35 Burst results for "Nestor"

Gardner's 2-Run Single in 9th Lifts Yankees Over Orioles 4-3

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Gardner's 2-Run Single in 9th Lifts Yankees Over Orioles 4-3

"The Yankees pulled out a four three win over the Orioles on Brett Gardner's two run single off Tyler wells in the ninth inning obviously you don't want to be in a situation where it's the last inning you're you're down a run or two but you know you you want to be up there with the game on the line and obviously you know I feel like I've been having pretty good at bats recently and see in the ball well Carter also scored a G. over shell S. two run Homer in the third inning of new York's fourth win in five games since a seven game skid Nestor Cortes was sharp in a no decision for the Yankees limiting the Orioles to one run and three hits with eleven strikeouts over six in the third the Yankees remain tied with the red Sox and blue jays for the two AL wild card positions I'm Dave Ferrie

Tyler Wells Brett Gardner Orioles Yankees Nestor Cortes Carter Homer New York Red Sox Blue Jays Dave Ferrie
Stanton's Single in 11th Lifts Yankees Over Orioles 4-3

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Stanton's Single in 11th Lifts Yankees Over Orioles 4-3

"The Yankees still trail the alias by six and a half games to the rays after the bombers pulled out a four three eleven inning win over the Orioles Giancarlo Stanton ended the game with an RBI single and he also Homer to help the Yankees take a two nothing lead openness when Lino helped put put up some good numbers at the same time as it's huge but most important is is the wind D. J. lemay who extended the game with a run scoring single in the tenth I happening after ram mount castle single put the birds on top Trey Mancini's two out Homer in the sixth chase Yankee starter Nestor Cortes junior when he pitcher clay Holmes wiggled out of a first and third none out jam in the top of the eleventh I'm Dave Ferrie

Giancarlo Stanton Yankees D. J. Lemay Homer Orioles Rays Lino Ram Mount Castle Trey Mancini Nestor Cortes Clay Holmes Dave Ferrie
"nestor" Discussed on Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

05:42 min | 5 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

"A ton of these all hands on guys like you. You don't wanna think of a world where garrett cole gets knocked out and like the first or second inning that would be a not good hopefully. It's a home wildcard game. That's what you want. that's what you play for. What they have the control their destiny right now but on the off chance that he doesn't like you can't tell me that this team has never been more prepared for situation like that with a guy like nestor and he'll behind him who can easily just absorb the next like six innings between them and get it too low iza and get it to chapman like there are a ton of dudes who right now are in the the rotation and have been like borderline ace level guys. Who if you need them to. The playoffs can easily be the is. Just give you three all out. Innings of weirdness and think about think about following kohl with nestor and then falling. Nestor with he'll that's fun. I mean that's very fun. And even just nester. And he'll that's a fun playoff game. Maybe one goes for one goes three like it's funky. It's fun it's interesting. i don't hate anything about it. I let's let's talk a little bit about you. Know let i mean. We're going to talk about luke voight agan before we sign off. I do want to give the twins credit. though wh- mean we beat the shit out of them. three dominant victories. They almost came back from six. Nothing down in the first game kind of sort of six nothing to six four six nine six three two six four two seven four seven five then went with squad and the game the next two games. They were nowhere close but a lot of people are doing all you. He's always beat the twins. It's true the twins it's hilarious. It's weird makes no sense but a lot of people are following that by being like they're worse than normal this year they're terrible. You know what that's said nothing about anything. Prior to coming to new york which again the twins always have problems here but prior to coming to new york the minnesota twins who have struggled this season foreshore went to cincinnati early august august third and fourth split that series seven five and lost six five since as now in the wild card. That's like one of the hot teams in baseball. Split that series on the road went to houston took three from the astros minnesota twins. Oh sorry took three of four from the astros. Nari read that wrong one. Another gate got another game. One it white sox come to minnesota. Minnesota takes two three raise. Come to minnesota. Minnesota takes two three indians golden minnesota minnesota takes two of three. One of those wins was a walk off. Two of those indians wins. We're walkup so the twins are coming in having split series with the hottest team in baseball taking three or four from the astros beating the white sox and raise and indians and three series in the yankees decimate them in three games. Great job yankees. Twins are at their hottest. The hottest the twins ben all year twins are supposed to win the division easily. Are i mean. I don't know people like the white sox playoff team. They aren't and that's fine but they've played like a playoff team in august and he just took them.

garrett cole nestor luke voight agan nester Nestor twins kohl chapman minnesota astros minnesota twins new york astros white sox Minnesota Nari baseball cincinnati houston yankees indians
"nestor" Discussed on Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

"Corey kluber needs to come back and and so does klay homes complicated. There's yeah there's no one removable here. It's like you very quickly. He is the only name stood out to me. Otherwise you're dumping alberta brave no thank you again. He's been a borderline closer for like two and a half three weeks now. Lucas leaky. no thanks. Don't want to get rid of him. Juan de peralta hasn't given up neurons since coming back from the i l. joey. Rector years has been great. So i mean bottom. Line tyler wade. Velazquez and nestor and heaney related the foremost removable names on the roster. And esther's going to get a playoff start in corey. Kluber is coming back unless they decide. He's not maybe they decide. He's not maybe reno is probably coming back for a bullpen. Roll down the stretch. But maybe they decide he's not i mean there's no way there's gonna work out lewis. He'll is not currently on the roster. I will remind you are best starter over the last ever weeks. Not on the roster. He's been co up and down roller coaster replacement for everybody upset by the fact that he keeps losing his rosters. This is why because there's currently no available roster spots Again not the worst problem to have the worst problem to have. Is our oster sucks. There's twenty roster spots. What do we do with them. It's called the baltimore orioles corollary. it's like oh my god there's so many roster spots we don't have a single player who's worth it. What what do we do. Not the worst thing in the world to be the hottest team in major league baseball on contending with an overstuffed rosser with unexpected contributors. But atas earn boyd. The unexpected contributors do have to leave We're going to take a quick break after we take that break though. We're going to have to assess nestor. Cortez junior someone who at this juncture absolutely cannot lose.

Corey kluber Juan de peralta tyler wade Velazquez nestor heaney alberta Lucas joey esther corey reno lewis baltimore orioles rosser baseball boyd Cortez
"nestor" Discussed on The Bronx Pinstripes Show - Yankees MLB Podcast

The Bronx Pinstripes Show - Yankees MLB Podcast

06:00 min | 5 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on The Bronx Pinstripes Show - Yankees MLB Podcast

"We have that Bob google i have the stat cast metrics and according to stack cast. His fastball velocity. Is the bottom bottom fourteen percent tile in the league. we're not is not a good spin. It's not a good spin rate thirty five miles an hour curb. Allston rates low. He doesn't get a lot of swings and misses he but look at the. Barrel percentage yeah. Barrow percentage is good and he doesn't give up a ton of hard hit contact and his expected stats actually even better than his than his real stats is expected right. Batting average slugging and expected on base percentage all in the top ninety percentile of the league. It's crazy what's his. his average. Fastball velocity is ninety one point seven miles an hour. That's my guess. Okay i was gonna say ninety. What's crazy here is that i'm looking at The one the one advanced out. That i like a lot is the barrel percentage. I think it's a it's a telling stat but when you look at the barrel percentage and he said ninety five. These are percentiles right amongst qualified. There's only five percent of the league better than right but but then look at but then look at whiffs when we look at when you look at bottom at sixteen percent the bottom sixty percent. So how does that correlate. Well there's foolish people. He's he's holding people. Make soft contact is is is fine. But he's striking out. These amount of people. Like i said over a strikeout. Printing pitched so the fact that he's coming in there with with this with this type of arsenal. He's pitching to contact. I guess he is getting the strikeouts as well. But i think that those are kind of had i think. That's i think that's just kind of the league niagara. You're gonna strike out if you're a pitcher. You're basically going to have a lot of strikeouts in today's game. I think so. Yeah that's why. I say it's almost happened since you're out there you're gonna strike out guys but your game is the pitch to to Soft contact you. You're happy when people are making contact because they're not getting a lot of barrel. So as forcing fastball is ninety point five miles per hour in twenty twenty one no. So what's when you come in different. It plays different it. So he drops down to the to the complete sidearm. Not even three quarter. Just like complete sidearm. Ud today at the six. So what do they do. Is this sort of just like let's see how far it goes before. He turns back into a pumpkin. You i mean at the point this the today you have to ride your hot half course and you have to ride your hot bats. You have to re ride your hot players. But they're about to get two of their three starting pitchers to come back this week and then deeming her on seemingly is going to come back because his shoulder problem was not severe. Okay and maybe kluber or severino comes back later in the years. So is it. Just wait and see where. Nestor cortez is after those dominos fall. And if he's still pitching well how do you take them out of the rotation. If he's still pitching to a sub three era or shit even audit mid three era. How do you tell him no. You don't get the starting because that's court has really isn't a starting pitcher for the new york yankees. He's a pitcher and he's zone is ab brazil. He's used he's used as they need him. So there are going to be plenty of opportunities or they're going to need a starter to go out there and indeed guy to go four innings in a tight game. He's just going to be deployed as necessary. But she's extremely valuable and whether he's in the I'm sorry whether he's in the starting rotation or he's in the bullpen ready to go. He's going to be a guy. That's going to be used so i i like. He's he's a really good flex piece for boon Hopefully he can use them in the correct way. I was trying to imagine what level of ship my pants. What i be at if mr cortes was starting a playoff game for the yankees on that. I'm not i'm fine with it at this point. Yeah let's let's get nuts. Yeah we've all been. We've been like i said to go into this game on sunday up five one prepared to be hurt. I'm like legitimately prepared to be hurt. Expectations are not. They're just just like all right. Let's see what happens here you. You can't hurt me much more. You get an extra cortes out there with that. Mustache thorn in the playoffs. You you throw him in a home game. Yo that stadium's going to be loud is shit hind him giving him that extra boost that he cortez will be. You know we'll have Monument talks with with that guy. If he's out there pitching welna playoff game in the bronx. So i'm fine with it because nothing else nothing. Nothing is defined here as like a goto. That's for sure no doubter. There's no player in our on our team that that that is that guy anymore. Kohl's not that guy right now. So why not. Mr cortes out there. Nestor cortez's a better than garrett cole. Crazy that's not a sentence. I ever thought i would say i mean that's a. That's an april statement. Even after we're one-star are couple of couple of guys who have been kind of aiding. We're talking about aaron judge in a little bit but before we talk about judge couple of guys that have been aiding him in carrying the yankees offense. Are brett gardner tyler. Wait i know tyler wade went. Oh for today. But he had been hitting almost six hundred his last seventeen at bats. I mean ten for seventeen crazy And he boosted his average up to two two and change to seventy seven on saturday. Oh it was under thursday michael. Okay mentioned it a few times on saturday night. I levi's is average one thirty two to seven. Whatever the hell it was and brett gardner philip. Brett gardner.

Bob google Nestor cortez Allston severino Barrow mr cortes niagara new york yankees yankees brazil Mr cortes garrett cole
Odor, Cortes Help Yankees Beat White Sox 5-3

AP News

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Odor, Cortes Help Yankees Beat White Sox 5-3

"The Yankees took the rubber match of their three game series with the white Sox getting two run homers by route NATO door and Luke voit in a five three victory in Chicago door put the Yankees ahead to stay with a blast in the second inning voice home run put New York ahead five one in the ninth Nestor Cortes was sharp over six innings allowing one run and seven hits for his first win since August two thousand nineteen Cesar Hernandez had a tough day for the white Sox committing three errors and heading into a game ending double play Andrew Vaughan Homer for the AL central leaders who have dropped four of five I'm Dave Ferrie

Luke Voit Yankees White Sox Nestor Cortes Nato Cesar Hernandez Chicago New York Andrew Vaughan Homer Al Central Dave Ferrie
"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

02:33 min | 6 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

"But next time your noses plugged give that a and see how it works for you. That's not quite an e. g. Study a little little more pragmatic for kron excited scientists. But for those of you with allergies it's worth giving it a try. It's amazing that's great. And i just prior to this interview did some alternate nostril breathing based on the recommendation from your book reading in on the right nostril breathing out on the left nostril alternating. About twenty breaths. I can't believe how much better i felt. So that's not going to be my back pocket anytime. I need a little focus. Pick me up. Simultaneously alternate nostril into the right out through the left in these practices again have been around for thousands of years and they've shown very clear with eeg studies looking at just breathing through the right nostril. How that activates more the left side of the brain just breathing through the left nostril. How the activates more the right creative side quote unquote creative side of the brain and it's fascinating that our noses naturally do this throughout the day or no this is covered with this tissue that will inflame or contract to allow us to shift our breathing from one nostril to the other every thirty minutes to three hours. Breathe through the nose. You can get all of those benefits as well. I'm sure we all now feel very well educated on the internals of our knows. We know more about the nose Ever thought we wanted to and probably are left still wanting to know more. Because is all really fascinating. So where can people find more about you. My website mr james. Nestor dot com. Some jerk took james nassar side. Put an mr in front of their. I have all of the scientific studies in the book available for free. There's videos there's doctors leading new through breathing practices all. That's there. i'm trying to get better at the social media thing. I'm on instagram. Handle mr james nester and facebook under the same name. Everybody should pick up the book available on amazon or your favorite book song. Wherever books are sold. Which i guess is just online. Now the sad is that is the try your local bookshop as well if you're so inclined asam rookus his in absolute joy highly informative and probably none of us will be which the same again. Thank you very much for having my sincere brusher. That was james nestor. He shares more about these ideas. Fascinating book breath the new science of a lost art.

kron james nassar mr james mr james nester Nestor instagram asam rookus facebook amazon james nestor
"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

"Also groff started developing a new system that could elicit some of the effects of lsd without getting him thrown in jail and he developed hala tropic breath work which i know a lot of people have heard of and even more people perhaps if tried but for those who this is about going into a room you listen to very loud music and you breathe as hard as you can for three hours that taller tropic broker and what are the effects of it. How does it work does work. It's funny because most people say oh. Well i'm breathing so hard individual. Select you're taking in so much oxygen your over oxygenating but my understanding is actually a carbon dioxide experience about it. It absolutely is. This is the one because it was so popular is to really go into it in the book and try to figure out the science so what we know on. The scientific side is yes really seems to work jimmy. Ironman use this with ten thousand patients in a hospital over the course of a decade and found that they had tremendous benefits from it. But i've even talked to one of the main people who runs the tropic sessions here in the bay area and she said that the science though is not very clear on exactly what happens to the body in these states which is still exciting. There's so much we don't know what we do know is by putting yourself into the state of chronic very intense hyperventilation for three hours. You are off gassing so much. Co two that you become deficient in oxygen in that sounds counter. Intuitive like wouldn't be getting more oxygen. When i get less the opposite is happening so right now with. Let's do a little mini trophic. Breath work session. Everybody so just breathe is harder to can for about twenty bras so if you keep breathing that way. You're gonna feel some tingling in your fingers you're gonna feel some numbness. You're gonna feel some lightness in your head. Check check okay. That is not from an increase of oxygen that is from a decrease of circulation in these areas. So just imagine doing that for three hours. And that's what hala tropics breath work does. Is it places your body into a state of extreme stressed kind of push you through your stress to purge you of your stress so that you can come out on the other side and be healed of whatever problems you have. That's the main impetus the main science or foundation apollo tropic breath work so that's a practice that increase stress by decreasing. Imagine oxygen starving. Your body essentially. Let's talk about one of the relaxing brat. Check nixon how they were. I think the one that you just went through a couple of minutes ago was great. Inhale for four excel for six. You can inhale you knew the five point five in the five point five out. That is a wonderful one as well. There's so many variations of this again for seven eight which is thrown out lot of numbers to you. Poor people but for seven eighths inhale for four hold for seven x hail eight few notice. That's fifteen seconds in which you're either holding your breath or exiling so it evokes this very robust relax sation response and again. These things are very clear to see when you start measuring what happens to your body. I've noticed i have borderline higher. Blood pressure not bad. But it's getting up there and just by breathing five point five seconds in five point five out. Don't worry about that. Half second is anything in the ballpark. I've been able to see my blood pressure sink. Ten fifteen points and other people have seen it as well and again. This isn't like some voodoo new age. Magic this is physiology. This is how our bodies operate. Yeah it's actually fascinating railway that your heart is correlated tear rap. So there's the cycle you notice excellent There's a cycle signers. Total a red man that most people no idea but it happens every second as a breathing your heart rate increases in as you breathe out your heart rate decreases. So as you're spending more time in an extended exhale you're spending more time in decrease in heart rate so that's nasty signaling to your body rest digest..

groff jimmy bay area nixon
"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

"Put over your lips so that you are not going to be mouth breathing at night and so much of our health depends on those two channels and for breathing through her mouth for third of her life. It's just bad news across the board so you actually did this record the him staking league gross detail. What happens when you force yourself to you. The first thing you didn't coverage or knows new only through your mouth. Can you talk a little bit about those results. In kind of underscores the importance of reading through the nose in ways that nobody would ever imagined the experiment was set up in two stages so working with nyack down at stanford and another subject. Who has a breathing therapist from sweden. He was so convinced the power of nasal breathing and had been telling his clients about how needed to be nasal breathing all the time he wanted to see the effects as well so we had silicon in our noses if that sounds like it sucked. It's absolutely did for ten days. So we're only breathing through our mouths and a lot of people think this is like some jackass stunt or whatever but we were really lowlying ourselves into a position that the vast majority of the population already knew twenty five to fifty percent or doing this so the most miraculous thing about it or the most horrific depending on your your politics was what happened to our sleep. I went from not snoring at all to instantly snoring. Not only that but a instantly got sleep apnea i. Stress levels just went through the roof. My blood pressure shot up about twenty points. We were anxious were miserable. I mean just had a whole laundry list of problems just associated by switching the pathway in which we brave and what's interesting is that ancients have known about this stuff for thousands of years various scripts through various cultures have said do not breathe through the mouth breathe through the nose was just interesting us to put a little more science behind that and see in our own bodies all the damage that could be done by breathing this way yes ever call by breathing simply through your mouth not through your nose. Your blood pressure shot up. You had growth curia inside your nose clearing itself all these things that we really don't consider when we think about which breakthrough. Yeah a lot of us. Think that snoring sleep. Happy is inherited. And there's not much we can do about it. But that's not true so stanford is now booting up study right now. Two hundred people looking at mouth breathing nasal breathing and sleep apnea and snoring. So i've gotten dozens and dozens of emails from people saying that they don't snore after they've used this little piece of tape after they train themselves to keep their mouth shut and this is not a psychosomatic placebo effect. When you close your mouth and you can try it right now. If you open your mouth up your tongue is going to gently kind of fall back into your airway. That's gonna make it harder to breathe when you close your mouth. Tongue is gonna move forward to the upper palate so the more you nasal breath the wider that airway is going to be the more you're gonna be able to tone it so that your me breathing that way most of the time and so to me. It's this is such a simple thing. Such simple physics and yet no one has been talking about it except for the ancients hundreds and thousands of years ago us little hack. You take a small piece of tape and this isn't just wake duct tapes. Your lips don't get stuck together and the skins not gonna come off glaucous through what you did. Yeah don't go on youtube. don't go online. Please don't do that because you're going to see a bunch of quackery people using ten pieces of tape and putting x's across their mouth..

stanford nyack sweden apnea sleep apnea youtube
"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:50 min | 6 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

"Did it particularly interesting experiment that you talk about in the book that is to take your mouth shut now. Anybody listening might wonder why on earth would want want take their mouth shut. Sumi could explain. Both why is interesting key and be what. Your experience was so lot of us. Think that the pathway through which we take in breath doesn't matter the mouth the knows who cares were dispersed as breath in. It's getting into our lungs and that's fine and a lot of the medical community. Believe this as well because they know that the body can compensate for different ways of breathing but compensation is different from being healthy. So the more. I started talking with ranallah gist and other experts. I was working with. Dr jack are nyack down at stanford numerous interviews with him and he kept explaining all of these essential functions that the nose plays in our health mental functions physical functions. I mean it goes on and on and on and it turns out that from about twenty five to fifty percent of the population. Habitually mouth breathes. So we don't get any of the benefits of nasal breathing when we're breathing through our mouths so it was part of my research. I wanted to see if i could improve my breathing over the course of a year and i took cat scans before and after and adopted different breeding habits in one of them and i know. The sounds sketchy. But they're studying this at stanford and their doctors who have been prescribing. This for decades is at night especially issues a teeny piece of tape. Put over your lips so that you are not going to be mouth breathing at night and so much of our health depends on those two channels and for breathing through her mouth for third of her life. It's just bad news across the board

wim hof chronic respiratory problems b james pneumonia san francisco ranallah gist Sumi Dr jack nyack stanford
The Art and Science of Breath With Author James Nestor

Untangle

01:50 min | 6 months ago

The Art and Science of Breath With Author James Nestor

"Did it particularly interesting experiment that you talk about in the book that is to take your mouth shut now. Anybody listening might wonder why on earth would want want take their mouth shut. Sumi could explain. Both why is interesting key and be what. Your experience was so lot of us. Think that the pathway through which we take in breath doesn't matter the mouth the knows who cares were dispersed as breath in. It's getting into our lungs and that's fine and a lot of the medical community. Believe this as well because they know that the body can compensate for different ways of breathing but compensation is different from being healthy. So the more. I started talking with ranallah gist and other experts. I was working with. Dr jack are nyack down at stanford numerous interviews with him and he kept explaining all of these essential functions that the nose plays in our health mental functions physical functions. I mean it goes on and on and on and it turns out that from about twenty five to fifty percent of the population. Habitually mouth breathes. So we don't get any of the benefits of nasal breathing when we're breathing through our mouths so it was part of my research. I wanted to see if i could improve my breathing over the course of a year and i took cat scans before and after and adopted different breeding habits in one of them and i know. The sounds sketchy. But they're studying this at stanford and their doctors who have been prescribing. This for decades is at night especially issues a teeny piece of tape. Put over your lips so that you are not going to be mouth breathing at night and so much of our health depends on those two channels and for breathing through her mouth for third of her life. It's just bad news across the board

Ranallah Gist Dr Jack Sumi Nyack Stanford
"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:15 min | 6 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Untangle

"A range of life's problems colossal explain a few different breathing practices like wim hof and holler tropic and box breathing. And how and when to use them so that we have a tool kit when the need arises. So hello james. It is an absolute pleasure to speak with you so much for having me. I am so happy to talk to you today. Because i have to say i read your book breath and i read it like enthusiastically. I dove into it. It is so engaging. And then i bought it for kind of everybody in my life who i can think of needs to know how to breathe better which is kind of everyone. That's amazing. yeah thank you. Thank you for writing. So i'm excited to have you share your love of breathing with our audience and perhaps we can start with a little bit of your journey and how you got into wanting to discover the breast and what you found will. I never set out to write a book about breeding. Actually when i started researching this subject really in a real way. When i was dedicating my all my working hours to my friends mocking me. He said why. Would you ever want to write a book about breathing. It's so simple. It's something that we just do unconsciously. But the more i delve into this subject the more fascinated became with it and against the the first jumping off point there were couple but the first one was having a very weird experience and a breathing class heros san francisco. Where i live lived here forever. There's all kinds of breath work stuff. Going on all over the place. But i had been suffering from chronic respiratory problems bronchitis and even bouts of minor grade pneumonia and my doctor suggested i focus on my breathing goto breathing class so i remember sitting in this room of this old house and breathing in this rhythmic pattern and just sweat with pouring out of me not even like i was exercising. Not that kind of sweat. Some other sweat assault. Wow this is so weird. I asked my doctor what had happened. She of course had no idea and as a science journalist. I didn't want to write a memoir. That's not what i do. So it just kind of filed this experience away until i met free divers who had mastered the art of breath so well that they're able to hold their breath for five six seven eight minutes at a time and really do what was thought to be medically and scientifically impossible. They do it all the time. And i thought well there's so much to the subject that we don't know when so i spent several years in the field talking to experts in doing experiments and just trying to get my head around it all you did it particularly interesting experiment that you talk about in the book that is to take your mouth shut now. Anybody listening might wonder why on earth would want want take their mouth shut. Sumi could explain. Both why is interesting key and be what. Your experience was so lot of us. Think that the pathway through which we take in breath doesn't matter the mouth the knows who cares were dispersed as breath in. It's getting into our lungs and that's fine and a lot of the medical community. Believe this as well because they know that the body can compensate for different ways of breathing but compensation is different from being healthy. So the more. I started talking with ranallah gist and other experts. I was working with. Dr jack are nyack down at stanford numerous interviews with him and he kept explaining all of these essential functions that the nose plays in our health mental functions physical functions. I mean it goes on and on and on and it turns out that from about twenty five to fifty percent of the population. Habitually mouth breathes. So we don't get any of the benefits of nasal breathing when we're breathing through our mouths so it was part of my research. I wanted to see if i could improve my breathing over the course of a year and i took cat scans before and after and adopted different breeding habits in one of them and i know. The sounds sketchy. But they're studying this at stanford and their doctors who have been prescribing. This for decades is at night especially issues a teeny piece of tape..

wim hof chronic respiratory problems b james pneumonia san francisco ranallah gist Sumi Dr jack nyack stanford
Yankees-Red Sox Ppd After 3 NY Pitchers Test COVID Positive

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 6 months ago

Yankees-Red Sox Ppd After 3 NY Pitchers Test COVID Positive

"Thursday's only Major League Baseball game had to be postponed after three Yankees pitchers tested positive for co that nineteen Jennifer in the waistcoat Nestor Cortes junior and Wandy Peralta were the players who tested positive Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said all three pitchers are fully vaccinated he also expects three other players to test positive the Yankees were supposed to begin a four game series with the AL east leading red Sox on Thursday Friday's game is also in jeopardy this was the eighth covet related postponement this season but the first in nearly three months I'm the ferry

Yankees Nestor Cortes Wandy Peralta Major League Brian Cashman Baseball Jennifer Red Sox
Judge, Sánchez Drive Yanks to Blowout Win Over Royals

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

Judge, Sánchez Drive Yanks to Blowout Win Over Royals

"Homers by Aaron judge Gary Sanchez Luke voit powered the Yankees to their seventh win in nine games eight won over the Royals judge opened the scoring with a first inning blast and finished with three hits Sanchez went deep for the second straight game a three run shot in the sixth inning to break the game open Jamison Tyana Nestor Cortes junior combined on a six hitter with tie and allowing a run and five hits over six in the third he ended an eight start winless skid losing pitcher Brad Keller was reached for four runs over five innings I'm Dave Ferrie

Gary Sanchez Luke Voit Jamison Tyana Nestor Cortes Aaron Royals Yankees Sanchez Brad Keller Dave Ferrie
Restaurant owners across Chicago struggling to hire back employees

John Landecker

01:16 min | 10 months ago

Restaurant owners across Chicago struggling to hire back employees

"Enough applicants to fill new job openings. Your drug. Nestor is general manager at Corcoran's Grilling pub in the city's Old Town neighborhood. I have so many different ads out and if I get if I put up 20 different things Have one person that will respond to me one person, maybe two. And maybe one of those people will show up Fernando View and you don't have kitchen staff have to have my food runners. My Buster's bartenders, servers hospitality employment website, culinary agents dot com reports a 100% jump in restaurant job postings with a 50% drop. And applicants from pre pandemic levels. The restaurants had their bills that they needed to pay on DNO. Now we have to try and make it as enticing for people as possible for them to come and work for us. With very limited resource is. Restaurant owners say some former employees are still waiting to get a covert 19 vaccine. Other owners say they wonder if people are choosing to stay on unemployment. One off Hospitality is an industry recruiter, Its CEO Karen Brown, particularly we're finding back of house positions. Very challenging, defined line cooks, prep cooks sews and chefs overall are incredibly scarce right now. Northbrook based Lou Malnati is

Corcoran's Grilling Pub Fernando View Nestor DNO Karen Brown Northbrook Lou Malnati
"nestor" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

04:58 min | 11 months ago

"nestor" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Hi andy victoria. Our next guest james. Nestor wrote a really interesting book called breath and i learned sto much from it. I thought i knew a lot about breathing. I teach breathing to my patients. I learned so much from this book me too and it's great to see the reception that this book is getting. It's being very widely read. And i hope it's really. It will really raise awareness of importance of brief. Welcome james james. Nestor is a journalist. Who has written for outside scientific american atlantic the new york times and many more his recent book breath. The new science of a lost art was released earlier this year and was an instant new york times bestseller james first book deep free diving renegade science. And what the ocean tells us about ourselves was published in twenty six teen welcomed james. I love for having me. I'm delighted to have you on the show. You first became interested in breath when you were interviewing divers. I'd love to know. What did you learn that made you investigate this topic more deeply..

andy victoria Nestor james james james new york times james first
4-Step Self Care Breathwork Protocol To Beat The Blue Monday Syndrome]]]]]

My Seven Chakras

05:14 min | 1 year ago

4-Step Self Care Breathwork Protocol To Beat The Blue Monday Syndrome]]]]]

"It's monday morning here on main street. Vancouver it's dry. It's cloudy and the weather is still an crisp. I woke up at five. Am did my morning. Routine had accord shower. And i'm feeling great right now. How you doing recently. I came across the term blue monday. Which is a name given to. The third monday of the year due to the combination of both christmas blues chord dark nights at least here in the northern hemisphere dismal results from the new year's resolutions that some of us have set and the arrival of unpaid credit card bills entered offered all in most parts of the word were still in a lockdown socially isolated mentally stimulated because of all the social media apps and there's a mass hysteria about the virus. And i know that it is very hard for most people around the world to deal with. And that's why i decided to put together a four part breath work protocol for you to try out. It is guaranteed to make you feel better. Promise me that you'll do this. And then you will reach out to me to give me some feedback. I want how it went for you. And how you fared after your promise. Now before we get started. I wanted to give a shoutout to magda who reached out to me with an email a few days back. And here's what you said jay. I started listening to your podcast. After i was recovering. From my niece edgy in may two thousand and twenty. Your show was my one. Stop shop to all things spiritual and bronzed on from there. Researching and learning about all sorts of different topics is much of wealth of knowledge from your shows. Many thanks for shedding it. All with us mukta. Thanks mugged up so glad that you get value from our shows and i appreciate you listening. I also wanted to quickly answer this. One question from kendall christine from our podcast. Facebook group is asked me this question. If someone's typical unconscious breeding Is impacted by trauma. How does one this store regular breathing patterns without actively making the self conscious and aware of their red twenty four by seven. And that's a great question and there are many ways to look at it. A simple way to look at it is when we expedient drama of any kind it creates an emotional signature that is stored inside our body as it a minor for us to avoid experiencing similar negative experiences in the future. It makes sense right so the body wants you to a wide. Negative expedients are another drama. Potentially in the future in so it's sort of adding a minder. Storing it in the body and this dramatic expedients how you breathe because we're always on the lookout for danger. Something suspicious on a stimulant that can lead to eight relapse off that same expedients typically when we breathe shallowly at his breathing only to the chest and not all the way down to your belly were unconsciously on a state of alert our fight or flight which is associated with high stress levels. High blood pressure and constricted blood vessels by learning how to correct our breathing consciously breathing diaphragm medically and breathing nearly through the nose rather than through the mouth. Were training our body to relax and active the rest and digest system. Initially you're doing it consciously but then over a period of time it becomes unconscious now. This breath work along with visualization and mantras and some journaling and other practices can slowly but surely release the health drama. So that your body is convinced that there is no danger and that you can breathe fully and easily just like any other habit through practice through repetition and self love you will unconsciously start breathing correctly in a way that supports your health and white daddy. For example at night. I is small piece of tip o'neill like a three m. micro poor small tape on my lips. Go train myself to breathe through my nose. Evil while i'm sleeping. I've endured that to snore sometimes at night and this advice from the book breath by james nestor has really helped. Correct my nocturnal breathing. Batons but again. Sometimes good habits can take time to farm and you need to shower yourself with self love index small steps baby steps because that will make all the difference. I hope that makes sense scandal. Thanks for asking me that question. And with that being said let us begin with our four step breath work protocol step one do and bianca younger literally means self love and it is an ira vedic self-care practice of oil massaging yourself to balance your dossiers. Relax nova system and make your skin glow. There are many ways to do this and some can take one or two hours. But i'm gonna give you the short and simple method. That will take about ten to fifteen minutes. Firstly

Kendall Christine Magda Vancouver JAY Trauma Facebook James Nestor Neill Bianca
Build Your Brain and Burn Fat with Shawn Stevenson

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Build Your Brain and Burn Fat with Shawn Stevenson

"Sean. Welcome back to the broken. Bring podcast brother. We re just been chitchat. A little bit. I feel like that was a whole podcast and itself like save. Save save save save. Save it for the audience to get into it and we definitely are so many topics to talk about today. And i was thinking as i was preparing for this Interview on my drive up from san diego visiting family. I was thinking. What kind of frame do i want to give this conversation and actually put out a quote that i came across recently from the author james. Nestor he tweeted it once before he wrote this book breath which is really great book. We have on the podcast. When read this quote. And i'm gonna tied into why it's so central to this conversation the first subjects. We're going to get into so this is from albert zafy gory a pri- butcher that a little bit nobel prize winner. 1937 was individual who was responsible for discovering vitamin c as a mechanism inside the body. He says more than sixty years of research on living systems has convinced me that our body is much more nearly perfect than the endless list of ailments suggest its shortcomings are due less to its inborn imperfections then to our abuse it and what i love about. That quote is that. And i posted on instagram this morning. So much of what we think of our body is messing up. Our body is failing us. Our bodies not showing up. How he wanted it to be is much of the by just trying to survive the crazy environment. We've put it in and nothing better describes as inside of your new book. It's smarter than how you introduce the world of fat to us and i'd love to start there so fat loss. Losing fat getting rid of belly fat. It's something that people always think of especially at the time to this. Podcast is coming out. Twenty twenty one. Everybody's like it's a new year. Let me get started. Twenty twenty was a tough one. Takes down the rabbit hole of what we do not understand and get about that. This is so good. And i love that quote so much you know. We're we're in a state where you our system is really focused on malfunction of the human body and not on the grace and the perfection in the beauty of the human body in all the potential you know. An an that's shifting. There's a shift taking place for sure and part of that overall assessment. Because right now we've seen it just run rampant here in the united states. We have about two hundred million citizens who are overweight or obese cry now things populations what three hundred ten. Something they'd it makes no like we can't rationally understand the magnitude of that and right now just shared a study yesterday. That within the next ten years half of the us population will be clinically obese. And we've we've gotten into where we're we're in a battle with fat. We're at war with fad. And i think that the war is a little bit misdirected. And that's wars that something on drugs on everything in that war inherently creates backlash. There's consequences to all of our actions. And i think that there's really just a lack of of well rounded understanding about what fat is because. Here's the the rub. your body. Fat is actually one of the most miraculous important things to your survival into your evolution as a human and so i wanted to start with that premise and kind of dive into fat in. Just open that conversation up because it's evolutionary adaptation that humans have that we've developed over time to be very good at storing fat. Our body fat is there for our survival and it's really really good at doing that. And during times of course we'd experience to our evolution. Where food is scarce. We want that fat to be there to provide a source where we can live to fight another day to see you know scavenger hunt or whatever it is to keep us going and now today however we've gotten we're in a war with this thing that is there for our survival in understanding how miraculous it really isn't so to start at the heart of it. Fat is an first and foremost. And as that's i think a big thing that even people who are in the world of wellness sometimes don't understand it. S just like the way that you would think about the heart. The lungs the brain fat and itself is in oregon. And and when you say it's an organ what are the characteristics of an oregon. That fat has so. This is okay. Psychologically we see fat as like this scattered random droplets of unhappiness at different points of our body right but there there are networks are communities of fat that i talked about in the book and so that i community is storage fats and this is what people are usually trying to target or we're talking about burning fat or getting rid of fat. It's these storage fats. And this goes under the umbrella of these white adipose tissue storage fats and again they're all interconnected and being that it's an organ it creates and produces its own hormones. It has its own receptor sites. It has its own management in cellular communication

Albert Zafy Nestor Sean San Diego James United States Oregon
There's not enough internet for remote learning to go around

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:44 min | 1 year ago

There's not enough internet for remote learning to go around

"This fall, we've been talking every Monday about education and technology during this pandemic including how access to high speed Internet and devices is just not cutting it across the country and there's new data on this in our latest marketplace Edison Research poll thirty percent of parents or guardians with kids. Online and making less than fifty thousand dollars say their Internet access is inadequate for online school marketplace's Scott Tong reports from Virginia on the broadband gap in central Virginia's Louisa County working mom Megan duck gets her two daughters online for school. By getting in the car they drive to a Wifi. Spot School district has set up in the Strip mall parking lot and here you can see a small jury rig flatbed trailer with solar panels powering electronics that send out an internet signal and from the car they log on the zoom. If we know like if their teachers say we have to do something we have to go to the Wifi spot because you couldn't even begin to logging on the website. Not. From home where they have just one choice for Internet service satellite, it's costly and it's not reliable doesn't work if it wind blows that doesn't work also at the hotspot. Today is fifth grader oriented Nestor Riding Shotgun next to her grandma in their suv, her online class. Let's her message the teacher for the box. It just POPs up on your computer win where at school it got good editor at their. At you need help you get acid they'll bested U. back. When your home. Do. You ever wish you could send a message yes I do. Her family has no broadband at home a reality for one third of rural Americans according to a recent

Spot School District Megan Duck Virginia Edison Research Scott Tong Strip Mall Louisa County Editor
A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

Hysteria

05:29 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

"Representative Presley. First of all, we love you. So you know it's going to be a hard hitting interview. With. We love you. Let's let's get into it. Okay. So president trump has clearly included playing up unrest in cities in part of his reelection strategy. He's even gone as far as to imply Democrats are to blame for escalating violence at protests, how Progressives and Democrats push for police reform in a world where an attempt at pursuing justice is spun as a rush to anarchy by right wing media and used as an excuse to become violent by law enforcement officials. Say It's thrilled to be here with all of you. Thank you. I'm big admirers in the ends of the two of you and glad to be with you today. You know what can I say about Donald? Trump. These already the dog whistles anymore there are just blaring horns you know wrapped up in incendiary soundbites and cruel policy in calcium administration. So it's very predictable. This is an old play in this sort of in movement building work you know we're used to it. How do we advance policy? The way always advanced policy as a nation nestor movements you. Know a lot of people when they reflect back on those grainy images, those black and white images of protests and demonstrations. In the nineteen sixties, they will define the progress came out of that solely as the voting rights act in the civil rights at but honestly that movement was the blueprint for every progressive piece of legislation thereafter. So this is how legislation is moved its through movement building and social transformation. That is why now things like inviting qualified immunity which bill that I introduced representative Justin Amash are now part of public discourse that is from organizing mobilizing. Conversations around reimagining our budgets to actually value black lives that has everything to do with the power of movement building, and so we have to continue to do that. We're in this moment of national reckoning on racial injustice is a culture shift occurring people. Now, a very unapologetically affirm that black lives matter but now that has to translate into power shift that is reflected in who we elect to office the laws that we right in the budgets that right those are the only. Receipts that matter. So if you believe that black lives, matter than black representation matters than black data matters, then black home ownership matters black entrepreneurialism matters in. So that's how I seek to legislate is in a very precise way and I'll in here by saying the disproportion hate heard her that has been foisted onto black Americans for generations was not naturally occurring. It was legislated was precise in codified lawmaking until the path forward must be one where we are also precise reverend. Barber. Poor. People's campaign someone that I look too often and just someone admire tremendously. Grateful for his moral clarity and conviction says for moment of reckoning the demands, a third reconstruction, and so that's what we need to be squarely focused. Dohrn is what does that third construction looked like and how do we enlist everyone from organizers to lawmakers as community builders in that reconstruction of a better word equitable world IANNA and I'm calling you Iona because I've known you since the ninety s and that's just how it's going to be. When you when you were telling me what's what? Let's not forget? This week. Joe Biden gave a speech and he released an ad where he made the point to clarify that contrary to what the trump camp is saying about him. He doesn't actually like property destruction that has occurred were some protests have occurred? By doing this Biden, allowing trump to control the conversation. Let me just say this there is an effort to infiltrate into undermine the impact of the black lives matter movement, and the fact that these motivation efforts have continued, which is constitutional. Right to assemble to peacefully protest descent is the ultimate patriotism. James Baldwin said I extensively paraphrase like I criticized this country America because I, love it just that much. She can and must be better. I think we have to be careful to make sure that our movements are not co-opted the people that I see in community who are the four of these movements bay, our community builders, not destroyers and the people that are doing that are infiltrators who won the black lives matter movement to be aligned to be mischaracterize. The people doing the work of justice seeking our peacekeepers you know and I, also think it's important that we not completely rewrite history and sanitize what these movements have looked like in the past. No. So people will bring up Dr King and they'll bring up John Lewis. Will John Lewis was who practice nonviolent peaceful protests almost died on that bridge in many times thereafter in fact, many advocates have said we don't know how John Lewis made it out alive because they always focused on.

Donald Trump Joe Biden John Lewis Representative Presley Movements Bay Justin Amash Dr King Iona President Trump Representative Dohrn Barber James Baldwin America
"nestor" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"nestor" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"My license everywhere everywhere, but still even on my phone, but still like Diamond masons. Of course, I have my license. Of course I have my license. I Yeah, So anyway, let's let's get back to finding a spot. Shall we? Google Earth is your friend Google Earth should be your best friend in any hunting endeavor. I understand the onyx hunt. I hide things like that. Really cool. Google Earth is I'm telling you is the best. And what you're looking for. Understand what a dove wants A dove wants the same thing we do. I wanna wake up in the morning and being they're comfy spot and they want to get up. Start moving around. They want to brush their teeth kind of wash the sleep out of their mouth. And then they want to go get something to eat. That's what we do. That's what we do as humans. That's what they do. So what you're looking for is obviously tree cover. You're looking for water. And you're looking for field food for them. That's what you're looking for on Google Earth and you're like that's a good spot. And then I know on on on extent they have the have, you know who owns the land? Private land, public land, all that stuff that's definitely beneficial. But find those spots before you go out. Don't just go driving around looking for a spot that's going to cause you nothing but trouble. And of course, you need to be a quarter of a mile away from any any structure. And by the way, I know the the regulations say, a inhabited structure. I don't care. I I risk it to me. I don't know if somebody's living in. They're not living in there. I just want to look a quarter mile away from a building. So just that's what that's the way I stick with it. But find a new spot. And by the way, the dove do the same thing in reverse order. Ah, when they go back to their to their spot where they go back to the little lad, Nestor homes so That's what you're looking for. On Google Earth. That's the spot that you want to pin on your garment or your watch. Whatever it is you want..

Nestor
"nestor" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"nestor" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Nestor you're putting dog but the crew is doing for thirty my dog you talk about what you're yeah yeah are you talking about dizzy them out with the propeller but my first my first children's book yes Mr still few copies floating around somewhere we we did it for charity we raised about ten thousand dollars I think for a dog charities out of that book was fun I loved it good time for the thunderstorms in what we'll see no disease long past so he he he actually succumbed to member that story about the Chinese had been somebody at a Chinese dog factory had been dog food factory had been poisoning dog treats they're headed to America and he got one of those he he he died from it a couple months after he was originally diagnosed so he passed but his replacement is jocular the vampire dog that was my second children's book and yes he continues to be terrified of storms and we're having one in about an hour so I gave him up till about two hours ago it is anti anxiety meds he's doing fine he's about fourteen years old but he's he's hanging in there hanging in there like us Joe right well you are all absolutely but I saw the storms in your ways hello yeah no I appreciate you saying that we are I will say this though you said you're sixteen yeah so I know the world is understands urges because every every ethnic group has brought a tremendous amount of beautiful most of our universe yep and to be prejudiced about somebody that's just different this is wrong I never got it I never got it I never I never in here I didn't get that gene either at night so I'm mystified by people anybody goes down that road and there's lots of prejudices and and I'm not saying I'm I'm I'm a hundred percent prejudice free but I know I always check myself if I ever find myself thinking in terms of the day versus us because there is no deber since this and we're all in this mess together I hope working together we can all get out of it always good to hear your voice Joe wildcard line Mary is in New Jersey on coast to coast Mary hello how are you tonight your guest had me thinking about rivers and water and yeah I live close to the Delaware well yeah I love John I was told this is back in the nineteen seventies services managed to walk his pet alligators at night time so glad I never ran into and in the store this is the middle coast to coast right it just sticks in my head you were talking about octopus so was your guests might grab the ship or whatever yeah that was a squid but yes same thinking one when was this and how to because because right but they're talking about octopus how intelligent they are yes would they be living on other planets and they're so intelligent and then others who told the story but like a baby all wrapped up real tight like floating on down on the octopus grapple at sixteen the octopus when she loves this baby right now we know humans can't breathe under water right and then this black and white chiller shark not short welcome from babies are not the baby so it turns out to be what's the Greek mythology what's his name because for the next year yeah yes Neptune something that's Greek mythology right well that's very interesting you're in my head never tell stories and I'm thinking I don't know where it came from the house because well but you know that did the whole thing about octopus and how intelligent they are is really fascinating because they they what they figured out is that how how hard it is to contain an octopus and so that was one of the things they discover how easy it is that they can they can get to the smallest possible crevices and they test things so soon as you try to keep it like contain an unlock to push they go through a process of looking for the weakest link and and this kind of intensive intelligence has been done a couple of times and yeah it is pretty amazing well thank you very love that's right about the crocodile guy I'm going to look that up later on tonight somebody you used to walk across about on the Delaware Delaware water gap is amazing stretch and beautiful and also in its own way in many cases very mysterious a first time caller line Bob is actually in the town where I used to live which is Long Branch New Jersey Bob yeah the guy that we either right but you weren't there long branch I did I did did you ever did you ever use are not about the old on the boardwalk I yeah I've been I can't remember the name of the place so you catch me there but I remember we used to go down to the boardwalk all the time that was I was there the year it burned they caught fire no we're not we're not one of those laws right I want to mention that correct yeah when I was you I love you didn't work so I'm not and I was in the bar area all right let's I love you I don't want to show your I should got together with your hand yeah it is they we did follow up a couple of times and they were in the end the he was even on to a different suspect but for a long time that look like a real possibility and I was disappointed that it didn't turn out to be him the couple television shows we're right up orders doctors will get on it the better B. group or show you our past good I love to shop there every second of the throat but.

Nestor
Language Modeling and Protein Generation at Salesforce with Richard Socher

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:25 min | 1 year ago

Language Modeling and Protein Generation at Salesforce with Richard Socher

"Hey everyone I am on the line with Richard. Social Richard is the chief scientist and MVP at salesforce Richard. Welcome to the PODCAST. Aloha great to be here to chat. Houston you said. Aloha and I was surprised that you're actually in the bay area. I always see these wonderful photos of you all over the place and I only get to ever see you in person at nerves nowadays and The blacken ai events and stuff like that so great to get a chance to connect with you mid year. How is everything? Life is pretty pretty. Good I'm very grateful of our research can continue working on some research during distresses now would that that is specific to Kobe. Nineteen and But Ryan Large sometimes joked at the PhD. Prepared me for several years. I staying at home eating pasta every day. Working on a computer all day and So so I'm I'm in pretty good spirits trying to have a little bit a positive impact and still go about my work and make sure my team is doing well throughout this crisis. And it's it's a tough time But I'm I'm very grateful for line of research we can work remotely. Who quite well awesome awesome. Glad to hear that it is Don't usually you know do this. But is April tenth that were recording. This what is it week. Four for you for lockdown shelter in place thereabouts right. It's it's crazy to time weirdly. It's slow and fast at the same time days morph into each other The Home Office is just the the home and the office and everything so the ad time definitely does not seem linear going through. This is very strange but before we jump into some of the main topics that we wanNA cover in particular language models and some of the recent work you've been doing applying that to the bio space. You share with us a little bit about your background and how you came to work in a chirp boy. It almost starts in high school when I really liked math and languages and when you think about Those two fields one you would hope is true even if you go light years in some other direction and language is district constantly morphing system. Where every you know teenager could just say Yo lo and boom you have a new word and now the the signs of nestor deal with that and so they marry when you try to use computers use math to try to understand language so I studied linguistics computer science Back in two thousand and early. Two thousands and dad's at the time seem kind of like an orchids kind of cute a niche topic to my parents. I thought man if we can get computers to understand language that would be just incredible all the things they could do. You know especially if you're lazy. He wants to agree. Repetitive tasks to be done by a computer would be quite amazing. And so that kind of more Into a couple of other interests in trying to use eventually initially just the typical machine learning essentially sort of machine machine learning by itself and I More broadly applied to computer vision problems. But I really do think in languages the most interesting manifestation of human intelligence There's some quite incredible visual systems and apparatus in the animal kingdom like the Mantis shrimp all kinds of price focal vision. And so on and each I and all of that animals have quite sophisticated visual systems but language connected thought and culture and society. Information are in so got excited about language. Then two thousand ten I saw a handful of people. Apply NEURAL NETWORK TECHNIQUES And extend them to a computer vision and at the time I had also just become a little bit disillusioned myself around how much time naturally crossing folks spend on feature engineering. So I thought couldn't we use some of these ideas from computer vision and neural networks for natural language processing? It was a not easy in the beginning early days had a lot of rejected papers reviewers just ignoring reasonably good experimental results saying why you submitting neural networks stuff to this conference. This is not the nineties anymore. Stuff doesn't work and so on but eventually more and more people have joined a small core initially was read just Joshua Banjo and Jefferson's labs and rings lap At Stanford and and it expanded more and more and and now it's kind of the default way for doing things to US network of course Not Dave developed more and more novel architectures to and it's it's just been super exciting so now I I work Not just on the research side anymore but also on a lot of applied problems you know in the end. I often think about trying to impact and in the end when you do research you hope that people will pick up the research extent Extended next apply it to some real world problems but if you have the opportunity to both the research and applied to real problems to kind of reduce the variance of the impact that you have and so. I work on a lot of problems. Chat bots and service sales and marketing applications trying to for instance automatic reply to emails or two phone conversations or having chat conversations is a really great one also doing a lot of computer vision trying to identify different objects in supermarket shelves. Doing Complex. Ocr for forms and a lot of interesting things recommendation engines Voice Machine Translation. Now the the group is pretty large and so we get to work on a lot of different things. You know it's a it's a research organization but as part of salesforce which we in no as kind of a new still. I still think of itself as a CRM company Owner than their terms here has kind of expanded and now includes everything that you might do with the customer right so we're just ecommerce platform because customers buy stuff online. I worked obviously the largest Sailed Service Marketing Organization but we also have helped companies integrate all the different data. Now Tableau we help people understand our customer data and do a lot of analytics behind it and then we look at you know where are the customers and we help governments senior citizens as their customers and help them especially now also in this crisis of build software really quickly bill chat bots so they can answer questions? You know the knee and if you go to. Da Department of motor vehicles. You have the question chat bots said. Give the answers. They are also You know our customer there of the DMV. We work with healthcare providers where the patients are customer. So the edition of what a customer is is getting broader and broader. We're in all

Richard Houston Department Of Motor Vehicles Ryan Large The Home Office Scientist DMV MVP Nestor Sailed Service Marketing Organ United States Crm Company Owner Stanford Joshua Banjo Dave Jefferson
March Democratic debate held without an audience

Houston's Morning News

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

March Democratic debate held without an audience

"The two top Democrat candidates going head to head in another debate this was hosted by CNN and Univision Joe Biden leads senator Bernie Sanders and total delegate so far with primary scheduled for Tuesday in Arizona Florida Illinois and Ohio now the states represent a total of five hundred seventy seven delegates the candidates went at each other more or less on several issues but they also preach the need for unity among Democrats he is the most dangerous president among Nestor this country what I said on day one but obviously I hope to win the nomination but if I don't win the nomination all right and I think every other democratic candidate is prepared to come together to do everything humanly possible to defeat Donald Trump well because of the CD nineteen Sunday's debate was held without a live studio audience it was in Washington and said of being I forgot we're was supposed to be in Phoenix Phoenix regionally and they moved it to

CNN Senator Bernie Sanders Ohio President Trump Nestor Donald Trump Washington Phoenix Phoenix Joe Biden Arizona Florida Illinois
"nestor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"nestor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Smart city can be re purposed to a more productive and is there any use for the Nestor the electors at the road all the way and maybe get in trouble for saying that but I is there any way to sort of re re program the the smart city without doing the whole concept away yeah I mean and I think often and the sort of feeds back into my critique of this idea of Teknaf this's image gonna build the technology thrown up in the air and the it lands where it's may I look where it where it may the the intent behind something is very critical and ultimately shaping where it goes so as I was saying I think the problem with smart cities becoming synonymous with surveillance states is it's built on this narrative a fear which ultimately is exclusionary what I instead think we should imagine the smart city as is an extension of urban planning and urban design so what if this is basically a digital urban planning where it's a way of kind of merging our analog and digital selves in real time in real space and frankly like anybody you know the young millennial and Gen Z. like their digital analog lives already very very marriage can you imagine like a fascinating physical manifestation of what this would be and if that is our value proposition for smart city should be it is by definition inclusive because it is about engaging all citizens it is about providing services to people as they wanted what is not about is saying you know is inspiring fear it's actually inspiring collaboration instead so what what I my dream would be is you know if if we actually put the notion of a smart city in the hands of urban planners and urban designers they actually probably come with a really fascinating ways to use the same technologies were using to track and surveil bodies and instead use it to actually improve people's lives they answer the questions that we actually think about every day which is like you know is my bus going to be on time in San Francisco now the muny will always be laid it down in the algorithm yeah this is going to be late taken over or lift or whatever or you know like are my children going to school on time it's like the myriad of questions that we ask ourselves on a day to day basis which actually aren't about surveillance or about a safety and security or you know so and I think that would be really interesting way to repurpose this notion of a smart city in a way that's more collaborative I know there are some places that are really trying to think about this I was at the Barcelona smart city summit and I'm really fascinated by the way Barcelona has pursued the notion of smart cities they're using busy crowdsourcing platform to get citizen input real time on how to shape these technologies is a lot more transparency involved so we do have some early paradigms and what it could look like and I think it's worth exploring and his ownership of data matter I mean doesn't matter who a particularly I suppose now that we have machine learning there's a sort of future oriented for speculative quality the data in a way where we gather a man by we I mean large corporations and states not us for about minutes but I gather large amounts of data in the anticipation that some useful or valuable kinds of patterns can be discovered in it in this context with the kinds of machine learning capacity is we they now have doesn't the ownership of data matter I mean how do you think about that in this reimagining yeah part time I guess there so the one thing but having public debt is now public data it's actually quite different from private data and can lead to some issues and problems so just like maybe a small plug up and doing this them a distinguished professor practice series at the Pacific school of religion up in Berkeley actually starts in two weeks I have not yet finished electrolytes but this might might it so it's a three three of us who are our professor practice we each have four lectures it's actually open to the public which is why I'm mentioning it and my first lecture is actually on the date of vacation of ourselves so it's a you know it's not just that there's data it's actually by having this technology there is data being generated about us that did not exist before and how might that data be used and utilize I think there's actually a narrative to have about the appropriate use of data or intended use of data I'm in a really good example is think something that seems innocuous but later ends up being quite a quite invasive are things like license plate scanners so you know this is not super sophisticated technology if we put cameras on cop cars instead of cops having to stop and write tickets this camera can read in real time track license plates with times and automatically send somebody a ticket if they've overstayed their parking time sounds wonderful right no one can simply there really isn't a bad thing with this except that now the database exists of license plates and time stamps and what happened in Oakland we had ice actually ask for that information in order to track individuals that they thought were suspicious so this data about them would not have existed if it were not for this technology still at I think there is that so in that I was in the privacy space we talk a lot about data minimization I think that is something that we should start thinking about this fast thing about that term is it almost flies in the face of data science culture which is about collect as much data as you can the world is your oyster and I used to teach that as well right if it's on the internet scrape it it's yours and I think there is this mind this mental shift that has to happen among their scientists to say is this necessary data is this necessary information why am I collecting and what am I using it for other kinds of data that you feel unequivocally should not be collected at this point genetic data Myanmar five by any collection of genetic data we don't have the kinds of protections they can but that that would shield us from it being used for a myriad of reasons I don't think there is the best track record of how a lot of this private Jerick information has been used and like you know going back to this question zero the notion and things like vacation suggestions based on your genetic history which it actually happened I got a Twitter ad for a diet it was like let us be sell you a genetically tailored B. I. it and I was like thanks I hated and maybe if we had more protections in ownership of our own data like yes I do think aid genetically a tune that would be great if I could trust that this information we could not possibly be sold to somebody else the reason somewhere that could be harmful and all that is actually in in the thing is like the people who talk about like regulations stifling innovation but actually we have a way around that I'm not using this technology because I don't trust that might might might it is adequately protected I want that ownership so then I would actually use this tech I actually kind of like something like that but I just don't trust it at the moment do you think there is a sign the regulation stifles innovation and yet something like GDPR seems to be creating so many kinds of business opportunity up it is for new kinds of technology it is the more you could say about when regulation generates innovation yes so I'll I'll college should be this quote is the economy is that directive innovations Rockefeller Foundation and he is he said this term breaks up a car go faster and I think that is the best way to think about a lot of these guidelines regulations so to sort of explain the analogy we drive eighty miles on the freeway because we know if something shows up I can slam on the brakes my car will stop if I did not know that I could stop my car I would call along at five miles notes that the I. D. Apsley petrified that hit something and this is the thing with a lot of this technology the fact that it moves at lightning speed without being able to stop is not necessarily a good thing it will enable people to feel more safe to drive eighty miles an hour if they know that I can put the brakes on I can stop it if I want to I can take back my data I have a right to let's say privacy ever right to not be found more of a right to visibility or transparency or I can I cannot contest the algorithmic output right people will actually be more inclined to adopt this technology and do you think I know no one can predict the future but do you think that we'll see more of E. U. style rights to be forgotten kind of rights to an explanation or Wednesday to in the United States in the next five ten years yeah I mean CCPA has certainly shaken up the U. the entire U. S. discussion on privacy so as you know California has instituted laws that are very similar to GDPR which in the US is quite revolutionary in different but what that's done is push the federal government's hands pushed ahead of other states consensually in with you are starting a business what you or at least of a government perspective federal government perspective you would ideally want the uniform laws you don't fifty laws in fifty states it makes it really difficult let's save on some sort of a company or some sort of business if you're trying to you know be outside of state lines so like I ate I do think that people are asking for more we're going to see more I suppose regulatory innovation coming from the bottom up and I use seeing technologists are people with special kinds of technical literacy going into government to work on those are just sort of educating from afar to writers places like logic of a role to play who do you see doing that go between work yeah and I and this is sort of the space of people that have now kind of started to form around I think to your point about GDPR creating industries and jobs I think is a very critical translational that's happening between pure technology and in society I mentioned earlier the role of journalists and simply educating the public in explaining things in a way that makes sense even uncovering scandals and controversies it you know and and the thing is like tech tech policy research have existed for a long time I think a lot of them are getting smarter on A. I. but they've these organizations have existed I think a lot of lawmakers are bringing in more technologists not just as advisors but actually into their offices are hiring folks for the technology background and I think that's really fascinating to hiring a technology staffer and I see more and more people on the hill who kind of know what they're talking about this and that and all of its like actually it I think it's really really wonderful other things I think we're supposed to go to Q. and a in just a minute or so but we've talked a bit about what companies can do what governments can do you know if you want to hire technologists in your policy makers there please do it are there things that private citizens who don't necessarily work directly I mean I think we now all work with technology right in one way or another but people who do not work at tech firms that say aren't coders ways that ordinary citizens who fit that bill might be thinking about taking actions in the space of thinking about A. I. ethics and accountability yeah so playing back to leads of Twitter discussion those having I gotta get my and my phone because it was it was like a like a hot debate against me you know and it wasn't it wasn't a flame war but like my my take on it was actually that so the question was really about what should data scientists doing the work and unethical company and my answer was but with your feet in the in the sense that you don't have to the when I when I first our data science only handful companies to work at and they're all only here that's why I moved here from from San Diego is why didn't move back to New York where I'm from the only place you get those jobs were in Silicon Valley that is no longer true and it's the same with you know tech companies with ethical principles there are a lot of companies out there that are at least trying to be ethical about their practices go find one and work there if that's what you want to do now if you want to work at a company that doesn't have a good track record but you want to work there because they're a big name in here and get on your resume you're signing up for that great so I think you know to your question of private citizens I think that there is a lot more information out there so we can educate ourselves and be smart so every time you know that there's the old saying like if you know the product as a product issue so you're in are you downloading this app for free like what is the data that you're giving them think critically about the you know before you you know use maybe a fitness tracker where you're going to input your weight and how many times you work out and what exercises you're doing do they have a privacy statement do they say explicitly you know I we will not sell your data things like that so look for these things as you make your choices because just like in every other market consumer choice matters so whether it's what top you download for free or what services you end up paying for I would rather pay ten dollars a.

Nestor
Digital Economy: Digital skills

The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

07:54 min | 2 years ago

Digital Economy: Digital skills

"Remote working made possible by the Internet is extended the talent pool that companies could draw on. Though as we're here for some that has meant bringing work closer to home at the same time geography still seems to play a role in the market market for digital skills hubs like Silicon Valley and its imitators serve as beacons for digital talent can companies who seek to employ them must contend with eye watering mm salaries and rent on this month episode. We discuss the dynamics of digital skills exploring how digitization itself is shaping their supply and demand. My guests Are John Director of education at UK Innovation Foundation Nester and Chris Johnson CEO and Co founder of talent acquisition platform on cute. I started our conversation by asking. Joycy what nesters research tells us about the digital skills that will be in high demand in future so nestor has done quite a lot of research into what are the skills that are going to be in high demand in the future. We've looked at forty one million job bad birds and looked at. What are the skills that will see see an increase in demand? And what are the skills that are going to see a decrease in demand and we noticed that some of the skills that are the basic digital skills those skills which associated with toss that or jobs that are going to see a decrease in demand are required a requiring lot of digital skills else but there are some jobs like teaching chef which will require which will see an increase in demand are actually seeing a law persons age of digital skills that are required so based on our analysis the top of the most promising digital skills are things like animation multimedia the production design and engineering research and quantitative analysis with some of the more advanced digital skills raw than the basic digital skills that can be automated away. The research shows that just having these technical skills additional skills not enough you need creativity. Collaborative problem solving communication skills alongside the digital skills as well. Chris does this match your experience. At on cubed what do you find are the digital skills skills that are most in demand among US employers yes it does and we tend to focus in particular on some of the skill sets that joycy mentioned and software development and engineering and data science. And then the related sort of sweet of skill sets required to build web driven businesses. That's where most of our work is. Based and two professions or skill sets I think are growing notably fast one is is of course software developers developers which gets a lot of press and attention and even civic attention as cities. Try to figure out how to make more of these jobs. available and accessible and and that is projected elected to grow twenty one percent in the next ten years and these are US Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers but the growth is pretty similar for data science but on the data science side. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is projecting a nineteen percent increase over the next ten years. So pretty fascinating in that if you go back to the ninety s when there was this massive sort of trend towards outsourcing. The thinking was at least in the US economy and certainly elsewhere. Swear that jobs were not going to be available in the US and now twenty one thousand nine going on twenty twenty you have the government itself projecting these really really massive increases in the number of jobs available here in the US so we can't discuss skills without talking about education and training and we've seen seen in the last decade some innovations in training. I'm thinking of online trading resources sort of massively online nine courses open courses and also scoop skills boot camps which often tend to be focused on digital skills. Joycy in your your experience experience. What impact have these new method tab? Which of the most effective and not only on the availability for of skills for employers but also about the accessibility of careers in digital technology? I think it's a really interesting space because there are lots of innovations happening in that space. So you have these mooks. Massive Open online courses like Cor Sarah Dusty index but there are also hold range of other online courses Lincoln Learning And others they have an interesting mortal some are like A university which is online and people can access it anywhere and then there are others. That are much more like a trade school. But the biggest challenge with these online courses is the law retention rate So hundreds thousands of people sign up but not many complete or not many go on to get the certification. So Nesta's doing some research to really looking at what motivates adults to learn. And how can you give them the right information advice and guidance so that can continue on this lifelong learning journey johnny. We're also launching a career tech challenge which is specifically looking at addressing this issue of not enough people using the online tools to upscale and rescheduled is to say that these things haven't had the impact that we're expecting for five years ago I would say it has had an immense impact because lot of people who couldn't have access to high quality education can now access it and without mooks that wouldn't be possible but in terms of really helping people transition position two jobs it still hasn't delivered on that promise and there are some new models you mentioned boot camps that have come up which give three months of training and but they cost ten thousand thousand dollars so it's super expensive and there's Avai small subset of society that can actually access these boot camps. There are some other innovations that are happening which are absolutely free and the only criteria forgetting his motivation and your potential to work hard and one example of that is equal forty two based in in France and now they have Opened in US and the model has been replicated in many other countries like Russia and many countries in Africa. Gotcha Chris so in your work. You connect candidates with employers. Have you seen these new approaches to skill development having an impact so far on for example the supply supply of skilled candidates on. I think all of these models have fallen way short versus the headline promise and certainly the the idea that a lot of investors astor's dumped hundreds of millions or billions of dollars into I think the numbers of people that have either found new career. You learned a new skill set outright through self directed online training is actually quite small and there certainly are success stories but I think we as a as a people might not be ready to learn that way I think on the other hand the bootcamp model which joys Aegis touched on in an laid out some of the different models and structures that we're seeing in the market now I think that has been effective and to her point. The original the original model is quite expensive and therefore prohibited for people. If it's ten thousand ten thousand dollars or or more per person but the model itself has been quite effective and I think what people are seeing out of it is a chance a two in a concentrated time really learn a new skill set that that can get a job and it's it's not perfect but we see plenty of bootcamp grads. Ads End up with very successful career as even at at Mike. Company on cubed our lead software developer came from a boot camp. She was a teacher and worked in education before

United States Chris Johnson Joycy Us Bureau Of Labor Silicon Valley Bureau Of Labor Statistics Uk Innovation Foundation Neste John Director Nestor CEO Sarah Dusty Lead Software Developer Nesta France Africa Co Founder Astor
"nestor" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"nestor" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"They don't want things to get out of hand so they lose power that's all it's all about power and control can also largely the war they have against god in the rebellion against god and against planet X. maybe a clear who you're going to go that far but they have been in control since the beginning of really before mankind and in fact mankind might have been a means that god was using to a measure of control over them mankind I think and and all the creation was intended to be kind of a of layers multiple layers of control to keep the phone angels from rising again because got a very the deep in the earth and chains of darkness until the time of the end court will convene arc and I think I'll god banish the part of the consummate readying being this intense power in order to keep that part from coalescing and log in to rise again he created the natural order to kind of absorb that power and reissued in a way that is useful but this is called the power of the word in the Bible is that patients of the power of the soul it's also known as my and some other things and and people are more of natural relations and that powers the power of the fallen angels it's their natural they give off light theory I have is that it's actually the power of life and all people have including in the plants and animals this is one that animates everything Nestor from the Holy Spirit which is something else that's something I got gives a certain people when they requested with an access to the power of the soul was just part of life and that's the power of the fallen angels at the radio and in order to keep that from having gather together and used against I hand it appropriately god created the natural order to kind of and then trying to kind of keep that down and spread out and that's what it said in the book the book of genesis be fruitful and multiply and subdue the earth so that the fallen angels were trapped inside of the earth cannot rise again store this kind of a prison planet on angels until the time of the envelope they'll be allowed to rise up.

Nestor
Cristina's comeback: Fernández de Kirchner set for dramatic return as Argentina's No 2

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:39 min | 2 years ago

Cristina's comeback: Fernández de Kirchner set for dramatic return as Argentina's No 2

"Guess who's back Cristina Fernandez de Kushner the leftist former president of urgent TNR is now the country's vice president elect thanks to a surprising coalition she formed with the most centers and decided less charismatic Alberto Fernandez the new president-elect on Sunday evening the Fernandez Fernandez de Kirchner double-act defeated incumbent Maurizio Macri who was vying for a second term with more than ninety seven percent of ballots counted Mister Fernandez had forty eight point one percent of the vote compared to Mr Mercury's forty point four percent of voiding any need for a SEC and round it represents a remarkable turnaround for Fernandez de Kirchner who has a slew of open criminal cases against her for corruption and erupted full from grace for mud three who wasn't able to turn around the nation's Faltering Economy Monaco's America's editor at large at Stalker unpacked the backstory Argentina's pen I'm like politics took a swing back to the left on Sunday as a parent friendly that told US coalition celebrated a return to power the presidential election pitted to polarize visions for the South American nation against each other followers of the populace emperor -tection EST policies of Christina finance the case now who governed from two thousand and seven to two thousand and fifteen and those who are now deceased husband Nestor President before her it is the right leaning will market-friendly outlook successor modest your macri no so long ago seemed as though macklowe guaranteed a second term after he had surprised many by beating Ferdinand is the case is era parent than the airline CEO early in the two thousand fifteen election he hated international investors by using Doda currency controls introduced by his predecessor and promise that the country was open to business as Fernandez case was embroiled in action Asians of corruption which saw several of her entourage sent to prison macree assured a change of direction and affects for the country's under-performing academy but he wasn't able to deliver as almost thirty five percent of the country's slipped into poverty last year macrey was forced to return to the international Monetary Fund seen as a bogeyman by many aggravating the country's woes knee aftermath of its recco debt default in two thousand and one else for fifty seven billion. US dollars the largest loan in the organization's history sparring food costs and rampant inflation Shen currently standing at well over fifty percent made matters worse and despite promising never to introduce currency controls earlier this year he restricted Argentinians access to their much loved greenbacks reviving duman black market a hallmark of the previous regime but I thought I see May Medina boy no Muss informacion him up but if you're honest the DC boito no detail procurement do know is somebody going through all the okay up on their to via Hulu which allowed the return of Christina Finan- this will suit of dogged by eleven criminal allegations and how mixed record in office it was clear that she was tainted which is why how much expected political comeback so the former president ron as a VP candidate for her parents ticket alongside a much less colorful and more centrist presidential candidate I'll bet finance this in August Argentina held primary elections essentially a dry run for October and dealt a better blow to macree we lost by over sixteen percentage points to the paranoia sts and was forced to recognize the comeback would be difficult or you're doing it on my lyrics and also the loss of lettuce but I can see that it's going to be secrete did manage a spirited late surge often seen as uncomfortable in the spotlight in the last few months he looked more at ease in the increasingly large accent he was able to convoke warning of the dangers of returning to the post his campaign close in the stronghold city of Cordoba to the sound of local quartet music so an estimated seventy thousand people take to the streets and while he was able to close some of the guy with his rivals in Sunday's vote largely seen as a knee-jerk reaction to the failing economy it wasn't enough to avoid a first round defeat another heavy loss for the ruling relish was felt in the province of born cise when we lost the governorship to former Economy Minister Axel Kissy Lav Mark kids will be fair for what is to come while Alabama of Hernandez has a show that he is his own man and not interested in repeating the misteps at the post applied between him and Christina finance their Kisner who still mobilizes an important base will be fascinating to watch who really holds the key to power will finance manage to hold the center ground and in Argentina's famously factional politics will this marriage of lenience remain for monocle I'm Ed

Fernandez Fernandez De Kirchne Cristina Fernandez Alberto Fernandez United States Christina Finan Fernandez Argentina Hernandez President Trump Vice President Nestor President International Monetary Fund Maurizio Macri President-Elect Mr Mercury America SEC Monaco Ferdinand
Brexit - latest news and updates on votes about EU deal

Bloomberg Daybreak

04:02 min | 2 years ago

Brexit - latest news and updates on votes about EU deal

"You know U. K. prime minister Boris Johnsons been left hanging as the E. U. failed to agree on a deadline extension for brexit ambassadors agreed they should accept the British prime minister's request for more time they just couldn't settle on how long he should get let's learn more about this from Bloomberg opinion column Nestor as Rafael joining us now from our London bureau thanks so much for taking the time with us this morning prime minister Johnson won the backing in parliament for the agreement but the timing of all of the still up in the air how does this cloud the outlook not just for markets but for everything else I think it clouds it considerably because the agreement the Johnson got in parliament Tuesday night wasn't wasn't an agreement for his deal as it currently stands it was an agreement in principle to send it to the next stage in which there would be extensive parliamentary scrutiny possibly some amendments that would change it substantially to Johnson knows that to continue through with that process is is risking the deal either getting bogged down getting turned down in the final vote or getting amended beyond all recognition that he probably like the E. you to come back and a lot only a short extension as McCall is sort of of the French president is kind of hinting that he would like in November fifteen date of birth he was very wary of making a decision that would be seen to be interfering with Britain's political process of trying to work out what kind of brexit it wants so I I think most of the betting right now is that the E. you will do this sort of neutral thing and come back with a January thirty first deadline but that either doesn't rule out the possibility that it will try to say offer kind of staged extension on early deadline followed by a later one or do something like that will probably note on Friday when when there is a another meeting of U. ambassadors and in the mean time both Johnson and the opposition labor party need to decide how they will handle any extension I guess I get that we are dealing with less data than we would like to be dealing with when it comes to a decision like this I might my question though is what has the bigger benefit for the U. K. a tight deadline that the French have been pushing for or that months long extension yeah I mean I think that that's a good a good question my view is that the U. K. and needs to scrutiny over this deal it is incredibly complex deal the implementing legislation is full of details that will impact our hold of Britain's relationship with Europe but also the relationship with in Britain between England in Northern Ireland England Scotland Wales and Northern Ireland how the border works how financial transfers to the E. U. work and that deserves a lot of scrutiny so one way or the other that needs to be raked over in parliamentary committees in in the full house and that won't happen immediately if we go straight to new elections which seems to be what many in Johnson's camp want so you know I think this does have to be a decision that's taken within parliament and between the the two main parties rather than the E. U. but how do you decide well obviously impacted and very briefly we only have about a minute left but the flip side of that of course is let's say they do go for that longer extension which would be better for them to factor in all the different data that will be accumulating at the same time that creates even more global uncertainty it does create uncertainty because if Johnson were to win an election in say December and get a parliamentary majority as many project then we've got the likelihood that his deal passes parliament we get brexit shortly after maybe January thirty first and they move on to the next to go she Asians which by the way are the real kind of you know the result brexit saga begins with those negotiations it's not over yet even with even with an election even with the Johnson

Boris Johnsons E. U U. K. Prime Minister
Tropical Storm Nestor eyes the Gulf Coast

Garden Talk

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Tropical Storm Nestor eyes the Gulf Coast

"The Gulf coast in panhandler paying especially close attention to tropical storm Nestor business owner Machel results says that when you live and work on the coast there are no small storms we have taken out a lot of things from the store at least waist high we are expecting cents were right over the water to get a little bit of water in the store so we're protecting everything we know needs protecting and many residents are still dealing with the remnants of hurricane Michael from a year ago WC TV reporter Jacob Murphy is in Marianna Florida about an hour west of Tallahassee Maryland dimming her property still littered with debris now she fears Nestor could finish what Michael started and this fight some of our trees this was hasn't completely

Panhandler Jacob Murphy Marianna Florida Maryland Nestor Michael Gulf Business Owner Machel Hurricane Michael Reporter Tallahassee
As Tropical Storm Nestor Forms, New Orleans to Use Explosives to Topple 2 Cranes

Guy Gordon

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

As Tropical Storm Nestor Forms, New Orleans to Use Explosives to Topple 2 Cranes

"Who is in Louisiana governor John bel Edwards has declared a state of emergency because of severe weather in the state this will delay the demolition of the partially collapsed hard rock hotel in New Orleans mayor latoya Cantrell says the decision by the governor was a good one this allows us to move forward with any avoiding any type of issues that may present themselves the city of New Orleans addressing the controlled demolition of the

John Bel Edwards New Orleans Louisiana Latoya Cantrell
"nestor" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"nestor" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Sean. Nestor? Please. You did. Now, you go. Please. Just. I love. Tech. Still.

Sean. Nestor
"nestor" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"nestor" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"This make you feel. Just let you know. You start. Incredible. Why? Nestor threat. In the city. The state this. In the machine..

Nestor
"nestor" Discussed on PerfBytes

PerfBytes

14:01 min | 3 years ago

"nestor" Discussed on PerfBytes

"Per fights coming to you from Deiontrez perform in two thousand nineteen in Las Vegas. I'm Brian Wilson and my co host is <hes> I've been saying the one and only a lot <hes> so mark what Mark Tomlinson from Perth vice but mark. What else can I call you besides the one and only I I will you could call me the <hes> veritable <hes> the incorrigible that that actually is my new favorite a synchronous yeah so anyway mark we have another guest with us today from perform a Nestor Zapata? He's a former guest of pure performance right and did he ever do anything with Pfizer Sir Yeah Nestor you've been on Perth Bites from live from performed for a couple of years yeah yeah I've been in life on perform and have also done a perfect bikes takes about forty five or even more with Andy Agile in operation so that was pretty lengthy one that we had and now the cold transformation that are obscene. He took a couple of years ago yeah yeah pure performance podcasts definitely and lesser so why don't you introduce yourself and tell people a little bit about yourself and then we'll jump in well. Hello everyone my name is Nester Zapata and currently I have a new role at such systems. I am the data center in Cloud Operations Manager. <hes> the last couple of years. I have been at performing work with identifies as one of the devops engineers on the web and application team team Anson's moved on to <hes> bigger and better things per se but always a continuing my work with data trays and today I had the opportunity to share my experience appearance about chat apps for autonomous operations and that's something that at six it is our goal to make operations more relevant in terms of feature feature of automation and in Wally things like predictive analytics a chow invoice up something that had a fun time. I'm enjoying my story share my story today at perform. Thanking <unk> first of all congratulations to the promotion sounds like you said you had <hes> so so tell us last time we chatted right which was the gear and a half two years ago <hes> on the podcast you you all were in the middle early middle phase of your transformation right you had gotten some landmarks and you know we said we were going to check back in and now I guess we can't check back in. Where are you now as opposed the SA- last time and what would you say you've learned <hes> from from this last big push in the last year or so while the last year I think one of the biggest give pushes? We've done is obviously moving along from at mon on Prem solution to the DEMETRI's Solution D._D.. South Platform and also moines on we did explore synthetics would they stood up with classics <unk> now obviously making that push making although synthetics go through our data trades platform so that was huge for us because with that transformation we will dive in and MPC at things like eight I and analytics that were not available to before a the moral bust information more deeper. Joel downs out that not only I._T.. Organization we were able to be successful at getting but also the business labor to benefit from because they saw how aggregation how their business being impacted as well and with GonNa trees we were able to do quick deployments. Now we've got to the point of trusting data from data trades including automated deployments of now our diploma simply production anyway when from a service now tickets to a person mentally going into Jenkins not all of that was done by a single ticket in snow or service now and then we moved on even further where we can test the data from data trays and pull it back into our slack channel. We incorporated what we call. A slack bought called ultra. I don't know why we named it the evil nemesis of the avengers but our operation world but that's what it's called and all yeah ultra the ad is you were. If you were able to see my session today you saw the clips of ultra working hand in hand with both Jenkins Adam another slack bald anti gun <unk> solution as well so basically somebody goes into slack till the ultra ultra to deploy it deployed the latest code. <hes> ultra adopt to Jenkin again Jenkins deploys at check out Donna trays textile whatever dignity to be done if it failed anything on the D._T.. Five will come back to the flag general say hey engineers. It failed because it did not pass the S._O.. This special was blown and you have to redeploy where you have to check it out. Before I move onto reproduction so is not limited the time that our engineers were spending doing deployment but also preventing bad colorful moving into production which of course led into much cleaner code coming into our official production environment viramune Altron is no longer evil so I wanted to try to pull like a little Andy grabner here and do a summary of what you did there because I I kind of think I heard this and I wanted to if I hear this right. It sounds like since we last talked <hes> your pipeline is matured amazingly right you've finished kind of all all the pieces of it and also oh that transition from moving from at Mont Dina Trace and allowed you to plug Deiontrez much more completely into all different aspects of the pipeline pipeline not just for monitoring data but for helping with the control low and everything else that really put the finishing touches on that pipeline. It's obviously obviously not the pipeline itself makes it it polished. It made it much more functional much more autonomous. <hes> and I think that's awesome because that's something that's a lot of our our customers right. Now we're going through in fact. The people are going to be sick of hearing me say this but I was teaching a hot day on Monday a call Deiontrez rat mon- users and and trying to help people make that transition of first of all. How do you use the new dynasties tool? If you'RE A long time at Mon- user like we all were but also what are the different the things you can do with it. In how can you have you start thinking differently and it's really awesome to hear that you all made are are leveraging all these side components of nitrates in in ways that it's designed to be there for you exactly and along with that a one point that a lighter touch on because we had various sessions questions that moving from <unk> mom into the demonstrates platform is GonNa give me everything I had before is GonNa give me every single looking cranny to the application and the answer to that is realistically no. It's not going to drill down to every single don transaction but at the end of the day we tried to understand the data trust the data and what that means will understanding understanding that we don't need to see every transaction that kinda comes through there we one of the problems the highlights of the engineered sometimes equally well this tool johnny down because is doing all the work for me and turn to them and I tell them. Don't you want that tool to do that for you and you concentrate on automating that solution collagen learning another skill set because now now you don't have to spend three or four hours finding will cost demonstrators within minutes you can figure out how it correlates the database Howard correlates to the front end servers in the application and what business users are impacted that you have that all in one frame one single pane of glass and you can trust that data because you know it's picking up every single transaction transaction on the back end and just presenting you what you need to know so that was a cultural change kind of a mind shift engineers can feeling there were being left out but once you once he knew that your role was going to change they went to accept that. I was kept saying you have to for I._T.. You have to automate yourself out of your current role not the job but your job role. If you detect any move onto this administration if you're assists admin or women janine onto deb of engineering or automation engineering and that's ask the application team have done in the last year they move on from being just simple you know web application administrators were engineers insist. They're moving on to not being more automation engineers DEVOPS ENGINEERS INC by some power show in having an automation first mentality and they understand that that a lot all of the stuff they can hand down to a level two or even a level one and letting go of work that you used to do the US think was oh my gosh so important that the world can reward without me doing this now. The extra seventy two all asked we move into a world A._I.. And predictive analytics yeah. I think that's really interesting too because a lot lot of engineers or even testers anybody right they find they can put value on themselves by showing the problems they can fix the problems they can solve in terms terms of problems that were created by other people. Maybe even themselves that were put into production or put into something but look how great I am a problem solving and it's great. It's a very easy way to validate your value you <hes> but if you can move away from fixing those problems or triaging them and instead become more of a creator of the new things that's that's you know that's what you need a little bit more confidence to take that step but that is that's why it's a cultural shift and since everybody loves car analogies right I I like it at the beginning I like to be if you're a mechanic and you're fixing problems like graduate to being the designer of the car right and that's what these these two two new tools wetherbee dinosaurs or other things that are automating or taking the human element out of it. It's going to let you move up to being more of a creator than a problem solver or a fixer <hes> but that's just the way we've been. We've always been fixing things that were breaking instead of getting ahead of it anyway <hes> so now you're going into chat ups. That's right and I'm hoping <hes> you're you're either GONNA call you're going to and for people who are not aware this touching into being able to plug dinosaurs into a chat thing <hes> but that's going to throw this out there before that I suggest you try to see if you can rename <hes> the you know the the the name command from Davis to either magneto since you have would be good argo or if you wanna take it really really go a little bit more obscure <hes> call it the master processor from trump. I think it was with those the master processor are is that the name of the evil computer guy or you know I want. I wonder if it wouldn't be better to just name him Jarvis Yeah we could do that. It's like the Chat Bot that Tony uses the Jarvis. Jarvis becomes altron but it starts says Jarvis yes. I didn't see that movie marked. You just ruined it for me so I saw actually I have one question for you nestor As you've streamlined the pipeline and people's roles have changed their working in different ways some of the some of the things I'm hearing from people is like well well. I don't have time to do experiments and and sort of you know kind of exploratory programming you know just playing around and experimenting with stuff. Do you find that is a challenge for developer engineers. Is there still room for that. You have other ways of accommodating that experimentation yeah so it's a different factors that come into play with that that is the nature of the beast in in our world and whether we think we work forty hour workweek will always working much more than that you have to make time for it has to be a priority automation. I has to be a priority. You have to bake it in into your process and management has to understand that and I always tell mateen if I ask you to do a task in Utah Me. Hey Nestor GonNa take me about two hours bleakest Manley mainly but if you give me a couple of days I've been whip up a pirate show stroke the python stroke to make it more of an automated script that we can use continuously honestly. I'm always gonNA tell you unless you know obviously nothing being done of course take the right to business days that you need to make it happen and I think what's important for leadership to do that for one as an engineer to go ahead and do that and also break out some time whether it is a perfect your lunch break or exciting maybe Thursday or exciting you know <unk> unless our <hes> that you want to take into your calendar inputting. I'M GONNA learn some automation skills do courses that you have online or work with another teammate. We've encouraged economic team and they do that on a weekly basis. They said Dow is in their calendar. Nobody's are they try to keep it as much they can and try to bake time into your into your routine because it is point to be needed. The feature is going to be all about automation more of a DEVOPS and if you're not catching up how Gwen have a tough time showing your value a three to five years from now when all these plots are Kinda. Doing some of the stuff with three guys were doing girls. Girls were doing shifting it to level level. One and now is the time to appreciate that learned that now because of not GonNa be a tough road the next few years yeah so I hear you right. I mean it's it's also as if I hear you correctly..

Nestor Zapata engineer Jenkins Adam Mark Tomlinson Jarvis Las Vegas DEVOPS ENGINEERS INC Brian Wilson Andy Agile Operations Manager. Mont Dina Trace Perth DEMETRI Joel downs Anson US Donna trays
"nestor" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

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"nestor" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"The DJ one or two point seven kiss FM if Madison beer this hurts like hell. Visit in may. Heads. Kisla? Cab. Touchable. Nestor? The best in the city. But..

Nestor