home newspaper editor Forest Berkshire Remembers Covering Their Your Story for the Kentucky Standard Forest takes us pass the newsroom and a squawking dispatch alerting reporters crimes happening in real time he walks us back to it was office. I was out in Bodoland which is just right outside of Bardstown there. The call came in the morning. We heard it over the scanner and it was a little details. We're a little foggy at that time. We run out there. and by the time we got there. Kentucky State Police were there and we started hearing the the name Netherland Orland and then one of my reporters at the time calls me and it's like hey yeah we're hearing that Samantha Netherland. I just did a story on her a week earlier about her being accepted to get an academy. The GATT academy is a very prestigious school stem school on the campus of Western Kentucky University very selective selective all and sure enough it was her Samantha and Kathy everyone who said that they had no enemies that there's no idea how something like this would happen is a very violent very brutal murder. Specially against the daughter Samantha from experts that we've talked to and that others have talked to have said that you know the majority of the violence was directed toward Samantha as if it was someone who's angry and by all everyone said Cathy was a very warm and engaging special education teacher who could have that bottle and have almost feel like it's. It's sad you know it kind of gets lost in a lot of the coverage. I think a lot of that is because of the way the family has handled it in the family. You just wants to keep it private. I spoke to Kathy's sisters on the fifth anniversary history of it and they said that they grieve just as much as anyone else and they understand the way that other people these other families have handled their cases but in their situation and their situation is very different they they've handled it their way and that's kind of Trau- closer together an inward word rather than outward Scotty sharp members responding to the Netherland home that Spring Day just one month before the one year Iran Averse Serie of officer Jason Ellis murder just a few miles off the bluegrass parkway. He makes his way down. Stephen Foster Boulevard passing the church where Jason's Jason Funeral was held and layers upon layers of cornfields before arriving at the Netherlands home just across the street from beverage carry out did go to the scene but I mainly went and did interviews around the community I'm trying to the information is a detective on that particular. The case of course had the interviews some of the family members you know and I and during that time with those family members yes I got to learn a lot about Taffy and Samantha. You know what kind of people they were and they were good people and they highly of the community and so you know that was in my heart broke for for for their family was extremely difficult. Cathy was a teacher. They're in in Bardstown. That's actually how they got reported the someone to go check on. She didn't show up to work then that next morning warning and she's highly thought of the Henry she had recently lost her husband to fight with cancer and so they were still creating over that and it had been tough on a two girls and Kathy as well. you know fan during during that process of those interviews. Samantha was highly intelligent young lady. She was getting ready to go to prom I'm looking forward that she got her prom dress and everybody was her family was excited for four. Har- and so he was again at heartbreaking absolutely heartbreaking. The family has been pretty private over the years. We reached out to Holly Netherland Millions Cathy's older daughter but she declined to be interviewed but she did speak to the media briefly right after they were killed and now what to know why why would somebody go and attack my system. Why would somebody shoot my mother. They'd like to stay low key and and we were we respect that they were always in constant communication with him. Our detectives are so and they it's been really really supportive. KS Fee in this process and they are good people I can't sing much praised about him as much supported that they are. You know sometimes families in it's understandable well sometime if the case goes along and it's not solved you know they get their doubts. There's there's concerns some criticism awesome sometimes and they never been like that and they're just really nice good people of course are opposed to this is a tough time in. I mean they're still dealing with it. Every day. We kind of hit roadblocks with their case alive just because because family doesn't WanNa talk but also because not a lot of people seem to know much about the case. Is there anything more that you can kind of. Tell us you you know one of the toxin. The town that we've heard is it seemed really personal against Samantha. Is that something that you the foul again. It's still an ongoing this station in in when I say that it's done. I'm trying to throw roadblocks to you. It's there's there's things things that in all of these cases that we want to as we say keep close to the chest the reason why we do that is because we we get tips and leads every day and we had to follow up so we have to find out which ones are are legitimate tips and which ones are way out in left field if you know what I mean I think it's it's out there. It was brutal. You know the the he was a a bad scene. I I don't know how much other way I can say that I it was but I I'm not. We're not ready to say that you know it was a a personal or anything like that. You know that sometimes you hear that in cases. I don't think we want to go there yet. but it was bad you know it was a very gruesome saying oh there's been very little evidence made public public but the scene did hold one clue that police followed up on we were looking for a new model around twelve to thirteen fourteen eighteen model and power at the time black and pal and that was the reason why is because we had saw some some footage on some security cameras in the area and we felt like that car potentially heads someone that knew maybe it might seen something. Nyan area or mud actually been participated in the crown. We don't know but we were looking for employees compound. We look for long term but but they've never located that car or it's driver the police ask them that for. They told me that the police asked him night and they said they couldn't. They couldn't think of anything and it just vanished managed. I mean they had it from what I understand. They had images from different as you travel along Springfield road different businesses that have these yeah they have surveillance cameras as you head toward the Bluegrass Parkway but somewhere bluegrass parkway cards disappears and they're we're not able to find any evidence where it went. They just know it was headed towards Bluegrass Parkway mother daughter. I mean they weren't caught up in anything bad. They were you know actually do gooders in the community farce yes during the course of our investigation we have seen they're just upstanding citizens a student and a teacher just like your neighbor. Nothing would would pop out stand down now. was there anything taken from the home. I can't go into them in December two thousand thirteen less than six months before she and her daughter are brutally murdered inside their home. Kathy writes a peculiar post host on her facebook page per eldest daughter. Holly is home for winter break from moorhead State University. The Post reads earlier earlier this afternoon. We heard a noise. I thought one of our two cats had knocked over something. We didn't find anything disturbed so he thought it was nothing boy. Were we wrong a little while ago. Holly opens our front door to go outside to pick up the mail and finds both glass panels in our screen endorsed shattered. We have taken picks and have carefully removed loose pieces of glass and the glass frames. All of the shattered glass pieces have been and swept up off the front porch. Guess I'll be heading to. Lowe's tomorrow to find replacements crazy. Hell unexpected events happen and there's been speculation that it's possible that the other daughter had some involve men will again. That's something I couldn't talk about unfortunately in every type of investigation like this we look at everybody's a suspect to certain extent. I don't we don't name suspects aches to we actually have one but you know we don't rule anything out but I can say that the the older daughter has been co-operatively positively an investigation and has talked to us in spoken to US and keeps in touch with us at all times. I know that there's rumors going around but we can't stop author Rumors Jessica. I try calling Stacey Hibbard Kathy Netherlands sister. Sorry your call cannot be completed. John Please check the number and again that is so not the norm all and that's the only number that we have on file while so she's never been really open and sharing phone numbers and contact information and this could have been her number before all all the media started trying to contact her about everything and she's just had a change to protect your privacy and stay under the radar a uh well. We could not get a hold of Kathy Sister Stacy Herbert. She did speak at a press conference when you pray for them him. Please pray and say a prayer that dumb one. We'll have the courage to come forward and shed light on on this terrible crime. Whoever killed Samantha was only slightly less cruel to her mother Kathy as parents. We pray the Kathy happy. Do I dodge quickly so she didn't have to witness. The vicious death her child suffer. It's obviously incredibly difficult halt when you somebody like can't get Samantha. It's the worst thing is the last thing you're thinking where you Gomez. They're always always on our thoughts in mind. This time of year particularly is really difficult because you think bounded beauty of spraying in the in the refers of nature in just knowing that that that's when they left Earth it really shatters chatters word of the piece of spraying. I don't really explain it other than to say that. There's just a part of its and you never get back back in you are to in life differently because of that until you experience at this type of loss. It's so hard to put it into meeting for for people that may be haven't in you know it really is the loss of part of who you are. It's still so hard to this day to just accept the fact that they're not here in that that they left the earth under bad circumstances the misery that the killer or killers 'cause is profound dione and if someone could understand that coming forward would would just give so much relief as well as justify. Caffeine Samantha's passing to some degree you know it. There's nothing we wouldn't do. There's nothing we wouldn't give You know to to know what happened to have answers. No matter what happens no matter what the answer is a resolution. This is never going to explain or justify or or make their deaths. Make sense so you yeah I know for for me. I try not to focus on why it happened because there's nothing that Kathy or Samantha did in wife that would explain the violence that that was brought to their home for the five year anniversary of their murders earlier this year. The family released a statement five years been hiding. We feel loss of Kathy and Samantha. Day Town eases the pain but the land in our hearts with their patsy. Is We love you miss them. More than words can never describe whoever ended their lives should not be furry. Is there anything that you want. The public know about this case to keep their eyes out for or something like that. Sometimes if you're like in beatty they did horse but I just no matter how small of a if someone's got information on how small they think it is all able won't matter. You never know the smallest things sometimes break. The Bee's dams out there so come forward. Let us now I never heard and that's that's something we've constantly thrown out there to the public and we appreciate the public tale that we have gone through this people concern. We tell we can tell that from the calls. People want this solved and and that's It says a lot about the community over there. They're good people there and they deserve justice over there. Should they have any fear. I don't I wouldn't. I don't want to speculate of anything like that but no I I. I don't think that it's just it's a tragedy. I mean that's all you can say about it. I mean having three open cases on our part the the reason I ask is you know obviously there's been a lot of coverage of these cases. Do you think it's unusual to have so many in high profile cases in such a small area I don't really want to I don't really want to go on that lamb and say that it's disheartening and it's in our post district in so we want to we wanna solve them and concerning. I mean I it is concerning that. That's it's happened in one community and you have three the SP alone is marquis. It is concerning but people don't need to be scared. there's good people and they want it solved in any of these cases or four in all of them. Do you think it's someone local. That's living within the community. We're not ready that we one thing hanging in investigations. You don't WanNa pigeonhole yourself in trying to focus on one area in lose sight of the bigger picture he wanted to thank thank outside the box so we don't like to say that want to pigeonhole ourselves and just focus. Maybe this is the one area. We want to keep wide. I guess a wide angle that look at all possible options when it comes specs. Where are you at each case. Would you say well. I've been asked that before and and really the the only answer in the most refined answer I can give you is one step closer from yesterday. I mean we're just one one step closer. I do step in there and talk to these guys. He's detectives every so often and there's ever day they're just sitting back there and doing they are working on this case and that makes me feel good because it makes me feel like well. You know what one step closer or better off today than we were yesterday just as Jason Allison Ellis's case rumors swirl around the small town but who would kill a mother and daughter who were such pillars of their community and the way in which they were killed. Was it a personal national attack a cousin who lived maybe about fifty yards from their house about six weeks after it happened. There was a knock on the door and officers wanted to know if this vehicle had been there. They knocked on the door of the House across the street and ask asked why. There's a young man living in this house. Do you think he might be selling drugs or you think he might be responsible and illegal activities. It was like they were trying to look for a suspect ex- bright there I think if they were pudding suggestions you know in into the ears of the neighbors it's like they didn't have any evidence these three murders and no suspects but the deadly crimewave was far from over in Bardstown fifteen months after Kathy and Samantha Netherland were found found murdered inside their home and two years after Jason Ellis was ambushed on his way home a new tragedy would strike another Bardstown family this time unfortunate July weekend. If you have any information in the murders of Kathy Samantha Netherland call the Kentucky State Police at two seven. Oh seven six six five oh seventy next time on Bardstown. I know my daughter and yeah I know. She would never just up and left her family. She would or not left me and her daddy either say type of everything but unless what happened to you you know you get up with the morning goes with it. It's never never off your mind. around the town is a bolt studios production Russian. You can find bolt studios on facebook instagram and twitter and learn about our other shows at vault studios dot com visit our website Bardstown on podcast dot com for more background information about the cases we cover in the podcast. I'm Shay mcallister a special. Thanks to our team Investigative Gate of Journalists Jessica Noll Producers Beth peak and Spencer Brood Egg Adam ostrow and well Johnson are are executive producers audio production by Richard Humphries at Tacoma Media in Silver Spring Maryland win three

Kathy Samantha Netherland Stacey Hibbard Kathy Netherlan bardstown Kentucky State Police facebook Samantha Netherland Jason Allison Ellis Cathy Bardstown elementary murder Holly Netherland Jason Shay mcallister officer Netherlands Samantha Trooper Scott Sharp cancer Bardstown town Kathy Sister Stacy Herbert Bardstown high school
Introductory Note: Egmont by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Harvard Classics

02:29 min | Last week

Introductory Note: Egmont by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

"Introductory note in seventeen seventy five when gerda was twenty six. And before he went to weimer he began to write egg. Mont after working on it at intervals for twelve years. He finished it at rome in seventeen. Eighty seven the scene of the drama is laid in the low countries at the beginning of the revolt against spain in the fifteenth century philip of burgundy had usurped dominion over several of the provinces of the netherlands and threw him. They had passed into the power of his descendant. The emperor charles. The fifth this powerful ruler abolish the constitutional rights of the provinces and introduced the inquisition. In order to stamp out protestantism prominent among his officers was the fleming. Lamb oral count egg mont upon whom he lavished honors opportunities of service opportunities. So well improved that by his victories over the french at saint quentin fifteen fifty seven and grave lines. Fifteen fifty eight. Egg mod made a reputation as one of the most brilliant generals in europe and became the idol of his countrymen when fifteen fifty nine a new regions of the netherlands was to be created. The people hope that philip to who had succeeded charles would choose egg mont but instead he appointed his half sister margaret duchess of under the new regent. The persecution of the protestants was rigorously pressed and in fifteen sixty five. Mont though a catholic was sent to madrid to plead for clemency. He was received by the king with every appearance of course but shortly after his return. Home the duke of alba was sent to the netherlands with instructions to put down with an iron hand. All resistance to his master's will how terribly he carried out. His orders has been told by prescott and mobley egg. Mont was an early victim but his martyrdom with that of count horn and later. The assassination of william of orange roused the netherlands to a resistance that ended only with the complete throwing off the spanish. Yoke such an outline. Is the background chosen by gerda for his tragedy with many changes in detail. The dramatist has still preserved a picture of a historical situation of absorbing interest and has painted a group of admirable. Portrait's the drama has long been a favourite on the stage where it enjoys the advantage of beethoven's musical setting.

Mont gerda saint quentin weimer the netherlands margaret duchess charles rome spain netherlands philip europe madrid mobley prescott william beethoven
Washington salmon 'teetering on the brink of extinction'

KUOW Newsroom

01:08 min | 5 months ago

Washington salmon 'teetering on the brink of extinction'

"Salmon in washington state are teetering on the brink of extinction. That's according to a new report. Northwest public broadcasting's courtney. Flat has more the state of salmon and watersheds report says time is running out for the northwest's iconic fish it shows a trend of warming waters and habitat degradation is causing trouble. Ford salmon runs ten of the fourteen threatened or salmon and steelhead runs in. The state are not getting any better of those five are in crisis eric. Netherlands with the governor's salmon recovery office. He says things will only get worse as the climate changes. Now i'm not going to sugarcoat things. The news is not good. Salmon are in crisis and they need our help now more than ever right now salmon recovery receives around twenty two percent of the funding. It needs larger more complex habitat restoration. Projects have been left by the wayside because of the lack of funding other issues. They salmon in washington or fish passage barriers pollution and predators like sea. Lions own says it's not all bleak. No new salmon species have been added to the endangered species list since two thousand seven. I'm courtney flat reporting.

Northwest public broadcasting washington Ford Netherlands eric Salmon Lions
Oil Prices

Newscast - Africa

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Oil Prices

"Fuel listening to the news at this hour on africa business radio. All prices sank more than three percent and monday as a new infectious train of the covid. Nineteen raise fears of a tightening lockdown and travel restrictions at around seven hundred a gmt wti crude. Three point one percent to forty seven dollars six cents. A barrel of brent crude dropped three point two percents to fifty dollars and fifty nine cents a barrel british health secretary matt hancock on sunday said the new variant is out of control while france germany. It the the netherlands belgium austria ireland and bulgaria all announced restrictions on uk travel. And that's was the news at this time on africa business radio. You can't continue to listen my line not stopping u. w. africa business radio dot com or via armel app. I am rachel. Chih-jen do thank you for listening.

matt hancock africa belgium netherlands austria bulgaria france germany ireland uk Chih rachel jen
What's Up Weirdo Wednesday SHOUT OUT Episode 1

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

31:29 min | 2 months ago

What's Up Weirdo Wednesday SHOUT OUT Episode 1

"Hi i'm abigail. And i'm addicted to money. So for the next fifty seconds. I'd like to feel dirty inconsiderate manipulative and ashamed. I apparently agreed to play the game of life by the rules made by the rich in order to make them more rich. Because i feel powerless and out of control. I am asking you to listen to this odd for anchor if you haven't heard about it it's the easiest way to make a podcast. It's free their creation tools. That allow you to record at your podcast right from your computer. Phone anchor will distribute your podcast wherever you can get podcasts. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership and everything you need to make. A podcast is in one place so download anger free on the app or go to anger don't. Fm takeout started so. Yeah that's all. I have things for letting me share. What is up weirdos. You're listening to the manic pixie weirdo. I'm your host. And this is the podcast. We talk about relationships and all the different kinds of relationships we have in our lives Surrey so this week This episode that is going to be released is something that it's a new thing that i'm gonna do every other wednesday so like every wednesday every other every two weeks every two wednesdays. I'm gonna put this up you guys And we're calling it. What's up weirdo. Wednesday it's shouts. I'm doing shoutouts. And the reason i'm doing. This is because part of having a relationship is giving credit where credit is due And saying thank you And you know this is a relationship. The relationship that i have with you guys. The audience The followers everybody. It is a kind of relationship that we have. We have this Of symbiotic relationship. Where you know. I put out content. You guys listen to it. Consume it And then you know you tell your friends. Are you tell whoever you vol is on social media or how ever you but there is there is work on your part. That is being done Because it does take effort and time to listen to this And to all the episodes that i put out So i just wanted to kind of give credit where credit is due and say thank you to everybody who listens and give shot ups. So what i'm gonna do is on the hosting site that i have or that i use. Oh sorry about that just again okay. Hopefully that's better so on the hosting site that we use It goes by like geographic region And so like tells me you know the country and then like the percentage of listeners that we have in that country i don't give a shit about the percentage that's not relevant to me 'cause i just don't care i feel like that's what we're adding numbers to shit that don't need. I don't need that And you guys don't need that we don't need any more sort of competition bullshit. This is not a competition the what country can listen the most. This is an inclusive podcasts. Where we want just everybody. Everybody and anybody wants to listen. Can listen from wherever the hell you are. So we're just gonna do by I'm just going to go down the list of countries. And shout out to all you guys if i am going to be giving a couple of personal shoutouts Just a few personal shoutouts and this is kind of so. This is the segment that i'm going to be doing that in is the what's up weirdo wednesdays So but that will also be. Because i'm doing it every other week. that'll give you guys time if you wanna personal shout out For me to get all those things together and and everything and if you want to stay something if you wanna like type you know if you want me to say something That you right. I can do that or i can. Just shot out you know. Just whatever just make sure that you put your name and the country that you are listening from And you can send those to either the email. Which is manic pizzi weirdo at proton dot com. Or you can d- emma on the instagram's which is the underscore main underscore weirdo one. Or you can do it on the twitter. Reuss At at mp weirdo podcast And now you guys gas fuck and what. We have a pinterest up and ready to go. It's exciting so the pinterest is at the underscore main underscore weirdo to one. So that's because i made. I got it all fixed made in two thousand and twenty one the year. We're in so just remember that. That's that's what the pinterest is. Okay so i run off the top. I'm gonna go ahead and get couple of personal shouts out So nerdy photographer podcast Asked me to get give a shout out to re animator I'm not entirely sure what that means because it just does any chance. We'll get a re. We can get a reanimator. Shout on the podcast. Just you can always get a shot on On the podcast. This is the time in the place that we do it Oh yeah the other reason i wanted to do. This was because i didn't want to start shouting out People like in the middle of an episode or something. So we're just going to do it all together like all his one thing And not only. Am i doing in every other week because i'm lazy but also i feel like that gives plenty of time for everybody to get their stuff. That's fine you just for the next one Anyway so that's the that's the one personal shout out that i got asked to give so. Yeah go check out re animator for reanimator. Shout for the reanimator shot cast and also go check out The fucking nerdy photographer. Podcast do that Have to give a shout out to d. at a stress depressed and anxious local not local neighborhood. Baby what is up girl. I had so much fun. Thank you for letting me have Have you on my podcast and thank you for inviting me to do your podcast. I had so much fun. Check that episode out. It just dropped on monday We talk about dreams it's Distress depressed anxious podcast. So we did a whole thing on dreams and it was so much fine yes ago. Check that out. So i'd like to go ahead and give a shout out to brett from the. Tell me about it podcast. He's going to be coming on later today and that but that episode won't be released until for a couple of weeks so but shout out to him. We're gonna be talking about some really good stuff more serious things so because we've been talking about comedy so let's we're going to durkan it up a bit. It's going to be fine. it's going to be fine. It will be great. It'll be finding. And then last. Monotony's personal shoutout to sean louis I had so much fun with him interviewing him talking to him a helping him promote his new album. His new album new are more. I do this every time you guys every time and his new single. Id y i don't know why. I decay w i don't know why is the name of the song but the single is titled idk. W my bad sorry so those are some of the personal shots that i wanted to give out. Go ahead and give out Thank you everybody who's listening This is this is kind of for you guys. This is for everybody who's listening. Everybody who's been supportive and everybody who You know sticking it out with a is so we're going to just go ahead and go down the list. We have united states. What's up you guys. Hello fellow americans. How's it going not great. We find it'll be fine. We can figure this out fruits with soap. France and the netherlands. What's gone on y'all some cool shit. Netherlands y'all have some cool shit some real close it with water like aqueducts and stuff. I think that was you guys. I watched a documentary. The other day about I'm that i believe about like aqueducts and like chirping not turbines god. I'm such an idiot. You know. I just never mind ignore me. I don't know what i'm talking about. Actually i do know. The netherlands is beautiful and france. Mean obviously francis fortress but it is sometimes nice to just hear that you know it is but france is really beautiful Obviously the netherlands is just great. You never i mean. I'm sure like weird. like taboo. bad shit happens in the netherlands. You just never hear about it. But i feel think that's probably true for every country like whatever country whatever country you live in. I assume you're you look at other countries and you're kind of like. Why are we doing it their way like it's just better. I don't have that's true. That's just how i feel right now about like living in the united states or it's just like i feel like every other country Just as like like. I'm only here. I feel like i'm only hearing about like good. Things that are happening in other countries Like france and the netherlands like good things. They're doing germany on this list. Geology and some good shit with like environmental like I believe it's solar. Maybe its nuclear. But y'all are doing like renewable energy goodman renewable energy shed And you just don't hear about that like in the eye it. That's not to say that it's not happening. It's just one of those things where it's like. I don't know. I feel like i'm rambling. I'm not making sense. Okay we're gonna move on sign in france. I mean come on just the best food just like just. The only thing i will say about french food is that it's very very rich. And so it's heavy and basically for me that means i have like a little biddy stomach and so that basically means that i have i can take four bites and then i'm like i'm gonna explode. It's just so good. I can't eat anymore but yeah anyway you guys. Didn't you too much information it's fine. Whatever united kingdom. I've heard it's not going over there either. So i guess we can all just kind to be in the same boat together german new. What's up guys. I had a baby when i was real little. Who like she was a really good family friends. Like i was in her wedding and shit like as a flower girl. Or whatever but the point She like her husband. After she got married they moved to germany and they had they send us pictures of link. I believe it's the chew lips. Oh god i'm ruining all of this. It's just was of like a really beautiful flower garden. I don't remember and but it was. I just remember just being like oh pretty. Why can't we have nice things. Canidu- how's it going in. I don't know. I haven't heard you always hear like in the united states. Hell canada's just so much better or whatever and to be honest let's be clear canada. You guys know what you're doing for certain things. Okay you guys for sure now What you're doing for certain things so in a way. Yes you are better way better because you have like things like healthcare you actually value and believe that like no no Everybody should have healthcare. It's thing that everybody should have And it also shouldn't cost a small fortune or a big fortune in order to get quality healthcare or prescriptions. For them outer better than us. You're just like the the chiller kinder more compassionate empathetic lake group of country like group of individuals like that create a country. Just like the better. You just the sweeter neighbor okay. You're just like the better person all right. It's true on toyed with the idea of like moving of having us moved to canada. My husband's trying to build like a trailer Like for you know Like camping and stuff. It's not real camping and slate. Glamping for real But it's not real camping. It's glamping for sure. But i told him i was like i don't care what you do to it. I need it to win. The shit hits the fan and when the shit goes down like it's common for us it is guys it's common for us and when the shit hits the fan and goes down we need to be able to hook that trailer up to the truck and book it to the canadian border like. That's what i need. This thing to be able to do from the southern tip of texas all the way i needed to be able to without problems like i don't wanna be started on the side of the road every five minutes because a wheel fell off like i need it to be able to get us for the point. A is where we are right now. Point b is canada. I need us to get to their when the shit goes down. Think i've watched handmaid's tale too many times so i love you. Canada pretty great. You'll also have in toronto. Y'all have like a bar slash lounge situation. I know it's called the lockhart. And i've always wanted to go. I want to go there so much. also through you. I visited you guys i was. I spent like a month there when i was fourteen so fine. I had a blast. You guys that was so. I've i wanna go back robot. Norway dude yonder doing some cool shit to all doing cooler shit like share the love you guys go. Come on. Share the love you guys. Norway got good fucking ideas. We need some of those. We need to borrow some of the sharing carrying okay. All of you people all of you. Japan guys. Please help us. Please please fiji south africa. Anybody who's not anybody who i've mentioned that it's not the united states. Help us alpa please. Y'all have good ideas. I refuse to believe that. The united states is the end all and be all of good ideas. Okay i refuse to believe that. There's no way in fact. I would argue that. In fact we have some mostly bad i. It is really mostly terrible ideas. Some we need to start taking and knowledge like from other countries like and we just seem to borrow it. You only they come over here and like show us how to do she. How do we get this like renewable energy thing going. How did y'all do it. I know i can hear you. Look it up. We can show you how we did it. Great no that's what i'm talking about. I can look it up online. That's fine. I need you guys to come over here and teach us to make this like we did. Apparently the united states needs to go back to first grade. Because y'all need to just teach us how to do it because we are stubborn and won't listen. Okay basically you have to shove it down. Our throats before warlike. Okay and i guess you might know something. Oh but share your knowledge so useful south africa and feed you. what's japan versus long south africa. How is it going. Y'all have some cooler Y'all have really good food okay. And if the only thing i'm allowed to borrow is your food. I'm cool with that okay. That's fine but it's good fucking fit. Nigeria you too okay. If the only thing i'm allowed to borrow is your food on okay with that because it's so fucking good it makes me so happy Fiji what is up guys fiji. I i like to personally say we're sorry Say i'm sorry because we ruined under fucking water and that's okay. And i did not realize that until a couple of years ago when i heard about it when i heard about the resnick water. Monsters on the dollar podcast. So if you don't know that as you haven't listened to go listen to that and hear about the horrible horrible treatment that we did that we allowed these ridiculous company this group this couple to just pillage and do interest for i mean we do it to everybody and i'm so sorry. Guys sucks were awful. Okay we're horrible. I know it's okay but we can get through this together and we don't. I'm not talking about the rest of the country. Just just just come over here just a hug. 's we just need hugs and we need ideas like we're willing to listen. Okay promise austria god every time. I see austria dollar. Probably so sick of hearing this but every time i see or like i see austria like the word austria. Or it's mentioned. I only think of the sound of music and that's mainly because i love julie andrews But i i probably so sick of hearing that. I'm sorry i'm so sorry again. Good food good fucking food philippines. I actually had a lot of friends. who were from the philippines. When i was a kid it was kind of interesting. I had a boss on when i worked for fedex. I had a boss. Who would go like to the philippines and vietnam I think he did it like once every two years or something like that. Or maybe it was like once every year but like he rotated emerson but like he could speak the language and everything and it was just he and the way he he showed me pictures. My god it just looks. It looks fun legged does it looks fun to like. Go and and see and meet people. It just seems like it would be a really fun place and a very interesting place. I do enjoy the culture very much too. I don't. I don't know what it is. That like draws me to it. It just seems very like i don't know the root of the culture it seems very peaceful. I don't know. I don't know maybe i'm probably crazy. It's fine russia what's going on. I don't even know why i still okay. So russia you guys. I'm still trying to figure this out. I don't know what the deal is. I don't know why we don't like you. I don't know what that's about. I feel like it's just who has the better who has the bigger dick energy and from someone who does not give a fuck that. It's very confusing. Because i'm just like no one cares my i kinda don't give a shit beautiful language beautiful country. I love learning about russian history. It's like one of my favorite things on the planet to learn about y'all's language to is really. It's really interesting. I love language. I do really enjoy learning about like language and all the different kinds of there are. I just think it's really fascinating. I dunno spain and egypt and the czech republic spain. How isn't going. I haven't heard much from like much about what's going on over there is are y'all doing okay I know that y'all got hit really hard with covid. I know that. I saw that on the news but i hope doing okay. I hope you are like. I don't know again another beautiful country and you hundred. Tear me apart for this. Because i'm really bad with this kind of stuff. But i don't. i'm clearly. I'm just mad at everything so it's fine with the world here for it. It's cool whatever But there an architect who. I believe his post modern and he basically creates buildings out like I guess it would be considered like eco. Friendly or sustainable. Like means like that's built buildings but it's so much more than that. It's not just that like it's it is its most pure sense. It is not like nature and humanity coming together to create to build something. That has like a very symbiotic relationship with the natural environment but like works with the needs of humans as well I for the life of me cannot remember the name of this architect artist architecture it's the form of art but it just he built like this really beautiful teacher all in spain. And it's like so it's but it's been so it uses things like tree. He uses things like trees and Like plants Things like in the surrounding environment. And then he like molds and shapes it into Like a building that can be used Church kind of a thing It's just really beautiful If i could remember the name of the architect i would tell you. But i can never remember the name and i would also probably butcher because i'm horrible at everything so whatever but let me know. Send me emails a. Dm's me something about it. 'cause like i wanna know egypt how are you doing. I haven't heard anything. It's kind of concerning to me Then i haven't heard anything. And i know really your the czech republic either again. Both of you have great fucking food. Great food okay. So good but i haven't heard about like how either one of you egypt or the czech republic i don't know how you guys are doing Since like cova head. I don't know what's going on. I know y'all egypt specifically all had some Like political unrest. I think maybe Like within the last year or so But see what happens over here in the united states is like we'll get like a couple of stories or like a couple of days of stories Like about what happens And basically you know it's bad like how one of the hallmarks that i know. It's bad and like nothing ever happened and came of. This is when you hear these stories on the news comes across your news feed or whatever and then all of a sudden it just vanishes and disappears like you never hear about it again and you have to physically go hunt down these sources and like just even try to figure out get some semblance of outline of an idea of what's going on yup. That's we know it's bad and there's nothing good that came out of this and it's yeah so but that's one of the reasons i'm like real concerned about you guys. I just wanna make sure you're all okay. Please be safe everybody. Please please be safe. There are some lunatics. They're not me. I'm difference deference okay. I don't have the energy to like do something horrible. Because i prefer to just stay in my own little bubble but please let me know that you guys are okay. A i love you guys again. Great food egypt czech republic. Same sort of thing. I heard something going down. I don't think i actually heard what was happening. I think i read about something that happened. I think it was with your prime minister or something And i never heard anything like i like. I said i put it disappeared after a couple of days. And i just haven't been able to find anything credible to figure out what's going on. I hope you guys are ok to i. Also don't know how covid. I assume it affected you know How bad the fallout from. It was I don't really know. Like i said i just haven't heard anything about it But i hope you guys are ok. Okay i really do I don't have money. I don't have i don't have monies to be able to send anybody All i can really do is provide you know support and i can't really offer any Like strength i can only offer like hope and aside of the site of entertainment And maybe you'll laugh and maybe we can cry and maybe we can have just a good time together. And i can be a form of escapism for you. So that that's kind of what i wanna do do with this podcast And with the shut offs just to let everybody know. Hey you guys like. I am thinking about you. I do really really appreciate all of the things that you have done for this podcast like i said this is a part of a relationship and i do need to start pulling my weight because you guys have been doing your part By listening and sharing and telling people doing all the things and rating and reviewing and liking subscribing and just all the bullshit. I ask you guys to do And sometimes i know it can feel like we were. They even like shaving. Well i do. Because i see that stuff and really warms my heart and thank you so much to everybody for all the things that you do like. I said it's time for me to start pulling my weight in this relationship with you guys. So that's what i'm trying to do. And so every two weeks meet us here on. What's up weirdo wednesdays. And i won't give everybody shout outs. We're just. I'm just gonna keep doing it the way they're doing it with countries And like i said if you want a personal shout out. Email me. At manic pixie weirdo. Protocol dot com For personal shout. You can write whatever you want. Just tell me if you want me to say it In the recording or not And make sure you end the country that you're from Because i like to know those things those things. Make me really happy I like to know everybody's from also if you have cool like history facts or like language facts or anything like that. I find like you know religious facts about things just like something that you don't think that i would now which is a lot so it could literally be anything about the country that you live in Like that would be so cool to learn about all of those things. I really want to know i will read it. I promise you. I will read it. And i will just be so cool. It just be awesome. I love learning about those kinds of things and learning about other countries. And like your ideas. And what you do and stuff like that. So like as i'd Email mannix promo dot com a dm The instagram is the underscore main underwear to one the pinterest. The new pinterest. Everybody is the underscore main underscore weird out. Twenty one. like the year that we're in but just twenty one And then the twitter obviously is at npr podcast So check us out and thank you guys so much. Everybody really thank you so much We will be back in two weeks and those personal shutouts and if you want them as always be kind and stay. Where'd you guys bye.

united states france the netherlands pinterest canada durkan sean louis francis fortress austria netherlands abigail south africa philippines Surrey germany fiji Norway egypt brett czech republic
Nigerias Exports To China, India, Others Hit N1.87tn

Newscast - Africa

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Nigerias Exports To China, India, Others Hit N1.87tn

"Carries the news at this hour. Africa Business Radio. Financial National Bureau Sticks Sand Commodity Exports from Nigeria to China India Spain Netherlands and South Africa and the first school. Two of the year hits one point eight seven trillion lire. The NBA disclosed this. This commodity price indices stems of trade report released on Thursday. Petroleum products stood out as the most exported commodities in the first quarter of this year, the major reports in tonight Jerry came from India during the review period, the monetary value of six hundred and thirty seven point five billion naira while total exports from Nigeria to Spain during the period was four hundred two point, nine billion naira with good oil accounted for three hundred and sixty point, four four billion naira or eighty nine point four six percent. Natural gas exploited sue. The country was put at thirty one point nine seven billion naira while partially refined oil, worth five point, two nine billion era counted for the experts balance. And! That was the niece at this time when Africa Business Radio. You can't continue to this in life online at www Africa business radio that come or von APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Nigeria www Africa China India Spain Netherlands South Africa NBA India Spain Jerry four six percent
Heroines Week Fanny Blankers-Koen

Chompers

04:31 min | 2 years ago

Heroines Week Fanny Blankers-Koen

"Choppers is produced by Gimblett and sponsored by crest and oral B. Oh, Hello again. You're just in time for jumpers your morning and night tooth brushing show. Start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side. And brush the inside the outside in the chill inside of each. It's heroines week where every day we tell you about a real life. Geraldo woman from history tonight. We're talking about an incredible athlete and mom way. My mom know, your mom's cool, but we're actually talking about an athlete named fanny blinkers Coon. Oh, okay. Yeah. That makes sense. Fannie blinkers Kuehne was runner from a country called the Netherlands. Fanny was a super talented athlete and her dream was to win a gold medal at the Olympics. The Olympics happen every four years and the best athletes from around the world compete. Switzer rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush, the molars in the back too. Fanny's big chance to compete came in nineteen forty eight for the summer Olympic Games by then fanny was married and had two kids. Then he told everyone that she wanted to compete people didn't think she could do it though, they said she was too old to compete, then he was thirty and most Olympic athletes were much younger. Plus, she had two kids and back then moms are expected to stay at home and not compete in the Olympics. But fanny was determined to run. Switzer brushing to the bottom of your mouth, but don't brush too hard. When it was finally time to race. Danny was nervous a ready before her first race. She pointed at one of the people who doubted her and said, I'll show you. Danny competed in four races. And she's shocked the world by coming in first in all of them banning won four gold medals. The most of any athlete that year. They nicknamed her of flying housewife because she ran so fast. It looked like she could fly. Switcher rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth your tongue brush to. Benny returned home a hero. The people of the Netherlands through a parade for fanning. And she was given a special honor by the Queen of the Netherlands Danny showed everyone that mom's could be anything. They wanted to be including one of the world's best athletes. Because of her boldness and unbeatable spirit fanny monikers Coon is tonight's chompers heroin. That's it for chompers tonight. But will be back at it tomorrow. Until then chain. Chompers is a production of Gimblett media. Hey champions. Did you know that our body is made up of systems that keep us alive and healthy? Like our digestive system that makes food into energy or are muscular system, it moves us around. So if you had to invent your own body system. What would it do tell your grownup and have them send your answers to us at chompers dot dental? We might use your answer on an upcoming episode of chompers grownups that address. Again, it's chompers dot dental. Chompers is brought to you by crest and oral B spring cleaning is all about freshening things up grownups that might mean finally cleaning out that messy garage. So why not gift that same spring clean feeling your kids crest and oral B have a great selection of dentist recommended toothbrushes for your little sprout and crest toothpastes come and flavors. Your kids love like strawberry. And bubblegum with the enamel protection, you expect for new meaning to spring cleaning with crest and oral B. Grownups. Learn more at oral B dot com slash kids.

Chompers Fanny Switzer Olympics Danny Netherlands Gimblett gold medal Coon Geraldo heroin Kuehne Benny four years
Quarterfinals Are Set

ESPN FC

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Quarterfinals Are Set

"This show is presented by Hulu, which has live sports, watch live games, and all your favorite teams live on Hulu. No cable required. Live TV plan is required. Restrictions apply. Welcome into episode eighteen of ESPN AFC special coverage of the two thousand nine hundred nine women's World Cup alongside a World Cup champion. Eight two time Olympic champion and an all w USA selection in two thousand and three while playing with the Boston breakers Kate Markgraff, I'm Sebastian Salazar. Great to be with you on this Tuesday, June twenty fifth. The round of sixteen is done and dusted. We are down to the last eight Cape. We started with twenty four. There are only eight teams left here. You're quarterfinal matchups, Norway against England USA against France, and then on the other side of the bracket, Italy Netherlands, Sweden, Germany. Of course, that Italy Netherlands, ma- matchup means that Italy was able to beat China today by final score of two nothing. And of course, Netherlands sliding by Japan, two one, thanks to a late late penalty. We will get into all that and just a little bit. But of course, our focus here. Continue. Used to be the US women's national team and the build up to Friday's showdown in Paris against the other co favorites in this tournament the host nation France to that end. Let's listen into this interview, our Julie Foudy spoke with Alex Morgan. All right, Alex, let's start with. How are you feeling after that physical match last night? Feeling good on the road. See recovery as we all are just preparing for next game. We need to do everything ticket our bodies back. Right. So yeah, it's a quite a few tumbles but feeling good that we're moving forward. Spain came out, you clearly with an approach to come at you physically. How do you think France will do with you specifically? I don't know. I mean I felt like we had played Spain earlier this year. We knew them pretty well and then they came out and had a completely different game plan. I think that just the two penalties are clear indication of the physicality that they brought which I think is unlike them. So moving forward to France. I, I would think that they're just going to play their game is we're going to play our game. But as as you've seen in a World Cup before you just never know what you're going to get. This is the matchup. Everyone has been intimidating. What are you most looking forward to? Oh, I mean, what am I not looking forward to you? This is this is what we've, we've been looking forward to you for so long ever since the groups are named and everyone started talking about that epic quarter-final matchup that should be a final match up. And here it is. You know. So we've been looking forward to this, obviously been waiting patiently and, and getting the work done in the group's age around sixteen. And, and now we have, you know, this EPA clash in a quarter final match. There are many who say they don't want the hosts and especially as good. A team is Francis. And a quarterfinal, but this team says, no, bring it why does this team embrace that you think you know, you have to beat the best to be the best? And it's. It's not going to be easy, the, the whole road, the knockout stage you've already seen some major teams get knocked out in the round of sixteen hour, a little unexpected so for us, it's just, you know, kidding pretty excited and pumped about it. And knowing that this is what we've really you know, Liz, what we live for this is why we play the game and, and we're excited for it. We're ready last one here. What do you think the US needs to do to be better against France? I think that we just need to assess the game as it's moving forward, rather than look to kind of readjust at halftime. And we kind of need to look at what the team is giving us in order to expose them a little earlier in a game and kinda just in and just read the game earlier, I think that Spain came out and played a completely different game than what we were expecting than than who they are. And I think it was difficult for us to, to adjust to that. So I think it's just. Reading the game and kind of be in on our game and putting together all of that preparation and the details that we've that we've put into every single training and scouting and meeting, not we've had over the last couple of years and executing you. Thank you. There's Alex Morgan speaking with our Julie Foudy on Monday in France Morgan, one of many US soccer stars Kate, like Tobin heath, Carli, Lloyd, Mallory, Pugh, and others who are getting paid a lot of money by Hulu. Why do the new goal celebration called Hulu has live sports all to let you know, one simple message who has live sports. You can watch the biggest games and sporting events on sixty plus top channels no cable required. Plus, you can stream the entire Hulu library. Start your free trial of who today live TV plan required. Restrictions apply. Learn more at Hulu dot com. Let's focus in on Alex Morgan, what you just said for second there. Kate no goals since the five spot against Thailand. How worried are you about Alex Morgan? I am less worried about Alex Morgan in terms and not scoring goals because no, none of that front three play to their typical level. Because Spain took them out of their game plan Alex Morgan needs service in the type of service. She needs has to be quality service. A lot of times the balls are being rifled indoor. This isn't saying that her body position couldn't have been better. She could have been side on how often do we see a side on Morgan? We don't she's very much a back to goal person. So she can't fend people off something, and she's going to get kicked a lot more when your back is completely square and parallel to someone's front. Right. Is that having that show that chicken wing out to create that gap? So the hit you as much, so it's a little bit on her, and it's a little bit on the team in what they're providing. But I thought she did a good job saying we need to read the game better, not just at halftime that saying, as players, we need to figure this out better on our own rather than having to wait for a coach to tell us what to do in half. So in the game in those moments where you have the ball can they be a bit more patient because that's what was. Lacking against Spain that when it wasn't working when it went out wide instead of holding the ball, they would, you know, try to force it anyway. So that's something that I think I, I like that responsibility, some discussion in that interview about how opponents are dealing with Alex Morgan. We saw Spain take a very obvious approach. We don't know what France will do you been centreback against the best in the world? How would you defend Alex Morgan? I do exactly what Spain, did I always knew that anytime anytime a forward lines up the way that she does and back to goal then you just what I need to do. An abbey's to gets Mamba. He's to get so mad at me. 'cause mind Abby is like five inches taller than I am and a good, probably fifty pounds or I'd say thirty pounds heavier than I am. I knew I couldn't beat her in the air. I knew I couldn't beat her if she got on the half turn because she would just push me aside with her arm. So every time she was lined up square, like not having her body on angle, her body positioning. She would go to passable and I'd actually kick her foot, and not in a foul way, so that her pass would fly off or foot because I actually. Adding more forks to her foot, and she's like stopped doing that. And I was like, well, you're allowing me to do it. And it's only way, I'm going to beat you. And then if I happen to kick you a little bit, too, I happen to kick, you, like I hate say, it's just one of those things that you do. So I would do I play Morgan Stanley's act way. Alex Morgan is a huge superstar, right? There's no debating that but I would make the argument that both this World Cup. And now certainly this big game against Francis quarterfinal is like a legacy moment for Morgan. If you if you look at her career early on two thousand eleven World Cup being used primarily as a sub two thousand twelve Olympics. There are some big time goals there, if you look at the last cycle of world championships, two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen they're not there, although she did score in the quarterfinal limitation against Sweden. If you remember, we did the broadsheet new member lucky goal like Sweden almost like cleared it off her. And then she finishes it right. There was there was some fortune there. Anyway. Point is that for all the goals? Alex Morgan is scored. She hasn't always scored. At least recently the big goals. It's not to say she other blades worth five goes against Thailand. She didn't play in the second goal. Second game in the group stage and in the third, he only played forty five minutes because she got hit by Sweden, so that is really unfair. And honestly, all I'm not talking about those years. I'm talking about World Cup twenty fifteen Olympics. Okay. Six World Cup twenty fifteen. She had a knee injury and really that whole entire team offense. It was a four five one. There was no way that they were going to be able to beat anybody using their offense. They won that world championship because of defense, not because of offense this team is skewed totally differently this time around she was injured talks bumping injured, she's a different player than she was what I think, is, she needs to figure out a way to make better runs. That's only criticism, I would give her because she likes to run to her left a lot. But if I'm her and I know Sam US was excellent. And I think she's playing very very well. But Samuel was was further away. There was a lack of connection between. Alex Morgan and the two sentiments there's very little connection between Alex Morgan was Lavelle heading to the right, right. Alex doesn't run to the right to run onto a right foot in the scene. That's where rosellas with someone. Who's that good at separating from players beating the line, and then looking for that pass that we, we see that always hits Pino? There's a reason why always Pino one is because Alex Morgan is clear out the space to allow that. But also because there's no space on the right because it's congested because Alex Morgan is sitting on the right, right? So it's either sacrificial lamb or it's always doing the same run and it's easy and predictable. Right. It's still can be effective. So I would like to see her curl run to the right a little bit, her sweet spot is to that left hand side. You know, left of center of sixteen yards Zao, that is her bread and butter that has been bread and butter. But it's, it's easy to scout. We have no idea what's going to happen over the course of the ninety minutes against France. So I, I know I'm putting you in a little bit of a disadvantage asking you this question. But you're going to ask it anyway. Of course. Do you feel like against France? Alex Morgan is a ninety minute player. Oh, that is you've totally do this to me. You about. We talk about pre game. What we're gonna talk pre our pre meeting and not this is not it. I asked because so many other options there are so many other options but after the last game it looked like Jill Alston. Wanna use any of them? I think she was trying to find confidence for them through minutes time, that's probably the biggest criticism, Jill Ellis ever is there in game. Hope solo spoke about it, whether or not, that's true. I'm not a hundred percent because it worked out for her today. I thought in two thousand sixteen that was mismanaged, but partly that's because of Tom's for reminding before her put her in a position and all the retirements because of her will Cup selections that she had to play injured players and out of in then players out of position this time I do understand what she was trying to do. But I mean what do you do when you're front three aren't working, like you can't solve all three and and you need them good for the next game? I like I said, I think she was playing short term and the long term strategy because she -ssume that she was going to go. So I think Carly will come in sooner. Alex Morgan struggles the way that we saw. Yes against Spain. You're saying, yes, I do think she'll come in earlier. USA France Friday quarterfinal in Paris, should be an absolute all time or to other teams punch their ticket to the quarterfinal round today. We will discuss those matches after this quick break. Welcome back. ESPN ABC's coverage of the two thousand nine thousand nine women's World Cup. Kate Mark raft Sebastian sell us out here with you couple of games today. Kate, we had Italy China Netherlands, Japan. Let's start with Italy, and China, the final score and this one to nothing Italy as they go through to the quarter-finals. They're gonna go on the fifteenth minute from Valentina Jacinta, who had not been a lockdown starter for this talion team. She gets the start in this one gets the early goal as well China than mounted some momentum. Late in the first half early second half though out. Rhoda Gotti, who had come on in the thirty nine th minute as a surprise some place for you. Ntus. She gets the goal and Italy advanced to the last eight China has been at almost every single World Cup with one exception in every time they've been a World Cup. They have reached at least the quarterfinal round that run comes to an end in the year two thousand nineteen Cape what stood out to you from this, one other than the fact that you're rolling your eyes on Italian players when I'm talian is out? You know, my mom's best friend in Mexico in my own, and we'd have us, I think, when my, my dad, I'm on. I'm not a hundred percent telling you. My dad is on my entire side of the family is my mom is like this. Random. Like paly person compared to the rest of us. And my dad text me is like be nice in your talion analysis. So this is for, you know, I think they started strong. I think no one has been able to unlock China defensively, and to make them look suspect now to China seem to start a little bit higher up in a higher line. It seemed to be so. But the quick transition of Italy was faster than what China had seen in their group stage games against their opponents. And they didn't have an answer for it granted a lotta time. The Italians were pulling them out of shape due to offside runs, but it did enough to damage the psyche of the Chinese, they instead of like hunkering down and getting their space incorrect. They actually got more narrow which means that bona say got to come and be more involved in the play out in the left flank, and it really was those runs that made this back line and the goalkeeper of China, very, very uncomfortable. And it's through those quick transition and excellent balls and unselfishness. Right. Golly is able to set that up the little slot ball. And then we get to see. I'm gonna I don't want to say the name incorrectly go straight into the goalkeeper. Right. She knew she was going to get drilled for that first goal. And then it bounces out to John Teti, because he is charged yet in D C, Jen, I like, do you intend FOX's saying differently every single time? So I couldn't figure out what it was. But I think do you intend to you that was just a nice calm finish? And that was a player that was able to do something special in that moment. But China then starting to take over a little bit. I thought the midfield and the fatigue of Italy was a bit concerning. But thank goodness for their strong will keep her Giuliani, as well as their centreback pairing at this arguably depending on how France does this. And then we have Norway. We have an argument that, that we have three top centreback pairings right now because I liked it. I liked to rank like you have your people all love and I like to rank your best centreback parents, because that's what it can carry you Italy's up there with Ghana Gama. And llanelli. Venar ayar. Surrogate leno. Nari Nari, one of the few. Players. In fact, the only player on the Italian team that plays outside of Italy's. She plays for athletic Madrid. I would actually think Gama gets a lot of the attention. I think because of the hair and because the captain's armband Barbie doll, I did have heard that on the broadcast today. But I think Lynagh is pretty clearly the better of the two mobile. Yeah. And you know, seems to make more plays, but quality between the two of them. Either way one thing I would note about this game is the fast start from Italy. You said it, right? They live off side, right? Like all of their runs are to get in behind on the wrong side of the law. I don't mind though. I don't mind. They're clearly being aggressive with these penetrating runs it added an element. It was clearly their idea at the beginning to put China under pressure. We have not seen that Chinese team. Look that rattled defensively throughout this tournament. The other thing about this game. I loved loved loved that Italy got a goal on the fifteenth minute because it forced China to play. And we, we have not seen that from China. And to their credit. They haven't needed a goal. We'll have needed if you look at their games. Right. One goal. Right. Yup. And Germany, gotta go on the seventieth minute against them. So they had twenty minutes to go for gold. But even in that game you think maybe they're, they're happy to just not lose by a big number against South Africa? They get a goal in the first half so they don't need to chase the goal and then in the game against Spain. Both teams seemed to be pretty happy with zero zero draw. So again, they didn't need goal now that they needed a goal. We Finally I thought got a little something out of China Wong, Sean, came to life. Maybe not to the level I was hoping, but, but came to, like, lee-ing was good. The number ten yawn. The number thirteen I thought was involved a little bit was dangerous. It was so much so that at the half China actually had sixty one percent possession. They just couldn't take advantage of it. And I think that's really the story with this Chinese team. And then when golly gets the goal early in the second for me Kate there it's game over because basically this Chinese team has one goal in them if they get it, they got a shot to win. If you get a second goal, it's pretty clear this group ain't gonna score. Yeah. I think we'll China they had nineteen chances. Right. There was slow and the chances that they saw with the exception of that one touch in the first half that Julianne was able tip over our that was probably their best chance because they played quickly they needed. There was just not that confidence to, like, okay. I'm just going to unleash this one in two time. Right. And that's the difference with Italy. They just quick passes in the decision making, but the what is the reason why this all works is because they're defensive positioning is superb. And they're always there cover is incredible, right? They do this press because they're in the press, they have so many numbers around the ball that if they lose it, they counter press because they're in such good shape, and then they win the ball back in good positions, or they. Lose the ball, but they're still positionally sound. That's part of the reason why the centerback parents are doing so, well, because the people in front of them are making predictable, so Italy, this is besides Norway might be the strongest defensive team, if I have a concern about Italy coming out of this match, it's just to echo, something, you said, whether it was the heat, but I gotta start to look at just the general health, maybe the conditioning of these Italian players bona. Ceo looked gassed and I'm not dead. I'm talking twenty minutes in there was a couple of times, I see your hands on the he, I think, okay, a little bit Girelli. We see subbed off. She's the player that got the hat trick against Jamaica half, which was thirty ninth minutes. He didn't look upset like so that means, like that is somebody. It's like give me thirty minutes. Okay. On the FOX broadcast, they said that the official fief report said that she'd come out due to conditions caused by the heat. So look it was a hot day. I mean, it goes to figure Bertolini the manager. She didn't rotate a whole lot in the group phase a mentioned MU. The move to bring Jia and she used her as a starter in the last group phase match, but she hasn't done a lot of rotating tour eleven and I felt like after that fast. Start for Italy. They really ran out of gas against China. They could afford to do that way from here on out. I wonder if that's going to be the thing that fails them those temperatures aren't changing waiting. It's a he's getting closer and closer in July when the heat really starts a hit in France, like eighty five ninety we're talking about game time tonight. So I mean I have a hard time. It's hard. You have to learn how to play in the heat you had the run differently in order to manage yourself for the entire game. It is very difficult though to get that done in like during games like enduring tournaments, a taste little time to acclimate in the end, honestly, get pretty much used to having goosebumps on your arms in the seventieth minute because you're starting the whole stuff's of heat stroke. I'm not I'm not condoning it. So no one come at me about. About how dare you influence people your water kids. Yes, you know put your take your salt, tablets, right. That's what we used to have to do a lot to just try to keep some sort of water in our body for the super sweaters, which I definitely was. But thank you for that. Yeah. Just wanted you to know that there you go. He's. Detail. But no, I just think it. Yeah. I mean it's also. But both teams were facing it. So that's so they had you know, I don't know. I don't know why Italy get gas much. Maybe it's because they were celebrating a birthday and had some line the night before as we saw in that video. We should bid farewell to the Chinese team as we have from us the teams that we've seen eliminated from this tournament for me, the big lament will be one Chuang. I've just feel like her. We never saw her at full fitness, we never saw her comfortable at full health, and we heard about it today on the FOX broadcast the reports that she could be leaving PS g had back to the Chinese league, I see this program, and then we kind of said this about Brazil, too. I see a program in decline. It's not just the fact that they reached the quarterfinal at every World Cup. They'd been at to this point. And then they didn't do it this time. They're not just sliding at the global level, they're sliding at the regional level as well. They won seven straight Asian cups from eighty six to ninety nine. They haven't reached an Asian Cup final since two thousand eight so that's in their own backyard, where they're losing pretty serious ground. And I would be really worried about this program moving forward. I would also remind people of our interview with variable cats from, I guess. Sunday show was she told us about her experience in the Chinese league. She talked about once you I'll say what she does it was just good. Experience said it was really professional instead there were good contracts, clearly that's going to entice maybe some, some international stars there. That means money, right? What she also said, though is that the level is not that high. And what I worry about is what I'm the same worry that I have for me is that as these European leagues started dish out, more and more money. Do the Chinese leagues of the world start to use lose their foreign players to the NWEA sales of the world's start lose their foreign players. And what does that do to the level in those respective leagues? And then what does that mean for the level of those respective national team? So I'm I'm worried about China moving. Yeah, I'm with you. But there's also a contextual factor. That is different than any other place in the world. Is that they're in its in its well-documented is in ninety nine right? You had the best Chinese team that had ever played and they had this huge government ministry of sport where you develop. Athletes. Right. And if you were tall, you got shifted to handball and basketball if you were fast, maybe looked at soccer. Right. So this is a country that has systemized and institutionalized recruitment of athletes based on athletic potential scouted at a young age nowadays with the global economy, and how fast China's taken off and their one child per family policy in the if they have a girl, they are not encouraged to go down the sport route because they don't think it's as financially feasible, especially post retirement because you take care of your parents culturally. And when we interview Chinese players, this is what you know, the ones that did play in the WS a and then comeback as coaches or administrators we call these games and I'm like, what's going on guys like right? And they're like, oh, kids aren't encouraged to play anymore. And in that structure in that society. If your parents are not on board with this. It's not happening. Right. And it's different than in Brazil when you go still play in the sidewalks on that two different culture. So that's something that unl-. Less. It's gotta come because they're such a, you know, a government run country is very much influenced by one's life. It's gotta come from them to figure out a way to solve that as well as sporting director. And that's just a little context from the conversations that we've had because you can't really get information outside of that. So China out of the World Cup Italy are moving on to the quarterfinals. The Italians on their side of the bracket would get the winner out of the Netherlands, Japan match disgust, that in just a second, but first, Hulu paying Tobin heath Carli, Lloyd, Mallory Pugh, and other US. Soccer stars a lot of money to do. A new goal celebration called Hulu has live sports why. It's simple. Because Hulu has live sports. You can watch the biggest games and sporting events on sixty plus top channels no cable required. Plus, you can stream the entire Hulu library. Start your free trial of Hulu today. Live TV plan required restrictions apply. Learn more at who dot com Netherlands and Japan. Ooh, a rematch best game of the tournament besides Norway. Australia. Wow. In terms of tactics it was awesome. It was so good. It was the cleanest game of soccer. It was well raft. I actually thought she's a good job and I haven't been able to say that about many games, I actually the at at least Chinese Italy China game was a great game. So that was good. So this one, a rematch, the round of sixteen at the last World Cup for years ago in Canada Japan won that game two to one and route to the final, where they famously lost to the United States this time around different story Netherlands, two one winners leak Martin's gets the goal in the seventeen th minute off a corner, kick she makes a play at the near post squeezes through a couple of pairs of legs off the post and it goes in Japan starts to build into the game. They get a goal in the forty third minute from you. E- Hasegawa beautiful, beautiful assists from mono- Iwo Bucci, and then in the eighty nine th minute after Japan had been pouring forward onto the Dutch goal against the run of play sake Kuma guy. The great leader for Japan and their defense gets called for a handball in the box. It was harsh. But I think fair Cape. Leak Martin steps up converts, cool as like the Dutch go home, two one winners, the Dutch. I mean, they didn't they started really, really strong. And I was like this is going to be a long, long day. But I think Japan gave taka clerk credit for this is she changed the game. Plan up a little bit usually lots of triangle passes able to build out of the back, even with three on three at one point was three on three in the penalty box in their own penalty box in Japan is trying to play out of it, because they know that there's a size difference and they accept that they're not gonna win those aerial battles. Even though they're timing is really good. The Dutch are extremely tall, and that was one of the strengths and I was texting with Daniel Slayton. We were talking about the game. And we were talking about how important set pieces were sure enough. They were, and it was brilliant in how the Dutch setup the Japanese team in that the first couple, or the first one, they definitely went long in the air and the second one they went on. On the ground from Spitzer to Martin's. Right. That was beautiful because I you could tell Japanese were not expecting that no one went with them. And yeah, it went through Suge was legs. And it was a bit lucky. But that was just a great setup. But then after that Japan grew in the game and then change your game plan in the sense that the midfield played a bit more direct. They didn't play the little tiny balls to build out of everything. They change it up a little bit where it wasn't quite the short short long that we saw from China at times. But it definitely had a nice little combination that you, we hadn't seen Japan to this entire time. So part of me thinks that this was all part of the plan to get through, and then we're going to do a little bit different. But in the end, they just don't have that clinical striker up top, even though they did have more players. Take shots on goal in dangerous shots. It just wasn't enough but they were the better team. They played better soccer, but they were not. They didn't it just soccer school. Didn't follow them, so cruel. And I think the most or the best evidence of just how cruel this frigging sport is. Who's that it's cool? A guy that gets, not just the handball called against her, but also like such a again fair, but harsh call right hires. I mean, she's trying to arm away, the thing is it hit square, like in the in the meat of your arm. Right. Not there's no debate it totally stinks. Like there's. I mean, but I don't even know how else you're supposed to come out and stop a ball like is if it's right in front of you have to run square to it. You can't turn you buy to the side. Right. Unless you do it at the last second that you turn it, sorry, going away from the mic is I'm thing, the body language and showing you how to run I'm gonna get yelled at for not speaking into the Mike. But that's kind of I mean but at the same time they hit the ball off the crossbar. They forced a good save in the second half, but they just, you know it just wasn't enough. But can you imagine this team next year? I can't imagine that I think it's going to change. The saw is going to get a little bit older, right? Twenty two year old has guy with scores a beauty of a goal. The Iwo Bucci Mandra, can this girl just start all the time. I think she'd only started twelve times before she got the start, and she's been around, like she's not, he's like a super son. Like gimme a break. Stop the squad. Rotation was here. It was all team in two thousand eleven. Yeah. She and she was that super sub. I think she was like ten at the time she was so young. She just still tore things up. So that's I think the squad rotation may have hurt them in the group stage because they never hundred percent built that chemistry or get people firing at the level that they needed to. And that's the only thing on like that's we're talking to our where I still think that this was really a long term play for the Olympics next year to make sure they show well until they have fourteen players were twenty three or under on this team. You definitely saw flashes. Once they were kind of brought forward by that early Dutch goal of the intricate little like classy, final third passing that, that was their hallmark in two thousand eleven and two thousand fifteen the one place, I will say you. Kasuga saw with the number nine she has just got to be more effective, one of these teenagers one of these young something forwards, that they've got on this roster has got to replace her or she's got to get better in time for the Olympics 'cause they won't advance if she there in this game. And they didn't have it. They had three to four either goalposts across bars. You know and twenty seven they did have some luck you need a little bit of luck to move forward in this game. They outnumber listened everyone talks about the Dutch midfield and how incredible they were in a four four two Japan played around that midfield, or through that midfield through their ball movement. They would get it and they would form a different angle. And then play through them spits it is a great player. Vanda donc had a couple of nice passes. But other than that, she got played around. Right. I just their ability to manipulate the midfield against this Netherlands team that everyone talks about how incredible the front they are. I'm sorry, this like between some Ashim o- on the right hand side. San and that was epic battle the Vince venison. And she wasn't impressive to me like Martin's might have scored two goals. But really? What did leak Martin's do in the first ten minutes, they shut down this potent attack? And they just couldn't convert. I it's just you don't like love. RA Hingst, like I love this panel today on FOX because they were brutal and a good way. And they were clear critical, and there was no. Like maybe because there teams weren't playing like you don't get stuck in that really hard. Right. It's really hard to call your own thing. And she was just like yet. Oh, you don't go goals. You lose like and I think she would say that about our own team minutes. I mean, unfortunately, just true that you can have all the pretty stuff and take a Dutch team out of their strength and not have leaked Martins and meet them a-, not make the impact that they normally do. But if you don't score on a lesser extent. Japan is also a program right now with a downward trajectory if you look at two thousand eight and the Olympics and make the semifinals two thousand eleven World Cup there in the final. They win two thousand twelve Olympics in the final. They lose to the US two thousand fifteen again in the final, but lose to the United States. Two thousand sixteen Olympics. They don't even qualify and to now being going out in the round of sixteen I'm worried about Japan, but I hear a lot more optimism. When I hear you talk about this team, this is though another instance of kinda UEFA dominance. First time we've had no teams from the Asian confederation reached the quarterfinals at the women's World Cup. It is truly historic you see this kind of wave of European dominance, real quick. One more question to you about this. Dutch team, the one difference because we reminded you that this was a rematch of around sixteen showdown at the last World Cup from this Dutch kind of front three perspective. The one difference is last time around the didn't have Vandersanden but you said she wasn't maybe so much of a show. Stealer today. I'm interested to hear your comments on Martin's because Martin's is a star, right? She, she was a star of this team at European championships, which was at home, which made a lot of fans fall in love with her. The fact that she plays for a club like Barcelona. I. Also gets her name out there a lot. She was under a lot of pressure and then a lot of criticism throughout this tournament for not delivering. Whether you say she played well or not is subjective. What you can't argue that is this a statement game for Martin's to get those two goals in knockout play. Well, I think they probably viewed her as they view repeat those two goals. He didn't have a great game in. She ended up being you know the player of the Matt Martin's was able to deliver in the key moments. And so even though you may not your impact may not have been impressive over the ninety minutes from the run a play your ability to deliver an execute in a high pressure situation is because as we see so many people cannot, I think you saw it. Excellent Japanese defense. This is the same Japan team that basically shut down the United States in February in the she believes they could not US could not figure out how to get out of the Japanese press. You can't. It's so hard to find that seem they close those passing channels so quickly. They over condense and they put you in bad angles and only the clearest touch, and the perfectly. To pass allows you to bypass their pressure. They did that today and I think we're getting to see like week might criticize Alex Morgan for not having a good game until beneath in Megara Pino, but we're getting to see two of the three because I actually don't right ban to send in that high because if there is no space in behind. I don't think she creates enough just from like cutting back and doing something different there isn't there's only one speed to her, and I don't see that being impactful against well, organized teams when there's no space than behind to run into, but we saw two forwards get taken out of the game today due to good defending, and it's going to be very, very hard as this tournament goes on for those players to make an impact because now you know, okay Martin's always wants to touch inside. She always wants to cut it to a right foot and set play so force or to a left-foot enforcer outside. Yeah. She's got a decent service, but you've got speed you can stay with her. So we said goodbye to China and Japan today. Yesterday, we said goodbye to Spain and Canada, we're gonna take a quick break on the other side will officially be. Those programs farewell. Plus a look at the quarterfinal matchups. All right, Kate. We've got some quarterfinal matchups to take a quick look at four of them to be specific. But I we didn't really get a chance to kind of say are official goodbyes to Spain and Canada yesterday we discussed their respective defeats. But I think each team has something to be picked at both about this tournament and maybe moving forward. Let's start with Spain. And Cape for me, the overwhelming feeling I get when I watched this team and think about this program is, and I'm not one of these people that watch game of thrones. But like it was so much in the public eye that, you know, like how they said winter is coming. I feel like Spain is coming, you look at everything that's that's going on around this program, and we heard a lot about about the, you know, an about women's football in Spain. And we heard some of that from our, our great interview with VERA book at which if you haven't heard, please go back to two Sunday's episode listen to it, it's the last half hour of that episode. You hear about round mother did? Right. One of the biggest brands in global football their investment. We've got a colleague of ours. He sits in the cubicle next to mine. His name is Alex. He Spanish he works for ESPN that Bertha's and we were talking yesterday. And I was like, hey, do you think this is kind of like flash in the pan? Or do you think this will stick? And he told me. No. I think it stuck. And he said, specifically the Madrid investment is why Ron Madrid really control so much of the discussion, the media, the print newspaper, the television, the online, they influence it so much with what they think is important. Right. It's such a cottage industry around measured that if they value this. He tells me that it's for real there's another kind of interesting note in this you way foot is launching its version of ESPN, plus for people who know which is kind of like a streaming service for some of their best content. Do you know what one of the focal points of that streaming services is gonna be Lolita feminine will the women's league in Spain? So I think that's very important. You look at the youth national team success you at all of that together. And man, there's a red wave. That's brewing that I think is going to be a power and women's football Kate for a while. Right. Because for all these very, very wealthy people in wealthy clubs investing in the women's game takes such small investment relative and comparative to the men's side, but your IRA is insane. We've gotten to see just by we've gotten to see just by these quarterfinals matchups. Is that a lot of these programs? Just started investing in their females ten years ago. And we've seen the underdeveloped nations or the underfunded nations, or people that don't have good game plans like the Asian federations. They go away. But because of that investment, you're getting to see those dividends evident and manifest in the performance of the national teams. And this is just gonna be keep feeding itself. It's going to be perpetual cycle, because then they're going to go back, and then it's going to draw more attention to it. For example, the Netherlands, do we have do we have a good Dutch like pro league. No not new. Nearly as good. Okay. So let's invest in again Denmark, etc. So it's unbelievable. And it's something that's concerning. If you're not in Europe, including for the NWS L in for the Asian teams, like we talked about, how are they going to compete because not only is getting into your Bank account. If you're a player you're going to be respected in the culture and not just from paternalistic point of view where it's like oh, isn't that so great, you play soccer like that? You do get from vans, right? Where it's like the NWEA sell they cater to, you know, a lot of soccer moms. They're trying to get away from it. Right. A lot of families, and that is, honestly the nation. It's just gonna take another generation, I think tell girls actually watch women play, and then and then as you get older. You continue to watch women's sports, and boys, watch girls play and women play on television, and etc. It's built in. So now it's about just teaching the culture and the big in the perception in the bias. Like I have a friend, that was over in Spain and tie up in US soccer, and he's like they have the best coaches at the younger levels, and it's just a matter of time till more girls start playing and it's acceptable. For more girls start playing in the culture. What drives culture your passions? What's the big passion in, in Europe, in Spain in particular, because since you're decided to bring them as example, it's your is your sporting teams? So this could be the greatest change. Because as we've talked about, when everywhere I do like diplomacy things like how did the US get so good? And how do you know the gender, you know, being respected as a woman, actually might cause a title nine so we've had head start. But now everyone else is starting to catch up because of investment because it's not doesn't take that much if I have a lament about the Spanish team, it's the what if about Vero I mean this team and the story of the team was can't finish. And you got your all time leading score. A not available to. If you want to know why she wasn't available again. Listen to the last half hour of Sunday's podcast. It's a really interesting story. My one caution with all this momentum around Spain is if you know anything about the history of Spanish football, you know, it's very much defined by the rivalry and almost the clash between the capital, Madrid specifically around Madrid and, and teams that are not in the capital and a lot of times that is defined by Barcelona. And that is also a dynamic within Spanish culture. Right. If you go to some cities in Spain, you'll see a Spanish flag everywhere, right Seville, for instance, if you go to Barcelona, you will see only flags of Catalonia, so some of it is beyond football right? It say other parts of the country verse the center, the capital, some of it is, though, defined by football. And a lot of the issues around Spanish football have come from this chasm between these two almost societies, and I think it may be starting to play itself out within this national team. I'll tell you why. Whole build up the young manager of this team is, is Barscelona blood through and through. Right. His father was a trainer on the Barcelona teams that you'll hunt Croix managed in the early nineties, the Alzheimer's. This team had ten Barcelona players on it. It had five outlet Madrid players on it yet. Athletico Madrid has won the last three Spanish titles. So you have a Barcelona product coach picking a team. With ten Barcelona players double the number of the team. That's actually won the Spanish title. The last three years, the specific example, here is Sylvia message that remember you surprised she wasn't always a starter. I was surprised Vero was surprised. Nobody knows that team better than barrow. Where does message? Airplay Athletico Madrid the player that got the job over her as Kenya where did it come from Barcelona? She now plays with Pele but for three years, she played with Barcelona. So I would just say those things. The one that kicked rose Lebel that led to the penalty kick room. There you go. So those things that have torn apart Spanish soccer for decades may be an issue when it comes to the future of this program, but for me it happens on the US team. I do. And I also think, just generally, like some of the issues with the Spanish federation, like if you look at the coach that book and her teammates stood up against he was there for twenty seven years. He qualified the team for two European championships in one World Cup. There was a twenty three year stretch where this dude qualified for one European championship. That's terrible. Right. There's nobody who has that record who keeps their job, unless you're buddies with the longtime president of the Spanish federation. And I think those issues which yes, our drew across the world that federations are old boys networks. They are certainly true in Spain and they hurt Spanish women's football for a long time under Ignasio, get Etta. And I hope they don't hurt women's Spanish football anymore, but I will just say it's their watch out. I think the biggest. Difference in the sporting landscape for females is the access to creating a narrative, due to social media. You know about the ninety nine hours because the media has created a couple of key players. Right back. Then you didn't know who the other five people were on the team that was fine for me. I'm totally fine. I couldn't have had. I did not. I want new business at that stuff. An OSCE would I would get self conscious in that my in hurt my performance in heck? I'd rather have the medals any day of the week. So. But nowadays, it's different in what I've seen the US team do that. I've sipped hurting to see everyone do, and it'll happen for all the countries because it always distills down is that they're using social media to create the narrative, the voice in its shapes because it hits one person and now you have exposure in your raising awareness of what's going on. So now there's many different talking points. And yes, it can get drowned out by the noise, but if there's enough of a groundswell of a similar voice, or similar sentiments being had it starts to get hurt. And that's what the. Beauty of social media is, is that your this these issues will get rectified, a lot quicker because of how fast information is coming out and it's available. And that is, and I think it'll help the women's game tremendously goodbye to Spain on Monday. We also said goodbye to Canada. I don't want to dive too much into the future of Canadian soccer, not that I don't think it's full of hope, but I want to specifically dive in a little bit more on the penalty decision that I think left Canada out of this World Cup. Right. So they're playing Sweden Sweden ends up winning one nothing but Canada has a penalty in the seventieth minute and Christine Sinclair sitting on one hundred and eighty two international goals, you'd think she would be the one to take it. Instead, it's twenty four year old Janine Becky who's playing in her first World Cup. And of course, the Swedish golly Hedvig Lindahl comes up with a massive save. Now when we talked about this yesterday. We didn't know the full context of the story in the post game interview Becky was asked what happened? She said Christine. Actually asked me if I wanted to take it. So there you go. Christine Sinclair is the person who left the responsibility for this penalty in the hands of Becky. That's what we were talking about yesterday. And I was really harsh on Sinclair yesterday. Kate. I thought she really led herself to be harsh on so many players that have that type of mentality. And that's the reason why they're good that is Mia Hamm to a T in ninety nine Mia Hamm was not didn't want to take a penalty, kick and Tony to Chico. Basically said you are the all time leading goalscorer the US women's national team. I do not care. You are taking a pellet kick, because you convert them because you can and we're not going to put that on over little Cates Obrero over there. Little centreback twenty two year old in front of ninety thousand people who's who is a Senator back in dozen score goals, therefore, you have to take the same thing in twenty two thousand sixteen with the Olympics. Becky Saddlebrook did not want a cappella kick. I'm sorry, if your mid thirties, and your captain, you're taking a Dan penalty, kick, and not having some youngster take it that was a failing air, and that's something I, I mean, I've had that conversation when Jill awesome. Like you should have forced her take it and not Kristen. S who up until that point had not proved she could rise in a big moment. Right. So this is something that this is wrong by the coach. Let's get into that. So the head coach is kind of Hyder molar. He's, he's Danish and afterwards. He says that he didn't have a penalty taker pre assigned before the match when I saw that. I thought, yeah. What yeah that's that's full on crazy because it's so I'm shifting my blame from Sinclair to Heiner Muller here. Are you completely because toast circle back because I didn't finish off on a tangent about other teams is Sinclair is a very selfless player. That's what makes her great. And that's why everyone in the world respects her in that moment, you need to have an authoritative figure to be like, then I know I know the reason why you don't want to take it is because Lindahl got in your head after she saved a penalty kick in March, and the reason why can't a loss because you didn't convert because Lindahl saved it for Sweden. So I do not care you Christine Sinclair, and you will take it and the reason why you're gonna take it because if deneen Becky misses it. He mentioned the weight under underneath becky's head. If she misses it, you're going to be able to handle this. If you miss it, I'd much rather have you handle it, 'cause you're experienced a youngster, I it's something along that's one route to take psychologically to get her to buy in to your Christine Sinclair you score goals. You will put this away because I believe in you. Yup. When it's unclear not rose to the challenge. Sometimes the coaches need to provide that self belief or change the shift a little bit. When the player has lost it because it's but that's the reason why they're player has been good. It doesn't mean they're weak. It doesn't mean they didn't want the responsibility. What has made them so good. Is that thinking of others, but isn't that the reason if you're Heiner Muller you take this out of the players hands is beforehand? Yes. There's no compensation. It's like Jill Ellis, when Megan or Pena was going to give it to Alex Morgan. If you look to Alex Morgan's body language wasn't good all game long. I was like, ooh don't have more can take it right now. That is she's not in a good spot. And I know what Pinos thinking is like, oh, I want her to get her competence, because peanut believed in her, but good for good for Jelavic. No, no. You take it. So for all those people that are like jello. The horrible liberal man manager in game. He made the right call on that one. Absolutely absolutely. In a big moment to a higher. Molar took over in early two thousand eighteen people who follow the Canadian program, we'll know that was after John Herdman kinda surprising left the Canadian women's program to take over the Canadian. Men's program after seven years in charge, still from the beginning of two thousand eighteen to the middle of two thousand nineteen you ought to been able to figure out who you wanted to take your penalties. I think that's actually. Yeah. I think about it. It's a really damning indictment. But you know what dozen one tail? The you're also thinking that you're play he probably just like leaving it up to sink Claire. Because he had so much trust ner. And he'll never do that again. Like it could be one of those growing moments that hurt his team, but at the same time this is a team that didn't create that many chances. I think they had two shots on goal to shots on goal. But what, what are they doing? Well, they're developing young talent. That is good. Not just like kind of good. Very good. There's a player that did not play. But keep no Julia Grosso. Oh, yes. That girl in the center of the mid, she slight he needs to put on some pounds, right? The happens as you get older. She's eighteen years old plays a university of Texas, unbelievable. They have a right back and I'm blanking on her name who also plays at Texas. That is a legit right back and can be I don't think I think I put Ribeira I'd push her up, and then I'd put her at right back, and I'm blanking on her name for whatever reason, but that is this team has quality in it. They just they. Just didn't do it against Sweden bit Sweden took him out of the game. Right. And dead with Sweden. Does what has what, what got them to a silver medal in two thousand sixteen is a know how to play defense and they know how to, to stymie teams it's gotten Sweden into the quarterfinals of the two thousand nine nineteen women's World Cup. We have four quarterfinal matchups. Of course, everybody's talking about USA, France. That's Friday in Paris, now on Thursdays show we're going to have Julie Foudy on. And, and plus also, we're going to have Julian, the Ron on, so we are going to have the US perspective. We're going to have the French perspective. It is going to be a full out mega spectacular preview. Don't miss it that in mind. Let's take a real quick look at the other three quarter finals. I want to start with Norway and England. They played in the round of sixteen at the last World Cup England one so there's a little bit of history there. Kate, what you're vibes on this one. This is gonna be a great game. I think no way has been excellent defensively. And it's not like there's going to be nerves the two centrebacks for Norway, actually play for Chelsea in play with many of these English players and have seen it. I think it's going to be fascinating to see what Lucy bronze Nikita Paris can do on that. Right hand side. They'll noble has a question to, to ask himself is should Fran Kirby starting I imagine he'll go with this ten but you can't say she's played a great tournament, and that's the big question. She's one of those bright flames. That's incredible. But can be inconsistent on the left hand side. You know, Tony do then we'll play but the wingbacks for Norway our concern, they don't have a ton of speed. They like to play this total football, and they can do the quick transition, very, very effectively. So it's just a matter of how they line up and on. This is a Norwegian team that has set up differently in terms of tactics, depending on who they play we've seen them play a four four two and a four five one and it all depends on the weapons of the other team. I imagine they're going to end up the same way that they did against France and Nola fi the wing areas, and make him go central. And if that's the case then Angan was huge in that game. Graham Hanson, my goodness. Hello world. Superstar coming your way. Youngster something creative something different. Best position is out on that right hand wing, but they may need to move or centrally. But this, this is going to be an exciting game. And I think Norway will do. Well, if they can test those centrebacks from England Graham Hanson, just signed with Barcelona from Wolfsburg if she plays as well as she did in the last game. I'm I'm a little worried for that games on Thursday, the winner of that game will get the winner of the US and France in the semifinals. Let's go to the other side of the bracket, then Italy, and the Netherlands, up this to me. That's so good. It's so intriguing right for Italy. It's a first World Cup since nineteen ninety nine Netherlands didn't qualify for single World Cup until the last one two thousand fifteen and yet you have these countries with amazing footballing infrastructures that if finally kind of turn. Learned that infrastructure towards women's football and for me what we decide here is who's come the furthest. The fastest I like how you said that upset. Good job. I think also the other layer is whoever loses out of these European teams doesn't go to the Olympics, because so far, all the European teams are winning. They don't get to send. They don't have a Olympic qualifying like we do in cook, Catherine. It all goes off the world club Cup results. So this'll be fascinating. Another Lund's was not impressive after the first twenty minutes today, but they got it done. So the back line is really good for Italy. There centrebacks are incredible. How do they handle minima? How are they going to handle the middle right now? I'm more impressed with how Italy's playing than how the Dutch applying. Yeah, I'm with you. I'm with you. I, I think the Dutch have some worries at the back, I think we saw that today for Japan. Again, my one concern with Italy would be, what kind of shape are they in, because they haven't used that many players. And if you watch their game today they were they play they play. Today. Right. Yes. Yeah. They're the they're the last those two are the last two games. Okay. You can't recover that quickly. I mean we used to play every other day. We'll get you. You kids these days with no Santa but that also. But what comes into play though is the age. So I don't know in front of me, who has younger team of the starters that does your recovery does play difference. Because when I got to be in my thirties and playing on World Cup Olympics. Then God, we had an extra day. It was like every third day, we played now it's like every fifth day. It's awesome because that's what the men get in recovery. I it it's fantastic. It limits your chance for injury and allows you to play to your bus. So it actually improves the game. But that's gonna be key for me on watching that when if you're talking about the fitness because they did look slow today, and that was a bit shocking. So the winner of Italy, Netherlands, will then get the winner of Sweden Germany in the other semi-final. And now these two teams if you think England and Norway, have some history. These two teams have some history, it is very, very, very one sided this history. Let me read some of it to you two thousand three world. Cup final Sweden loses to Germany Germany wins on a golden goal. Two thousand four Olympic bronze medal game Germany one nothing over Sweden two thousand eight Olympic quarterfinal, Germany, two-nothing over Sweden. Are you sensing a pattern here? Not two thousand fifteen World Cup Germany four Sweden, one in the round of sixteen two thousand sixteen Olympic final in Brazil with a gold medal. Germany to Sweden one forget all the European championships. Germany has won eight out of the last ten in that competition, Germany owns Sweden. And they did this year. If you watched that game in preparation for covering when they've oh, that was April. Right. When they played. Yeah. And it's I- Germany, played a mix of high and low pressure system. They through different things at, at Monterey. John was incredible. So this is the other wrinkle to this is Marijan available in. Do you player if she is she said she could play but it would cost them injury. It's just going to be a fascinating. Matchup. I imagine Italy. Sorry. Germany will come out in a four five one like they always have. And it's how are they shut down us Lonnie from Sweden who I think has been impeccable and I just I gotta go the Nazi Germany. I do because they just have that mental thing, and that, that mental endurance to handle games that are not going their way to handle to continue to stick to the game plan and knock it impatient. What about the idea of having teams number have you ever felt like either you as a player had somebody else's number or another team had your number? And, and how much does that history that we're talking about here? Look, some of that stuff's ancient two thousand three is is forever ago. Right. How much does that actually matter institutionalized confidence is what that is? And that is once you have that on another opponent, it takes them beating you before it goes away. And so it's one of those things like you Ben there, you've done that you've bought the t shirt you've seen it, you know what to expect. And if you know what to expect, you know, how to have experienced and you're able to withstand. And you don't really have those moments doubts, it doesn't matter, if you're down, you know, you can come back and so because of that, then you're able to continue to be consistent with the game plan and usually you have to have good coaching for that, right? So we'll get to see what MVP does. She's a new coach for Germany boss, tech lemberg. Right. She said six months with the team essentially by the time this game gets played, I think a little bit less than six months. How is she going to line up, right? What are they going to do? And in all honesty. This is very good German team. That's young. A lot of these teams like when I look at it in Germany, who else France like the turnover these players are young away cycle. Wave of your generation shift. My goodness. Japan is in the middle of a generational shift in just on this just starting now with the new cycle players. Can you imagine the next year? But how about this four years from now? Same thing with Spain. Oh, dear God, watch out. So Germany and Sweden met in Stockholm on April six Germany won that match two to one. I mentioned the European championships before at the two. Thousand thirteen European champions ships, Sweden where the host a guest who beat them in the semis. I dunno seven tell me, Germany, and guess who won the tournament in Sweden at a know Germany. So if you don't think the Swedes want this one and want this one bad, you're kidding yourself. I, I love games with history. And I don't think you're gonna find one with more than Sweden, and Germany, or at least it would be really, really hard to do that. Kate. We've made it to the quarterfinal round. We did it. I think we got. I think I don't know about you. I love this brackets it in front of me. I'm really really just really pumped with these four games. I don't think it could've turned out any better at least the on the other side and not because they lost I wish because I would love to see I would love to see them against other teams really assess how they're doing because I think Francis. The other best team in the tournament. Yup. USA France England, all on one side of the bracket, Italy Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, all on the other side out more about we can find out more about the US and where the strengths and weaknesses. Because we're callers Olympics the next year. Right if they're exposed to different styles like if we could play against Norway, and see how we do against that because I think tactically, that guy, the coach is doing on credit showbiz doing incredibly well, I would love to see how they're doing smaller ones. Like it's just like one of those things where it's like, oh not yet. I don't know. But I think if the truth is you gotta go through the best you got. Yeah. I agree. If the US gets through France and England on their way to the final, they will be battle-tested for sure. All right. That's all the time. We've got for this edition of ESPN AFC special coverage of the two thousand nine hundred nine women's World Cup for Kate marker on Sebastian Salazar, a reminder, we won't have an episode tomorrow. Go back and listen to Sunday's episode with Vero boquete, the trust me, you won't you won't regret it. And then we'll see you on Thursday for the mega spectacular preview, episode head of USA and France in the quarterfinals.

Spain China Alex Morgan US Kate Japan France Italy Olympics Netherlands Hulu Norway soccer Barcelona Matt Martin Sweden Madrid Canada ESPN
Bee Week 2019

The Good News Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

Bee Week 2019

"Hi I'm calling your host for the good news podcast. I'm neil the other host the good news podcast is your source for Good News Fun Stories Auditory Delight and Sonic Joy. We're bringing. We knew all of this goodness from beautiful downtown Chicago. Welcome listeners this week. We're talking about bees for the entire week. It's called. We're calling it bi week super novel. Brand new naming convention like Shark Week but be week yeah it is like Shark Week so we'll have a episode today <hes> about some good news about bees and then later in the week. We're going to hear from an urban beekeeper for this episode. I said I had to remind myself that Holland the Netherlands and the trawl referencing the same place in people that take good reminder because I also needed that reminder to any listeners if we have any many people who are listening from the Netherlands Slash Holland which we probably do. I apologize for our ignorance but we're we're figuring it out. I guess trying our best. We're trying our best anyway. We take you now to attract you checked. They're really going there well. You have to take some pictures while you're there because in Utrecht they have covered three hundred and sixteen bus stops with of little stopover rest areas for be oh my gosh. The roofs of three hundred sixteen of these bus stops have been covered in seed them which is like if you seen green green roofs it's kind. And of that like Hodgepodge G Mishmash e wildflower <hes> kind of like succulent winning covering so three hundred plus of these best obser- now covered in that which is great for honeybees and for biodiversity and also they've retrofitted the bus stops to capture fine dust and store rainwater is they're trying to be more aware and more cognizant of air quality in the city of attract so while you're there where I'm going to breathe breathe deep. I'm going to take a picture for you. Additionally these best APPs have been given new L._E._d.. Lights which are of course more energy efficient and I love this bamboo benches because bamboo grows so fast. I can't you can't hold bamboo back. You can't hold bamboo back. I bet it's a nice bench to oh I can't we this is really getting me excited for my trip and future plans for who trekked. She's a Whiz. They plan to introduce fifty. I five totally new electric buses for clean public transport within the next decade. I maintain all the power for those buses Dutch windmills baby you got it got US sales. I think about when I think about tulips but don't you think of a field of tulips with the background absolutely like it's spinning tulips on the ground wearing clogs. I the whole thing you might like be. I know right clock some love and for the rest of this week talking bs Bi Week Baby Week Twenty nineteen. We didn't do this each year each year wheel. Hey Babe. Thanks for listening. Do you have good news incredible or maybe WanNa tell us a joke or idea excellent email us at hello at the good news podcasts dot F._M.. Or leave us a voicemail at seven seven three two one seven.

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The Morning Briefing: Monday, December 21

The Briefing

02:19 min | 6 months ago

The Morning Briefing: Monday, December 21

"Palawan with the briefing from the telegraph. It's monday december. The twenty first as a series of travel bans begin. So europe's shutting the door on the uk's been hit with travel bans by a host of countries that designed to stop the spread of a new more infectious strain of cove. It so far. Twelve countries have closed their borders to the uk including france belgium. The netherlands germany island and more could be on the way the eu meeting to discuss a blanket ban. It means since the early hours of this morning passenger flights and freight transport from the uk were halted for at least forty eight hours. It will threatens to disrupt food supplies christmas presents and even the covid vaccine the prime minister's chairing an emergency cobra committee meeting. Today you can follow the latest in our live blog. The bans were triggered. Adopt britain alerted the world health organization to the new variant. It said to be up to seventy percent more transmissible than earlier strains government. Scientists announced racing to prove that vaccines can fend it off. We've got a piece on everything. We know about the new mutation now after tier four was introduced to a huge swathe of the southeast. The question many people are asking is how long four. While government sources of admitted restrictions could be toughened further still and might remain in place until easter now health that is lower donnelly understands ministers believe twenty million people will need to be vaccinated before the measures are relaxed. Handy postcode cheka lets you search for the rules in your area and we could probably will do with some stories of hope. Tier four means the christmas plans of up to sixteen million people now up in the ad from families forced to part to the problem of what to do with the turkey. That's now much bigger than you need. We've got the stories of eight families on their search for some festive. Cheer just to mention a couple of other bits. Two including what happens next with brexit. After last night's trade deal deadline was missed and bill. Bailey's final strictly diary after he lifted the global right. You're up to date from the telegraph. Chris will fuel second briefing of the day this evening.

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AP One Minute Headlines Mar 18 2019 21:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

01:30 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 18 2019 21:00 (EDT)

"Let's say you just bought a house bad news is you're one step closer to becoming your parents, you'll proudly mold along, and if anybody noticed you mow the lawn. Tell people to stay off the lawn compare it to your neighbor's lawn and complain about having to mow the lawn again good news is it's easy to bundle home and auto through progressive and save on your car insurance. Which of course, we'll go right into the lawn. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurers discount not available in all stages situations Netherlands shooting, I'm Tim Maguire within a p news minute in the Netherlands. A suspect is in custody after gunman killed three people and wounded five on a tram, and what a thorny say may have been a terror attack. We are investigating or possibilities. So that means possible terrorists Motors, but also other possible personal motives, the Dutch Justice Minister says the attacker was known to police and had a criminal record. But would not elaborate a rally held in Sacramento, California tomorrow. Mark the one year since Stefan Clark was killed by two city. Police officers Reverend Al Sharpton, one of the speakers. You might have killed him a year ago, but you can't kill the movement. Clark was shot to death is police responded to calls it. Someone was breaking into cars that night, local and state prosecutors announced earlier in the month. They would not charge the officers because the police thought Clarke had a gun in feared for their lives. Clark was holding only a cellphone, I'm Tim Maguire.

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Nationale Bijentelling

The Good News Podcast

03:24 min | Last month

Nationale Bijentelling

"The i i'm neil. The host of the good news podcast. This is your source for good news. Fun stories and sonic showing. All of this. Goodness is coming to you from beautiful chicago illinois about two years ago the good news. Podcast colleen and i did an episode where we kicked off our inaugural and i think so. Far only be week. We talked about a new national program in the netherlands aimed at helping local bee populations bounce back after many years of declining populations as a long range update to that story. I'm pleased to report that. As of the end of the most recent national be senses. It looks like being numbers are steady not bouncing back per se but not declining either. This is the fourth annual nationale. Bijan telling any dutch listeners. Out there per usual. I apologize for my pronunciation but i love that word beijing telling which i think is just be count probably as of this most recent b.'s. Census eleven thousand people counted bees and they noted two hundred thousand bees and hover flies honeybees took the top rank with fifty five thousand sightings followed by red mason bees and earth. Bumblebees or field. Bumblebees both at around twelve to thirteen thousand. This make sense. There's been a rise of home beekeepers in the country so there is a possibility that honeybees might be edging out local native. Bee populations any way you look at it. It is good to have more pollinators in the netherlands and that means that interventions like the green roof bus shelters and attract have worked to some degree and as a reminder for people who who don't remember that episode from two years ago the city of attract has put seat him rouf's on their bus shelters and from the city website. These green roofs capture particles store rainwater in provide cooling when it's hot and promote urban biodiversity all of these are beneficial for insects like bees. Bumblebees and butterflies. So they have three hundred. Sixteen bus shelters seat him covered roofs. They look beautiful and they're paying off. That is today's episode and update from an episode. Two years ago. That shows good. News can keep on getting better. Thanks for listening. If you've got good news or an idea for the show. Amazing send an email to hello at the good news. Podcasts dot fm. While you're at it. Follow us on twitter at the good news pod if you love the show think about supporting our patriot or reviewing us where you're getting this. Podcast from both are great. The music you here on the show was from paddington. Bear have a great day.

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How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket

Environment: NPR

03:46 min | 1 year ago

How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket

"And we have the story of a strange and elaborate quest that all hinged on a couple of decimal points scientists today need to figure out how much hotter the oceans are now than in in the past but the old measurements are unreliable and figuring them out is more difficult than it might seem. Here's n._p._r.'s rebecca hersher. If you want to know how much hotter the oceans are today than they were say in the eighteen hundreds. You need to things information about how hot the oceans are now and information about how hot the oceans were then and it's that second part the historical measurements that graduate student do oh chan was interested in. I sometimes joke with my friends like oh. I'm not only a climate scientist. I i'm a detective. His detective work started with a tome that sent him down crazy rabbit hole. The book listed all the ocean temperature measurements taken by sailors. It's going back to the eighteen hundreds. Yes you'll see that there are like more than one hundred different data sources. Were so what what we can. I read a couple of them. Sure so japanese whaling fleet norwegian arctic whaling factory ships netherlands marine yes and here you have like the japanese kobe collection in all there are millions of measurements from all over the world and most of them up until world war two were collected using buckets. I the sea temperatures take and the movement of women cold cuts affect the weather good deal. This newsreel is from nine hundred forty-seven the medicine teves canvas bucket over the side and collect a sample luke seawater temperature. The temperature got written in a log book but sailor is generally didn't write down other information like how big the bucket was or what it was made of or how long they waited before putting thermometer in all things that could change a temperature reading. Peter is the lead scientist on the project. This is like like if someone left you <hes> all their receipts that they had ever spent during their lives and you were trying to piece together what had been doing do oh chan the grad student was undeterred. He had an idea he took all the measurements and looked for ships that had passed near each other so they had both measured the temperature of the same piece of ocean at the same time about he found nearly eighteen million pairs of measurements like that and look for patterns and found one big one. The measurements from japan pan in the nineteen thirties seemed to be a little bit too cold but why do i thought maybe japanese ships were getting taller so the water cooled pulled off as it was hoisted all the way up to higher decks so he found records about japanese ships sizes and in order to read them. I learned japanese you did i did turned out ships had gotten slightly bigger but all that work ended up being for nothing because ships is actually had nothing to do with the cold measurements since it was something much more mundane rounding a colleague in the u._k. Happened to send them some vital information an old air force document after world war two the u._s. Military had taken all the ocean temperature measurements from japanese ships and digitized them and when they did that they dropped the decimal place so if the water was fifteen point one degrees on one day in fifteen point nine degrees on another both temperatures were recorded as just fifteen degrees overall all that made the measurements artificially cold by about half a degree. It's amazing like people keep a record of what they did. The team published their research. This spring and it's made waves because of their work. We now know that the pacific ocean used to be slightly warmer than we thought which will help make climate models more accurate and the potentially help avoid catastrophic climate change rebecca hersher n._p._r. News.

scientist rebecca hersher graduate student netherlands japan Peter fifteen degrees nine degrees one degrees one day
WA Shipwrecks Museum charts early European encounters with Australia

The Science Show

08:56 min | Last week

WA Shipwrecks Museum charts early European encounters with Australia

"And so we go back. Even further in history with another famous researcher who's been honored internationally for his work on wrecks shipwrecks europeans. Who came here by mistake or accident and sometimes lived through. The horror is dr jeremy green in fremantle. Congratulations on your international award. What's its name. It's the order of the irish missile. Given by the dutch while it was presented to me by ambassador netherlands she came over here and it was the presentation from the king of the netherlands. Obviously the king couldn't come here. A message was sent yes. It was an enormous honor. I'm gonna say the invitation went out to everybody that we are having a book launch and the dutch ambassador come to fremantle a make the presentation and that was going to be a special announcement and we will thought it was going to be founding or legislation and so the book launch went ahead and the ambassador started finished launch. And she said and now you've heard about presentation well it's not bad legislation on. It's not about funding. And she looked at me and she says all you that point just about fell off my chair. Well of course. It was their ships bumping into australia. All the time on their way to the spice islands beck in the seventeenth century. Yes absolutely and the embassy's being very kind to us in sense of supporting a lot of the projects that we did. The batavia is partially restored. Well as an awful lot of it actually here. isn't it. yes it's here in the building. We started excavating it in the seventy one. And it took about three four years of excavation work and then conservation and then rebuilding it in the gallery here in this wonderful shipwrecks museum g. Lots of visitors yes. I mean. we've done very well actually tickly because the when the new museum was being built here about the nine museum closed down and of course the shipwrecks and maritime museum to museums and fremantle were both capterra from that period so we got a lot of visitation up until of course when covid could do tell the story of some of the horrors associated with the batavia the crew the captain zone. Yes really surprising that they've never made a hollywood movie out of it because it's got all the necessary ingredients for it. The ship is wrecked. The sophist get ashore. The captain the command pelser decides with all of the senior offices. Some women and actually are probably infant. Only a few months old. So it would have been born on the voyage. Set out to search for water ostensibly as i couldn't find water on the broncos they sell to the main nine could find and while they were on their way to behavior the notorious jeronimus cornelius to massacre the survivors and quite extraordinary story. And so by the time pell back they killed about a hundred and sixteen hundred and twenty people men women children and it was just fortunate that the final sort of set piece to this was the mutineers. We call mutinies. They're not really is but anyway. These people under the leadership of cornelius were taking a group of soldiers had been isolated from the main party because they were soldiers. They knew what they were doing. And they attacked them and cornelius was captured by the mutineers. And just as things happening passau in the q ship sails into the bike and at that moment the mutineers get into one boat and the leader of the soldiers gets into another boat and they severing rice. Get to the rescue. I and fortunately the commander of soldiers got their first worn pelle. Sort of the thing. Mutinous were captured. Some of them are executed. They will sell back to batavia and there of them for their doom. 'cause many of them executed in batavia. Full the part that they took in the mutiny absolutely extraordinary story. There was a little bit of investigation of a possible link with the crew in landon. Possibly the joined aboriginal. People is still going on those happing settled. Well it's three different dot shipwrecks. That might have had some sort of connection with the aboriginal people. The batavia's relatively unlikely because there was no need to mutineers. They considered too young to minor and they were abandoned on the mainland by pelser on his voyage. Back to batavia but of course there was the old rack in sixteen fifty six. Where a large number of people got to shore and lots of evidence that surviving material on the mainland so they were one group of people and the other of course is this out outta where everybody despoiled. They just disappeared. You know as never heard of again. It's a very tricky story. Because of course he also had people from indonesia coming down with intented labor. And i guess one day. Somebody's going to try. And sort out the dna story but haven't got a few weeks ago inside show. We passed the plans for the sixteen. Sixteen sircar dog the island. Bree militating an awful lot of the natural history. And i think that celebrates one of the oldest collisions overdubbed chip took hotoke collision. Not quite right. 'cause he he actually just arrived and shot by now up a pew to play on cape inscription then sailed off. So he didn't he didn't wreck. Nope i encounter well of course staff can before that but they first recorded evidence of a european on the australian coast is actually dakar talk daft. Can we live from journals that they d go contact on golf cart terrier but a secondary sources not original journal. We sat about sixty nine or something. That's right yes and i think. Some of the recording of that is in the national maritime museum in sydney. Yes yes that's right. Yup what are they play. If you want to visit well close. They have the replica. Of the daphne. Now yes that sabena. Big an area of contention for a lot of west. Australians that you know the ship was built here and this was a group of people to volunteers work on mckinnon and off. It goes to sydney and nothing to do typical. Isn't it. yes well see the other thing about it is i suppose there's always this perennial thing with you know. The captain cook discovered australia. Which is something that you know how long we've been trying to educate the people in these states that the europeans first year pits to discover australia were dutch. Not counting is even the landing buccaneer in sixteen ninety nine. I think yes william damp here as he was the famous william dampier who had all sorts of interesting adventures. How many other wrecks are out there. That you've yet to go search for is or is it impossible now not really. it's an interesting situation. When we started hearing nine hundred seventy one we really get caught. Also reports every year off shipwrecks and gradually numbers being dropping down and finding now the wrexham more in deep water with being found by more complex methods and technologies. But what's interesting about. It is that we know that in westralia from the records research has been done by this department there are about one thousand five hundred shipwrecks that have occurred from newspaper records request circle records some sort we found about two hundred ninety three hundred so it's still quite a lot there but they're going to be very hard to find. So congratulations again on the question. Do you still go out into the field or you comfortable in your wonderful building very comfortable in my wonderful building. I'm not doing so much filbert these days when you're getting close to being eighty it's a certain limitation as to what you can do. We can call you captain nabet. Thank you and congratulations again. Thank you dr. Jeremy green at the shipwreck museum in fremantle now have been wondering how they managed to put that batavia story together for insect work on a massive scale.

batavia dr jeremy green ambassador netherlands jeronimus cornelius cornelius fremantle the netherlands australia pelle broncos original journal sabena landon hollywood Bree sydney william damp william dampier national maritime museum dakar
Dutch Euthanasia Doctor Warns Britain Against . . . Euthanasia

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 9 months ago

Dutch Euthanasia Doctor Warns Britain Against . . . Euthanasia

"A doctor who was once four and even performed doctor assisted suicide is warning us all not go down that road for the Colson Center? I'm John Stonestreet this is breakpoint. Until his death in two thousand eleven Dr Bernard Nathanson was a champion of the pro-life Movement, his nineteen eighty-four movie the silent scream helped dispel the idea that the fetus is only a clump of cells. His pioneering work with ultrasound technology paved the way for its widespread use by pro-life advocates. Part of his authority came from his history he was a co founder of Nay Raw Nathanson worked alongside people like Betty for Dan to liberalize abortion laws when he had an eventual change of heart while it was big news. A new Bernard Nathanson might have just stepped onto the world stage Dutch physician. Burt Kaiser was euthanizing patients nearly twenty years before it became legal in the Netherlands. In fact, he played a significant role in its legalisation as Aljazeera. Put it. When somebody wants to die in the Netherlands Bar Kaiser, his often the man they call like Nathanson Kaiser seems to be having second thoughts about the deadly system he helped create. He's especially alarmed that the developments in Great Britain where Conservative member of parliament Andrew Mitchell predicts that euthanasia could be legal. By twenty twenty, five Mitchells a conservative MP who chairs an all party commission looking into this issue he told Sky News that he wasn't talking about a massive change but instead quote very, very tight reform. The Law Proposes Mitchell would contain quote very strong safeguards such as limiting euthanasia to those with less than six months to live patients would also have to get permission from a High Court judge in to doctors before proceeding. Now, of course, everywhere euthanasia has ever been legalized. There have been quote very strong safeguards safeguards that are eventually Ignored violated and discarded Doctor Burke. Kaiser having witnessed this up close and personal is now warning British lawmakers to think twice before legalizing assisted suicide riding in the Dutch Medical Journal at Kaiser admitted that his British colleagues were correct two decades ago when they warned that countries like the Netherlands quote who embark on euthanasia venture down a slippery slope along which you irrevocably slide to the random killing of defenceless sick people in quote far from being combined to the terminally ill kaiser admits that the practice for the Dutch has expanded to include. Older people who find their life no longer has content eventually, Kaiser predicts the Dutch will expand euthanasia to include disabled children and prisoners serving life sentences and his own words about his own country quote. Every time a line was drawn it was pushed back. The same lines have also been eliminated in Belgium may be more and Canada doctors have advocated expanding that country's medical assistance in dying law to include children even without parental consent at least eight states have some form of so called death with dignity laws and abuses like we've seen an. Are Well documented inevitably, what starts as legal? I suicide ends in legalized homicide Dr Bernard Nathanson change of heart about abortion eventually led him to become a Christian. Maybe God has something similar in store for Kaiser let's pray that he does in the meantime. Let's pray that his warnings are heated. The honesty that Kaiser brings to this discussion about euthanasia is scandalously lacking and it starts with his use of the. Word euthanasia phrases like doctor assisted suicide or physicians assisted suicide, or assisted dying. These are Wellington in euphemisms that only obscure what is really happening the taking of an innocent life based on someone's judgment that it's no longer worth living the third, Reich had a phrase for this lives unworthy of life Doctor Kaiser has given the world much needed clarity. Let's pray that the world listens for breakpoint I'm John Stonestreet.

Nathanson Kaiser Dr Bernard Nathanson Netherlands Bar Kaiser John Stonestreet Andrew Mitchell Netherlands co founder Doctor Burke Colson Center twenty twenty High Court Dutch Medical Journal Belgium Great Britain Wellington Dan Reich Betty Sky News Canada
Amsterdam: Jordaan Walk

Rick Steves Netherlands Audio Tour?s?

41:20 min | 8 years ago

Amsterdam: Jordaan Walk

"Amsterdam's don walk amsterdam. Modern city of eight hundred thousand people is also a collection of quiet neighborhoods in the your don neighborhood. You'll leave the tourists behind experiencing the laid back lifestyle and catching a few intimate details. Most busy tourists never appreciate hi. I'm rick steves on this walk. We'll go from dumb square the bustling time square. Amsterdam into the characteristic. You're done neighborhood. It's a pleasant gentrified area home to cafes boutiques bookstores art galleries and trendy residents along the way we'll pass by one of the city's most fascinating and sobering sites. The frank house allow about ninety minutes for this short and easy going walk. It's nice in the sleepy morning. Or as part of a visit to the anne frank house or en route to a dinner in the evening. Bring your camera. as you'll enjoy some amsterdam's most charming canal scenes. A word of warning everywhere in amsterdam be aware of silent transportation such as bicycles and trams. This is especially true when you're wearing earbuds and absorbed in your surroundings now. Let's get started as we go on cultural scavenger hunt. We're sure to see a few things which well commonplace in amsterdam. You won't find in any other city in the world how to use this audio guide. This audio tour gives each of the your don's greatest sightseeing hits. Its own title and track number much like the songs of cd or album. You can skip ahead or taylor. Itinerary to your own tastes but navigating through amsterdam on your own can be confusing and it's easiest to just follow the tour in the order. I've laid out to help you along. I've invited my colleague lisa. Welcome lisa hello. She'll give directions from one site to the next after listening to lisa's directions. You can pause the audio guide then restarted at the next audio track when you're ready for the next site. Ideally this walk will unfold in real time. You should be able to sightsee from start to finish without pausing or fest forwarding much at all but of course when you want to linger longer pushing pause is encouraged. If you're taking this tour. With my rick steves audio europe app. Don't miss latest features. There are zuma ball maps which showed the route and east up. The maps are viewable. While you listen a twenty-second rewind button allows you to catch something. You might have missed or here. Vital directions a second time and the speed button makes me tuck faster chipmunk style you can refer to the actual script of this tour as you listen and if you'd like more information on the spot you can download our entire guidebook on this destination with a couple of clicks those following this tour on their ipod rather than with my fancier app may find that my guidebook to this place with its maps photos an exhibit titles can make following this audio tour easier. Be aware that even with the best of directions sightseeing a big city can be confusing. Roads might be closed and sites can be covered with scaffolding. Be flexible and don't hesitate to show a picture of sight to a local or to one of your fellow travelers and ask for help as always in amsterdam be aware of silent transportation. Trams and bicycles. Don't walk on amtrak's or bicycle paths before you step off any sidewalk. Do a double or triple check in both directions to make sure all's clear now let's head into amsterdam and get started. Lisa take us in. thanks rick. The tour begins dumb square. Start on dom square face. The royal palace. That's the large building with the green copper tower. You're facing roughly west the direction whether you're don neighborhood lies to your right is the new church or newark. Kirk rick dom square is where the city was born. It was here that around the year. Twelve fifty they dammed the still river to create Still dumb the original resident settled east of here in the neighborhood now known as the red light district but his amsterdam grew from a river trading village to a worldwide see trading empire. The population needed new housing developments. They started reclaiming land to the west of dumb square. Where we're headed. They built a new church. The newark to serve these new neighborhoods canal canal created new neighborhoods of waterways lined with merchants. Townhouses this is. The area will be walking through in the first half of our tour by the sixteen. Hundreds amsterdam's golden age. They needed still more land. They opened up a new development further. West the your don. It was serviced by the church to the west. The vesta kirk which will see it was also in the sixteen hundreds that the royal palace was built here on dumb square. It didn't house royalty as the name suggests but was home to the city council. They passed zoning laws and oversaw the rapid expansion of this growing metropolis. Now let's go see it. Lisa facing the royal palace slip to the right between the palace and the new church. You'll soon see the facade of the red brick magna plaza shopping center as you walk west toward the fanciful magna plaza building. You leave the fast. Food chains the minds and the tourists behind. We're heading to the place where real amsterdamers live. The your dawn up ahead. The magna plaza was built in eighteen ninety nine like so many buildings in this soggy city it was constructed atop a foundation of pilings. Some four thousand five hundred of them in this case in its day it was ultramodern symbolizing. The city's economic revival after two centuries of decline the north sea canal was opened. There was increased industrialization and it was all capped by a world's fair in eighteen eighty three until the nineteen eighties. This was amsterdam's main post office now. It's a mall housing forty stores as you approach magnum plaza crossed. The busy street called new. Besides faubourg vall be sure to watch out for. Bikes tramps and cars definitely facing magna plaza. Turn right on new besides four bergvall. this wide. Busy street doesn't really seem to fit the city. That's because it's new well from the eighteen. Eighties built atop a paved over canal. Walk fifty yards down the busy street to the corner of the tiny street called mole stag before turning left down most egg stand and surveyed this case of amsterdam most egg the sods and bicycles scan. The facades are you drunk or high or in amsterdam where building settle nice line of gables both along the busy street. End down most egg before moving on notice. The t shirt collar around the corner decades ago. I bought a mark and t shirt from a street vendor now. This amsterdam original has his own upscale shop selling t shirts and paintings featuring spindly lined semi-abstract cityscapes raven works primarily with small etchings. As rembrandt often did now look down. Tiny mall steak street from here. This tour is essentially a straight shot west though the street changes names along the way start. Strolling slowly west down most egg. But don't walk on the reddish pavement in the middle. That's for bikes. Stay to the sides always a good reminder a few steps along posit house number five on the left just one window wide. It's typical of the city's old narrow houses look up and notice hooks above warehouse doors. This was the typical merchants design shop on the ground floor. Living space in the middle and storage up in the attic hoses lean out on purpose so you can hoist up cargo without bouncing things on the wall. Continue down most egg to the intersection with spouse trot. You'll likely see rows of bicycles parked along the street. Amsterdam's eight hundred thousand residents own nearly that many bikes the netherlands. Seventeen million people own seventeen million bikes many people own to a long distance racing bike and junkie in citi. Bike often deliberately kept in poor maintenance. So it's less enticing to the many thieves town locals are diligent about locking their bikes twice. They locked the spokes and then they use a heavy chain to attach the bike to the shaped hitching racks which locals call staples continue strolling west. Another short blac. Amsterdam is a great bike. Town in fact bikes outnumber cars the efficient dutch appreciate a self propelled machine that travels five times faster than walking without pollution. Noise parking problems or high fuel costs on a bicycle or feats in dutch. A speedy local can traverse the historic center in about ten minutes and biking seems to keep the populace fit and good looking people. Here say that amsterdam's health clubs are more for networking than for working out and when it comes to helmets. Few wear them as many dutch say fashion over safety. This street opens onto a small square. It's understandably nicknamed big heads square. Because of the statue. The square is actually a bridge. Straddling the single canal. It's called the torrance laos bridge torrance laos bridge. We haven't quite reached the your don yet but the atmosphere already seems miles away from busy dom square with cafes art galleries and find benches for. Picnics is a great place to relax and taken a golden age atmosphere. Find a place to enjoy the scene belly up to the railing. Take a seat on a bench or even pas the tour for a drink. One of the characteristic bars that spill out onto the bridge then xilin is famous for its variety of beers. Villas asec is popular for its sandwiches and apple pie. Take in your surroundings. The single canal was the original moat running around the old walled city. This bridge is so wide because it was the road that led to one of the original city gates. The area's still looks much as it might have during the dutch golden age of the sixteen hundreds. This was when amsterdam seagoing merchants ruled the waves. Establishing trading colonies as far away as modern indonesia. Fueled with all this wealth. The city quickly became a major urban center lined with impressive homes. Each proud merchant tried to outdo his neighbor pan three hundred sixty degrees taken the variety of buildings the houses crowd together shoulder to shoulder their built atop thousands of logs hammered vertically into the marshy soil to provide a foundation over the years. They've shifted with the tides leaving some leaning this way and some leaning that notice that some of the brick houses have iron rods strapped onto the sides. These acts like braces binding the bricks to an inner skeleton of would almost all amsterdam houses have big tall windows to let in as much light as possible. Although some houses look quite narrow most of them extend far back the rear. The building called the actor house is often much more spacious than you might expect from the facade. Real estate has always been expensive on this canal and owners were attacked by the amount of street frontage. It was especially expensive for homes with a wide facade and minimum usable space in back a local saying back then was only. The wealthy can live on the inside of a canals curve. I don't get it. We'll think of a slice of pie. If you're on the inside of the curve you get lot of crest and not much apple I'll have to chew on that slice mingled among the old houses are a few modern buildings. Those sleek gray metal ones are part of the university built in the less affluent nineteen seventies. They wouldn't be allowed today though. These buildings try to match the humble functional spirit of the older ones. There still pretty ugly but the students they house inject life into this neighborhood. The big head statue honors a writer known by his pen name multi born in amsterdam in eighteen. Twenty multi totally did. What many young dutchman did back then. He sought his fortune in indonesia. Then a colony of the netherlands while working as a bureaucrat in the colonial system he witnessed firsthand. The hard life of javanese native slaving away on dutch owned plantations in eighteen sixty. He wrote about what he saw in his semi autobiographical novel. Max havelaar the story follows progressive civil servants fighting to reform colonial abuses. He was the first author to criticize dutch. Colonial practices a very bold position back then for his talent and subject matter. Multi has been dubbed. The dutch reviewed kipling. The single canal is just one of amsterdam's many canals all told there are roughly fifty miles of them. Most are about ten feet deep. Canals originated as a way to drain dychkov marshland as the grew they also became part of the city sewer system. They were flushed. Daily by opening the lock says the north sea tides came in and out. You can glimpse the locks in the distance. Their way down at the north end of the single canal. Beyond the dome you'll see some white flagpole thing spouting at forty five degree angles. Those are part of the apparatus that opens and shuts the gates the dutch credited with inventing locks in the thirteen. Hundred's try telling that to the chinese locks are the single greatest invention in canal building besides controlling water flow in the city. They allowed ships to pass from higher to lower water levels and vice versa. It's because of blocks that you can actually ship something by boat from here inland from amsterdam. You could go up river connecting to the rhine connect the rhine with the danube. Thanks to a series of locks at the continental divide in germany and then sailed down the danube eventually reaching the black sea and romania. You follow me. I'm still chewing on that slice of pie. The green copper. Dome in the distance marks the lutheran church to the left of the church is the new city reclaimed in the sixteen hundreds and destined to be amsterdam's high rent district to the right is the old town. Let's move on continue west on odelay start orderly stride or the lady or the wrong country browse the shops on. Odelay lescot on the way to the next canal odorless strut on old. Lillies street consumers will find plenty of amsterdam. Edibles raped nears cheeses puccini's bon-bons sukebe amis rice. Staffel grey areas marijuana. Thirsty dogs traditional cafe fair schwartz's everything but lily's by the way rape and cheese shop offers tasty samples and has a classroom in the basement for cheese tasting sessions. Pause at the gray area. This is a thriving coffee shop. It sells marijuana the green and white decal in the window. Identifies it as number. Ninety two in the city's licensing program while smoking marijuana is essentially legal here the cafes name refers to the murky backside of the marijuana business how coffeeshops get their supply from wholesalers. That's the gray area. That touch laws have yet to sort out. Pot is no longer imported with modern techniques countless small time dutch growers expertly duplicate strains from around the world nearby greenhouses to meet the demand of local shops. This esteemed coffee shop the gray area which works with the best boutique. Growers in holland was a recent winner of amsterdam's cannabis cup high honor to be sure. The next canal is the herron rocked pause on the bridge while rick points a few things out Hereon graft during the dutch golden age boom in the sixteen. Hundreds amsterdam expanded adding this canal. It was named for the heron. The wealthy city merchants who lined with their mansions. Because the city was anti-royalty. There was no blue blooded class. These hereon functioned as the city's aristocracy. Even today the herron graft is the high rent district noticed that. Zoning here forbids houseboats. Check out the house. That's kitty corner. Across the bridge at herron graft one fifty it has features. You'll find on many old amsterdam buildings on. The roof is a gable. A false front supported with rod's these gables have no structural purpose. They simply decorate the otherwise sharply pitched roof lines. I'll talk more about gables and just a bit notice. Also that this particular buildings at the end of the block you get a cut away look of its entire depth. The long side of the building like this one most amsterdam buildings are much bigger than the appear from the front in a few minutes. We'll be walking by the most famous after house in all the world. The anne frank house the word g- rocked refers to the ensemble of canal and the lanes. That border it on each side like herron cracked by the way. A strut is a street without a canal. Before moving on notice the parking sign a long hair and grabbed the sign warns motorists put money in the meter at the end of the block. Parking is a major problem in a city. Like this designed for boats. Not cars continue west walking slowly alongside. The league rocked toward the next bridge. Lali this is one of the city's prettiest small canals bind with trees and crushed by a series of arched bridges. There are some four hundred such bridges in amsterdam. It's the pleasant street of trends furniture shops and bookstores. notice that some buildings have staircases leading down below the street level to residences looking up. You'll see the characteristic beams jetting out from the top with a hook on the end. Attach poly to that and you can lift up a sofa and send it through the big upper story window much. Easier than lugging it up Maung narrow staircase continue onto the next canal. You cross the kaiser's grat and pause on the bridge kaiser's cracked from the bridge. Checkout the variety of buildings decorating the rooftops are amsterdam's famous gables or false fronts gables. Come in all shapes and sizes might be ornamented with human and animal heads. Garland's earns scrolls and curly cues despite the infinite variety. There are a few distinct types see. How many of these. You can spot a simple point. Gable just follows the triangular shape of pitched roof. A bell. gable is shaped like a bell. How clever step gables are triangular in shape and lined with steps. These are especially popular in belgium. The one with the rectangular protrusion at the peak is called a spout gable neck gables rise up vertically from a pair of sloping shoulders coral gables. Make pointed. roofs looked classically horizontal. And there's probably even a clark gable. Frankly my dear. I don't give a damn from here. We make a detour off our westward. Route veering left toward the church. Called the vesta kirk you can see the vestry kirk tower rising above the rooftops capped with a colorful crown. So crossed the kaiser's greg bridge and turn left. That is heading south. Start walking south along. The kaiser's rocked canal. While rick directs. You toward the church a detour to the ester kirk walk south about a hundred yards along the kaiser's crocked you'll reach his head of steps leading down to the water there you'll find at triangular pink stone jutting into the canal is part of the so-called homo monument amsterdam's aids memorial. If you survey the square you'll see that. The pink triangle is just one of three triangles between here and the church. These are contained in a single large triangle. That comprises the home on mount the pink triangle design reclaims the symbol that the nazis used in concentration camps to label homosexuals and it's also a reminder of the persecution gay people still experienced today you see flowers or cards left here by friends and loved ones near the monument on Square is a souvenir kiosk called pink. Point here. The volunteer staff gives out information on gay and lesbian amsterdam especially nightlife. The green metal structure near the homo monument is a public. Urinal it offers just enough privacy city truck circulate around town on a regular basis. Sentencing them down from here. Walked through esther mark square between the church. And the busy street called rod who strut. you'll find to very dutch kiosks. One sells french fries when it's closed the shutters feature funny paintings putting fries into great masterpieces of western art. The other cells fresh herring if you've yet to try a delicious dutch herring. This is the perfect opportunity. Lisa care for a raw herring. Now thanks for around three euros. You get a herring with pickles and onion still. No you get a paper plate. Sorry and instructions from the merchant on how to eat it Old don't be so picky. Listen i'll try one haring if we can also get some french fries. That fair enough. Yep you can't get more dutch than fruits dipped in mayonnaise sauce true but personally. I don't really like the mayonnaise now. Who's being picky. Maybe we should just move on idea near the church. Look for a cute little statue. It's of an frank. The anne frank house is just down the block and was born in germany but her family moved to holland. When the nazis took power in their native land ends father set up a prosperous business in the neighborhood and they hope to enjoy a peaceful life here in this city so known for tolerance but on may tenth. Nineteen forty germany's lift. Boffa began bombing schiphol airport within a week. The netherlands surrendered queen. Vilma fled to britain and nazi soldiers. Goostepped down rod who strut past the vesta kurkin into dom square where they draped huge swastikas on the royal palace. A five year occupation began more on that tragic story in just a bit for now look up at the towering spire of the impressive vesta kirk the crown shape was a gift of the habsburg emperor maximilian the first as a thanks for a big loan. The city got permission to use the habsburg royal symbol the tower also displays the symbol of amsterdam with its three xi's the vestry kirk or western church was built in sixteen thirty one as the city was expanding out from dumbs square rembrandt's buried inside but no one knows where the church tower has a carolina that chimes every fifteen minutes at other times. It plays full songs. Caroline's are a dutch specialty. They were invented by dutch makers back in the fourteen hundreds the chinese say that they are the ones who worked with me. Lisa work with me. A carillon is a set of bells of different sizes and pitches. There's a live musician inside the tower who plays a keyboard to make the music mozart. Vivaldi and bach. All of whom live during the heyday of the caroline brought music. That sounds great. On this unique instrument during world war two the vesta kirks caroline played every day. This hopeful sound reminded and frank who hit out just down the street that there was indeed an outside world and so we go to the end. Frank house continue past the church entrance walking north along the princeton gawked canal. You'll pass by a long line of tourists marking the entrance to the anne. Frank house the anne frank house do. We won't go inside. It's worth pausing here at princeton rocked number two sixty seven. This was the office of 'em frank's father otto. Who owned a business. Selling spices in commercial gelling agent called becton. It was here that during world war two eight amsterdam jews hid from nazi persecution including thirteen year old and frank after invading holland the nazis started rounding up amsterdam's jews and shipping them by train to death camps in the east to avoid deportation. The jewish frank family went into hiding. They decided to hide out auto frank's place of business so on a rainy monday morning. July six nineteen forty two. They walked down the street wearing extra clothes to avoid carrying suspicious suitcases. They breathed their last. Fresh air. took a long look at the princeton grabbed canal went in through the entrance and disappeared. Where did they go as we've seen on our walk. Many amsterdam structures have spacious backhaus enactor house. The entrance to the hiding place was concealed by paul away bookcase. Meanwhile the front of the building remained a working business. The nazis had no reason to suspect anything fishy was going on here and frank's family and four other. Jews hid for twenty five months. They were kept alive by brave amsterdamers. Who smuggled in food. They tried to carry on life as usual and kept up her schoolwork. She pasted photos of american movie stars on her wall. She flirted with the sixteen year old. Peter van pels. Who was hiding out with the frank family day. They had to keep completely quiet so no one in the office could hear them. They'd whisper tiptoe and step around squeaky places in the floor. The windows were blacked out so they couldn't even look outside. They could hear the bells of the vesta kirk chiming every fifteen minutes at night. When the office is closed they could sneak into the business area and listened to winston churchill's bbc radio broadcasts and chart the progress of the war. All this humdrum existence was captured by thirteen year. Old an in her diary then on august fourth nineteen forty four. A band of nazi police politely entered the office. They went directly to the hidden bookcase entrance. No one knows who tipped them off. They arrested the jews sent them by train. To auschwitz the notorious death camp in poland there and died of typhus just weeks before the camp was liberated by the allies of the hundred and thirty five thousand dutch jews. Hundred thousand perished in the war otto survived. He returned to amsterdam where he found his daughter's diary he had it. Published in nineteen forty seven under the title deductor house. It became a worldwide sensation. Spawning translations plays and movies. The anne frank house is a grim reminder of the horrors of world war two has an uplifting twist the diary of anne frank which lives on a testament to the human spirit that cannot be crushed. Our tour continues just ahead at the next bridge. Turn left the bridge and stop at the summit. Mid canal for review of the princeton grabbed canal. Princeton gr- act the so called. Prince's canal is considered one of the most livable areas in town. It's lined with houseboats. Some of the city's estimated two thousand five hundred. These small vessels were once cargo ships but by the nineteen thirties. They had become obsolete replaced by modern craft. They found a new use. As houseboats lining the canals of amsterdam. Where dry land was so limited in pricey today. Their former cargo holds are fashioned into elegant cozy living-rooms the once powerful engines have generally been removed to make room for more living space. Mortgage spot surprised and grandfathered. In making some of the junky old boats worth more than you'd think house voters can plug hoses and cables and outlets along the canals to get water and electricity. Note the canal traffic the official speed limit on canals about four miles per hour at night. Boats must have running lights on the top. The side and in the stern most boats are small and low designed to glide under the city's bridges. The princeton graft bridges average height with less than seven feet of headroom. That headroom varies with the water level. Some bridges have less than six feet. Boaters need good maps to tell them the height of the bridges which is crucial for navigating police boats rome on the lookout for boaters. Dui just across the bridge are several typical. You're don cafes. The relaxed cafe de prinz serves food and drink both day and night. The old timey fates fund a few doors to the right occasionally features the mournful songs of the late local legend. That balladur yanni. You're done finally. There's the cafe to smaller. It's not visible from here. But it's about a half a block to the right. It has a deck where you can drink outside along the quiet canal. But let's keep going for now once you cross. The princeton grabbed you enter. What's fishery considered the you're done neighborhood facing west toward cafe to prince crossed the bridge nvr left start heading down. The street called new alleles trot. Walk slowly making your way to the i intersection. Well rick points a few things out. Newer lali strut. Welcome to the quiet. Your dog built in the sixteen hundreds as a working class housing area. It's now home to artists and yuppies. The name your done probably was not derived from the french gerardo but given the neighborhoods garden like ambience. It seems like it should have been developed good. Travelers is notice number. Two while parking is generally not allowed this prime space complete with a plugin reserves spot for those investing in an electric car. Signs warned speeding. Drivers of the speed bumps let up. It says. Watch out for trembles. Notice how the pragmatic dutch deal with junk mail on the doors stickers next to the mail slot say nay or yeah no or yes. Telling the postman if they'll accept or refuse junk. Mail residents are allowed a front yard garden as long as it's no more than one sidewalk tile wide. The red metal bollards have been bashing balls since the nineteen seventies when they were put into. Stop people from parking on the sidewalks though. Many apartments have windows right on the street. The neighbors don't stare and the residents. Don't care the even invite their friends over for candlelit dinners right by the front window. Excuse me a few directions at the first intersection. Turn right on air. Staley davar strat. Thanks lisa it's no way i could have pronounced aristotle lali diverse strat gotcha pause and linger awhile. This tiny lane. Imagine the frustrations of homeownership here. The ugly modern buildings you see date from the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. This was before the gentrification of the nineteen eighties when they started making the more restrictive building codes of today checkout house number nine number nine number nine here. A rundown historic home was torn down replaced by a cheap and functional building with modern heating and plumbing. Now move ahead to number five number five number five. This owner was probably stuck with rent control so he didn't invest in the place. He missed the window of time. When a cheap and functional rebuild was allowed and now he can't get permission to renovate his home without making it prohibitively expensive across the street number two a obviously had the cash to spruce things up first class newly renovated homes need to preserve their funky leaning angles. And original wooden beams. Nice to look at but absolutely maddening if you own a building and aren't rich. Hey just give me a houseboat. And i'm happy just ahead. Stop atop the bridge over the canal. The heart of the or done for me this bridge and its surroundings capture the essence of the your dawn look around. There's bookstores art galleries working artists studios small cafes filled with rickety tables. Look down the quiet. Eglin tears canal it's lined with trees and old narrow buildings with gables. Classic amsterdam look south at the vesta kirk or western church. This is a completely different view of the church from the one that the tourists in line at the end frank house get framed by narrow streets crossed with streetlamp wires and looming over shoppers. Bicycles to me. This is the church. It's very best plight now with your back to the church. Look north down. The street called today d ag. A little help here please. Lisa veda eglin tears device dot. Yeah veda what she said. That street is the laid back your non neighborhoods main shopping and people street. If you venture down there you'll find boutiques galleries antique stores hair salons restaurants and cafes but for now we're moving onto our final stop from the bridge faced the fester kirk facing the church. Turn right going west alongside the ears canal. Our final stop is a block and a half away. Let me point out a few things along the way to saint andrews hof by way of electric lady land as you walk west along. Egland tears canal. Check out the boats. Junky old boats. Litter the canal. Some aren't worth maintaining in our left abandoned as these dinghies fill with rainwater. Start to rot. The city confiscates them and stores them in a big lot. Unclaimed boats are auctioned off three times a year but most boats are well used and even the funky est scouse can become cruising love boats when the sun goes down. Our destination is saint andrews off up ahead. But there's something along the way. I wanna show you. You'll come to the i intersection. The street called called beta. Lali bar strat at the intersection. Turn left and walk a few steps to number five. You'll find a small shop with a flowery window display. It's called electric lady. Land the first museum of fluorescent art. The funky facade hides in luminated wonderland within its the creation of nick padalino. One cool cat. Who really found his niche in life. Downstairs is a tiny museum of fluorescent. Black light art. Nick personally demonstrates fluorescence found in everything from minerals to stamps to candy to the tattoo on his arm. He seems to get a bigger kick out of it than even his customers. You can see the historic first fluorescent crayon from san francisco in the nineteen fifties. Well the label says us with black light for church groups. Wow one hundred yards further down the street. Old hippies might wanna visit the paradox coffee shop. This is the perfect coffee shop for the nervous american. Who wants a friendly mellow place to go local. Wow wow indeed. but we have one final. Stop remember backtrack to the canal and turn left after turning left and walking a few dozen yards you'll soon find. The saint andrew's huff. It's on the left side of the street at number one. Oh seven the black door is marked. Sint andries huff one. Seven t m one. Forty-five the doorway looks private. But it's the public entrance to a set of residences. It's generally open during daytime hours. Except on sundays enter quietly. He may have to push hard on the door. Go inside and continue on. He'll walk into a tiny garden courtyard surrounded by a dozen or so residences. Take a seat on a bench. This is one of the city's scores of courtyards called huffy is similar. To amsterdam's much larger began hof these are subsidized residences built around a courtyard funded by churches charities and the city for low income widows and pensioners and this is where our tour ends in a tranquil world. That seems right out of a painting by vermeer. You're just blocks from the bustle of amsterdam. But it feels like another world here immersed in the your don where everything's in its place end. Life seems very good. We hope you've enjoyed this. Walk through the your don. Thanks to jeanne. Openshaw the co author of this tour. If you're doing more sightseeing in amsterdam. Check out our other tours. The amsterdam city walk and the red light district. This tour was excerpted from the rick. Steves amsterdam bruges and brussels guidebook for more details on eating sleeping and sightseeing in those cities referred to the most recent edition of that guidebook for more free audio tours and podcasts and for information about our guidebooks tv shows bus tours and travel gear visit our website at rick. Steves dot com. This tour was produced by cedar house. Audio productions thanks don koogle and for now.

amsterdam vesta kirk dom square magna plaza royal palace Amsterdam the netherlands herron rick steves anne frank Lisa lisa hello Kirk rick dom square west of dumb square canal canal frank house red brick magna plaza shopping magna plaza building frank north sea canal
Mindfulness Moments for More Patience

The Daily Meditation Podcast

11:20 min | 3 months ago

Mindfulness Moments for More Patience

"This is two thousand. Two hundred and thirty three off. The daily meditation podcast. I'm mary mickley. And i welcome you to day. Five of our series. Were exploring this week this week. It's all about staying positive in a negative situation as you're exploring this weeks series. I want you to know you can find the full. Half hour guided meditations on the sip and patient app. You receive a positivity journal as well as a positively slowdown guide with an herbal tea recommendation. All the meditation techniques. You're exploring this week as well as a yoga pose customized for this weeks series. You can try the sipa no meditation app free for seven days and entire week's series. That's where you can always find more if you're ready for it. Were the thirty minute guided meditations there. So how are you doing with your challenge this week every week. We explore a challenge. Ride along with a meditation series. Your challenge this week is a unique challenge where you are focusing on the ordinary miracles. You come across in every day life. Today i was out walking along the mangroves near where i live in florida i live on a barrier island. Just off the coast of florida and i saw two night herons. It's rare to see these birds. And i saw two of them together. They were perched on a large mangrove area and they were looking intently into the waters below them for fish so their necks were craned and they were sitting there for a long time. They had been sitting there before. I came across them and i watched them for about ten minutes. The hadn't caught any fish while i was there watching them and i'm sure that they stayed. Maybe all day fishing in that spot. They were incredibly patient. Fishing requires patience and this ordinary miracle. I saw these two rare night. Herons fishing so patiently. I wonder how you're doing with your challenge today where your focus is patients so every day this week i'm sharing with you a challenge to look for a particular kind of miracle each day for today. Look for they miracles. At patience it could be nature. Could be with someone you're having especially somebody who maybe as with a young child or someone who is being rude to us and you're noticing. This requires great patience to control your temper so your journal. Prompt i know many of you are journaling right along with your meditations your journal. Prompt is to journal about the ordinary miracles. You see today the have to do with patience and you're going to be guided in a meditation to help you. Cultivate the virtue of patience. I wanna share with you. What your fellow. Meditators has to say about patients and their lives. This is from carl from the netherlands. He writes. I want to share with you. How much. Meditation has helped me to enjoy the moment. I used to rush through my day and at the end of the day. I could hardly even remember the things that i had done because i did them. So absent mindedly. Meditation helped me to be more mindful. About how i am living my life. This is created so much more life satisfaction. And i've never felt calmer or happier. Thank you for sharing daily meditations and for focusing on a different theme each week the different themes helped me to focus on different parts of my life that i hadn't considered before. Thank you carl for listening all the way from the netherlands and for giving yourself permission to slow down. It's true that when you slow down you become more mindful of how you live your life and this brings so much more quality and richness to your life experiences. I'm sure many of you know this as you meditate each day but for those of you who are new. I hope that carl's message will give you some hope to keep showing up for yourself. So now i invite you to settle yourself down and get ready to meditate set up straight and closure is as you close your eyes as always heap them gently uplifted to the point. Between your eyebrows. Your spiritual lie began to notice where you hold tension in your body notice. What may have caused that tension. Now it is. What's going on with your emotions today. Not going so deeply into particular moments just observing. How you're feeling and why you're feeling this way you begin to notice your breath as you inhale and exhale through your nose. Reflect on a moment when you felt impatient. Maybe out and patient today or maybe there's some situation or some person that generally causes you to feel impatient now reflect on why you could slow down and appreciate gift at each moment in your life notice if your impatience is caused by a lack of time. I consider why you need to rush through the moments or times when you feel impatient. Consider what it would be like if you allowed yourself a little more grace and a little more time notice. If you feel like you're impatient moments have to do with feeling like you need to be doing something. More significant are more important. Hang consider how sometimes this small insignificant moments at app to create a major part of your life. How could you value the little moments adhere here life more. Continue reflecting and then allow yourself to simply sit in stillness. You are so slowing down for royal.

mary mickley florida carl the netherlands
Conviction politics: Floridas disenfranchised felons

The Economist: The Intelligence

22:33 min | 9 months ago

Conviction politics: Floridas disenfranchised felons

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist. Radio, I'm your host Shashank Kyoshi filling in for Jason Pocket every weekday we provide you with a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. Columbia is the only democracy whose police force is run by the Defense Ministry. The country's cops are poorly paid overworked and very heavily armed. A recent case of police brutality in Bogota has sparked big protests and calls for reform. And Dutch farmers normally raise about two and a half million mink a year for their for me the Netherlands, one of the biggest producers in the world but it turns out that the cuddly creatures can carry covid nineteen and pass it to humans luckily for them that turns out her saved their skin. I up. Joe Biden took to the campaign trail in Florida, this week. As a rally for Hispanic voters Mr. Biden emphasized seemed like a eight point. Getting people out to vote. So please. This election. Make your vote her. Through your vote, your voices her. Make a plan to vote has been pointed out. Make your plan to help your community for. But the very act of voting in this year's election has become contentious. President trump has been railing against mailing voting is having little evidence of fraud this whole ballot system where you can send it in. and. It's not even requested. We're not talking about it solicited. They're unsolicited ballots and they're sent in is very dangerous or our country and in Florida a fight over voting rights for former felons could see hundreds of thousands of people disenfranchised. So. In Two thousand eighteen voters in Florida approved a constitutional amendment allowing felons who had served their time except for murderers at certain sex related offenders to vote in elections. After that amendment passed Florida's Republican legislature passed a law saying, that's fine. They can vote but they have to pay back all the fines, fees and restitution costs of their incarceration. John Facile is economists. Washington correspondent. So that's the sort of thing that sounds quite reasonable. Right if you stole one hundred bucks from someone, you gotta pay back what you stole before you can vote but Florida's criminal justice system is unusually reliant on fines and fees from offenders. So you have people who had been convicted of felonies poor people who had to pay fifty dollars to get a public defender or one hundred bucks for some sort of fee to file a complaint. then. You also had fines levied on them that were quite heavy. So I spoke to one woman who was convicted of her part in a fraud scheme that she says was unwitting, but she was ordered to pay back fifty, nine, million dollars and no. One's ever going to be able to do that. I spent time with another young man who was convicted of a felony while he was basically just out of school and it turns out that when he went to registered to vote, he owed four thousand dollars to the county where he was arrested nobody had ever told him. That and other courts allowing this law to stand the courts have let it stand on Friday the last court in Florida weighed in and they've let the stand the court said the fines and fees were part of the criminal sentence. So they couldn't be said to a fully completed their full sentence until they had paid off everything they were told to pay off. So it looks as though almost eight hundred thousand people who thought they would be able to vote may not be able to vote and so is the supreme court likely to weigh in at this point now again? It's probably not going to go to the supreme. Court again, they declined to hear it in July, before that last appeal they declined over the strong objections of Justice Sotomayor who accused her colleagues of continuing trend of condoning disenfranchisement that's in Florida is this happening else? Well, the rules regarding where and how felons can vote changed dramatically from state to state you have some states like for mountain main where people can vote while in. Prison and you have some states like Florida used to be where if you've been convicted of a felony anytime, you never have the right to vote. So it's a Patchwork of laws regarding felony and franchise, but the trend has been over the past decade or so to loosen restrictions rather than strengthen them. But as we've seen in Florida sometimes that involves bats lighting sometimes the loosening isn't as loosened practice as it appears it should be. Felons aside, how easy or hard is it in general for people who exercise their right to vote in America? It's harder than I think it should be it's harder than most people think it should be it used to be the case that the Voting Rights Act which was passed in nineteen sixty five required jurisdictions with a history of voter discrimination. To submit any changes to how they conduct elections to the Justice Department in two, thousand, thirteen, the supreme court basically gutted it. The Voting Rights Act they said that requirements should no longer apply since then around seventeen hundred polling places have closed and previously covered jurisdictions, the largest numbers were in Texas Arizona and and most of those places are in heavily minority district. There's also the problem of long lines often what I found that I was recovering Super Tuesday in Texas before everything shutdown is that in suburban precincts. White it was much easier to vote than in inner city precincts, which were which were heavily African American of the Tino. In two, thousand, sixteen around half a million voters failed to cast ballots at their polling places because of problems at those polling locations. So I think people tend to think of voter suppression as as physically keeping people away from the polls that really doesn't happen. What does happen is that the exercise the franchise is likely to be much more onerous if you're a non white than if you're white, are we seeing any of those problems this round this time round for the election that's coming up. Yeah. We saw them in full force in Wisconsin in their primary earlier this spring in April. Shortage of poll workers as much of America does as result, they're only five precincts total in the city of Milwaukee, which is the state's biggest city in which had one hundred, eighty precincts in two, thousand sixteen. There are a lot of places that are really concerned about having enough poll workers to have all the polling place that should be open poll workers tend to be retirees, which puts them at high risk of Covid, and so a lot of them understandably don't WanNa come out and and sit in the crowded place for long hours. But there's a fear that this shortage of poll workers is GONNA lead to a lot fewer polling places in there should be. Perhaps. It's a naive question but why would anyone want to make harder for people to vote? So there are those who say that because Republicans are so dependent on older white voters who tend to be the most reliable voters that is in their interest to make it harder for non white and young voters to vote. Donald Trump. When he was talking about expanding postal voting essentially gave the game away. He said they had things levels of voting that if you ever agree to it, you'd never have a republican elected in this country again. So it seems as though Republicans rather than trying to appeal to as many voters as possible regardless of race color creed or. Are really trying to tailor the electric to best suit themselves. What about voting by mail something that would seem obvious into pandemic but that's been hugely divisive. This round hasn't it. Yeah Donald Trump has been inveighing against it, which is odd because there's a ton of research that shows that voting by mail tends to improve turnout but not for any particular political party more recently, he has been encouraging his supporters to vote by mail I. Think he has got nervous that if Democrats vote by mail and huge numbers and Republicans don't vote by mail at all then this may lead to an imbalance in the results that doesn't favor him. There have been polls that have showed that as many as fifty percent of Democrats, more plan to vote by mail whereas only one in five Republicans do you can imagine it sort of pandemic situation in red states where Republicans don't want to go to the polls but think that voting by mail is corrupt is now trying to walk back some of the damage you may have caused. How do all these trends impact the election this year? Do you think John? I think that between the president inveighing against the election warning that it's going to be rigged concerns about foreign interference. There is an alarming number of Americans people on both sides of the aisle who thinks that this year's election won't be free and fair I. Think there are concerns that people may be less likely to vote and that once they vote, they'll be less likely. To accept the results of the elections that is going to lead people to lose faith in democracy itself for those who do want get the vote out what are they doing about it? Well, people can check their registration status early, they could make sure that their friends and neighbors are all registered. I think there's a lot of worry among Democrats because traditional touch points that. They use to register voters you know the DMV or college voter registration drives those aren't happening now because of the pandemic and there are fears that young people are not registering at the numbers they should be. But for Florida's felons, there have been organizations that are working to pay off fines and fees almost four million dollars have been raised so far. Bloomberg who had been. Running for president said, he will spend one hundred million dollars of his own money to help Joe Biden win in. Florida. I think there's there's a hope that some of that will go to paying off fines and fees, but unfortunately, it looks like whatever happens not everyone who thought that they would be eligible to vote will, in fact, be eligible to vote this fall in Florida. John Thank you talk to us? Always a pleasure trashing. For the latest on the American election in November. More of John Listen to checks and balances available every Friday. Columbia has been rocked by an outpouring of rage against police. Earlier this month in the capital Austar police arrested heavier or years a taxi driver and father of to drinking alcohol on the St. Louis video that went viral chosen officer with his knee pressed against Mr Ordinary as his back and using teasing. A. Police Stop the filming but witnesses say he was unconscious when they took him to a police station he died hours later in hospital. His death spot days of protests that left thirteen people dead and hundreds injured. Protesters and activists say police brutality is out of control. The mayor of Bogota on Sunday that a gathering. Of. The peace and bereaved relatives. Cool. was a woman named Myra. Runs. AK- Lamari building I am the wife of High Defense Acre the mother of a seven month old child who the national police left without a father the last night. Tomba. Hosted they've done without the right to know his father the right to grow up with him. And the mayor cloudy Lopez a self call for reform of the police. Solution is not to militarized Bogotanos. Demilitarize the police. Columbia is perhaps the only democracy in the world in which the entire police force is under the control of the Ministry of Defence Marianna, Palau Couples Columbia for the Economist. There are countries that have a militarized police force, but that is only part of their police sort of in addition to a less motorized police. Columbia is a long way from reaching that stage. Sometimes it's really hard to differentiate policemen from soldiers. They both wear military green uniforms they both use the same military ranks policemen often carry rifles and you can also see them flying blackhawks, for example. As they are searching the jungle for coca or illegal armed groups. In recent years reports that abused by the cops are getting more and more common. So Marianna how these heavily armed police cope with the challenges of a city like Bogota. So the problem is that there's not enough policemen to patrol the streets. So most policemen are overworked, they're exhausted because they work overtime and this leads to poor quality policing, and that is part of the reason why you see severe forms of urban crime. So there's high murder rates mugging his really common domestic and sexual violence are on the rise. In Bogota for example, you've seen bike thefts increasing some people have even been murdered because these will stop at nothing to seal their bikes. And the way that police deal with this is defined by some experts as. Not Exactly. appropriate. So for example, they targets street beggars and transsexuals often, and they can be verbally abusive oversized mayor's office has had about one hundred and thirty complaints of excessive use of force in from the police. But that is actually an understatement of how much force is actually used. Because most people don't report this kind of abuse as you pointed out, most countries have their police under civilian control. Some of these problems to do with the fact that the Colombian police are under the Defense Ministry one of the main issues is they compete for resources with the army in particular. For example, a former police general told me that whenever he tried to increase his men salaries, the army would demand soldiers salaries to be increased as well. Then, you have issues like an important part of the police consists of conscript, and then there's a cultural issue because experts told me that policemen and Columbia. For example, glorify going after guerrilla groups and you have to remember Colombia had the far left wing guerrilla group who want to overthrow the government and police. You're also love going after narcos which Columbia saw a lot of Nargis cartels back in the ninety s but than preventing crime for the police is just not that sexy but former police generals have told me that as long as the police. Is under the control of the Ministry of Defence. There's no way that these issues are going to be solved. So how did the police end up this this paramilitary appendage? If the Defense Ministry of the best place I think you have to goal baton one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety s to answer that question. So Columbia backline was going through a period of political violence and mayors were in charge of local police forces were using them to kill their political opponents. So the president back then we started Benita he by the way was an army general. He made the police a national institution and put it under the control of the Ministry of Defence. During Columbia's fifty, two year armed conflict. It made a lot of sense to have a militarized police force because the government needed all of its security forces to fight off the FARC. And you know in the nineties, we saw the rise of drug lords, Pablo Escobar, and several drug cartels, and these had their own militias and they were heavily armed. So the government also needed a militarized police to fight them off, and the truth is that Colombia's police they were highly strengthened by billions of dollars in USA. They did lead one of the most or some of the most important blows against the FARC and were key and dismantling cartels. Maybe there was an argument then for militarized police force back in Colombia's more lawless days of the police still dealing with that kind of warzone environment today Escobar has been dead for more than twenty five years and the FARC signed a peace deal with the government. In Two thousand sixteen and they mobilize. So Columbia's threats have changed since then and this police force which was really good at fighting guerrillas doesn't seem so good at fighting these threats. So for example, in rural, Columbia there are still illegal armed groups much smaller than the gorilla less ideological, but they still focus on drug trafficking and they export businesses, they community leaders and the police haven't been able. To Stop these threats and I think it's pretty telling that during the pandemic, it is these armed groups and not the police who have been enforcing lockdown measures to stop the spread of the disease I think it's important to mention that there is awareness that post-conflict Columbia needs a different kind of police. The subject of a police reform has been an on and off matter of debate for some. Years now I mean one hundred Santos who was president of Colombian signed the peace deal with the fartsy set up a commission that would propose a police reform but he quickly lost interest in it and we never saw anything come out of that going back to this month's violent protests and caused by the mayor of Bogota for reform. Do you think change might be on the way the president? Refuses to consider reform and this has a lot to do with political reasons because the right wing parties that back the president have historically defended the country's security forces and. See Police reform as an attack on the police some government officials say that you know the rising power of violent groups and rural. Columbia. Justifies a militarized police force and. That does make some sense, but I also think that the protests have shown that at least part of the police needs to change and that if it doesn't Columbia's leaders expect more and rest. You. Thank you. For a lot more analysis like this subscribe to the Economist to find the best introductory offer wherever you are just go to economists dot com slash intelligence offer. you might not have heard me before. You probably have seen the small weasel like creatures or these defa often used for coats. Since two thousand at least eight European countries have banned fur-farming. But in the Netherlands mink farmers had the mission to carry on their trade for a few more years. Until one, thousand, nine, hundred. Initially. The Netherlands was scheduled to end mink farming as of two, thousand, twenty four. They adopted a law, the two thousand and thirteen, which gave farmers ten years to get out of the business. Matt stained glass is odd deputy your. But. They have pulled band four to two, thousand and twenty one because it was discovered this spring that mink can get and spread covid nineteen. How did that happen? How did somebody figure out the minks can spread covid nineteen to humans in April a few the workers at some of these farms in southern Netherlands came down with covid nineteen and it wasn't clear initially whether they have spread it among themselves or whether the animals were infected Tuesday tested the. Animals. The animals turned out to be positive and then I did some genetic testing which found that in at least two cases it was overwhelmingly likely that the humans have been infected by the mink rather than the other way around. So that established for the first time that these animals could spread to humans and the number of farms that the disease spread to rose very quickly. So that created a great deal concern, the Dutch government and led to a votes. To bring them forward that sounds like an unexpected win for animal rights activists. Yeah. They had already won the battle back in two thousand thirteen by getting the band past is the fourth-biggest mink farming country in the world after Denmark Poland and China and it had already banned other forms of fur-farming at the behest of the Dutch party for the animals, which is a remarkably strong political party and has four seats in the Dutch parliament, which has one hundred. Fifty seats, it's the I definitely, the biggest most powerful animal rights party in the world and the big one in this case was just that they managed to get the band pulled forward by several years because public health concerns so good for the party. Good for the minx what are the farmers have to say about all of this the farmers obviously they're disappointed they knew they were getting out of the business that accepted that but they're having to do. It three years early, they say the total turnover, the industry is about one hundred and fifty million to two, hundred, million a year the animal rights activists put the figure much lower at below one hundred million, and there's been a glut of mink on the market in the last few years. So the for prices have been extremely low and it's not clear whether the compensation that's been offered to farmers who have had their mink destroyed because of the COVID. Nineteen. Infection has been higher than the market value of the MINK for itself. But the farmers nevertheless say if the government is going to tell them, they have to get out of the business three years early than the government has to compensate them for that. The animal rights activists feel that everybody has to suffer because of covid nineteen and the idea that farmers should be paid extra to get out of business if they already knew they were leaving seems unfair. In these difficult times what about the ethics of this how unsavory is modern mink farming minks have been formed for a long time actually over one hundred years and there have been successive steps to try to make the farming of make more humane. Farmers obviously claimed that conditions at their farms are quite favourable and reasonable but animal rights activists say that you can't farm mink in a humane fashion because minkin wild are solitary predatory animals. The contention is that. They can't humanely raised in Barnesville stacked cages and it hasn't been that much work done to try to breed variety of mink that fines being cooped up more palatable and among Dutch voters do animal rights activists outnumber the mink wears they definitely outnumber the mink wearers hasn't been testing specifically on the move to bring the ban forward. But in the past, all the polls of Dutch public have shown that more people are in favor of banning for farming then defendant. Ex. This episode of the intelligence if you enjoyed listening to us, please give us a racing on apple podcast and see you back here tomorrow.

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123. OIL SEE YOU IN COURT: suing the climate culprits

Reasons to be Cheerful

54:58 min | 1 year ago

123. OIL SEE YOU IN COURT: suing the climate culprits

"In this as reasons to be cheerful. There's milliband Jeff. Hello Hello thank you so good to have you back and obviously I'm conscious. This is a kind kind of a dual transition to make coming back to the country after your holiday and also blending back into civilian life following the overthrow the Jeff Chrissy. I mean that is obviously. You've you've been abroad. There's been a coup in your hands. I mean you must have thought about claiming political asylum. So yeah yeah I mean I think you should be pleased. I sort of arrange safe passage for you to come back you know any further questions Sawyer Sawyer video last week promoting the episode where you seize the means of casler actually i. I just think that this is just a blip in the the In the coming glory days of the Jeff Accuracy. And I just want you to know that you will be flung into political prison. I'm Shay One. I'm sure I'm sure I will be. But but but how do you feel about is does serve you right for having gone all day really. Yeah that's that's the moral of the story is that is all elitist. Don't do when their grip on power is tenuous. The reason I came back wasn't just to reestablish the Jefferson but it was to be half of the launch although Chapel Book Club Long Station Yeah the first episode hit and run through her. That's right she was great and we're gearing up for episode two which is going to be Alex bid natural born learn as a brilliant book about education as a combination with me you and Melissa Love Melissa Ban yes asks she doesn't she and it doesn't pop up in this fade. You'll need to go and subscribe to the media just search for Cheerful Book Club wherever you casts or if you get to our website you'll find links that will link into the description to this episode. So we're back and what we get into this. We were talking about climate litigation the use of legal cases to force governments to change climate policies and wind damages from fossil fuel companies responsible for the crisis in December. The Dutch Supreme Court upheld decision by the lower courts. The government of the Netherlands had to reduce carbon emissions by twenty five percent by the end end of two thousand twenty the compared to ninety levels. This is the first time of course off the national government to reduce carbon emissions by a set amount. And it's the latest in a wave of more than thirteen eighteen hundred climate cases that have been brought in twenty eight countries including the U K. And we'RE GONNA BE TALKING TO TESSA. WHO's on the legal team? The brought the Dutch case now. She's an interesting currency. What we before? I met her to dinner with Mary. Robinson the former president of island. And you're she she she works. Climate Litigation around the world are also Tim crossland who brought to climate cases against the British government. And then we're going to Vermont literally. Ernie Lands Bernie landfill the bud. where a number of cities he's including New York? Well we're going to Vermont. Talk about the United States where a number of cities including New York San Francisco both a Baltimore assuming fossil fuel companies. We're talking to law. Professor Pat Perenco. But what's going on there. And then you recorded a conversation with a cheerful person with net. Shankar Oh Sarah who produces a a really great podcast called brave new words which is about successful progressive campaigns. And we're going to have fascinating conversation compensation while you're away and we're going to be hearing that. So what's your reason to be cheerful. Joe Joe Rabbit. Have you seen it no did you. Have you heard of it. No I think it's been nominated for a bunch of Oscars the pictures at the moment tycoon. YTD Who people. I think he was sort of involved with the guys from flight. The conchords very early Liane and he's gone on to become this big deal. Hollywood director made one of my favorite comedies. which is called what we do in the shadows which has now been adapted to TV show show but he's he's very much in demand in Hollywood and he's made this film and accommodate but it's really heartwarming beautiful and it set in so the dog days of the Second World War in Germany? And it's about a German boy who because of his personal circumstances way lives is desperate to be the and Hitler youth but then there's an inciting incident in the film which means he very early on which means he he can't go to the youth camp with all the other boys so he spends time with his imaginary Canary Friend. Which is adult Hitler? Now what you think you think in this sounds a bit crescent tasteless. But isn't it's it's really nominated for lots of yet has its is really. It's a it's a comedy but then the final third of the film is is really beautiful. Sounds it's fantastic. Yeah what's your reasons to be cheerful. What obviously my primary primary reasons to be cheerful? Is that your bag thank you. It's gone back as we shouldn't take it as read because we should emphasize that was I. Final insecure what would the overthrow. The Jefferson generally insurrection. Left me feeling a little but real respect my self esteem go one is I. I've watched the only the first episode but I kind of see what people see in succession rights. This is not about the Labour leadership contest. Assist Faithful Murdoch isn't it. I mean the Jesse Armstrong writes. It will say it's based on a variety of people which I'm guessing is just the way I've covered you back illegally but yeah I mean it really does seem like it's written about that particular family designated survivor with for a long time. I was pushing sought of kind of got really at the end of series. Three sort of it's kind of lost. Its allure slightly for me Simply don't want you anymore. No no interviewed Kiefer Sutherland told told him you're a big fan of it. He said who yeah but Cham- early adopter of succession. One was. Yeah not only. was I early adopter. But when you get to the end of the first series the last episode from the fantasy opening minutes the episode I predicted to my wife. Exactly what would happen really. Yeah it was one of the great victory of my life. Does that mean that a good thing or a bad thing. It's not it's not predictable. It's just I'm really embrace these things. It's a gift. It is my singular gift. We'll keep giving reasons to be cheerful with ED MILIBAND INGEST Law. Let's make I guess we have Tessa. Khan who is a member of the agenda legal team and the CO director of the Climate Litigation. Networking Tim Crossland who's barrister and director of plan. B Hello both of you well. Let's start tested by asking you about your experience would be on the agenda legal team for the for the case versus is the Netherlands. Can you tell us about that. Case for people who don't know about and then you know what what transpired what that decision from. The Supreme Court means sauce awesome. I might start with what the case means so as not to bury delayed so the reason that the case is so significant is because it's the first time in the world that a court it has ordered a national government to reduce a country's greenhouse gas emissions by an absolute minimum amount and so the case started in two thousand and thirteen when the agenda foundation which is a Dutch sustainability. Ngo together with about nine hundred. Dutch citizens brought this case against the government of the Netherlands alleging that the emissions greenhouse gas emissions trajectory of the Netherlands in twenty twenty was unlawful on the basis that it was incompatible with the human rights of Dutch citizens and a breach of the Dutch Civil Code and they ask the court to order the government to reduce the Netherlands greenhouse gas emissions by at least twenty five percent in two two thousand twenty compared to nine hundred ninety levels and in two thousand fifteen. The District Court of The Hague agreed with us and made that order which was the historic kind of water mark moment and then in two thousand eighteen after the government predictably appealed the decision. We want again. The government appealed yet again and in December last year the Supreme Court of the Netherlands which is the highest appellate court affirmed the decision for the last time winning. Yes and we've been that's sit. There are no more avenues of appeal. So you know the cases protected come a little the bad guys when they when they keep appealing this. Yeah I mean and I've you definitely they could just get on with implementing the Reduction Order of the court and not waste tanks basis of the twenty five percent was that is the thing that would be consistent with two degrees limiting global warming to no more than two degrees and the Dutch government had signed up to that at which Kuban Hagen will Paris but it was started before per exactly it started before Paris to the two degree target was embodied in a number of the UN climate decisions decision that the government had endorsed and signed up to and the twenty five percent reduction Taga also featured in a number of those decisions as being the very minimum amount the industrialized countries to reduce emissions by by two thousand twenty. And is it something about the Dutch constitutional all system or legal system that lent itself to this case. Not at all. Actually that's why I as an international human rights lawyer got involved because because I think so. Many people saw the potential to replicate what had been done in the Netherlands in other legal systems because as I said human rights and in particular human rights that are protected on the European Convention on Human Rights which has been ratified or signed up to buy forty seven. European states are applicable in all of those countries trees and those are the rights that were relied on ultimately determinative. So what is the human rights argument. The argument is that climate change is a a at risk to the enjoyment of the right to life and the right to what is articulated in that instrument as private and family life which includes includes your ability to enjoy your housing and general well-being. Very much these here jaw. Yeah exactly and you know everything that we are are about. The current trajectory that we're on the likely impacts of climate change at above two degrees means that those rights are incredibly vulnerable and in a country like the the Netherlands which is super low lying and also in light of all of the of impacts of climate change in western Europe recently including mortality associated with haight waves the likely other health impacts of climate change the quarter grade that those risks are concrete enough for the government to need to take action to reduce emissions so far so good so we should bring in Tim because plan. B. Wall has taken two cases. I think I'm right in saying one around. Net Zero and twenty fifty and Heathrow expansion. Tell us a bit about those cases and the and the thinking on them. Sure so I'm plan. B was established just after the Paris Agreement in two thousand fifteen and governments pretty much all the governments of the world degrade our collective future depends on limiting warming to well below two degrees naming for one point five Mike decrees. But they didn't agree on any way to deliver that and their actions take us way beyond that so the concept was to hold them to account for those commitments through the courts. Now two thousand and eight when the Climate Change Act came into force. Climate Change Minister was one add millions and he signed the eighty percent sent target by two thousand and fifty on the basis that would limit warming to two degrees down as we just heard from. Tessa was the consensus at the time. In Two Thousand and eight post two thousand fifteen. Everybody's agreed that's not good enough. That's catastrophic potentially catastrophic but we hold onto down same target in other words. The government is now legislative for knit your cases now legislative net zero precisely so the time we started the case. That hadn't happened. We begin the case in December. Two thousand seventeen and then by January twenty eighteen. The committee on Climate Change. Say we now recommend a review so we don't succeed through the legal process but there's another story. It's the parallel parallel story. Of what happens outside the cords when you focus a ten significant to the fact that you didn't succeed in the legal case compared to the Dutch case I mean what is it. A less activist Colt is differently. Sort of legal different laws. What what what sort? What's the reason we as far as we can discern it so we tried to human rights arguments? The court just wasn't interested in those arguments. What happened outside the cords? He tells a bit more about that. The difference that made so we'd had a process of P- reaction correspondence with both the government. I'm an and the committee on climate change from April at no point during that correspondents did they say well. We're thinking of reviewing the situation when we start Dr Legal Action. Suddenly people like David King come out publicly and say this is Roy. Minton's does know what needs to be done and not doing it. It's not good enough. If I have to support legal action I will. Suddenly the spotlight is on this discrepancy between the government's claims to leadership. And what is actually doing and that pressure sure. It appears to contribute at least to the committee saying we recommend a review and then quite quickly actually outside the court process as we get to roughly where we could possibly have hoped to have got through the legal action. I don't think the twenty-fifth target is ideal net zero at all. It's it's not good enough. In accordance with the science we were never gonNA get more through the court process. And what about the Heathrow campus. So in tell us about twenty eighteen in Chris greyling signs off approval for the third runway. A he does. He's bound by law to to consider government mm-hmm and policy on climate change but he considers only the two thousand eight Tonkin. He ignores the Paris agreement completely completely. He comes out and says I considered the Paris Agreement. Irrelevant because the point of making this decision about Heathrow it hasn't been implemented into domestic law therefore completely irrelevant I will use the two degree target. Not The one point five degree target. We say that is complete madness. How can you base Jason Decision on a target? That's been completely discredited by everybody. That's dangerous that's leading us all to a place we don't want to go. So that has been the central argument acumen that was rejected by the High Court but then we got permission to appeal and had a full rehearing before the court of Appeal in October. And we're still waiting to hear from the Court of Appeal. What do we learn from these from these different suitcases about the potential of taking governments To court you think I mean I think I'm right in saying that in the UK on air pollution planner did succeed in forcing government. I think three times to forcing them back to improve the air pollution strategy that they had can we. Can we draw. Draw any conclusions from what's happened so far in these two different jurisdictions. Yeah definitely I mean. I think that as Tim said you know what happens outside the courtroom wants these cases added added is just as important as what happened inside the courtroom and in the Netherlands as I said the government's been appealing the decision for the better part of five years now but in the meantime Dutch climate. I'm at change policy. Making has been completely transformed by the case and the popular mobilization around the case the way the media covered it so for example since two thousand fifteen. The Dutch Parliament has agreed to phase out qualified power as soon as possible. It's passed a new climate change act it enacted in emissions reduction target for two thousand and thirty daddy that at the time was one of the most progressive in your you know it's really changed the discourse and you know the kind of overton window for policy making in respect of climate change in the country and that's because what these cases do they do two things one of them is that they really put the facts of climate change on the table in a way that is beyond and the argumentation in bad faith. or The obfuscation of the fact that happens in the media or in Parliament in court you just can't lie. You have to meet a certain standard of of proof and the other thing that they do. These cases do is they create really clear narratives of responsibility that a missing from the way that climate change. I just talked about and principally what they do. Is they pin responsibility for this crisis on the two sets of actors who have known about it and have committed to do something about it namely national governments and the fossil fuel industry. And that's the other I think quite important set of cases in the context of Climate Change Litigation until tell us a bit about those the difference between those cases in the ones that are brought against governments show in the last few years. We've seen a suite of cases. Brought against fossil fossil fuel companies primarily those that were identified in really groundbreaking study that was published about five years ago that identified that ninety companies these are responsible for two-thirds of greenhouse gas emissions that have been omitted since the start of the industrial revolution. And I think a lot of people saw that study and thought themselves well. It is outrageous that these companies are not being made to bear the costs of climate change and so at least partly inspired by that study and often often drawing directly on it a number of for example. US cities and counties and states have brought claims against big fossil fuel companies unease asking them to pay the costs of the inevitable harm that those CDs will incur as a result of climate change. Many of them are coastal cities. And we'll have to to adapt. So that's one example of the way those those cases look a bit different from the ones against governments which are more seeking policy change range and I think a particularly compelling example. Actually of those cases is a case that Spain brought by a Peruvian farmer who lives in the Peruvian Andes and Hayes brought a case against Awa which is one of Germany's main energy companies on the basis that adobe is one of those companies that was identified in that study and and the his his village in the Peruvian Andes basically threatened by melting glaciers. And he's asking me me to pay the costs of adapting to that glacier melt in direct proportion to its emissions since the start of the industrial revolution. Which which actually when you look at it when you add it up? It's only about twenty thousand euros. But it's such an important principle that these companies need to be held responsible when these cases of brawl who is bringing in where does the ground swell tend to come from one of the interesting things that Organza has in common with plan is that a lot of the cases have been brought by relatively civilly small groups that have established around this idea of bringing litigation rather than the major NGOs that have relatively deep deep pockets and have been established for years. That's one of the interesting things the way people are mobilizing around this concept. What about the argument that this stuff should be determined determined by politicians rather than lawyers? Well I think always asking courts to do is to enforce or vindicate Existing Rights Lights. We're just asking them to apply those rights to a new set of fact that's what makes this litigation same creative or novel or political because climate change policy is can be seen as being really political but in the case against the Dutch government. We weren't asking the court to tell the Dutch government how to reduce emissions. We weren't sang. It needs to shut down these coal fired power plant then reforest this part of the Netherlands and take the following measures. All we said was look. If the Dutch government doesn't reduce its emissions by a certain percentage. Then this is the kind of heart human rights harm. That's GonNa flow from that so all we're trying to do is establish Bam minimum of action that the government has to take how it implements. That action is really for policy makers to decide and looking forward. How how much of a to use this old cliche game changer can lit plumbers relation? You think be as the science gets clear and clearer and and the emergency gets greater return greater and governments have to make harder and harder decisions. How much of a role? She can play well. I think it can play a significant role in these cases. HASE's are more and more likely to win for the for the reasons you've outlined. The science is more robust. The gap between where we need to be where we're going is getting larger and people a more and more afraid and outraged by political inaction on the problem so as I said now with the precedent that the Dutch cases set there is a very strong legal basis assist for arguing that governments have a human rights based obligation to take sufficient action transfers from one jurisdiction to another if the Dutch of concluded that does that have relevance in all the calls fires a judge. That's interpreting the same riots in another country will look to how those rights interpreted interpreted in the Netherlands. I mean it's not a directly the applicable decision in another jurisdiction. But yes certainly because there are so few of these cases at the moment we see already that courts are citing the way that other courts have dealt with climate change inches a problem. So that's one element of it but the other thing is that both governments and particularly the industry is affected by the risk of litigation. And I saw fear this. There's this little relevance here too. Is it pay forty six of the Conservative Party Manifesto. The famous page forty six. The mole memorize. This was a big big issue during the election. But this is about this little politicize ation of the judges. so-called politicization of the judges and activism of the judges and the and this was in the context of the the brexit decisions. Do you think there's a danger. It was sort of chilling effect that the government wants to send a message to the courts back off again. This this is exactly the issue that confronted Churchill and others in one thousand nine hundred eighty five live when politicians said you cannot trust governments completely and on festively and there are some things that are so fundamental here that the court is always going to have to have Arro- because politicians and government simply don't have a mandate to drive their population towards destruction and devastation. They don't have a mandate to pursue policies that according to science will leave our planet on inhabitable that Sancho basic proposition is very difficult to see how anything could happen. The took that outside jurisdiction of the courts. I think the other thing is that courts are extremely sensitive to that concern so all of the cases that have challenged government policies for not being ambitious enough on climate change in all of the decisions. The first thing that caught say is we want to be clear that we are staying respecting expecting the separation of powers. So I think that's attention that's at the forefront of the mind of every judge that considers based questions. So it's part of the reason why I some of the jurisprudence in area has already been so conservative unease resolution is to try and not just talk about these ideas. Give people an idea of what they can. Do I think just the process of talking to a lawyer. You can feel like an intimidating thing or something that is a big leap for people. Where where did they get started? So I'm doing this because I'm a lawyer and I don't think we want to be saying that Communists occasion is a silver bullet. It's not don't the only thing I think for me. The question is just for every body. Could face up to this moment of crisis that we're all in and to ask themselves what they can bring to this. Maybe it's contributing to Crowd Fund for some litigation. Maybe it's campaigning outside court coming into the courtroom showing you care about it but maybe it is something completely completely different and standing up and requiring your office to face aunt to. What's happening now asking everybody? What are you doing now in this time of crisis prices? How are we gonNA come together around this? I just like to add something for the lawyers who always thinks about podcast which is just to say that I think at at this point in time a lot of legal practice. The sort of big comes in cities like London. It's it's no longer a kind of amoral into for is and I think in a country like the UK where there's such a great culture of Pro Bono legal practice the profession you know lawyers can also contribute to supporting litigation for the public goods as well as whatever it is that they do to make the big bucks we have a thing of the podcast called the folksy Utopian Future. I'm the supreme leader. Ed is a political prisoner after his remarks on last week's podcast but if I was to make it I mean what you want. Attorney General General with specific regards to climate litigation. Is the first thing you would enact in your new role. So it's a difficult thing to enact but I think the first thing I would do thinking about the Glasgow cop is say I'm going to put my political credibility on the line here. We're not going to go tweet. This same pantomime. We've been going through for twenty five years when the only thing that matters global emissions keep going up. We're going to go in there. We're going to seek all who international solidarity around climate emergency a ten year plan to get net zero and planetary recap our twenty thirty. And if I don't deliver on that I'm going to resign line and I'm going to join extinction rebellion. I think even the Jefferson bring the kind of Utopian autocracy that it is. I think even under those circumstances seconds. You can't really get away with doing anything to help lawyers. I think that's still quite up with a receiver. Yeah and I mean really in an ideal world. We wouldn't nate eight climate litigation because governments would be doing what's necessary. This is a last resort exercise. And I think frankly we'd rather be doing something else or to thank you so so much. We're joined now by PAT. Parental who's professor of law and senior counsel in the environmental and Natural Law Clinic at Vermont Law School. Thanks thanks so much for joining us. Very welcome we couldn't help but noticing. Urine Urine Bunny country indeed feeling the ban Bernie since the time when he was mayor. I was the environmental commissioner here so I got to know him quite well. Wow GonNa tell us about litigating against fossil fuel companies but going. Tell tell unless you unless you bundy stories. Once you see from Bernie. Today's that same thing you would have seen forty or fifty years ago. He hasn't changed a bit neither on his policies his values his commitment to social justice and environmental quality. And all the rest He is exactly what you see. He's a prickly character Bernie's Ernie's not the easiest guy to love but boy does the does he have a heart of gold. We'll show you what was your highlight when he was the mayor and the Environment Commissioner. Well I tried to get get him to clean up is sewage treatment plant and he said I'll clean it up where people can afford it. So that's that's like another lead of greet new deal thing exactly exactly combined exactly environmental justice. Yeah so he said you gotta go with me to the state legislature and then down to the US Congress and get us some money. And I said Okay Bernie. Let's go look we. We're here to talk to you. Because you're an expert in the litigation against for fossil fuel companies. Can you give us an overview view. Walt's been an another the log on what's been happening in the US of the recent cases the the the the the biggest tastes have been taken in the US colds. These cases cases are being brought by cities like San Francisco New York City Baltimore but also states like Rhode Island counties governments like Boulder County in Colorado and and they're all seeking compensation from what we call the carbon majors. These are the the major oil companies not just US but international Royal Dutch Shell and VP. And all the rest. These are the companies that are responsible for something like two thirds of the carbon being emitted every year and all of these cases cases are seeking money so that these frontline communities as we call them. can begin to adapt to the consequences. That are already happening putting sea level. Rise water supply interruption droughts wildfires impacts on fisheries. The whole long list of horrible is. Of course we're seeing and this is an old fashioned tort offense It's it's it's not trying to get the government to regulate carbon or put a price on carbon urban reading like that. It's it's trying to get money from the oil companies for the damage that they've done this sort of fundamental kind of legal base base. You'll will that being relied upon here. We heard about how in the Netherlands against government it was the European Convention on Human Rights and the right to family life different against the fossil fuel companies whilst. We'll see what a fundamental base of it. It's basically a failure to warn a danger. Creation Deceit of course is a big part of it. What did you yeah no? When did you what did you do about it? And the record there. Of course that's been established. Pretty firmly as is they knew a lot for a long time we back into the seventies that they hid that information. They lied about that information. So this is an old fashioned tort remedy of saying you companies By virtue of your conduct developing promoting marketing and lying about the dangers of your product have led to this situation and and it's time for you to pay up polluter pays and and other parallels with the cases taken against the tobacco industry in the nineteen ninety s in the United States. There are indeed and the parallel is is similar to Suppressing the information campaign of propaganda lying to the the public lying to regulators and politicians and there's documents internal documents from Exxon from Dutch royal. All Dutch Shell that reveals what they knew and how they went about covering it up and denying it and saying this science was still uncertain when they knew it wasn't that it was very certain they were making business decisions based on what they knew. Climate Change was going to do accessing oil and gas in the Arctic raising their platforms as sea levels rose and so forth so it's the same story with tobacco doesn't cause cancer were not getting people addicted. It's good for your health or at least it's is not damaging to your house and so on and so the parallels are are pretty close in that regard. What's the chances of success of any of these cases? Do you think that's a good question. We don't know I mean. Climate change is actually changing the law. The way I look at it there's a lot of skepticism is among my colleagues in the Legal Academy that these cases are going to ultimately succeed and of course all cases like this big ultimately go to the US Supreme Court Lord and we all know that's a very conservative court and in terms of its majority right now so it'll be a long time before we have firm answer to that question. I think the cases instances that have the best chance are the California cases because I think the evidence of the damage that's being done through sea level rise is the strongest and and the the legal system in California courts is the most aggressive on some of these theories like public nuisance negligence failure to warn and in curious like that but if one of these state cases breaks through if one of them get some verdict in say California then then we'll know that this is a real real movement not just a theoretical one. You just mentioned public nuisance. Can you explain to us what that principle is in. US law the simplest way to put it is. It's aw unreasonable interference with a right held in common by the public so obviously when you're talking about coastal areas and communities that are on the coast coast are at risk and being flooded and their coastlines are eroding their even talk about having to move the San Francisco Airport because it stuck out on a peninsula very revolt to storms and everything that's happening and so that the the idea is that carbon pollution is creating these impacts forcing forcing these communities to spend money on seawalls or moving people out of harm's way and so forth and so these are real damages and they're causally related to the carbon emissions from these companies and the work of people like Richard Hiti who's a mathematician and who's crunched the numbers and who's actually actually been able to allocate to individual oil companies their share of the carbon that's in the atmosphere. So you take that number. And that's the number that you assigned to them. I'm as the responsibility for the damage that they're doing. And the compensation that's owed to these municipalities. I'm why is driving this wave of climate litigation. Shen is it the public in the city's putting pressure on our elected representatives it is and it's also municipal leaders in elise frontline communities that first responders if you will that. They're looking at their budgets and looking at their tax base many of these these communities are are relatively low income particularly imperial beach in California is an environmental justice community. They don't have the money to deal with these problems. They're not going to get it from the federal government. The real driver is money. And the fact that these these municipal officials don't have it and they know they can't keep soaking their the limited tax base For what they're gonNA need so they're going to the deep pockets that's what it's about the. US obviously seen more climate cases than any other country in the world I am hoping that there's GonNa be some kind of action Here against some of the fossil fuel industry a Do you think the rise of climate litigation is going to continue as we as we kind of climate emergency worsens. Oh yes mm-hmm and God forbid is the second term trump There's already a blizzard of litigation over everything he's done. The Natural Resources Defense Council one of our leading NGOs rose has over sixty lawsuits alone against trump. I mean there's a new one every day right so even if he doesn't get a second term and if a progressive more progressive arrested Democrat does get in and if the Senate flips and so all of these gifts politically could change the litigation landscape it could become more of a collaborative cooperative the effort in the United States to move forward but even even with a more progressive government the pace at which we have to be moving is so great on the scale. AOL of decarbonisation is so great that I can i. Will I foresee a lot of litigation and a lot of it's GonNa be aimed at the Fi- at trying to create eight the financial risk I think litigation helps move that needle. It helps create a material financial risk that shareholders big shareholders are are paying attention to and so forth and I think. Isn't that the reason to be cheerful here. which is we heard this in the early discussion? We had whether the litigation succeeds exceeds what it does start to create a climate. Forgive the on of of forcing these issues out into the open and maybe changing the behavior of the fossil fuel companies. And maybe say the Calculus of risk I agree. I mean there's all kinds of reasons to be hopeful. The the question is can we move the massive capital out of fossil and into clean fast off and on a scale that's necessary and I do think that that litigation nation combined with Citizen Action You know voting at the ballot box. All these things have to be happening at once all over the place But there certainly is reason to believe that we're reaching a kind of tipping point. There's tipping points in the climate system. Were scared to death of. But there's tipping points in in the political system that we're looking for and hoping for and the thing about tipping points in the political system is you don't know there there until they're there and then everything changes and and that's I do think there's reason to believe we can do that. Parental that's a great note to end on. Thanks so much for joining us or you're very welcome. I appreciate it. What did you think Jeff? Let's just dive in. It's just di Di di Di. I've been very good at diving. Can you dive. What do you think I can bellyflop flop? No I bet I can always eluded me. It doesn't surprise me. You don't have to like Quality Gillette quality famously alike quality. I really enjoyed the conversation. I really enjoyed this aspect. That victory is the only is the object. But it's it's not the only good outcome just how much these cases can reshape profile profile shape public opinion and therefore aw influence government policy I think completely right and and also presumably introduces an element of risk for government and for fossil fuel companies companies and therefore they might think we've got to move a bit in order to because we might lose this case so I think that's important I think in a sense the call also trump played the role of future generations at least in relation to government. That's kind of way I think about it because the whole thing about climate we've discussed before is the the actions we take now. We'll have the big effects in the long term. You Know Twenty fifty twenty one hundred and the courts are sort of basically saying well look if you signed up to this dog it. It has in two degrees in the Netherlands to live by. I've also been publicly encouraging Klein and others to Toronto onto the fossil fuel companies to call here. Whether it's going to happen all the and comes out. The compensation is the European Convention. Human Rights can apply but the Netherlands and the UK UK but the courts can take a very different view of its implication which is Kinda surprised. Yeah it was surprising and I think there is a thing as I raised in the conversation. A my fear is that the government is firing a warning. Shot with all this jiggery-pokery that talking about in relation to the courts. And when you have the overstepped the mark by trying to move them off here but it was encouraging to. That is something you can do without being government and also loved hearing from Pat about about how city governments all state governments. Now take him fossil companies to call. That's that's going to be a good thing reasons to be cheerful phone podcast about ideas with and Jeff. If you've got thoughts on this week's episode or ideas for future episodes good for our website. Eight triple PODCAST DOT COM with love to hear from you and last week Jeff. When you were away and being overthrown we I talked about the began yousry phenomenon? Yes I did it. I mean this phenomenon dude dude you have to do nothing. Further research show. I was talking about my kids and getting them tweet. Tweet Vegan and all of the whole vegans. The the you know I mean anyway. This one is about that but this is comes from Malcolm Cathcart a subject subject. Greg's bonus high. Both Ed mentioned the lightest podcast breakthrough in Burnsville employees. I heard something about that. Be Good to hack towards is there was some feedback from worker. Greg's who said he and most of his colleagues on universal credit. So they will they will get an extra three hundred pounds of January. Their benefits will drop by three hundred three hundred pounds when you see catches up if this is true what kind of incentives visit private ride to work. As now Jeremy Corbyn raised at provinces questions. I do the full three hundred pounds but it does reflect part of the problem of the benefit system which is when your income goes up. You get so much of it clawback. Yeah and you know. People often talk about the so-called penal tax rates. We used to after the richest in society. But that's what operates for so many people in lower income And I think it just in a way it's kind of highlighting its that phenomenon and particularly when it's like a bonus that people are being paid that we have any other income other people on universal credit. I get so it's a really important point. The Malcolm Malcolm is making. This is another one on veganism says thanks for another haunting podcast. It feels like the generation below mine. We'll be the ones to save the world. It's easy to find Vegan and vegetarian foods. Kids really if you sort of ignore the label vegan stroke vegetarian and instead simply observe the Universal Salote of child feeding which knowledge in the point of not rushing th lots of things that make things bad in combination with an in ahead box ticking exercise while you ask yourself if the kids have had something from each required food group in the mail interesting I've served my kids a male. We recall bits. Bits is a bit like party but as as all of the ingredients are clearly visible they will eat. It had party that Labor Party. You had that political party tea. He says an example of this might go like this pepper and cucumber sticks steamed in Broccoli or a bowl appease sliced avocado. They can dip this sesame seeds if they want sticks of cheese often with April in it bredow toes fingers with vegan spread str- after a stroke butter and Marmite Brad is always a seeded wholemeal or a whole meal Pitzer Vegan sausages of the lentil by swans for Macaire or the corn ones fruits of napster pudding. They get one each a whole pack within this rather put together meal we have. I N not just any old an Dan some Broccoli. B-VITAMINS marmite seeds in the bread sesame seeds protein cheese avocado sausages broccoli AU pays carbohydrates and start art and other veterans memorials minerals provided in the veg- came from cap more. That's right and next week. We're going to be talking a to Vegan food writer. Jack Monroe reasons cheerful PODCAST DOT COM follows on tweets. Cheerful podcast also route facebook page reasons to be cheerful podcast as part of our cheerful people. Series I'm delight to say that we are joined from California now by Annette Schenker Asari. Oh whose political communications expert and host of the brave new words podcast. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having me so we in need of cheering up even on this podcast and and we're hoping you're going to because you'll you'll podcast. It costs about progressive campaigns around the world including the two thousand eighteen together for yes campaign in the Irish abortion referendum on Justin drawdowns victory in the New Zealand general election. But maybe you can start by exploiting the work you do on campaign communications and how you got into doing it. Yeah so my background is within cognition and linguistics which is just a fancy way of saying I explore and examine why certain messages and ideas and collections of words persuade and mobilize people and why others don't and so I do experiments around language and then I advise campaigns in various parts of the world on the words that work and tell us about what that experience taught you. And how you go into doing the podcast. What got me into? The podcast is that I finally recognized. It took me a while That I was actually a being a hypocrite and and the way that I was being a hypocrite was my main message and really the main output. We see from all of the research that we do around the world in terms of which messages work in. which don't is that you need to say what your four and now what you're against that essentially what you fight you feed and the more that you talk about how big your opposition? How relentless how tenacious overwhelming? How well-financed the more were essentially sending sending the signal to our listeners? This is an mission impossible. There's absolutely no hope of ever getting it done. We lose a lot where the losing team team. You should join us and it turns out that hosts people shock. Yeah they don't want to be on the losing team it's weird and you'll podcast. Brave new others have have mentioned has covered six progressive victories. Talk US through a couple of these in the lessons that we can draw from them because I think it will it will help our listeners to understand your work. Let me talk a little bit about Australia. And the four consecutive campaigns that we won their For people seeking asylum and toward closing the offshore offshore detention camps. That many of your listeners will know. The government Australia has shamefully inexcusably been operating for decades in basically the big lesson in their and our multiple is empathy. Not Sympathy what we see in the research not just there but in the states as well is that the instinct to show the harms arms and horrors to show the image of the people behind bars to show the image of the child face-down drowning that will get you instant attention. It will get you click. It will get you small dollar donations but as many have remarked Martin Luther King did not get famous for saying I have a complaint. There has to actually be a dream. You have to engage people not merely in the amelioration of harm but in the creation of good and so what they did there in. Australia is stay flipped to just sort of a full frontal assaults of empathy instead of showing. These are the terrible horrible things that people have left. These are the terrible horrible conditions there in they did aimed marital advice column in women's wear daily. They did A. What is your favorite music? They showed images of the children as children. Playing and There are other efforts in tactics that we plan to use for example creating a spotify playlist of music from detention essentially forcing your public to to confront these people as fully three dimensional human beings and then second and here is a lesson that you can really see for example in the Minnesota episode which was about beating race baiting. The second sentence has to address the problem inactive voice. That's one of the major lessons instead of saying homes were lost or the wage gap has grown or poverty is rising. Her homelessness is increasing. If we don't establish at the outset that a problem is person made it becomes cognitively inconsistent to believe that it would it can be person fixed and so we have to structure that second sentence where we named the problem in a way that provides the origin story that Dr allows our listeners to understand. This is where this comes from so to be very parochial about this in Britain because to me because of experiences I had in the recent campaign. foodbank uses. Rising in Britain doesn't reach L. E. Y. happening whereas universal credit is driving people to feedback of credit is a benefits that this government has introduced and it's causing terrible misery for lots of people. That's that gives you a sense of the victim of causing the problem and I take it a step. Further and say certain politicians have decided that our people will go hungry or certain politicians have decided that that some people in Britain will never have enough to eat. So I think should listen to your podcast but just give us a sense of you've if you had to sort of an this is probably too simplistic but other. What are the sort of the two or three takeaways? The progressives get wrong. They should be just a way of thinking about the issues. or The you're going I mean there's many but if I have to boil it down down it's number one as I said what you fight you feed. Say what you're for not what you're against you know. Don't be stop climate change. Don't be a not this don't be we can't have that. So that's the first. The second is when you do named problem which you do need to do You need to do that in terms that actually finger culprit. That are not passing voice because the other side is very much decided who the culprit is and then finally and this is going to seem a bit out of left field. It's what we haven't talked about. The biggest challenge for the left that we see in messaging is our opposition is not the opposition. It's cynicism it's not that people don't think our ideas are right. It's that they don't think needs are possible and Penn road and so so a lot of our challenge actually lies in the fact that we have to paint a portrait of what I like to call the beautiful tomorrow that has never existed misted whereas what the right gets to do is the laziest thing on earth they're beautiful tomorrow is constructed of Nostalgia. It takes no imaginative the effort. You just sort of back. I don't know what the British equivalent as I apologize. Beautiful yesterday was didn't really exist. But how do you convince people have more beautiful fool tomorrow. If people are cynical about the possibility of big changes they definitely all I think talking about changes terrible idea. I think when you talk talk about change your selling the recipe and what. I'm arguing that you need to sell the Brownie. which is the outcome of change? So partly talking about change changed does trigger those fears and that cynicism talking about the kind of beautiful wonderful world that it can be is actually helpful because you need to build that imagination in people and then the other thing is it has to feel like the leadership is different a friend and credible and enticing and exciting and you know wear. Electoral campaigns differ concertedly from issue campaigns. where I spend and most of my time because it's more satisfying to be honest is in a candidate campaign? The candidate is the product and it's very very difficult to detach act the message from the Messenger. This two things. I will finish the two things I feel about this compensation one we need more linguists in politics and then secondly I wish I in twenty fourteen before I read in the British General Extra Twenty fifty but there we go. Because it's it's good we've met now an shankill. Reo thanks so much for joining us. Reasons to be cheerful with Edmund jet loan now true that went well didn't it was likely like we've never been by just clicked but yet back in we clicked. It's amazing to me that both you and I can click 'cause we both somatic. Nobody would only nations nations. We should mention that. Tickets are selling fast for our show at kings place in London on the twelfth of March for anybody who His email to get in touch on social media. Saying when are you going to be doing shows elsewhere in the country. That's coming soon but just wanted to remind you that our first show of the year is GonNa be in London King's place we did one of those a couple of years ago but tickets are genuinely selling. We'd love to come along. It's going to be a great night and again go to our website. SCHEFFEL PODCAST DOT COM. We'll give you details of how to get tickets and the websites. We mentioned at the beginning of the program. You'll find details of of Chick Fil Book Club. Thank Tessa CONTO crossland pepper and Annette Schenker and mccutchen producers are focused with backup and research from cajole piss and Joe Kenyan gear. lofthouse's I renounce James Deacon made the identity seed composed the music and the artwork wasn't designed by M me power but by Henry and recall. You don't sometimes much fun saying his name. Those little highlight my week. Retire power do you. It's time twenty. Six twenty in the discussion about retiring. Harry victim should definitely retire. The discussion and retire emily the power. I think we'll get a nice retirement packages it look that we get emily couch plug sorted chocolate carriage carriage clock. Is that a thing. I've never looked a carriage book. Thought its CREPE. I wish I could eat it. kershaw is a bit in seventeen. Yeah I suppose carry these questions. Email is getting toucher the website. He's come back hastily either. Be Raising speech.

government United States Climate Litigation the Netherlands Tim crossland ED MILIBAND Dutch Supreme Court Dutch government UK Supreme Court Jeff Chrissy Netherlands European Convention Vermont Tessa Cheerful Book Club