31 Burst results for "Netease"

"netease" Discussed on The Business of Esports

The Business of Esports

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"netease" Discussed on The Business of Esports

"That's definitely the place you want to go. Jeff and I host meta business and it's an amazing show talking about the business side of the metaverse. So if you love business of eSports, I guarantee you. I will guarantee you will love meta business. So let's talk about this though on this show because I think it's important that we touch every so often on metaverse stuff here. And what this story is, it says, a number of metaverse related trademark applications have been denied registration by the national intellectual property administration. This is in China. And this includes submissions made by NetEase. I don't even know how to pronounce that. And zhao Hong Shu and supposedly they've denied, I think.

Jeff national intellectual property NetEase zhao Hong Shu China
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So i think if you few reasons why we liked it one just that it was open source rate like no one likes installing agents on their machine like no one thinks it's selling software. They don't know that's totally in a blackbox on it. To just the fact that the sufferer itself is open source. I think helped a little bit. Still have objection of like. What are you running machines and are you going to cost me a bunch of money or slow me down or coughing performance issues right that that's still there but just having the code openness helpful and again the other brady mean in some ways again you can think worse query has just like the way we get an api to bespoke servers right. If it's aws server we can use aws api's to query setup configuration and reason about it. It's a bespoke machine os queries how we have api quote unquote metaphorically to what's going on. But that's the key part for compliance because it just a lot of compliances. How're things set up in real life. How do you want them to be set up. Ideally your controls cool. What's the delta right. And so agent technology oh crew and others are helpful in the power thing set up rome. Yeah you another dimension of this. I don't know if. I don't know if you've talked to anybody about about this. But there's something in coober netease world called the operator pattern so coober netease is this newer infrastructure platform thing and they. There's this thing called the operator pattern where you can basically pro grammatically describe where you're trying to get to declare actively describe where you're trying to get to and whenever you drift off course from that for whatever reason. The system tries to remediate that. And that's that pattern has been useful for so anyway. I think it's it's actually something. I mean not the only metaphorically similar not actually similar but we really encourage customers to use infrastructure as code tools tariff on cloud formation. Whatever right but it's getting to a similar idea of like declare the world. You wanted to be figured out the configuration. You want write that down. Go apply that everywhere and go from there and then from a compliance and audit perspective one. You're actually pretty good way to reason about like well in this file. I said i wanted databases to be encrypted. And so in fact they all are and to auditor really love more than one person doing something. So if you're clicking around and like an aws console just one person clicking around and like are you gonna make a video of yourself clicking around and show it to the auditor like that's weird right but if you're writing stuff down in like tariff foreign file and the code review that gives you two people into the auditors like yes jeff road christina code reviewed it to people saw the change. I like this change much better. What.

netease rome jeff road christina
Russia Still Using 'Brute Force' to Break Into Computer Systems

Cyber Security Headlines

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Russia Still Using 'Brute Force' to Break Into Computer Systems

"Russian military cyber unit behind large scale brute force attacks a press release issued by the national security agency on thursday indicates that the russian military cyber unit used a cooper netease cluster to quote conduct widespread distributed an anatomist brute force access attempts against hundreds of government and private sector targets worldwide and quote. The advisory indicates that the threat actors used the brute force capability to access sensitive data and identify account credentials. The actors exploited well known vulnerabilities including microsoft exchange bugs for remote code execution in further access to target networks. The advisory notes that the attacks are ongoing enlists mitigating steps. That network administrators should adapt including use of multi factor authentication implementing timeout in lockout features. Use of strong passwords and deploying zero trust security models authorities sees double vpn service used by cybercriminals a coordinated operation by authorities in nine countries from north america and europe resulted in the take down of the double vpn service which allegedly served as a hideout for ransomware operators and fishing scammers double vpn which was heavily advertised on both russian and english speaking underground cybercrime forums offered its customers single double triple and even quadruple vpn connections for as little as twenty five dollars per month to help them hide their misdeeds a seizure notice appearing on the now defunct site indicates that law enforcement has taken possession of double vpn servers including details of all of its customers and goes on to state quote. Double vpn's owners failed to provide the services. They promised and quote microsoft research team reveals critical. Vons in nekia routers on wednesday microsoft's three sixty five defender research team revealed three critical authentication. Vulnerabilities impacting neck year routers. The first bug allows unauthenticated access to any page a susceptible device by appending get variables in sub string requests while the second flop permit side channel attacks which allow attackers to extract stored credentials in the final bug allows extraction of the net gear back n. t. g. r. b. k. Encryption key allowing remote attackers to decrypt an excess stored.

National Security Agency Microsoft North America Europe Vons
Automatic Identification of Outlier Galaxy Images

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Automatic Identification of Outlier Galaxy Images

"Shamir from kansas state university. I invited you on to talk about the paper automatic identification of outliers in hubble space telescope galaxy images. So a lot of fun stuff to get into maybe to start. I think everybody knows a little bit about the hubble telescope. Could you tell us about the data we get back from it. Are these just. Png files or what are you. Start from caso. It will happen space. says civil instruments on hubble space telescope not just the main camera but it collects all sorts of the we know the hubble deep field which is when freeing that was one segment of the sky was going for civil days very long exposure goldie but other surveys done by hubble space telescope and i was i into the cosmos survey of several shirley lodge survey covering a relatively large part of the sky explains the cosmos was to score degrees. Doesn't sound but in help terms this. Because bill goes really deep deeper than guam-based those scopes. So that's what. I covered the data that you get his image data that i used incomes informants feats debts former. That is very common in a strong meets. Not very common outside feels strongly but that's the standard format of astronomy eats. Uniqueness is that it allows to make the metric measurements for the day dining j. peg form. It's like that we often use. I know in image netease like that. We cannot remake safety for to metric measurements because the dynamic range. Compression away the feeds. That's a each week. Salihi is represented by in algebra. Be in one by twitch channel but actually it's quite a day name. Acquaintances allows medical measurements.

Shamir Kansas State University Shirley Lodge Salihi
Temporal Product: Managing State With Ryland Goldstein

Software Engineering Daily

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Temporal Product: Managing State With Ryland Goldstein

"Done a show about temporal before and workflow engines in general. But i think it's a pretty deep subject and i like to start off by just exploring. The distributed systems related problems that a typical infrastructure team might encounter. That are still not solved by all these nice tools that we have today like. Aws and cooper netease and so on what are the outstanding problems. Yeah it's a great question from my point of view. It's actually sort of the same problems that people have been. Having even before distributed systems were like in vogue and they were the way to build applications. I think you know the same problems around. You know transaction optimistic basically guaranteeing that things like transferring. Money works out. Well those were problems that existed far before you know. Most systems were distributed world. These web scale companies. I think what ended up happening. Is that those problems they lingered you know. Those are still challenges that companies that are really important like banks and other financial institutions. even just like ecommerce. They still have to solve those problems. But now it's under the context of having to do it in a distributed environment and so it's essentially having to solve the same problems that were already challenging but now the pieces that you're actually building your application on top of in the things you're sort of relying on our shifting under you because their these distributed systems with all these edge cases

Cooper Netease
Temporal Product: Managing State with Ryland Goldstein

Software Engineering Daily

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Temporal Product: Managing State with Ryland Goldstein

"We've done a show about temporal before and workflow engines in general. But i think it's a pretty deep subject and i like to start off by just exploring. The distributed systems related problems that a typical infrastructure team might encounter. That are still not solved by all these nice tools that we have today like. Aws and cooper netease and so on what are the outstanding problems. Yeah it's a great question from my point of view. It's actually sort of the same problems that people have been. Having even before distributed systems were like in vogue and they were the way to build applications. I think you know the same problems around. You know transaction optimistic basically guaranteeing that things like transferring. Money works out. Well those were problems that existed far before you know. Most systems were distributed world. These web scale companies. I think what ended up happening. Is that those problems they lingered you know. Those are still challenges that companies that are really important like banks and other financial institutions. even just like ecommerce. They still have to solve those problems. But now it's under the context of having to do it in a distributed environment and so it's essentially having to solve the same problems that were already challenging but now the pieces that you're actually building your application on top of in the things you're sort of relying on our shifting under you because their these distributed systems with all these edge cases

Cooper Netease
Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

Software Engineering Daily

03:50 min | 1 year ago

Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

"Lou. Welcome to the show scrapes video. Thank you you started new relic awhile ago and before that you started a different company wiley. Both of these companies were focused on what we now call observability hauer software applications today different than from when you started new relic. Well yeah you know. I'll talk about what's different today but also talk about what the same and i guess. It's what's the same as so long as our software there is going to be bugs and they're going to be problems that happen only in production and that's that'll be true forever. I think so as long as humans create software and just like in the medical field are so long as people get sick. Then there's going to be a need for doctors. And so i think so. Long as there are software. There's going to be need for tooling and visibility capabilities to help understand. Soffer behaves when it's running under load in particular and take that understanding to improve the performance availability stability and the customer experience of that software. So when i started wiley twenty-three years ago the idea was this brand. New thing. At the time in ninety eight was java and the idea was let's see inside. Jvm without asking our customers to change any of their source code and put that visibility to production low overhead and captures much data as possible and presented an easiest way possible to help customers debug their jvm's and fast forward to two thousand eight. When i found new relic the thought was well. It's a multi language world now and applications aren't running on two or three physical servers are running on twenty or thirty or so back in that time. Virtual hosts and it was very early in the cloud but people those hosts for running increasingly in new environments like amazon web services. So the idea was. How do you put visibility into that are composed of say a half dozen services running in a virtual environment where. There's multi-language in that. That really was the sweet spot. If new relic when it was founded through the first several years and now here we are in two thousand twenty one what an application looks like today is often hundreds of services thousands of containers more and more in coober netease incredibly complex. A lot of a synchronous work a lot of stuff going on systems like kafka and so trying to make sense of a really complex system is more challenging than ever and it seems like what's behind all of this complexity is imperative to help developers be more productive to first of all have smaller more independent teams who can deploy with pretty good isolation and rely on good. Api's and things like that to allow lots of those teams to collaborate on a large effort at high velocity but so that that increases velocity but it comes at the cost of increased complexity on how that whole integrated system works and the solution to that in our opinion is complete visibility into all the application micro services all of the infrastructure and the end user experience. All into a common platform that operates at massive scale and really the guts of observability. If you understand the difference between observability monitoring i'd say monitoring is about telling you when something's wrong but observability is having access to all the telemetry need to answer. Why is something wrong which you don't even know what question you need to ask next to get to the understanding of what's wrong in today's world it just like collecting a massive amount of data and trying to make sense of it. Is you know as rapidly as possible.

Wiley Soffer LOU Kafka Amazon
Bilibili Moves on Fall Guys Mobile

The Business of Esports

04:41 min | 2 years ago

Bilibili Moves on Fall Guys Mobile

"Fry Billy. This was from the south. China Morning Post and the article is Billy Billy Ratchets Up China gaming drive with publishing rights for fog is. Fall guys could become the first non animated anime style hit game to be published by Billy Billy and the article goes on to say that Billy Billy plans to release fall guys. As a or plans to publish a mobile version of the title. So. This is their plan. So to make mobile fog is essentially. The Chinese market at. Like that. To me that's that that's interesting. Right at the perfect. It makes a lot of sense to have it on mobile. It's a very natural fit for mobile and honestly like it goes with I, think the aesthetic that goes with the dry by the the motivating factor but find Paul guys as accessibility getting it on a more accessible device fits well into that strategy. I think the news here though sorry Paul is not about fall guys billy, billy. Talk to me about. Agree Billy Billy has been new. Yeah. Out of I mean versus the League rights, right? We talked about two or three podcasts ago where they had they bought the rights to the League of legends like finals a few of like almost all the competitions in China and Indonesia, right? Yeah. That was their first big move. Yup and then, and now they have full guys pickup, which is really substantial pickup given. The success of the title could threaten pub mobile style sort of numbers in China and Russia. There's a place for it to do well for sure and what's more interesting to me as less they got it and more who beat together right now because they be ten cents, a Nazis I'm guessing that is that right? I think I read something or your new girl Yo you would assume who are their competitors which is basically tell sent pulling the strings in both places for sure for the localization publishing, it's Netease tencent would have beat for this. Those were those wouldn't be direct billy billy competitors necessarily right compatibility bit more of a streaming platform. Yeah. Yeah. That's But. But this is I think publishing rights, right? It is crazy. But so is streaming platform moving into publishing rights which I think in and of itself is interesting. Moving into which again goes back to our whole thesis of Watch out streaming platforms when it control the Games for Exclusivity Yup, right? So that's what's going on here billy now has to in their another belt or get into good ones a hyper casual even if it doesn't last long I think it'll last long enough for them to get their to to to do some jobs for them and then league and the thing is like basically everything you WanNa, do in Asia's published by ten Cincinnati's and these guys beating them out you have to wonder was it did this come up so quickly and they just move faster. Did were the other guys asleep at the wheel is this now a pricing war right? Or is there something else a streaming platform can offer? That pure publishing play cat you know so that last one I think is the most interesting. Let me add one more. That's why I ended on it Paul. That's why I I wanted the dialogue. Let me throw out. One more is ten cents just too distracted at this point because we we're big fans of ten cent raise we've been saying are making all the right moves, all the right investments it seems like the the the guys can't be stopped, but at some point, they're so big. Right there. So dominant their their hands are in everything. Now at some point, do you go maybe they just are distracted they're gonna Miss Things because they. As much as they want to be everywhere they have so many things to worry about now. So many plates to Juggle One's going get dropped here and there. Yeah I suspect that a little bit because this like this game was on nobody's radar until it blew up, right. So like I suspect that they might be a little slower, a little less nimble have some other deals in the works they're trying to merge their streaming platforms and all of a sudden you have a more motivated competitor that may be you know gave extremely is by the way probably financially driven to enter the market and maybe very flattering terms this public why not you know why bill is maybe outspending tencent Right. Wow because because M- maybe ten cents has the legal right where ten cents yeah. You come do business with us. Here's why and you don't want the biggest guy. You want the eight hundred pound gorilla in your corner. Okay. Go go play with the small guys. We know. There may be something arrogance

Billy Billy Paul China Tencent League Of Legends Netease Cincinnati Asia Russia Indonesia
Tilt: Kubernetes Tooling with Dan Bentley

Software Engineering Daily

05:36 min | 2 years ago

Tilt: Kubernetes Tooling with Dan Bentley

"Way way to to get get in in trouble. trouble. Let's Let's start start to to talk talk about about what what you you have have built built with with tilt. tilt. Can Can you you explain explain what what the the tilts tilts product product is is yeah yeah I. I Hope hope so so You You told told me me in in a a in in a a couple couple of of minutes. minutes. Share Share what what we we are are trained trained to to do do with with tilt, tilt is is make it it that that multi multi service service development development is is easy easy that? that. You You can can get get back back to to where where you you were. were When when you you come come in in in in the the morning morning or or when when you you join join a a team, team, you you just just type type tilt tilt up, up, and and it it takes takes all all of of the the source source code code for for all all of of your your different different services, services, and and it it spins spins them them up up in, in. so So you you have have a a developer developer instance instance that that could could be be running running on on your your laptop laptop could could be be running running in in a a cloud cloud cluster, cluster, and and you're you're. You're able able to to win. win. You You hit. hit. Save Save then then see see that that code code running running for for real real not not in in a production environment, but you can load it in your web browser, and you can interact with it, and you can change any line of code whether it's go code in the graph, Q. L., server or type script. That's running in the front end or a JVM, service. Right kind getting live, reload for your entire stack and so. What's important there? Well, one thing is the speed of from when you hit save. How long does it take until you're codes? Running developers are this fantastic and evil kind of lazy. Where if they see a shortcut, they'll start doing it. And it will end up being unsafe at some point, and then you've saved yourself some time because it's faster as you do it, but. When it gets out of sinker, askew. You then have to spend hours figuring out what's happening. And so I'm really proud. That tilt supports live update that you can actually update containers that are running in the cluster, even in the cloud in less than a second. You would never want to do that for your production workloads, but it's the way that you're able to get the same kind of feedback loop low latency as you had before, you moved to Coober Netease for development. And then I think the thing that we've realized is. You don't just need to get the code out there. You also need to get the feedback when there's a problem when a pods and crash loop back off when it dies when it can't even except the camel. You're able to see it in the U.. I because tilt runs as a web APP. It's running on your laptop. Your seeing it in your browser at local host, but you're able to get a holistic view, and so in addition to the logs in the center of your screen over on the right. There's a sidebar that shows you. Each

Developer Coober Netease
Tilt: Kubernetes Tooling with Dan Bentley

Software Engineering Daily

05:36 min | 2 years ago

Tilt: Kubernetes Tooling with Dan Bentley

"Great great way way to to way way get get to to in in get get trouble. trouble. in in trouble. trouble. Let's Let's start start Let's Let's to to start start talk talk to to talk talk about about about about what what what what you you have have you you built built have have built built with with with with tilt. tilt. tilt. tilt. Can Can Can Can you you you you explain explain explain explain what what what what the the the the tilts tilts tilts tilts product product product product is is is is yeah yeah yeah yeah I. I I. I Hope hope Hope hope so so so so You You You You told told told told me me in me me in a a in in a a in in a a in in couple couple a a couple couple of of minutes. minutes. of of minutes. minutes. Share Share Share Share what what what what we we we we are are trained trained are are trained trained to to do do to to with with do do tilt, tilt with with tilt, tilt is is make is is make it it that that it it that that multi multi multi multi service service service service development development development development is is is is easy easy easy easy that? that. that? that. You You You You can can get get can can get get back back back back to to to to where where you you where where you you were. were were. were When when When when you you come come you you come come in in in in in in the the morning morning in in the the morning morning or or when when or or you you when when join join you you join join a a team, team, a a team, team, you you you you just just just just type type type type tilt tilt tilt tilt up, up, up, up, and and and and it it takes takes it it takes takes all all all all of of of of the the the the source source source source code code code code for for for for all all of of your your all all different different of of your your different different services, services, services, services, and and and and it it it it spins spins spins spins them them up up them them up up in, in. so So in, in. you you so So have have you you a a have have developer developer a a developer developer instance instance instance instance that that could could that that be be could could running running be be running running on on your your on on laptop laptop your your laptop laptop could could could could be be running running be be running running in in a a in in cloud cloud a a cloud cloud cluster, cluster, cluster, cluster, and and and and you're you're. You're you're you're. You're able able able able to to win. win. to to You You win. win. hit. hit. You You hit. hit. Save Save Save Save then then then then see see see see that that that that code code code code running running running running for for for for real real real real not not not not in in in in a a production production environment, environment, but but you you can can load load it it in your in web your browser, web browser, and you can and you interact can interact with it, with it, and and you can you change can change any any line line of code of code whether whether it's it's go go code code in the in graph, the graph, Q. L., Q. server L., server or or type type script. script. That's That's running running in in the front the front end end or or a a JVM, JVM, service. service. Right Right kind kind getting getting live, live, reload reload for your for entire your entire stack stack and and so. so. What's What's important important there? there? Well, Well, one one thing thing is is the speed the speed of of from from when you when hit you save. hit save. How How long long does it does take it take until until you're codes? you're codes? Running Running developers developers are this are this fantastic fantastic and and evil evil kind kind of lazy. of lazy. Where Where if if they they see see a shortcut, a shortcut, they'll start they'll start doing doing it. it. And it will And end it will up end being up being unsafe unsafe at some at some point, point, and and then then you've you've saved saved yourself yourself some some time time because because it's faster it's faster as as you do you do it, it, but. but. When When it gets it gets out out of sinker, of sinker, askew. askew. You then You have then to have spend to spend hours hours figuring figuring out what's out happening. what's happening. And And so so I'm really I'm really proud. proud. That That tilt tilt supports supports live live update update that you that can you actually can actually update update containers containers that are that running are running in in the cluster, the cluster, even even in the in cloud the cloud in in less less than a than second. a second. You You would never would never want want to do to do that for that your for production your production workloads, workloads, but but it's the it's way the that way you're that able you're able to to get get the the same same kind of kind feedback of feedback loop loop low low latency latency as you as had you had before, before, you moved you moved to Coober to Coober Netease Netease for development. for development. And then And I then think I think the thing the thing that that we've we've realized realized is. is. You You don't just don't need just to need get to get the code the code out out there. there. You also You also need to need get to get the feedback the feedback when when there's a there's problem a problem when when a pods a pods and crash and crash loop loop back back off off when when it dies it dies when when it can't it can't even even except except the the camel. camel. You're You're able able to see to see it in it the in U.. the U.. I I because because tilt tilt runs runs as as a a web web APP. APP. It's It's running running on your on laptop. your laptop. Your Your seeing seeing it in it your in your browser browser at local at local host, host, but but you're you're able able to get to get a holistic a holistic view, view, and so and in addition so in addition to the to the logs logs in the in center the center of your of screen your screen over over on the on right. the right. There's a There's sidebar a sidebar that that shows shows you. you. Each Each

Developer Coober Netease Netease
Edge Computing Platform

Software Engineering Daily

12:11 min | 2 years ago

Edge Computing Platform

"We're GONNA talk about edge computing today and particularly red hat's strategy strategy around that. Give me two recent applications that you have seen of edge computing so to very often reasons. Why the applications WANNA run the etch is latency which means you want to have very fast request response and the second one is reducing bandwidth over the network and those are very to have very often mentioned once? They're way too many other reasons why to do that. And for me. These two reasons are mainly the consequences of what I want to achieve and if I want to improve user experience does are probably the two The latency is probably the first one if I want to reduce the cost probably reducing. The with is another one but then there are other reasons for example risk factors. I want to improve resilient therefore I want to run my applications nations at the edge and have them running in very completely isolated environment so there are really many reasons by the two. Most mentioned wants is definitely latency latency and bandwidth so the type of edge competing. We've had for a pretty long. Time is CDN infrastructure CDN infrastructure is fairly basic. It's if I make a request for an image for example apple that image is GonNa get cashed at the edge and then subsequent requests to that resource will be sent to the edge because the edge can be closer to the user and the edge. Might it'd be a content delivery network. That is pushing out that content to a lot of different locations so that a user news Becca Stan has rapid access. A user in Texas Texas has rapid access the kinds of edge computing. That we WANNA do. Today is very different than that type of simple request response for an image for example. What kinds of computation do we want to do at the edge today? I don't want to repeat myself but it's always it depends ends on the use case and there are many industries which are doing competing for different reasons. All let's take for example Industrial Iot in the production. Shen lines where they are running. They are having multiple sensors in their production lines to control quality production for example of the product the sensors are generating a lot of data data and this data is being analyzed and is being responded is the product quality. Okay can I continue in the direction or do I need to interrupt and just a process. This is kind of application which needs very fast rapid response you cannot really rely on sending that over the network to centralized location do the processing there and then and get the response back so this is very often reason why you want to push the edge computing to location of the IOT industrial but there are also reasons. Why want to centralize? You don't want to do everything only at the edge. There are reasons why you want to do centralization so imagine I have the industrial plans and I have them all over the country but I need to train my machine learning models from different examples and I want to gather those examples from different locations therefore I need to centralize them somewhere then do training model. They're likely in the centralized location and then push out only the train models to do the fast decision making at the edge so this is one of the examples right and that architecture makes a Lotta sense because in order to train the machine learning models you need all the data centralized in a particular place or you need some large subset of the data or you need the new training examples. Whatever the data to train the models takes a lot less space than the actual models that can make a decision that can improve application infrastructure? So we need to start deploying thing these models to the edge now if we talk about the types of CDN infrastructure that has been there for a long time where you're caching an an image and then you can request the image at the CDN layer if we're talking about hosting machine learning models versus hosting basic images. Do we need different different infrastructure to run those machine learning models instead of simple. CDN Type of infrastructure. Absolutely we do and it depends on the context. What kind of application I WANNA run? Therefore the machine learning very often or for example video processing or similar requests we we might need data processing. We need real time kernels we need. GP use use very often to speed up. The processing can reduce the cost of the processing power so the type of the hardware which is enabling the the use cases is specific for the application which needs to run on top of that the CDN is very simple. Use Case as you mentioned you don't really need much of the processing Specific processing processing. But if you need to run for example containerize network function. It has very high requirements on the fast data path and networking or it needs to access the real time kernel which difficult CDN networks don't need Ari talking about machine learning stuff. I've also heard of widespread bread edge competing use cases in the telecom industry. Can you tell me about those applications. So S Forty Telco Day one to do editing edge competing for multiple reasons. I would separate it into two categories first. One is to run their own brighter X.. Networks and for that that is the containerization containerization of their network functions. As you know there was a progress of running network functioning onto bare metal itself with specific hardware than it moved to. VM's and now it's to moving through containers and here the Yukon. We actually saw demo of the proof of concept how to do the five G. fully running on carbonated. That is one of the kind kind of the application. Because at the antenna level you need to have the processing as close to the signal as possible so that you again reduced latency NC and you don't have to push all the data through the network to raise the swap that is the main requirement for five G. or main features of the five G. The second use case for the telcos is to monetize their infrastructure. which they are building for the five and that is to provide mobile edge edge computing platform for all the independent service vendors or other enterprises running their applications? So I can be an enterprise fries which has branch offices and in order to get access from those branch offices to pass processing. I might want to run my applications closer to those branches not necessarily centralized in my data center which might be private cloud one national data center but I might take an advantage of my telco provider either to run the application closer to my branch office and not a very common use cases gaming or augmented reality where you take advantage offbeat as close to the end user with a cell phone or the smart devices possible so that they have the good user experience and then to date on experience instaflex so I understand correctly. Telecom like verizon. They need to build essentially data center infrastructure telecom data center center infrastructure to support five G. for their basic cellular customers and in order to get additional value. Oh you add that infrastructure. They are adding the capability to essentially lease out those resources to enterprises that might need similar functionality to that same five G. infrastructure basically they're already building data centers and they're like well we might as well reuse this for edge computing. That's exactly right amazing. So as red hat you basically have an opportunity to help a telecom like horizon that is not historically thought of itself as a cloud provider to the extent that I understand it become a cloud provider. Essentially yes I would not necessarily called provider but mobile computing platform provider. Absolutely the and any of these telcos or service providers in general. It doesn't have to be Telco. Only it can be Internet service provider as well think of comcast or others that is to raise. Is there infrastructure which they need to build to support five G. we can think also of the other use cases when they want to place a device to the end user premise itself. So you can think of Smart Stadium. It's aware you have broadcasting of different games for example you need a server which needs to run there you you need high bandwidth. You need to broadcast it. So what verizon or other Telcos do they place the server there at the stadium at the end user premise and the a US benefits of their infrastructure behind or s in consumer for example. I'm a comcast user. I have my set top box at home. Currently the setup boxes being used for very specific services for example to get my TV streaming on my screen but but in order to use this device to be more generic we start talking about the universal customer premise equipment to turn these very specific use case oriented devices into more generic computing platforms to turn on your home into smart home and connect the Iot devices devices to it and provide different kinds of applications running there. Okay so that's a very different kind of edge computing. It's very different kind of competing but it is still edge computing. Okay Eh. What role would red hat have in that kind of application? The like. I'm comcast I've given you a dumb set top box and now we WANNA turn into like a smart connected home thing. Comcast is still owner of that server or of the device which is running at your home so they need to run some operating operating system. There they need to run some platform which is enabling to run applications on top of that. And guess what the applications are very often containers so we can and think of for example taken to the extreme Kluber not seen at box so real quick the applications running on my dumb comcast sorry to call comcast dumb calling the box. I'm not calling comcast dumb. Those applications that are running on the set top box. They're running in containers. They might some of them might rerunning depending ending on the vendor interesting. Okay sorry continue. So and then you can think of that device to have a marketplace of different applications which can run at that device. So he doesn't have to the only TV streaming you can now have audio streaming or you can now connect your light bulbs and half the LIGHTBULB manager running on top of that box so beat really generic computing server. which can run any kind of applications and then the Internet service provider can give you? This is the marketplace of APPs these vendors who are contributing there you you can deploy your APP or on your up there. And is that to say that coober netease would be useful as essentially a consumer operating system in that environment or maybe open shift is the operating operating system or is it just a lennox just a single node. You don't actually need to distribute system. You're you need new elites distributes have containers running on the same note. But it's just a single all note it is just a single note in our homes so in our home you probably don't want to have free service to have physical H. A. So so you have one single server which is transformed tobback's which is a single box running operating system which is always the core of everything you need need to enable the hardware in some way and then you need some platform or you need something which is orchestrating the workloads on top of that depending on the level of orchestrations auto healing or other things. You need there then. You need difference of services from for brands to run on

Comcast Verizon Telco Industrial Iot Texas Becca Stan Smart Stadium Apple Tobback United States ARI
Edge Computing Platform

Software Engineering Daily

12:11 min | 2 years ago

Edge Computing Platform

"We're GONNA talk about edge computing today and particularly red hat's strategy strategy around that. Give me two recent applications that you have seen of edge computing so to very often reasons. Why the applications WANNA run the etch is latency which means you want to have very fast request response and the second one is reducing bandwidth over the network and those are very to have very often mentioned once? They're way too many other reasons why to do that. And for me. These two reasons are mainly the consequences of what I want to achieve and if I want to improve user experience does are probably the two The latency is probably the first one if I want to reduce the cost probably reducing. The with is another one but then there are other reasons for example risk factors. I want to improve resilient therefore I want to run my applications nations at the edge and have them running in very completely isolated environment so there are really many reasons by the two. Most mentioned wants is definitely latency latency and bandwidth so the type of edge competing. We've had for a pretty long. Time is CDN infrastructure CDN infrastructure is fairly basic. It's if I make a request for an image for example apple that image is GonNa get cashed at the edge and then subsequent requests to that resource will be sent to the edge because the edge can be closer to the user and the edge. Might it'd be a content delivery network. That is pushing out that content to a lot of different locations so that a user news Becca Stan has rapid access. A user in Texas Texas has rapid access the kinds of edge computing. That we WANNA do. Today is very different than that type of simple request response for an image for example. What kinds of computation do we want to do at the edge today? I don't want to repeat myself but it's always it depends ends on the use case and there are many industries which are doing competing for different reasons. All let's take for example Industrial Iot in the production. Shen lines where they are running. They are having multiple sensors in their production lines to control quality production for example of the product the sensors are generating a lot of data data and this data is being analyzed and is being responded is the product quality. Okay can I continue in the direction or do I need to interrupt and just a process. This is kind of application which needs very fast rapid response you cannot really rely on sending that over the network to centralized location do the processing there and then and get the response back so this is very often reason why you want to push the edge computing to location of the IOT industrial but there are also reasons. Why want to centralize? You don't want to do everything only at the edge. There are reasons why you want to do centralization so imagine I have the industrial plans and I have them all over the country but I need to train my machine learning models from different examples and I want to gather those examples from different locations therefore I need to centralize them somewhere then do training model. They're likely in the centralized location and then push out only the train models to do the fast decision making at the edge so this is one of the examples right and that architecture makes a Lotta sense because in order to train the machine learning models you need all the data centralized in a particular place or you need some large subset of the data or you need the new training examples. Whatever the data to train the models takes a lot less space than the actual models that can make a decision that can improve application infrastructure? So we need to start deploying thing these models to the edge now if we talk about the types of CDN infrastructure that has been there for a long time where you're caching an an image and then you can request the image at the CDN layer if we're talking about hosting machine learning models versus hosting basic images. Do we need different different infrastructure to run those machine learning models instead of simple. CDN Type of infrastructure. Absolutely we do and it depends on the context. What kind of application I WANNA run? Therefore the machine learning very often or for example video processing or similar requests we we might need data processing. We need real time kernels we need. GP use use very often to speed up. The processing can reduce the cost of the processing power so the type of the hardware which is enabling the the use cases is specific for the application which needs to run on top of that the CDN is very simple. Use Case as you mentioned you don't really need much of the processing Specific processing processing. But if you need to run for example containerize network function. It has very high requirements on the fast data path and networking or it needs to access the real time kernel which difficult CDN networks don't need Ari talking about machine learning stuff. I've also heard of widespread bread edge competing use cases in the telecom industry. Can you tell me about those applications. So S Forty Telco Day one to do editing edge competing for multiple reasons. I would separate it into two categories first. One is to run their own brighter X.. Networks and for that that is the containerization containerization of their network functions. As you know there was a progress of running network functioning onto bare metal itself with specific hardware than it moved to. VM's and now it's to moving through containers and here the Yukon. We actually saw demo of the proof of concept how to do the five G. fully running on carbonated. That is one of the kind kind of the application. Because at the antenna level you need to have the processing as close to the signal as possible so that you again reduced latency NC and you don't have to push all the data through the network to raise the swap that is the main requirement for five G. or main features of the five G. The second use case for the telcos is to monetize their infrastructure. which they are building for the five and that is to provide mobile edge edge computing platform for all the independent service vendors or other enterprises running their applications? So I can be an enterprise fries which has branch offices and in order to get access from those branch offices to pass processing. I might want to run my applications closer to those branches not necessarily centralized in my data center which might be private cloud one national data center but I might take an advantage of my telco provider either to run the application closer to my branch office and not a very common use cases gaming or augmented reality where you take advantage offbeat as close to the end user with a cell phone or the smart devices possible so that they have the good user experience and then to date on experience instaflex so I understand correctly. Telecom like verizon. They need to build essentially data center infrastructure telecom data center center infrastructure to support five G. for their basic cellular customers and in order to get additional value. Oh you add that infrastructure. They are adding the capability to essentially lease out those resources to enterprises that might need similar functionality to that same five G. infrastructure basically they're already building data centers and they're like well we might as well reuse this for edge computing. That's exactly right amazing. So as red hat you basically have an opportunity to help a telecom like horizon that is not historically thought of itself as a cloud provider to the extent that I understand it become a cloud provider. Essentially yes I would not necessarily called provider but mobile computing platform provider. Absolutely the and any of these telcos or service providers in general. It doesn't have to be Telco. Only it can be Internet service provider as well think of comcast or others that is to raise. Is there infrastructure which they need to build to support five G. we can think also of the other use cases when they want to place a device to the end user premise itself. So you can think of Smart Stadium. It's aware you have broadcasting of different games for example you need a server which needs to run there you you need high bandwidth. You need to broadcast it. So what verizon or other Telcos do they place the server there at the stadium at the end user premise and the a US benefits of their infrastructure behind or s in consumer for example. I'm a comcast user. I have my set top box at home. Currently the setup boxes being used for very specific services for example to get my TV streaming on my screen but but in order to use this device to be more generic we start talking about the universal customer premise equipment to turn these very specific use case oriented devices into more generic computing platforms to turn on your home into smart home and connect the Iot devices devices to it and provide different kinds of applications running there. Okay so that's a very different kind of edge computing. It's very different kind of competing but it is still edge computing. Okay Eh. What role would red hat have in that kind of application? The like. I'm comcast I've given you a dumb set top box and now we WANNA turn into like a smart connected home thing. Comcast is still owner of that server or of the device which is running at your home so they need to run some operating operating system. There they need to run some platform which is enabling to run applications on top of that. And guess what the applications are very often containers so we can and think of for example taken to the extreme Kluber not seen at box so real quick the applications running on my dumb comcast sorry to call comcast dumb calling the box. I'm not calling comcast dumb. Those applications that are running on the set top box. They're running in containers. They might some of them might rerunning depending ending on the vendor interesting. Okay sorry continue. So and then you can think of that device to have a marketplace of different applications which can run at that device. So he doesn't have to the only TV streaming you can now have audio streaming or you can now connect your light bulbs and half the LIGHTBULB manager running on top of that box so beat really generic computing server. which can run any kind of applications and then the Internet service provider can give you? This is the marketplace of APPs these vendors who are contributing there you you can deploy your APP or on your up there. And is that to say that coober netease would be useful as essentially a consumer operating system in that environment or maybe open shift is the operating operating system or is it just a lennox just a single node. You don't actually need to distribute system. You're you need new elites distributes have containers running on the same note. But it's just a single all note it is just a single note in our homes so in our home you probably don't want to have free service to have physical H. A. So so you have one single server which is transformed tobback's which is a single box running operating system which is always the core of everything you need need to enable the hardware in some way and then you need some platform or you need something which is orchestrating the workloads on top of that depending on the level of orchestrations auto healing or other things. You need there then. You need difference of services from for brands to run on

Python packaging landscape in 2020

Talk Python To Me

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Python packaging landscape in 2020

"Chris. Welcome back to talk by thirty. He thinks how's it going. It's been a while it has been awhile how it has been since the summer of two thousand eighteen so not quite two years. But it's definitely been awhile since you were on previously. You're on to talk about. Continuous integration. Continuous delivery rate with Python. And you know that was a really popular episode. Actually I thought the topic would be popular but you came across with all all these little tools and techniques that people just love and so yeah I was really great and I will probably learn more about cool tools and techniques this time around to. Yeah sure it was a a good episodes to kind of get everything up together in a nice little summary Feral so yeah anybody. That's interested is a good one. So let's maybe fill people blend on what you been up to lately day to day. Sure if you are on the software development side but it sounds like you're on the testing and like process making sure stuff works works for the folks around you that they don't build bad software as well so when we recorded that last episode. Yeah I was mostly doing development side but I was in a small all team so I was tied into everything. Qa builds and everything. But since. Then I've transitioned to a different organization and I mostly doing Qa now 's okay tooling which is still involves build stuff but not really developing a product more developing tools to help test and release code. That's cool so you're basically basically in the developer tool space but for internally for your company not like Jimmy rains or the microphone. Like that right right and I've done that in my career. You're a lot actually like it because they can walk over and talk to my customers and tell them that you like this and they're like no it's not okay so fix it. That is super super cool. Feeling I've worked thin small offices where basically the users of the software they were a few offices or little space down and it was like all right what we need for the next week. Is this come back three or four days later. This is what I built. I know you ask for this but I think this part can be automated to. Where do you think about like either like Oh? That's amazing using her. Now what were you doing. Of course you can't do that and so on. It's that quick feedback loop is pretty cool. Yeah it just helps you. Produce something productive for people that will help their productivity. Yeah cool so well that sounds really fun and also related a little bit to what we're going to be talking about now. Yes yes so. I WANNA start really high level with our conversation. 'cause ideas we're going to dig into some of the options for for packaging python applications and I think before we even dig into the details of how we do that. Some of the cool tools out there honestly. I think we have to define what the heck that means. And it's not because we just need to be precise but I think to different people have vastly vastly different expectations and needs some tools. Completely solve that and if your your desire is different it's completely broken like imagine. I want to get my web web APP onto a server to run consistently maybe docker and coober. Netease is the perfect answer. If I have a accounting in application I want to give to accountants running a coup Bernice cluster is not the right answer right like these are really really different. So maybe what are some of the definitions of of what packaging might mean for different people. What's the spectrum out there right so even in the ORG? I'm in right now. We actually have this problem because we have a wide range of tools right so if you're building a bunch of services with sap is to help you deliver something to that's remote or let's call cloud like two people rate that might like you said that's something you might WanNa package as a docker container as as a service running an on a server which is a different deliverable. Then Dan say a double click. This icon here desktop application. That you'd want to deliver if you're one wanting to say create a log viewer. Refer somebody to help them. Process that information right and is completely different from some utility where you just want to provide a quick library or or other people to write more code using your library and all that you'd WanNa deliverable for all of that would be different in and something that makes more sense to the user in the environment that they're in different environments Yup absolutely like. I suspect you're kind of on the border at at work right because because you are working with developers so it's it's probably reasonable to say well there's arrest in point or there is a command line tool you type in the a command line and magic happens so the rest endpoint easy rate. So there's there's this gooey uses some rest. Api and you can track your execution of your tests. For example you can see how things are going. But when you're talking about the actual test you wrote the needs a library for you to access the infrastructure and a bunch of services in that infrastructure that might relate to just stuff. You need an requesting resources for testing or using other integrating with other tooling. That will help you with that rate which is then completely different from some utility. That'll tell me. Give me the list of all the all Mike compute that I have available to run tests on right. Yeah and then that utility needs to run and every developer's machine and then how you distribute that starts getting complicated.

Developer Netease Bernice Cluster Jimmy Rains Mike SAP DAN
Interview with Anil Dash Discussing Web Development

Developer Tea

09:55 min | 3 years ago

Interview with Anil Dash Discussing Web Development

"An ill welcome to the show thanks for having me it's kind of honor I feel like I've I've seen your work for a long time and I think the world is a better place because of what you do but for those who uh of for whatever reason they haven't encountered what you do the things that you are part of can you can give a basic background to the work that you're doing Jack make stuff on the web And so the first thing I became known for his I I started blogging about twenty years ago reading about software in pop culture and whatever else and then you didn't have to be he didn't have big late you consider tries though and then along the way I got to work a number of startups in the early days of social media out build a tool Co. movable type those sort of one of the first big long tools these billy's till the post and Gawker and things like that and then we'll recently a lot of my work has been around trying to enable collaboration creativity coating together so I'm on the board of Stack overflow and Sankara blow actually spun out of call our creed also travel links other products and about three years ago I took over the company and we launched so the latest in that series of products called glitch and it has become a very substantial very interesting community people creating web stuff together in it's both a platform we can code right your browser and instantly ship up to the entire web and also a really great creative community reconsider the People's work remix it in and and clower together and it's been a pretty you know knock on wood every night success and the gates we've had it just lots and lots devs come in and be like Oh this brings back creative feeling Ron cody and so we ended up actually rename the company to glitch and focusing all in on it and since we decided to do that about a year year and go it's really taken off people now built millions of APPs on the and that's one day to day is running the company and getting direct with the community and I'm GonNa ask you a intentionally broad and difficult question about glitch now I'm not sure Who is glitch made four and who is it made not for WHO's not made for I guess is a better with it and I can use English properly today who is it not made for that's a great question so the first thing I thought about is every Hamed a developer tool in the past it had always been this felt like they hadn't pictured guy sitting at a desk with a black turban screening green taxed on and that was the sort of the ethos in the aesthetic in and the mindset of this thing and who's GonNa prove your command line is this is how you became a developer and we actually have a great cohort of people that work that way and they're using this as a tools English but it wasn't that we put them I thought we know we check that box those kinds of developers but for people interestingly on other the opposite ends of the occur from that's the the middle of curve adopters on one enter a real experts who lobby on the web but have had you know any I be in differing views are created toward the tools of us and and I think they've lost some of the the joy the fun of just making stuff and sharing it because it's become very complicated you can't just ship stuff and all of a sudden you're negotiating your deployment environment and also stuff it's just in the way and so those very very experienced coders I think have lost the the fun of the soul of connecting them to creating an the other end are beginners in this can be a kid is learning to read the first line of each to mail it can be experienced over trying API that they haven't used before this sort of back to square one or somebody that doesn't take themselves coder at all maybe they do you know they edit formulas in spreadsheets workers like that the share in common you've got some technical skill but they're a little bit out of their comfort zone a little bit out of the norm in for them listing Louis they had the same needs that expert coder has when they just want to get an idea of their head which is I don't WanNa worry about the overhead and complexity I don't WanNa be distracted by getting something just the basics running I won't be expresses idea I wanNA capture this this little mood of inspiration than I had before evaporates because it's so fragile seen same way as like you know a lot of friends with musicians and all of us have in other guitar two new residents were sitting next to them so that they got it songs in their head they can just capture it and the same thing applies for for making stuff on the web were sometimes you said this fun idea you get out there on glitches as easy as remix it and change it tweet it to be exactly what you need for managed that's in your head we're making everybody that's ever had a moment that you don't be cool thank you know what the world should see this one little idea yeah that's super cool so there's a lot to be said for lowering the barrier to entry both for people who are you know well into the industry now the job and doing fine but also perhaps more importantly for people who are not in the industry who want to try something for the first time but they don't WanNA learn sixteen hours worth of coober netease material exactly right that's not what they're looking for and even like I can't I can't provisional serve on aws again the deploy script but my Gosh I don't want to you just WanNa make something in in back in the day I used to be able to go on Geo cities or journal or whatever the time and just sort of like shop something onto the Internet and it got worse and then it got hard you know and so he's got some difficult than it couldn't just you know try something can just experiment and so having I feel where it's like I said as joyful it's just like tapping out a song piano or something I it's a really Nice feeling yeah I think so so what you've said is this really cool the idea of of a quick idea get it out on paper and you know I think a lot of people may have a misconception about glitch based on our conversation so far that's only made for like these prototyping ideas but there's actually these like the ability to do production level thing right yeah so I mean we run glitch dot com visit south on which is estimated and that's obviously you know Michigan legal for us it's very important out but but either lots of companies where you you're not going to run your air traffic control system on it you're not gonna that's nine you're not gonNA run the Stock Exchange on it sure did that a lot of times or just like I wanted you know we have some old proprietary apple or company and we would like to have it ah you know drop something in the slack so we have a reporting system in I just wanted to set it up but I'm the one the president the office who has permission to launch production apt to do all the I'm stopping I don't WanNa ask the IT guys to do it for me in the third quarter of next year and so maybe I can just put something together and I think that that's the taste but I think it's true at home or somebody who's like I just wanted to you know put together a website to organize early neighborhood wants to clean up the park the playground I want to have to do a facebook group for it and there's a lot of different ways of capturing that impulse but their relapse and they really run and they there full stack and they are us any framework and toolkit API I do think a lot of times we start with that in Nicole were all of like in the technical bonafides and not so much the creative impulses destined care about the most is you actually figure out any tech you need to or any you will learn a teenage learn if there is an idea that just animates you so much that you need to create it in the world and Sony learn that way to begin with or at least started that way and And we wanted to sort of enable that because the expert coders are very well tended to there are tons of resource capabilities but the people who are like just need to get this idea out there and then maybe they got some experience coating or maybe you tone but will handle all that other complexity offer you WanNa go if you want to run the large scale production side like you are that's great that's all in there you don't have to think about that we start right yeah I think there's there's an interesting discussion here that kind of merges when when you start thinking about you know that seam between and I'm back when I was an agent he works especially I saw the same pronounce Stephen Moore but it's between the kind of creative people and technically adept people Zainur and develop per prototype kind of people where the designers kind of quarantines to this area where you know they might be able to make a motion prototypes they may even be able to work with HD on Java scrip- right but there's no way that that stuff is GonNa make it over that seem is not going to get into the quote real APP yet right and it got harder to because we introduce the frameworks of the toolkits build scripts that you couldn't just tweet it yourself now you you had have this knowledge

Jack Sixteen Hours Twenty Years Three Years One Day
Helena Avelar and Lus Ribeiro on Traditional Astrology

The Astrology Podcast

10:00 min | 3 years ago

Helena Avelar and Lus Ribeiro on Traditional Astrology

"A first of all we have people from all different different countries not only English people because that's in London but from different countries in the environment the way that we relate to supervisors or to other students. It's really really so we feel at home all the time and we we have access to an amazing library and a amazing library. That's one of the things that I really miss your. You have shelves and Garters shelves only dealing with history of astrology so every critical edition every little lot secure article article that you can imagine it's probably there so it's it's wonderful yeah. I visited in a two thousand two thousand eight and I'm pretty sure that has to be the best library just in the world for astrology books and especially for traditional an older astrology books in critical editions and things of that nature and the way latest organized you can actually you don't need to ask the book to a librarian if you are a student of the institute can just go there to the shelf off and see and they are organized by topic not inauthentic order so you go there to pick one book and you end up with five hundred books because they are all related so it is organized in a way that you can. You can make the best asked of the library. Make the best of your study because of this so it's it's really amazing. If you have the opportunity to go there I would advise you to go because it's an amazing place and you just finished your actually before we get to your PhD dissertations so that's really important because it seemed like for most of the past century there were in the early part of the century suddenly there was academic interest in the history of strategy and there is a growing but relatively small a group of academics who are doing important work making critical editions and doing projects like the CCA G to catalog all of the surviving Greek manuscripts on astrology. You mean the work of the vigils penalty the early ones the L. Yes more like friends. Kumaon and some of those people in the the twentieth century where there was growing academic interest in the history of astrology and then eventually later in the century astrologists started getting interested in traditional astrology eighty but they were kind of like separate groups for a long time that didn't intersect but more recently over the past two decades there have been individual astrologers bruce who have been making an effort to to go back to school and get advanced degrees especially in the history of astrology the history of science in order to sort of merge those two worlds or blends merged that gap between the two groups for instance India Warburg issue too we have dr in Greenbaum. Darden was one of the first I think and I I always I always say that he she broke the ice for us. You know because he she was one of the first the scholars to openly at studies theology in in this at this level so I think you interviewed Dorian sometime ago. Yes she appeared on the podcast a couple of years ago and so she was another person in who like you she was an astrologer. I think she had like a bachelor's or a master's degree in Egyptology but then became an astrologer and she did a a translation of Police Alexandrina sin. I think two thousand one but then eventually in the early two thousands decided to go back to school and get her. PhD She went to the Warburg Institute where I think Charles Burnett was also her adviser and she ended up doing a dissertation on the Domon in Hellenistic astrology. Um so she was really inspiring to to you and seeing what she was able to do was part of maybe what motivated you guys to make that such a big move yourself yes not only she was inspiring but he was actively supportive because we know her personally and she was very very supportive of both of us yeah it is important that we have the study of history in with straight to because in speaking from monastic logistical perspective it's like it was saying there were many groups and there are still certain degree because we have Bach. It's can say buckets of people people who studied specific words specific authors and I'm sorta less orbiting those altars and those lines of bookstores strategy while we in our experience. Oh of course you always go to certain technique or practice altered at you. Prefer that's that's almost natural but one thing that blacks as to have a complete view of astrology of you of the tradition Asian so so that we can see how it'd false how it develops and we can extract them. I think content the basic concept since that of having a basket full of contradictions because people sometimes discuss lots of contradictions strategy and they forget to see what everyone talks about and it's common to everyone and it's that fine line where you have the the column of strategy would we did the consistent tradition the consistent drafting of strategy through times. That's where we should. You'd focus not so much in the little differences sure and it seems like the study of history and culture are kind of go hand in hand with the revival of traditional astrology because in in modern or contemporary astrology you study the techniques and you don't really need a lot contextualisation because it's written in the same period that we're living in now so there's just things you can take for granted that everybody knows except but as soon as you start going back history you have to understand the culture and the time period and everything else and so it seems like that's part of what you felt like you needed to specializes in more or wanted to become more authorities to talk about is just that that process of of understanding the history and the context in which the techniques emerged or were practiced. I think what we value is what we call us logical culture because contemporary very people in most contemporary people. I don't know what they do. I don't know all of them but most when temporary people would just focus as you said in the practice and they don't worry about the way the technique evolved or the way technique was created so what happens is that that opened the space for all sorts of opinion and if you don't know all the technique is generated. If you don't know the rationale of the Dick you just you might have your own opinion or you say l. Because in my own horoscope it works that's the main the main argument it works for me and so this would generate all sorts of what we might call personal astrology for Meat Works and so if you know where the technique comes from if you have this context all the context if you understand the idea you will be able to criticize in a good sense of the word you will be able to criticize and say this. I think it makes sense this. I don't think it makes sense because it's not rooted in the tradition and that is the the main thing in also because probably because I'm a Nestorian but I think it's very important for any kind of practice to understand our developed otherwise you have no route you just you just leaves me thing in the superficial level all things without any substance what we were living in the world people say things without any substance anyway. It sure seems like that's what's drawn. A lot of people to traditional astrology over the past decade is on wanting to go past oftentimes doing modern astrology but hitting a wall in terms of your understanding of the subject and realizing that if you wanted to go deeper into it and wanted to be able to actually synthesize charts or no the reason why you're you're saying certain things that at a certain point you have to go back into the tradition in order to figure some of those things out I think what happened if any I'm talking about historically historically here also but the twentieth century we had the move slow move from tradition and natural escaped from the tradition because of the whole Cultural Movement of the twentieth century and got two point where things get to a level of abstraction which Chad no connection to reality so we have a lot of astrological practices now days that don't have any connection to reality and sometimes not any connection action to strategy itself so most of the time we see people say they're astrologers and so the strategy but they explain astrology Assu of several other systems as tarik psychological several spiritual or something something else or scientifically even and they don't explain this torch by itself and any form of knowledge such as astrology sheet must be able to explain itself. It must have an internal rule which we can follow up on when we have adult or elder and we can't. It's like mathematics comparing it so easy comparison to do if you have a doubt you go for the mathematics rule go for the geometrical the rule that will give you the answer if you're progressing correctly or not and the Saudi lack that for a long time now it's recovering. That's an we. St- we're we're starting to see a nucleus of heart core nucleus of astrology of the doctrine that's coming out again which was completely lost until and we started to have translations and we'll hear speaking in English so we in the English speaking community you there were many translations of texts until two decades ago three decades ago so it they were known and now all we have it and now you had already enough time for that information to mature and to result in in a community. Let's let's say of people develop rankings to digital strategy and have a common language already grown up which is not willing lily. It's not mystic. It's it's not mediaeval. There's already a nucleus with which is common to any tradition in astrology and that's that's where things need to be worked upon its to understand exactly what the nucleus is composed off although we can have of course second deck. Niks that exists in different cultures in different from epochs that's natural but still there is common ground to hold this essential dignities. the goal is of the planets all of that is the nucleus and we can see in any any astrology book anesthesiology prime. We'll have to have that was principles which which are absolutely lacking in most of the things that were written in the twentieth century. You don't have a common ground. You don't have an explanation Ford Meanings of the planets. You don't have an explanation for the aspects or you have an explanation netease outsiders not not like psychology for calling numerology symbolic mythology for example one of my main glitches with with the the rationale of astrology now sometimes now in presentation is mythology you fall back into mythology to justify. Why applied works in a certain way way but we're forgetting that mythology was forged from observations of the planets so we're doing things incorrectly yeah? It's not a a logical God that gives the plant certain quality that the body that God was derived from the observations the planet's actions and a nature so doing it incorrectly you you cannot do it. The process inversely so it's complicated lead and there was also the presumption that that's the way it's always been done and the assumption was projected back into the tradition that mythology has always been and the primary interpretive principle for understanding slender bodies and therefore it's getting projected forward into the discovery of new ones so that's the primary way that they're approaching like new bodies by thinking about the name and the mythology

Warburg Institute London Netease Kumaon Cca G Darden Dorian Charles Burnett India Chad Bruce Tarik Two Decades Three Decades
"netease" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"T shirt, visit d d dot dot net. Rocks dot com to get started. And we're back. It's Richard Campbell Carl Franklin run dot net. Rocks to our friend, rob Richardson talking about STO, and this sort of mature model of containers, orchestration dealing with multi clusters and the endless naval terms. They use. It's been so long heaven seen you since an entire commercial ago. Have you been? Seconds. Rob. What even with yourself? We've been shipping things all over the place. Yeah. You could ship quite a lot in thirty seconds. There you go. I love how Cooper Netease has all of these naval themes, and like all of the things building on top of it have now introduced says, as well is the oh, polling in all these things. We're gonna run out of words. We're going gonna have to start using like naval ranks and all sorts of very obscure, naval words that sailors, don't usually say in mixed company, you know. Yes. Naming things is hard. It is hard. Yes. And renaming things is harder. Because it's like okay, do I take the overhead of renaming all of them? Or do I just rename the ones that I bumped into today? What happens about those ones that I didn't bump into do I rename those eventually do? I not now. You can you definitely can get down the rabbit hole with the names. And yeah, it's the only after go so far. I don't know what the heck in this studio is, but it doesn't matter. I can see. I think I can remember this. Yeah. So close enough for the name should we explore? I actually I want to stay on the brownfield story. So we've got a customer, they're running in VM, you're starting to peel stuff out in containers. Do you wait until you've emptied the VM before you light this, upper, can, you do sort of interim phase with a few things running in containers and everything else, still in the VM? What's cool about STO? And I've never practiced it in this way, is that is DO in theory is this mechanism of communicating between things and is not necessarily tied to Cooper Netease. In fact, they very specifically have an implementation tier to get their traffic, shaping methodology into Cooper, Netease, so in theory, you could pointed at some virtual machine services and pointed at some container services. And that sounds interesting of ideally, I kinda wanna wrap all the things in this security blanket. And if it's running in VM, can I ensure that all the traffic coming out of the VM goes through my proxy? I don't know it feels like an interesting exploration. Right. And they I mean they're offering support for different containers services as part of the traffic management. But that's not the real issue. Right. The real issue is getting this stuff that isn't in containers at. All right. I mean in the end it's all Tia, lest HDP. So you should be able to get to it in the end. Yeah it's just data. More data. And I love that in the end is just data, but it's probably running overage to defeat nowadays. So in the end, it's just a web connection says that's kind of like our baseline assembly today. Yeah. You don't you don't really need to go further than that. Should we dive into some of these details about what these entities are within steel, like we know at envoys are, but mixers and pilots and citadels and galleys should we go down that rabbit hole? Yeah. Definitely. We can those start to get kind of weird as we dig out the pieces of another way to go is we can look at. So now that I have this proxy mechanism between my services. What abstractions can I build on top of that? So either path could be really entertaining to dig through. Well, you're the expert so you decide. When I have this mechanism where I've got this control plane, this pilot that drives traffic between containers. Well, now what if I drive some of my traffic to this other container and most of my traffic to the regular.

Cooper Netease rob Richardson Richard Campbell Carl Franklin Cooper thirty seconds
"netease" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"To. Netease nineteen. But sounds but none. Keeping it real. No. Calmed down walked away. I was like I love this guy. She would be exhausting to my God. Lease jeez. I booking my flight on delta experts. Lemonade if they come up online again, and then you had this also happening in New York over the weekend for the rock and Roll Hall of fame induction, which is not in Cleveland, New York Stevie nicks, big fan, apparently of Harry styles or one direction that she said he was from insect. I didn't make that mistake. Even when she said, she knew it was a mistake. And she said well never lived down that one delta is like twice as expensive as southwestern. Yes, you can get online. So I'm assuming the most of the airline center backed up and running this is kind of fun. Daily price. Check. What was the price on Ellen? The cheap one. And I gotta make like eight stops three hundred and nine dollars on on south west. It was like to. So I'd be going to twelve one way again. Yeah. That's it one way. But this flight leaves it's six thirty tonight. Does it get into providence until like almost midnight? That's a terrible. That's a horrible. The cheap one. Up from there. More price checks coming up, actually, no we're gonna do because we hate April Fools pranks. We're gonna is it a prank or not we're going to go through a couple of different items that are out there. I think some of them are on us. We're going to decide together. I think I don't think I'm just saying a couple of headlines coming up a couple of minutes..

Stevie nicks Netease New York Ellen Cleveland Harry nine dollars
"netease" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on This Week In Google

"As you covered the flexibility to customize standard or even CPU optimized droplets, you can this thing. I love about digital. It's sometimes I think people don't understand exactly what I'm talking about. But. The idea is if I go to my digital ocean account. I'll show you how easy it is to create a server they call him droplets droplets in the ocean. Right. So I'm gonna create a droplet right now. Now, I use this because I am a hobbyist programmers. So I always liked to have servers running. So I can learn how to code in. No j s and things like that. So you could start here you with distributions boon to free BSD fedora, Debbie and sent us. They're also a complete full support for containers. Like Docker Kober Netease. There's a marketplace as well of one what they call one button installs. These are all apps. Let's say, I don't know. What should I say? Okay. Let's say I wanna learn how to do no J s that's actually something a lot of people want to do, and I could create a lamp stack very easily or a complete node j relation running on a boon to eighteen o four. I'm gonna choose a plan, and you know, for when I first start up I like to get the cheapest serve. That gives me a gigabyte of ram a CPU twenty five gigs of fast enterprise grade, SSD storage, a terabyte a month of transfer. So I'm going to set that I like to enable the backups a buck a month. What you know if I like to have it be backed up. You don't have to you can add block storage if you're gonna need more storage..

Docker Kober Netease Debbie
What Can We Learn From China's Music Business?

The Frame

06:34 min | 3 years ago

What Can We Learn From China's Music Business?

"We've talked a lot on this show about how the recording industry has changed due to streaming platforms like Spotify and apple music. But today we're going to be discussing a couple of streaming platforms. You probably never heard of ten cent music and net ease both are Chinese platforms which cater mostly to domestic artists. But unlike Spotify both have managed to turn a profit even in a country, where music piracy has been rampant for years to find out more. I spoke with Sherry who she's a freelance music and technology writer for outlets like billboard and Forbes, and when I reach her by Skype today, we began with what makes the Chinese music industry different. I think one really interesting aspect of the Chinese industry that the French sheets from what's going on in most western markets. Maybe some of the markets in Asia's Wallace that there's really a holistic view of. Celebrities enough celebrity culture in China. Meaning that if you're one of the biggest singers or music celebrities in China, you're also very likely a really big actor are also very likely pursuing a lot of deals with fashion brands and another smaller comedies, and if I were go to China and listen to music, what would I see that's different from the United States. Is there broadcast radio terrestrial radio record stores? How is the market fundamentally different from what people here might be used to? I do think broadcast and TV still play such an important role. Like singing, contests rapping, contests is this one show called wrap of China. Pizza told you so a lot of people treat that as a gateway from the artist's perspective into the major corporate hip hop world in China in terms of the physical market. I actually don't think CDs and bottle records are really increasing in China doll for showed the dominant mode of music consumption is still streaming and most of that is happening for free. But one thing that is also different is that if you look at the if you look at a given streaming service in China on how people consume music, I think it is much more multi media by default within a singular platform. So if you think about the the average US extreme consumer you might discover a song on Spotify, a non you'd have to go to YouTube to wash the music video whereas on some of the biggest services in China. Let q music you have audio video more fully integrated. And it's awesome. Much for social experience that you can comment on videos and songs and share them with your friends. A lot more easily through the same platform, you reported the China is recorded music industry is growing really quickly, but it's still relatively small, and if you look at the per capita spending, it's only like twenty cents per person per year is that because so much of this. Dreaming is free is that because there's so much piracy a combination of those factors if it were totally legitimate and people were paying for what they're listening to how big could possibly be. I'm not sure if any official numbers published on this fed, if you ask anyone who is active in the Chinese industry in the early two thousands like around two thousand five they would say that consumption digital music exception with essentially ninety nine percent pirated any would have situations where these platforms in companies that are quite big are actually just sourcing their music from or call the cloud locker. Files so essentially like MP three files that were stored in the cloud somewhere downloaded onto their platform, regardless of having any kind of fishing license from the major labels, and it's only within the last night even five years. I would say just like two three years that major labels are now pursuing official licenses and in many cases, exclusive licenses with Alexa, tencent music in net. Use cloud music as well, which are the two biggest platforms in the country. And so I think now that we have that infrastructure in place. I think the industry will grow more quickly. The other thing that you point out is that they're streaming platforms like Netease and ten cent. They're actually signing artists way. A record label would is that part of the trend there that a lot of artists in China are bypassing what we would consider to be the traditional model where you signed to a label label releases your music, and then a streaming service picks it up. Yes. Definitely. And this is so interesting because not just in China and. India you see one of the biggest streaming services in India called seven also running their own essentially, artists management and music marketing company already in addition to a streaming platform distribution platform underspin mostly positive reaction. And I think that the the same is happening in China yet the net use cloud music, assigning direct deals, both with local end with international artists. I think there's this realization that these platforms. Not only have a lot more reach just by nature. But also, they have the digital marketing expertise and the ability to move really quickly and dynamically that traditional labels might not have. I'd like you to explain the idea of tipping, and why that's important to streaming music and China, and whether or not western music companies could emulate that behavior. Yes, definitely. So let's take tencent music as an example. According to their most recent financial report, I think the filing that they put out a head of their appeal launch US December. They revealed that they made over seventy percent of their revenue not from audio streaming but from tipping as low as maybe even a couple of cents so didn't have to be large donations, but the sending money to creator. So they wanted to support for us to they wanted to support. And you see this kind of tipping micro payment dynamic, not just the livestream environment. But even in a downloading environment. I think part of it is distinct China, but I think what other western is extreme platforms. Can learn is that there's a much wider diversity of people's willingness to pay for music into support artists than just the nine ninety nine a month that I feel like a a lot of us are being funneled into

China Spotify United States Tencent Sherry Official Asia Netease Apple Skype Forbes Writer Pizza Youtube Wallace Alexa India Ninety Nine Percent
"netease" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"But it really I thinks I would venture to say the naming the initial naming might have had some, you know. Understanding problems with it. You know, people might have assumed that that it was only good if you were running windows servers virtually and whatnot, and we've certainly expanded our services, and our off offerings a whole lot in the last couple of years, it's gone through a lot of changes very quickly. You know, obviously, Amazon has a great product. And they've been doing things for a really long time. We are doing our best to have equally good products. And and in some cases, even be industry leading for things. Like, our our managed Cooper, Netease service and things like that. But yeah, you're right in the last few years is when you start to hear like the analyst talk more about Azure, revenue and whatnot. And it's become a bigger part of the business. And and that's because more and more companies are using the cloud because it makes more sense than owning or renting their their own hardware and maintaining that stuff. And so having a lot of data centers and being really good at managing this data centers and having services that will run well and efficiently. And whatnot is a good thing. So it's become a bigger part of the business. I would say in the last five years really the last three we've seen a bunch of changes and one of the challenges that we face as advocates is that if somebody used the product of a few years ago things are very different now the things change very quickly. And but the feet both in features and capabilities and so trying to keep up to date on all those things. But also, you know, hoping that people will give it another chance. They'll take a look at it if they're going to use something else. And then because we it's more than just like hosting an app, we also have, you know, machine learning an AI frameworks to do stuff. Like, if you want to do that type of thing, and we have other cognitive services like speech tax star. Image recognition and and stuff like that. There. There are a lot of different options. And so trying to kind of let people know, hey, you can do this on Azure, is as.

Netease analyst Amazon Cooper five years
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Okay. So you have moved from Google working on Cooper, Netease and tensor flow there to now working Microsoft today. And I think it's an interesting story of continuing work on open source projects despite moving from one cloud provider to another, and I think this is happening in in an environment where we really are seeing more collaboration. And I think positive communications between companies that could be cast a certain light is being bitter rivals. I think I think it is less like, frankly, speaking from from all the coverage, I do and talking to people I think there is less like kind of bitter rivalry today. And more of like a realization that this is just a gigantic market. And it's and it's not it's not like we're gonna dog fight for some limited set of of enterprise contracts right now. It's more like the entire world is going through an adoption of of cloud related technologies. Whether it is by a cloud provider, or they're just modernizing their own infrastructure. And I think there's a just a general feeling that this is really good for kind of global business. And you see it reflected in in. I think somebody like yourself where you're moving from one giant company to another. But it feels like I don't know. My my impression talking to you is you are it's not like you have to adjust your mentality and your personality to at least to a stark degree from you know, in going from one of these big corporations to another which is something that would have been very different five or ten years ago. I think can you tell me about what it's been like to go from Google to Microsoft such an interesting point that there's no question that that was still fierce competitor is in many ways, whether or not you're Google or Amazon or Microsoft. We certainly all have opinions about how to help customers get to the cloud and revolutionize and transform their data centers. But like, you said this really is a new world where folks like, Azure, are so deeply committed to open source that they hire real notables from the community to come in and help them guide the way that that we do open source here and collaborate where it makes sense. Microsoft, Azure, or one of the top contributors to Canetti's, obviously, we're continuing our work with cute flow with me here, they contribute onyx and onyx Runtime to public use and their contributors to pie torch, and so on so the amount of open work that's going on here at at Microsoft, Azure, is just absolutely tremendous to your point. I think that you know, every major cloud provider has really realized that it's not like it was ten twenty thirty years ago where every software package needs to be incompatible with every other companies software package. There's just a lot of opportunity to collaborate on common problems. And then differentiate with services and tools and data centers where it makes sense..

Microsoft Google Netease Cooper Canetti Amazon ten twenty thirty years ten years
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Are offering with a service mesh can you describe? What exactly your go to market strategy is and how that fits in to the ecosystem of what products people are looking for? So like I walk around in the expo hall at the coober, Netease conferences, and people are enthused about service mesh whether they're using it or not they like the ideas around service mesh because it does this rate limiting and service discovery and policy management, and all these different things that you want on top of your your coober Netease network. And I think you're offering things that are similar to that. But implemented differently than the service mesh approach with sidecars give an overview of how your offerings are going to fit in against the backdrop of the Kuban, Netease service mesh world. So I mean, as I mentioned the Netflix platform works on cougar Nettie is it works in. AWS or Zora whatever cloud provider using but it also works and then data center or even a web browser because it doesn't use something like a sidecar. So I think the core difference. I think people are looking for solutions to these problems that we mentioned right service discovery routing resilience security, telemetry service, mesh has sort of come to me in one particular way of solving that problem, which relies on sidecars, and is generally useful in something like environment like Cooper netties, but comes with sort of a set of restrictions that might not be appropriate for your application. We're trying to do is solve these very similar set of problems. But we go a lot further than that. And that we use our sock it to offer new capabilities to the application developer the service meshes mainly considered concerned with connecting the pieces together within this distributed application, so if you want to. Connect the pieces together product, which is called protease does that in a way that's vastly more performance than the current service, mesh offerings? But then it goes further than that allows you to sort of take advantage of these new applications semantics like pushing and streams of push messages that go to your browser or mobile phone or dealing.

Netease Kuban Cooper netties Netflix AWS developer
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So it seems like the the scope of of where it could grow to his is quite large when I'd also influence the private cloud aspect of it. I mean are s and the hybrid cloud for that matter, our aspiration is that if you as an enterprise operating in maybe you have a commercial distribution on your own hardware in in your own data center. And then you're also operating in a couple of different public clouds that you can go to. Each of the conferences of that of each of those vendors, but it should also be feasible. If to come to coupon and be able to book meetings with some of the top architects from from each of those companies. So we do think there's some role for us to play as that that vendor. Neutral, multi cloud, hybrid cloud, kind of kind of environment. So I know we're running up against time. But since we're on the subject of multiple vendors, I talked to besides some from abound earlier this week, and we were talking about coober Netease federation and the vision of multi cloud, and I think people want to have access to a cloud resources across any cloud because I think the clouds are going to get more and more differentiated, obviously, they'll they'll overlap, but you won't want to have to choose the services that you use based off of what cloud your monolith is anchored to explain what Cooper Netease federal. Is. And why it's important. I guess what your vision is for what a multi cloud company would look like sure I mean, I think the first thing that I would just say is that if you're looking for absolutely rock-solid, deployment hosting running of of your software and not just of modern microscopes, but of the monoliths and everything then Kuban Eddie's is a fantastic choice. And we have you know, dozens and hundreds of examples of companies doing that fibrillation. I would say is really on the leading edge of new development in just isn't quite there yet. So in particular, the multi cluster group in in coober, Netease started with the federation v one approach, and then they went back, and based on some of the learnings and some of the challenges they ran into have have have gone forward on on a federation to. And so I think there is an aspiration that a lot of end users have today that just like they can build a bunch of containers and write a bunch of ammo and say, okay. This container needs to run on we four machines. And this one needs that she pew every time it runs, and this on voice side card needs to be deployed in every pod, and those sorts of levels of of interaction that they would love to be able to say, and I want you to decide whether it should be running on my private cloud, or which of these public clouds based on the current spot pricing or based on the deal that I have or based on the need for some special service that they're offering in. I think my sort of high level understanding of of the space right now is that functionality is not quite fully baked yet. And so I think there's a lot of great work going on in the multi cluster sick that definitely encouraged people to get involved in. That's you know, there's are all public meetings in interactions mailing lists and get her repose..

coober Netease federation Netease Cooper Netease Kuban Eddie
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And so sometimes the people I speak with speak shockingly, good English as she when they've never lived in the US. But when they're not, and I can just have that person come over and begin begin translating. It really is amazing. How much we we do have in common and how interested they are in in what what CF in club native communities offering. And then of course, vice versa. I will say just based on your comment. One thing that occurs to me is that because I for coming up next week when things that we really do emphasize talk about is the value of. Hallway track? And so it it occurs to me that we could try them formalized that a little bit more. When we go back to Shanghai next year in June twenty nineteen and just have some some live simultaneous interpreters who are stationed at different spots along the hallway, and you know, no guarantee that they'd be available. But but just that you could grab some people and walk over and would allow you to have a more of that hallway conversation than you might be able to otherwise another thing. I I regret not doing is trying to schedule because you had a simultaneous interpreter that was made available to me, but I had to schedule it, and I wasn't exactly sure who is to to schedule it with or how to schedule it. But in retrospect, I wish I would have done that a little bit more Gresley because I was unable to do my walk around the expo hall, and and con- converse with people just because there was you know, it was very rare that the there was an. In both in in person. That was an engineer that spoke English at at those booths. So I didn't really, you know, I I saw their diagrams I saw some of their presentations that they had at the expo hall. But I was not able to really get get the same kind of sense that I would, you know, walking around coupon con North America and talking to the Cooper Netease businesses there. Yeah. Until we would love to to try and formalize that with you a little bit. And I think just on your second. Visit you would find it easier to ask for those things and just say, hey, just going to reserve the person for half an hour an hour. It definitely makes it a little bit more challenging to have that kind of serendipity where do feel like it's often just this hallway conversations or running into someone that is could be the highlight of the event. But of course, for, you know, most of the people there speak Chinese, so they're all able to to interact a perfectly well. So let's talk about Cooper Netease. More broadly in the CF exists to make cloud native. Ubiquitous you wanna be a neutral home for cloud native projects to build cloud native solutions. How has the CNC f- adapted as an organization over the last year? We have a been trying to deal with hyper growth, so seem CF is the biggest and fastest growing open source organization ever when we got started three years ago. And that's that's literally three years ago. This week we had twenty eight members in the organization and zero projects and then soon after Cooper nannies, and we now have three hundred forty six members and thirty one projects, and it's definitely just much more complicated. There's a lot more things going on. There's many more services that were offering to our projects to our members. And so it's definitely taken some. Scaling. And I think many of your listeners have experienced with startups and know that scaling can sometimes be a little awkward, but it's also been a really fun ride. The first who projects to graduate from the CFO coober, Netease and premisses and the third project that.

Cooper Netease expo hall Netease US Shanghai Cooper North America engineer CFO premisses three years
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"How do I do monitoring? How do I do service discovery between these applications and the way that a lot of folks initially approached this problem is that they make it? The business of the application to figure that out. So every application has bits of this code tucked in to try and do this. And it doesn't really scale if you want to change the way that service discovery happens you need to update every application within your ecosystem. And if you're a running at large scales that could be hundreds thousands of Microsoft is that you need to to update. And so it's DO is an open source project that was formed that built on top of the primitives at coober Netease provides and tries to solve these challenges of trying to make it easier to glue together Microsoft services, so that application developers can be even more one one more step removed from the the complexity of how the application runs, and they can focus more on application code. And then K native is a play in the server less space, which is taking things a step further and saying just give me your application that you. Your code that you want to run as a container, and you know, this system will figure out how to run it for you. You don't have to worry about Cooper, Netease. You don't have to worry about how things interact with each other. We'll make it even more simple for you. And so I am really excited to see where these projects are going to go in the future and see adoption grow there and see how it they're solving problems for customers in terms of just let don't worry about the infrastructure focus on applications saw deli. Thank of software engineering daily. Thank you very much for having me. It was a pleasure..

coober Netease Microsoft Cooper
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"How do I do monitoring? How do I do service discovery between these applications and the way that a lot of folks initially approached this problem is that they make it? The business of the application to figure that out. So every application has bits of this code tucked in to try and do this. And it doesn't really scale if you want to change the way that service discovery happens you need to update every application within your ecosystem. And if you're a running at large scales that could be hundreds thousands of Microsoft is that you need to to update. And so it's DO is an open source project that was formed that built on top of the primitives at coober Netease provides and tries to solve these challenges of trying to make it easier to glue together Microsoft services, so that application developers can be even more one one more step removed from the the complexity of how the application runs, and they can focus more on application code. And then K native is a play in the server less space, which is taking things a step further and saying just give me your application that you. Your code that you want to run as a container, and you know, this system will figure out how to run it for you. You don't have to worry about Cooper, Netease. You don't have to worry about how things interact with each other. We'll make it even more simple for you. And so I am really excited to see where these projects are going to go in the future and see adoption grow there and see how it they're solving problems for customers in terms of just let don't worry about the infrastructure focus on applications saw deli. Thank of software engineering daily. Thank you very much for having me. It was a pleasure..

coober Netease Microsoft Cooper
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"That your customers are going to have available to them, and you can provide a set of plug ins that will allow your Cooper, netties instance, to be able to communicate with those volume. Begins and prior to see aside, those plug ins were built into the core of coober Eddie's. So the challenges were in, you know, figuring out the bugs in those storage systems and the bugs of the coober Netease layer. But there wasn't there aren't inherent major complexities there. If a particular cloud customer chooses to use other storage on top of what is provided by the cloud provider for the most part that is the responsibility of the customer in the storage vendor that they choose on top that provides an additional software defined storage layer to figure that out. How are you going to deploy it how is it going to interface with Cooper Netease, the challenge I think is for folks trying to run coober Netease on Prem in their own environments and trying to figure out how do I run these storage systems? How should they interact with coober netties who is going to provide me, my CSI driver. How do I get it running? If I'm running within a virtual is environment. I'm running VM ware or something. How do I expose storage through? That VM layer into the into the the VM. So that they're available to the containers inside those at least for our specific cloud provider. G E, Google cloud. Guber Netease engine where we recognize that problem, and we're trying to provide a managed solution for on Prem as well where we'll say we're trying to solve a lot of the problems that exist in that space and give folks there a managed solution as well. All right. Well, we're here at qb Khan, and there's a gigantic amount of people here. Seventy five hundred people you work on g k so you're at the epicenter of Cooper, Netease development as much as anybody give me some predictions or tell me what you're excited about in the Cooper Netease community. That's a good question. I am very very excited to be here. Tim Hawkins who was the person that recruited me to the cougar Netease team early on in two thousand fourteen likes to say that when I'm at q Khan, I feel like I'm with eight thousand of my best, friends and. Honestly, I feel that way too. It's it's very nice. It's a great wonderful community in terms of what I'm most excited about. I think there's a couple of things one is just continued adoption and growth of coober Netease in realizing that we're reaching a state where a lot of the innovation is not necessarily happening within coober Nettie is it's happening at a layer above coober, Netease and figuring out how we enable that. And how we bridge the gaps. So that this ecosystem continues to grow. And then the second is basically an extension of that. Which is what are the kinds of features that we're going to expose there that are going to make -application developers lives easier and make deploying and managing applications in clustered environments dead. Simple the way that I like to think about it is that, you know, back in the day before there were operating systems folks who were developing applications had to be in Neethling aware of the specific hardware that they were deploying that particular application on and..

Cooper Netease Netease coober netties coober Nettie Cooper Khan CSI Google Tim Hawkins Neethling
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And if there's a bug you gotta wait and follow the massive Kuban Netease released process, and maybe they don't wanna open source code in some cases, so together with the vendor community in Kuban Indies at that time wasn't super mature. So what we did was. We partnered with other cluster orchestrators cluding Mazo cloud foundry Docker Docker swarm at the time. We all got together and decided we're going to create a standard called the container storage interface and the purpose of this was to have one standard for how a storage system. A storage vendor? Could plug their storage into a cluster. Orchestrator a cluster orchestrator being coober netties Mazo Docker swarm, cloud foundry and that works started about two years ago, and we're very happy to announce. That CSI went one point. Oh this last month and coober Nettie is one point thirteen pushed CSI support two G A. And what this allows now is that vendors can basically develop new extensions news for new storage systems independently of the Kuban Eddie's release the way that they develop them is basically just like any other coober nineties application. It's containerized there is an interface that's defined they implement that interface, and they deploy on coober Nettie is using the Kuban as primitives that exist just do acute cuddle apply. And now support for a new storage system exists within coober Netease and Kuban eighties is able to allow application developers to begin to use new new kinds of storage without having to modify the core kluber, Netease code. So if you're a cluster administrator previously, you were limited to the set of storage plug ins that shipped with coober nineties, you were of course, responsible for setting.

coober Nettie coober netties Mazo Docker Kuban Netease Kuban Kuban Indies Kuban Eddie CSI Netease administrator two years two G
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So I'm sure there's people out there that this will be helpful for the interfaces that if I'm the cluster, quote, unquote operator, then I'm standing up file storage and or block storage with a persistent volume interface in front of it on a coober, Netease cluster and the application developers can get to say, I know I need a sequel database and through coober Netease. They're going to make a persistent. Volume claim for file storage for that sequel database, and they're going to describe it's under the covers the their Kuban Eddie's clustered they're part of the Kuban as cl- application is going to say, okay. I need a volume claim with our I'm going to let's make a personal claim with this kind of configuration. I this much file storage. And then the Kuban Eddie's master is is cycling through the Coster. And looking for persistent volume claims that are have not been satisfied yet. And the Kuban as masters going to assign a persistent volume that matches the persistent volume Claude dynamically provisions or dynamically provisions dynamically provisioned oh class on the fly. There hasn't been enough. Persistent volumes have been created yet. Let's schedule some more automatically create a new volume automatically create a Peavey and use that instead of having those pre-provision. That's exactly right. And we can dig into a little bit of that lower layer if you're interested, so how does a cluster administrator exp. Does storage? So this is very interesting. When we first started with coober, Netease. We had a set of volume plug ins that we supported and they were built into the core of coober Netease. And those included the obvious cloud volume so on persistent disk on Amazon ABS volumes, but also NFS ice Ghazi Fibre Channel in the number of other volume plug ins, we're all baked into the core of coober Netease, and what these volume plug ins would do is they define that for this specific type of storage. Here is how you provision that volume. Here is how you attach that volume to a given node if that is a concept that makes sense for that volume plug in, and here's how you actually mount that particular volume into the container because ultimately, those processes are different for the type of underlying storage that you're using if you're using for example, say port works verses using a g. Assistant disc on cloud that is going to have a different interface for how you interact with it at the lower levels. And so we permitted. We created these volume plug ins as an interface that can be implemented. And then coober Netease uses those to to to do the operations that it needs which are provisioning attaching mounting, and so that interface as we grew with coober, Netease, kind of matured, but the number of volume plug ins continued to expand and it became very challenging for us as coober Netease maintainers because all of this is essentially third party code that is living in the core of coober Netease. And it's very difficult to test. Oftentimes for a lot of plug ins is actually went untested. It also meant that since these plug ins were part of the core. Kluber netties binary any bugs in this third. Party code would cause core kluber, Netease binary is to crash, and it also meant that any the security privileges you provide the security binary are automatic. Quickly given to these volume plug ins, so we wanted to get away from that model, and we found that vendors also wanted to get away from that model. Right. If you're a storage vendor? You don't want to be tied to the coober netties release process..

coober Netease Netease Kuban Eddie Peavey administrator Claude Coster Amazon
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"At Google. And you're also on the sig storage. For Cooper, Netease welcomes offer engineering daily. Thank you very much. Glad to be here. So when I talk to people in the Kuban as community about the issues in coober, Netease. That are still not completely resolved. One of the things that seems to frequently come up is stateful versus stateless workloads and the idea that it is difficult to run a stateful workload on Kuban Netease. Could you disembark, wait? What is a state full workload? Sure. So let's start with what a stateless workload is. So if you deploy a traditional containerized container onto Coburn. Eddie's running on Docker you could have your application. Do whatever you want inside that container can right to what appears to be the file system. The problem is that as soon as that container is terminated all of that any. Thing that was written to that file system is gone. So anytime that container terminated its moved. And if you're running in coober, Eddie's your containers can move around if there's resource constraints. There's not enough resources on a given. No, they can move around. So as you're container moves around any state that it wrote to disc is gone. So if you're trying to run any type of -application that needs to remember what it did. So you know, you put something in your shopping cart, and you had that request handled by a application running in a container. If it happens that application got moved to a different machine you come back. Your cart is gone. That's pretty bad or even worse. You know, the information about your profile, for example. So we need to find a way to be able to persist that state independent of the life cycle of a single container. That's kind of the domain that we operate in. When I spent up a container. It is given some section of resources where. I can write two why would a container move a good question. So there can be a number of reasons, for example. Let's imagine that you are running the one of the beauties of Kuban as it's you don't have to dedicate a single machine to a single application. You can kind of treat your machines as a large pool of compute.

Kuban Netease Kuban Netease Eddie Google Cooper Coburn
"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"netease" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And you have your own communities cluster. And so essentially, there is more and more reason now to treat carbonates clusters like cattle, just as you know, in the past we used to use the expression treats, you know, treat your notes like cattle. I think. Again, not net. More more more dispensable. That's right. More dispensable fungible. So we're getting to the point where you could maybe create a cluster use it for a short amount of time. And then dispose of it. Whether you have a few clusters or you have hundreds of clusters one of the problems with managing those clusters is you know, how to get a consistent configuration across them. How to have a common surface area for management across them. And also how to orchestrate work across them. Right. So this whole multi cluster effort is interesting, and as one that, you know, the the work confederation Kuban at his federation has started around both addressing the administration issue of multiple clusters. But also starting to think about how to deploy and manage containers across clusters being smart about, you know, region locality availability and other things that they consider that term federation. What is? A federated Cooper Nettie cluster. It's essentially when you have multiple layers of clusters, so you have a higher layer. That is connected to a set of clusters on the lower layer in the cluster at the Hyler is able to control the ones at the lower layer. So that's it's a hierarchy of clusters where you have one cluster connected to that access to federation control plane connected to multiple clusters that are just standard carbonates clusters. Why would you wanna federate a coup Bernice cluster, or I guess a hierarchy of them because you get essentially a single control plan that's able to control multiple. So you could do things like I'd like to deploy a workload or an application that I want to run across these clusters maybe run across multiple regions. And so if you're doing that, you either have to do that, you know, essentially want off go to every cluster and do that and. If things change you have to go one off change at all or use a federation approach where you have a control plane that is orchestrating work across other clusters, just like a standard granny's cluster. Orchestrates works across work across machines notes. When you talk to engineers who are using Kuban Netease at a place like Google or net. Flicks. Are they doing federated clusters? There are some folks that are using federal clusters. I think Sern is the one that comes to mind. I think the last coupon they talked about using federation amusing two hundred and fifty clusters within certain. I'm sure there are other cases where be pleased federation, the the project itself has gone through a, you know, a rewrite, and I think there is definitely more traction on the the second version affiliation now and with federation what is hard about doing that about setting up of like if I if I. I'm at net flex I can imagine. If I was able to snap my fingers, I'm like the the architect at net flicks. And the chief architect I could stat my fingers and make architectural changes that does sound pretty appealing having a single control plane, basically the internal net flix cloud. They probably have something like that some kind of control plane internally. But but doing it through federated Cooper Netease cluster. Sounds like it would make sense what's hard about setting that up. I mean, I think so things that are hard about that is that just if you using federation communities petition there, it's still a new project in their lots of missing gaps and features. But there's also, you know, a lot of bootstrapping that you have to do when you get clusters working. So I'd say it's not necessarily a obstacles at this point is just more work that has to happen to get to the level of this thing working as in a streamlined fashion that say communities does today at. Single cluster level. So the ideal scenario might be that I have my coober Netease control top level control plane, running in whatever cloud or on premises or whatever. And then have also got Kuban reneges clusters at Google. I've got a got a coup grenades cluster at Amazon, I've got one Microsoft, and the one that I have on Prem or the one that I have.

Cooper Nettie cluster Bernice cluster Kuban Netease Sern Google Cooper Netease Kuban chief architect Microsoft Amazon Hyler