35 Burst results for "Nestle"

Donner Memorial State Park

Haunted Places

04:17 min | 1 d ago

Donner Memorial State Park

"Located off interstate. Eighty in california about ten miles from lake. Tahoe donner memorial state. Park is nestled in some of the country's most jaw-dropping landscapes every year thousands of tourists flocked there to enjoy. It's wild beauty. The park contains many trails and emigrant museum and the beautiful donner lake surrounded by towering trees. It might be hard to believe that a place so tranquil busy terminally damned but it is said that the energy of a place even a stunning one can be changed forever by tragedy. And that's exactly what happened to donner memorial state park in the winter of eighteen forty-six the previous spring eighty-seven people from the donner and read families. Embarked on a journey from springfield illinois heading west to california brothers. George and jacob donner hand carefully planned the route with james reid but poor leadership and a series of missteps led the men to make few errors. The i was the decision to take the hastings cutoff and untested shortcut that put the travelers behind schedule in fighting heavy wagons and exhausted animals. Slow them down further by the time they traipse through the sierra nevada's winter at already begun and with it of fatal snowstorm. Thompsons hands trampled. She rang out the rag. The snow she'd melded onto it had been warm just moments ago but the wind had put the fire out now. The cold wet cloth was stinging her fingers still. She squeezed the water into her husband. Georgia's mouth moistening his dry lips but he didn't move he hadn't for days he just lay there chain of obligation fastened to her ankle. Tanzim had been against this journey from the start she'd been happy in illinois they'd be well off with a sprawling home in happy children. She had done a teacher there but he wanted more. He insisted on california and thompson could say nothing. Why are meant to nod politely. Even as they watch their husbands arrogance lead eighty plus souls into health and then a month ago. Hope had come. A rescue group had broken through the snow. Georgia been battling ethan. Dan so she'd sent her children. Were the rescuers to brave the wintry pass and get out of this nightmare. Take the children. She said she'd stay waiting out starvation with him. Because that's what whites were supposed to do. They stood by their husbands even when a doomed them. Now george was dying and she'd be all the whole thing had been selfish of him. But that was george always onto the next thing with no thought for anyone but himself her mouth twisted bitterness. Blame was the only feeling stronger than hunker. The wind shuttered the tent blowing open. It's flab with it. A torrent of snow flurries blue inside outside. Tamsin could see dim sunlight shining on the oppressive white woods. The evergreens were tall thick and laden with snow. Tencent thought that it looked like a cage. If ice she rose slowly to pull the flaps shut then looked at george i g shuttered. Then he lay completely still is is open and unseen. She held her hand under his nostrils. No breath he had died after all that she had nearly missed it. She expected more of a spectacle. As george always liked attention. She should have felt sad but all she felt was cold and relentless throb of hunger swelling her belly and there was no question. The hunger was worse

Tahoe Donner Memorial Donner Memorial State Park Jacob Donner James Reid California Donner Lake Tanzim Illinois Sierra Nevada Springfield Georgia George Thompson Ethan DAN Tamsin Tencent
Traveling To Snowdonia

Travel with Rick Steves

04:13 min | 6 d ago

Traveling To Snowdonia

"Let's start with a peak at the natural appeal of the largest national park. In wales snowdonia the highest peak and wales in fact the highest peak in england and wales is called snowden sits in the heart of the snowdonia region and in one of britain's first national parks these welsh islands offer outdoor adventures gorgeous backdrop and draw countless tourists each year. Well skied martin. The land of its is here to help us make the most of our time in snowdonia martin. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having me there. So i've been to your home. Snowden is right in the backyard you grew up there in northern wales snowden in snowdonia national park mean to you. It's a place. I tend to walk quite a lot. It's just a huge and beautiful area. When i say huge. It's massive eight hundred and twenty seven square miles but you don't see that many people in it feels massive because it's it's windy it stark. It's pristine yeah. Small road not allowed to crowds. How tall is mount snowden. It's the massive height of three thousand six hundred fifty feet above sea level at its peak but because it rises more or less out of the sea. Yeah it has the aspect of bigness about it. It's so interesting because here on the west coast of the united states. Three thousand five hundred feet. It's like this is sort of a medium mountain pass for britain. That's a big peak. That's you know. Ben davis is the highest one in britain and there are few mountains over four thousand of the snowdonia national park. You have all of wales peaks over three thousand feet high and on. I think there's only one pecan english over three thousand okay. And this is the north of wales in. I've traveled on wheels. A fair bid. I just if you got limited time. I would recommend north. The peaks only Less than four thousand feet but didn't The british Climbers have mount everest. Actually practice in the snowden area. They practiced in that. Nobody had ever used oxygen on a mountain before. And so they had a stroll round be had Two systems an open and closed. And they thought oh. The closed system is much better. But what they didn't realize goes onto everest the vows and clo- system froze so the luckily they had a couple of open systems with them but they had some rugged enough areas in north wales where thought they could have some practice there. And you do get to some mountain. they're not resorts alert. Sort of hiking centers or something there. There's some beautiful towns. There's town called. Beth goulart galaxy. Guess who described beth killer it's a mountainous area and therefore towns villages. They nestle in the valleys. They don't sit on tops of hills and bathe galax which means ballots grave is useful in a little bowl with rivers running through it stone building. Oh everything is built on. Everything is built stone bridges over the babbling drone bridges and of course slate roofs because wales used to be the slate production center of the world at one time that right so when we think about going to north wales as a visitor and we want to do some hikes. What advice would you give for enjoying the nature of snowden national park and bringing up some calories at the same time you can hike all levels. Mt snowden itself with acid in welsh is an attraction. And there's a railway that runs up if you don't wanna walk for three hours just take the train and this is kind of a cute little tourist steam train. Yeah it goes from some berries up to the top and that's a family out it is. It gets crowded. Some of what i was going to say is that snowden is like a magnet people have heard people know that so that eight hundred and twenty seven square. Miles will get away from snowden. You'll see fewer and fewer and people which is a lovely thing. It is very empty area. It is and if you wanted to have some rugged memory you could hike it without the steam train. Take what five hours or so three hundred. Well five hours up and down if you if you know. It's a nice day. It's a lovely day. Beware say this flat up. Beware of times of year like easter when it's considerably cooler the top dress. Well okay

Wales Snowdonia Snowdonia National Park Snowdonia Martin Northern Wales Britain Mount Snowden Snowden North Of Wales Ben Davis Beth Goulart National Park North Wales Martin
Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

Business Wars Daily

02:37 min | Last week

Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

"With on again off again covid restrictions keeping hungry mouths out of restaurants. It's no surprise that twenty twenty was a banner year for cooking at home. That's been great for meal. Kit companies like hellofresh and blue apron. Homebound customers tired of familiar recipes flocked offerings like smashed black bean to start as in meatloaf la mom already and under forty-five minutes hellofresh orders grew one hundred fourteen percent over a year ago according to a statement from the company as much as meal kits have shown during the pandemic though. There were no match for their biggest rival. The microwave twenty twenty was a record year for the frozen food. Aisle sales of microwavable ready meals in the us grew to more than twenty five billion dollars last year. Outpacing the growth of all other grocery items according to market research published by global industry analytics. This increased demand sent items. Like tinos pizza rolls. Marie calendar's is and trader. Joe's tikka masala flying off their ice shelves twenty twenty also saw gin hot pockets that came as a blow to military bases where the microwavable meat and cheese filled bread bars or a snacking staple so report stars and stripes magazine nestle owned stouffer is meanwhile celebrated its record year by debut in a shop where it showcased food themed clothing with slogans like cheese. Self care yeah. That one's a little debatable. Live laugh lasagna. T shirts aside. However microwaveable meals showed they could adapt to the times amy's kitchen which built a brand off organic and vegetarian. Ready meals enjoyed sales bumps up to seventy percent for some of its products as reported by food navigator usa dot com nestle. Meanwhile grew it's plant based offerings by forty percent in two thousand twenty on top of organic and meatless options. Healthy choices have been winners to namely the company's diet brand lean cuisine that is until december when pieces of plastic from a broken conveyor belt ended up in a batch of frozen mashed potatoes. I guess that means this time. At least the lou calorie frozen meals might actually tastes like plastic nestle recalled ninety two thousand pounds of their lean cuisine baked chicken and potato variety as we emerge from the pandemic. It remains to be seen whether pre-prepared microwaveable meals will continue their meteoric rise. Customers might be looking for a break from all that processed food. just ask allison robot celli. Who eight and reviewed thirty five hot pockets in four days for the takeout when recalling the experience she says nobody should attempt this without a note from their doctor

Marie Calendar Nestle Tikka Masala Stouffer LA USA JOE Allison Robot Celli
A Girl Scout calls out child-labor link in Girl Scout cookies

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

A Girl Scout calls out child-labor link in Girl Scout cookies

"As 500 shelters open up. Girl Scout cookies are made with Palm oil and reports indicate the oil is being traced back to child labor and Indonesia and Malaysia. This you'll see to press reports. The mass production of palm oil is also tied to products distributed by companies like Nestle, Pepsico and Kellogg's. This was discovered by 14 year old Olivia Chaffin, a girl scout from Tennessee, who was investigating how the cookies were actually made. Since then, she has sent multiple letters to the Girl Scouts of the USA and the director of a company that certifies ethical production of Palm oil.

Olivia Chaffin Palm Indonesia Malaysia Pepsico Nestle Kellogg Tennessee USA
Roller Skates And Atomic Power

The Past and the Curious

04:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Roller Skates And Atomic Power

"Charles baggage would dream up the analytical engine which most people agree was the first automatic digital computer famously. His friend at a lovelace was considering badges computer when she published what was basically the first computer program now. The actual computer wouldn't be created during their lifetimes but they're well planned ideas. We're enough to change the world. Don't get me wrong. You wouldn't have been able to play minecraft or among us or even solitaire on a computer like this or anything but it was a pretty radical idea and like many young people who go on to do great things. Babich was inspired by some pretty creative people. One man in particular comes crashing into mind when he was a young boy badges mother wishing to nurture his curiosity and fascination with mechanical things took him to visit a short older and quite unusual man. John joseph merlin. Now if you live in england and your name is merlin people might expect you to be some sort of wizard and while this merlin contrast spells or shape shift and he had certainly never counseled any mythical kings like king arthur. He was a wizard in his own ways. By this time he was approaching the end of his life but he had remained pretty famous around england for decades. You have a hard time finding a man who had created quite so many unusual inventions. And you'd also have a hard time finding a man who knew how to make an entrance and get noticed in quite the way that merlin could first off. He was an inventor of automata but he was also one of the most prolific inventors in all of europe. If you've listened to our episode mechanical monsters you probably recall the basics of what goes into an automaton. If you haven't listened to that episode well. It is our most popular so consider this an invitation in short an automaton is a mechanical device often resembling a living creature which through years and finely tuned pieces can create movements that mimic something like life. Think of it like an early robot. They were wildly popular at the time and they didn't even really do anything they were just like cool to look at in some ways. People never change and they love good amusement and automata were the pinnacle of impressive amusement in the seventeen. Hundreds one of merlin's earliest creations was a collaboration with a mentor of his. It was called the silver swan and unlike many of the automata from the seventeen hundreds. This one still works the shiny. Silver swan bobs. Its head on. Its long neck cranes over its shoulders and ultimately catches a fish which it appears to swallow before nestling back into its wing to watch it now and consider all of the mechanical movements and all the time spent making each articulated piece still amazing in the seventeen hundreds it would have been mind blowing and these sorts of things. Slow badges young mind during this. Visit the world changer. To be sought some of these enlightenment era robots but also saw invention after invention mechanical curiosities. And some of merlin's favorite creations. Instrument's it was obvious to merlin that. This boy showed an aptitude. He dripped with potential and he burned with desire to understand more so the man suggested to his mother that they all visit his private up which was not something. The general public got to cast their eyes upon. This must have made quite an impression. Because years later after merlin at passed away his collection was sold and the now adult badge bought a few of the eccentric. Man's unfinished atop and finish them himself in sort of a tribute to the genius. Who showed him kindness and knowledge at a young age. Of course this meeting was towards the end of merlin's life when he was a younger man he wasn't so famous and he didn't have a museum filled with his creations

Merlin Charles Baggage Babich John Joseph Merlin Lovelace England King Arthur Europe
46 tons of Lean Cuisine meals recalled due to plastic pieces

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

46 tons of Lean Cuisine meals recalled due to plastic pieces

"Now there's also a frozen dinner recall Bai Ling cuisine to tell you about the maker of lean cuisine. Frozen dinners, is recalling more than £92,000 of it's baked chicken meals to the possible contamination, specifically pieces of plastic that were found in some dinners. Packages air labeled his lean cuisine baked chicken, white meat chicken with stuffing, Redskin mashed potatoes and gravy and a best before date of October of next year. Food maker Nestle says it's gotten five complaints, the U. S Agriculture Department says so far no reports of anyone getting sick from the contaminated dinners.

Bai Ling U. S Agriculture Department Nestle
The Sodder Family Tragedy: 75 Years Later

Extraterrestrial

04:50 min | 3 weeks ago

The Sodder Family Tragedy: 75 Years Later

"Long before his house burned down any lost five of his children. George solder saw the united states as a land of opportunity or at least of escape he was born as georgios saw do on the italian island of sardinia in eighteen ninety five. He spent the first thirteen years of his life. They're growing up in a small town on a hill. Not much is known about his youth mainly because he refused to speak about it. It was obvious to those who knew him. Later that something happened in italy that made young giorgio want to leave in one thousand nine hundred eight. He sees the chance to escape his home. Country in boarded a steamship with his older brother headed to ellis island Because we don't know his brother's name will call him. Rafael georgia was thirteen years old when he and rafael saw the statue of liberty and new york city skyline for the first time but whatever excitement. The new land may have inspired in giorgio. His brother didn't seem to share it for reasons. Unknown rafael return to italy immediately after delivering his younger brother to the immigrant inspection station. Perhaps he was only tasked with delivering giorgio safely to america. Maybe he was just along for the ride. It could have been any number of reasons he could have been turned away from. Ellis island for criminality or disease. Regardless when thirteen year old giorgio emerged from ellis island. He had a new anglicized name. George solder he was alone in a brand new country for better and for worse. His new life in america began that day in nineteen eight and he quickly got to work. George didn't stay in new york state for very long instead. He headed west to pennsylvania in order to find opportunities there and find them he did. It took a few years but before long. He left a railroad job in pennsylvania for west virginia and worked his way up through the hauling industry to open his own trucking company. But that wasn't all he wanted out of life in the early nineteen twenties. George met jenny. Cheaper yanni jenny. Like george was also an italian immigrant but unlike him she moved to the united states when she was just three and couldn't remember much of her life in italy. It didn't matter though the two had plenty in common and hit it off right away. They fell in love and soon enough. They got married ready to start a family. They moved to nearby fayetteville west virginia. Their new town was nestled in the foothills of the appalachian mountains and was home to a small but tight knit community of other italian immigrants. Over the next twenty years they became respected members of the fayetteville community their neighbors view george as a successful local businessman and jenny was known as carrying housewife who adored her ten children but a mystery lingered at the heart of this solder family and it involves georgia's past or rather the lack of it. Everyone and their italian american community new. The georgia emigrated to the states. Just like many of them. Andy may have had his secrets but he certainly wasn't shy about his political opinions during the nineteen twenties and thirties. Italy's fascist prime minister benito. Mussolini expanded his power and allied with the nazis in world war. Two during this time. George made it known that he despised the dictator. He sometimes got into passionate arguments with other italians who supported mussolini and reportedly expressed relief when he heard the dictator had been killed in the spring of nineteen forty-five but even still george was reticent to talk about his past however it seemed the community. Opt to let these quirks go. They were fond of the families. Many children the solders had ten kids. Understandably they ranged quite a bit in age. By nineteen forty-five their oldest. John was twenty three years old. While the youngest sylvia was to the family was large an by all accounts. Happy and christmas eve. Nineteen forty five was no exception. That is until a fire changed their lives forever. By the time the sun rose in the morning half of their children would be on

George Solder Giorgio Ellis Island Italian Island Of Sardinia Rafael Georgia America Rafael Italy Georgios Yanni Jenny George Pennsylvania West Virginia Fayetteville Jenny Liberty New York City Appalachian Mountains Georgia
Higher education now offers pathways into medical marijuana industry in Pennsylvania

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Higher education now offers pathways into medical marijuana industry in Pennsylvania

"Blank, I know doesn't sound appetizing. Then again, it appears only plant workers took the food's home. A worker's been suspended from his job. There's now facing at least one felony charge. It's unclear if anybody else was involved in the operation. But the idea of drinking wine from the sewage planet well, trying to get that image out of your mind now w p h I FM in HD Jenkintown k y w NW, my pfm HD to Philadelphia radio dot com station. The Children were nestled all snug in their beds. While visions of cyber threats danced in their heads and

Philadelphia
Reclaiming Black Culture in 'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom'

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:15 min | Last month

Reclaiming Black Culture in 'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom'

"Played by chadwick. Boseman as the young trumpet player levy colman domingo cutler michael potts as slow drag and glenn termine as toledo. We also meet mas young lover. Desi may play by taylor page and her nephew sylvester played by deuce on brown. I want to just dive right in joel. You said you were very excited to talk about this coming what you thought. Oh my gosh linda. I loved it like it's hard to put into words how much i enjoyed it. And all of the reasons but chadwick boseman this be his final performance. Jeff estates think recently denzel washington in an interview said that like he didn't lose anything we lost him this idea that he gave everything he had to give while he was here. This for me is probably his magnum opus. His great work his his final statement. To wasn't he left us a lot of really great. If you look at all the roles he's chose in the last like three to four years. All of them are about conclusions and about wrapping things up. This one is so much more about like the hurt and pain. You have to just go through as a black person just to exist in this country and it's profound and gorgeous and the way we'll shoots this. I struggle a lot with theater to film translations. Because it's like theater it's so meant to be experienced in person and sometimes dial it doesn't quite work and particularly when they're monologue like you have a hard time like this doesn't feel real because it's not it's theater if you don't have to live in same kind of rules that film often does but when we'll takes his camera at a high angle as chadwick boseman is giving this like very revealing monologue. You're able to stay in it because you're sort of. It feels almost more in his head. It's more conversations having with and it captures. I think what is so hard to translate between these two mediums. And i love it and then on top of all that colman. Domingo like if you're making a movie just put colman domingo you cast anyone else in any other will ever a silent killer in everything that he does. And it's so profound. I love his in bad movies. I love his work in great. I love coleman doing and here he just continues that check and then they leave is crowns. It all off by just being great and showing up and her vocal performance away. She drinks coke. Makes you wanna die. It's a seven. I love performances. I like live live for like actors being able to nestle into character and create something that is so alive and vivid. No one in the cast isn't doing that. It's nearly a perfect soga. Yeah stephen thompson. What did you think. I love this movie. Too i think the central performances by chadwick boseman and by viola davis are so beautifully done. I do think there are a lot of parallels to be drawn between this film and fences which one viola davis and oscar that has also adapted from an august wilson. Play and both films are really so centered on the performances. They are really showcases for actors more than there necessarily like show willie directed big epochs. There are focused on the performances. I think that theatre film translation does trip them both up a little bit. Where they're so focused on the performances. They don't flow as naturally as they might. This there are points in this film. That felt a little bit stagey to me. But at the same time those performances are glorious. As joel said that chadwick boseman performance is is titanic. I mean it is a oscar clip e speech -i big performance. I think we cannot underestimate. How great this viola davis performance is. It is a quieter performance. She's doing so much work with just like kind of heavy eyelid. Look at a character will just is just searing. She is fantastic film and like joel said colman. Domingo is great. Glenn is great as toledo. I loved this film and as you would expect it just weaves music in beautifully. Yeah all right. I asia. Let's go to you next to you.

Chadwick Boseman Boseman Levy Colman Domingo Cutler Michael Potts Glenn Termine Taylor Page Jeff Estates Chadwick Colman Domingo Deuce Desi Denzel Washington Sylvester Joel Toledo Viola Davis Stephen Thompson Linda Colman
How Does the Larynx Work?

BrainStuff

04:44 min | Last month

How Does the Larynx Work?

"Brain stuff. Learn boban hair. The larynx may not get the same amount of attention as the heart or lungs. But it's still an important internal oregon nestled in the next of people and other animals. The larynx helps allow for noisemaking and speech and is located below the epa gladys which is the leaf shaped flap that prevents choking by keeping food and drink out of the lungs. Part of the leering structure includes the voice box also sometimes referred to as the vocal chords. It's what makes up the bump that you can see in feel in the middle of your neck scientifically known as the laryngeal prominence but more commonly called the adam's apple a women have one to just often at less pronounced during childhood. The voice boxes of boys and girls are about the same size but when most boys hit their tween and teen years their vocal chords hit a growth spurt. This growth causes their voices to crack and eventually results in a deeper and more resonant town. So let's look at how the voice box or vocal cords work first off. Neither moniker is really accurate. The vocal chords are actually two bands of flexible smooth muscle tissue that are located in the larynx and these muscles vibrate as air moves through them on. Its way to or from the lungs. They're more properly called folds. Instead of chords we spoke by email with eric guna. Dd he explained during sound production. The vocal folds close together and start vibrating as air is expelled from the lungs and passes between them and into your mouth which helps to make the sounds. We hear when we're listening to people talk. So the lyrics is made up of a cartilage skeleton that contains the vocal folds covered by mucous lining. The folds are extremely adept at changing shape position and tension so the voice can make a range of sounds at a variety of levels if the lyrics becomes inflamed because of illness or injury the vocal chords can swell and caused laryngitis. Which is characterized by a horse gravelly sounding voice or the loss of one's voice altogether we also spoke by email. Taylor graber md. He said if they're swelling to a vocal chord from overuse cancers are trauma. The tone function produced by the vocal cord becomes altered. The sounds can also change by injury to the muscles or to the nerves that enervate or give sensation to vocal chords. However there are several sounds that we can produce out electric's even speech via whispering. When you whisper the vocal chords can stay slack and not vibrate but mrs known as an open throat whisper and it allows people who are mute. Make sound it's also a helpful technique for people who are arresting their voices such as singers or those with a sore throat. However most people don't use passive technique when they whisper instead they strain to produce a sound and this can be just as harmful to the vocal chords shouting but hey if humans and other animals all have a layerings then why is speaking uniquely human ability. Our brain formation has something to do with it but people have an especially complex system comprising the larynx which produces sound and a flexible mouth tongue and lips. That in combination allows us to generate. The precise sounds that language requires when we talk air moves from the lungs through the larynx and that sound shaped by the extreme fine motor control found in the throat. Mouth tongue. and let's we also have a bone called the hyde and this is a u. Shaped bone situated at the front broke above the larynx. According to graber he said it forms the attachment multiple muscles in the neck. A which aid tongue movement end swallowing. What's really unusual about this. Larynx related bone is that it has the distinction of being the only bone in the human body. That's free floating which means it isn't connected to any other bone instead it supported by connective tissue. The is only found in humans and the end atolls and is believed to be the foundation of our ability to speak. There are about sixty thousand people in the united states who have had their larynx removed. But only a few who've had a larynx transplant. a few people qualify. And if they do. The surgery is complex takes about eighteen hours and is hampered by shortage of larynx available to transplant. However new initiatives including lab grown in three d. printed larynx have the potential to help people recover their own voices again.

Boban Eric Guna Taylor Graber Md EPA Oregon Adam Apple Trauma Graber United States
One of world's largest telescopes collapses in Puerto Rico

WBBM Evening News

00:46 sec | Last month

One of world's largest telescopes collapses in Puerto Rico

"Footage captures the collapse of what was once the largest radio telescope in the world. It was a sound too sad in the heart of star gazers everywhere. The National Science Foundation released footage of the Tuesday collapse of the damage Radio telescope in our Cibo, Puerto Rico. The closing of the telescope had been announced in November after cable snapped and gashed the reflector dish and damage to the receiver platform. Then on Tuesday, the 900 ton receiver platform fell until the 1000 Ft wide reflector dish more than 400 FT. Below. The telescope, nestled in the mountains of Puerto Rico, attracted tourists and played a key role in astronomical discoveries for more than half a century. Observe. Natori officials said they were saddened by the situation but thankful that no one was hurt. I'm Jennifer King Days

Puerto Rico National Science Foundation Natori Jennifer King Days
Footage released of collapse of huge Puerto Rico radio telescope

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Footage released of collapse of huge Puerto Rico radio telescope

"Newly released footage captures the collapse of what was once the largest radio telescope in the world it was a sound to sadden the heart of stargazers everywhere the National Science Foundation released footage of the Tuesday collapse of the damage radio telescope in Arecibo Puerto Rico the closing of the telescope had been announced in November after cable snapped and gashed the reflector dish and damage the receiver platform then on Tuesday the nine hundred ton receiver platform fell onto the one thousand four wide reflector dish more than four hundred feet below the telescope nestled in the mountains of Porter Rico attracted tourists and played a key role in astronomical discoveries for more than half a century observatory officials said they were saddened by the situation but thankful that no one was hurt I'm Jennifer king

Arecibo National Science Foundation Puerto Rico Porter Rico Jennifer King
Nestle, Cargill at high court in child labor case

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last month

Nestle, Cargill at high court in child labor case

"Child labor laws are before the Supreme Court today. It's a case brought by six Africans against US chocolate companies. The plaintiffs from Molly say they were trafficked as Children and forced to work long hours on the Ivory Coast cocoa farms and kept at night in locked shacks. The suit against Nestle USA seeks damages and argues that the company should better monitor child labor on the farms. The Washington Post reports. Child labor is why Spread on the cocoa farms of West Africa, or about two thirds of the world's cocoa is grown

Supreme Court Molly Ivory Coast United States Nestle Washington Post West Africa
How To Align Your Customer Experience

eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

05:45 min | 2 months ago

How To Align Your Customer Experience

"Now my guest and says, episode is Tim Ashe who is an acknowledged authority on evolutionary psychology and digital marketing. He's a sought after international keynote speaker and the best selling author of two books I one landing page optimization, and more. Recently unleash your primal brain actually just listened to recently on audible. Fantastic. We're going to dig into that one for sure Tim has been mentioned by Forbes as a top ten online marketing expert and by Entrepreneur magazine as an online market influence to watch. For nineteen years he was a CO founder and the CEO of site tuners, tuners dot, com and their digital marketing and optimization agency. Tim has helped create over one point, two, billion dollars in value for some amazing companies that I know. We all know Google expedia harmony facebook and American Express and cannon and Nestle there's massive list year semantic new to it and humanity Siemens anyways in countless direct to consumer brands. So exciting to have Tim today busy schedule. But please join me conversation with Tim Today. So. Tim Welcome ECOMMERCE battling. A Ha-. Very. Happy Veer Steve. So you've had quite an eventful career I might add keynote speaking around the world are writing bestselling books year you run international conferences, I guess pre cove in our doing some virtual events. So tell me a little bit about best can your entrepreneurial journey so far? Sure. Well, I've worked in a variety of high tech companies when I started university at UC San Diego my undergraduate majors were in computer engineering and cognitive science, and then I stayed there for graduate school and what would neural networks or what would now be called deep learning or machine learning or A. And this was early days We didn't have the big data sets that we do now with the Internet. So I switched Internet marketing and started my first marketing agency back in the early DOT com days and Never, let go of the Tiger's tail and twenty five years. Later I decided you know running an agency wasn't my highest and best use on the planet. So I decided to focus on what I really enjoy, which is the thought leadership in the form of as you mentioned, keynote speaking and writing my latest book and spreading knowledge out to people as opposed to working on client accounts. Right? and. So I did mention a little tiny bit of top of the show but you know you've worked with a lot of some really great ecommerce brands some of the largest brands I might add like what are some mistakes that you see kind of consistently some of these e commerce brands are making today will if we restrict people have different definitions of ECOMMERCE, I, just WanNa start there for some ecommerce anywhere. Any website that has as A. Checkout anything where you sell items directly and for others, it's more restrictive and I'd say it's a e commerce catalog and that's I think a more standard definition. If you also use a lots of different items, you have a homepage category pages, search results, pages, and product, and so on. It's not a website where there are two or three things for sale in those early incidental. Would I don't know is that a fair definition or how would you agree with that? Totally would agree with that yes. So In the case of large catalogs, I'd say the common mistakes that we I've seen in my careers one gratuitous use of motion and wasted real estate on the homepage in the form of giant sliders everybody seems to have those Sh. Yeah. That's a big known my book I talk about I have a whole e-commerce best practices section in my landing page optimization book and I devoted a page to why sliders. An evil that should be immediately removed from your site. While you know what part of it I think to is that it doesn't position the brand well, enough I think with having like motion and I think when people have a lot of different slogans, tag lines or kind of looks and things going out other different sections on the site they think they're trying to blast all of their bullets out on this highly sought after a piece of real estate versus maybe having a proper positioning statement or something. One thing that's very important. That's key to why someone should click. Through or why someone shown up on this particular website having one message and one brand image and go further than that I, would say that I'll numerate the reasons why you shouldn't have a slider on your homepage. The one that you mentioned is by far the most important our brains from an evolutionary perspective are designed to notice things moving in are visual field. It kind of has survival value. If you know what I mean here is coming to eat me I need to know what direction and how big is right So. they're they're an interrupt, their the nuclear option in the face of motion graphics won't get looked at and even in the face of graphics, text won't get read. So anything that's graphics or text on your site can't possibly compete with that atomic bomb of a slider on your homepage. And and another reason that really bad is because it's trying to pretend you have more real estate than you really do. So everybody wants a piece of the homepage and lurk. We can add another frame tour slider. Well Great. Thanks. So now have to sit through a longer commercial nobody likes to do that on broadcast TV. There's certainly don't have the attention span to sit through five three seconds sliders to make sure they saw every frame of the crap you're trying to throw them on your home page You don't really an editorial problem. You can't decide what's important. So you're trying to cram it all in there and make everybody happy except your site visitors that are trying to give you money,

TIM Tim Ashe Tim Today Entrepreneur Magazine San Diego Veer Steve Forbes Siemens Google Co Founder Nestle Facebook CEO American Express
Amy Coney Barrett sworn in as newest Supreme Court justice

WBZ Afternoon News

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Amy Coney Barrett sworn in as newest Supreme Court justice

"This morning at the Supreme Court Justice Amy Cockney Barrett was officially sworn in here's A Bee sees a nestling patera hours after being confirmed by the Senate with a 52 to 48 vote Justice Barritt taking the judicial oath at the Supreme Court, officially kicking off her tenure on the nation's highest court. Baird, assuming the late Justice Ginsburg's chambers, with Ginsberg's clerks being reassigned to other justices. Ginsberg passed in September at the age of 87 as delicate. Terra ABC NEWS Washington

Supreme Court Justice Amy Cockney Barrett Justice Ginsburg Justice Barritt Ginsberg Terra Abc Baird Senate Washington
Could Subscription Models Save Hotels?

Business Wars Daily

03:13 min | 2 months ago

Could Subscription Models Save Hotels?

"There's nothing quite like staying in a Nice Hotel and Ashiq, location to make you feel like a VIP. Maybe you prefer staying near the warm sandy beaches of Kabo, San Lucas were being nestled in a bustling Paris Rondi small. If. You're ready to board an airplane takeoff to somewhere far away travel subscription might be just the ticket. Subscription based models have taken over everything from entertainment to clothing purchases. Now, the tourism industry is following suit vacation club Inspir- Otto has reduced the price of it subscription model for twenty five, hundred dollars a month you get your pick of luxury vacation homes, hotels, and resorts all over the world with no other fees. Taxes were nightly rate charges a new six, hundred dollars. A month option gives you access to the company's lodging options, but you also have to pay for the room. Bookings through your inspiration subscription can last up to sixty days but a minimum of seven days is required between a checkout in a new check in so you can't fund your endless vacation on an inspiration subscription, but you can bring guests they just have to pay their own airfare. The company told C. Suite Quarterly magazine that pass holders typically travel every six to eight weeks with an average of four nights per trip. Another company adopting the subscription travel model is amsterdam-based citizen 'em Hotel. The brand isn't targeting jet-setters instead, it's targeting quote freelancers digital nomads in adventurers who love Big City Life, but not big city rent prices. In other words if you're sick of working from home and M.'s Goebel passport gives you access to twenty one hotels in fourteen cities including New York Paris and Amsterdam. For roughly fifteen hundred dollars a month you can stay at any citizen 'em hotel for the month or travel between hotels with a seven night minimum stay at each you also get access to meeting rooms and the living room workspace. So you have some room to move around in in addition the company's corporate subscription plan is about six hundred dollars. Per employee per month, companies get access to meeting rooms and living room workspaces plus each employee gets three overnight stays per month travel media companies skipped called traveled subscriptions a mega trend to watch, but they also face some obstacles I. Obviously, the pandemic people are worried about covid nineteen and travel restrictions are a moving target borders may be open one day and closed the next depending on the viruses spread while the US State Department lifted the travel advisory about international travel the Centers for Disease Control still advises. against. The travel to dozens of countries including most of Europe Canada and Mexico The Wall Street Journal reports, and June survey by the International Air Transport Association found that more than half of people surveyed. Don't plan to get on a plane this year at all. But for those who are ready to start traveling again for work or pleasure subscriptions grant. To enviable destinations in lodgings and tourism companies are hoping their offers are enticing enough. Customers will check it out. And start, making plans to check in. Once again.

Nice Hotel Paris Rondi Kabo Inspir- Otto Ashiq Centers For Disease Control C. Suite Quarterly San Lucas Europe Us State Department New York International Air Transport As Paris Goebel Canada Mexico M. Amsterdam
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
"nestle" Discussed on Snacks Daily

Snacks Daily

08:50 min | 9 months ago

"nestle" Discussed on Snacks Daily

"This is nick this Jack and this is snacks. Daily is Tuesday April twenty eighth. Spring is in the air except up here in Vermont where we've got snow again last night. Apparently on the east coast spring not thing winter straight into June real thing. Spring is not a thing but this is the best podcast yet. It's so much better than what we whipped up for you guys yesterday Jack for a story. The main course of Nestle's earnings report was human food. Catch her back baby. Didn't know they were gone. But they're back. But we're digging into the fancy feast in the pet nash over next to the table or talk and pet pampering. It's an accelerating trend for our second story. Making automobiles isn't exactly work from home. Friendly honey can keep things down trying to drill the carburetor into the chassis. I told you I've already downshifted as much as I can. Honey stop saying random car terms to me please. Volkswagen just reopened the world's largest car factory in Germany. We're talking about a big chicken and egg issue for a third and final story is the Unicorn of the day institute has become Insta- famous because people are afraid to visit the grocery store. The grocery delivery options had its first prophet. Ever were so happy for you. We've got a proposal on how INSTA- cartridge spend its first profit one word big W warehouses. So it's knackers before we get into that happy teaboy Tuesday feels. It just felt like a Tibo Tuesday. I woke up. It felt like a teaboy. Teaboy is of course the best one yet and you may have noticed that zoom stock on Friday wasn't the best one yet no wasn't it gets situation. Zoom stock plummeted thirteen percent before the weekend. Basically zoom got sucked and that's because facebook decided to whip up a little thing called room three video hangouts for up to fifty people for and did we mention it's free classic. Facebook style Mark Zuckerberg mentioned the word connections two dozen times in the announcement about the new product. Which is clearly as Zoom nocco also classic facebook style this blatantly copy someone else's product facebook's biggest strength besides no every personal detail about you is the fact that like two point. Five billion people in the world had facebook accounts already and it takes advantage of that by copying features from potential rival. And you've already gotten account so it's easy to use for example. Instagram stories looks a lot like snapchat. Facebook data tender vibes all over this facebook market craigslist copycat straight and simple and this last one is more recent facebook. Lebron has gone is. It's pretty much of address. This brings us to our teaboy Tuesday question of the week. What will Zakim facebook knockoff? Next what company is GONNA get sucked? I'm thinking facebook's go launch F male which is like g mail but no Google snacker. Tell us at robinhood. Snacks tweet us. Well get suck next daily spoke about the Hamre Food Candy. They don't reflect the views. Her family informational. Just so you get no recommending any security. It's not a research report or investment advice to offer or sale of security by snacks digestible. Business News video financial. Llc member favors less happy. See for our first story. Nessa just enjoyed a huge sales growth for human food. We're focused on. Its pet game but before we get into the story nick. I have a trivia question please. This company is based in Switzerland. How many official languages are there in which I appreciate asking such a neutral question? Well you've got French. You Got German. You GotTa Talian and I'M GONNA go with like some random obscure local like shush lot language. It's very alpine guess of neck. It is the fourth one. That's hardest which is romance a beautiful tongue now. We're talking about a company that's a lot like. Unilever but less creative with the brand names as both are big food glamour. It's based in Europe but NESTLE NAMES. Its Products Ness Cafe Ness quickness Bresso nasty net cetera net sector. It also happens to be the world's biggest food company and enjoyed a solid four point three percent sales growth last quarter which was way more than it expected. That doesn't sound that good for point. Three percent sales growth before a packaged goods company. That's best in five years. It doesn't get much sexier than that and it's all powered by comfort foods that were like whipping up in the microwave during work from all. We're talking no. It's not delivery it's digiorno and also hot. Pockets is made by NASA LATE. Giorno folded up into a tiny rectangle not to be confused with Stover's which is then unfolded digiorno pizzas. That were originally hot. All of these are nestle products. Put Nestle has a new profit puppy pet food. This is what Fast Jack and I- pet food is Nestle's fastest growing product category. When he cut through all the other information about their food products all remember Purina has the most space in pedophile any grocery store that experience double digit sales growth last quarter. Oh and for that food segment of PURINA. It's up fourteen percent. In North America as of Twenty nineteen. Pet food is now nestle. Second biggest category and this is a huge company. We're talking about a company that produces walk Candy Lori L. Hot Pockets Gerber baby food. This is their second biggest category. Like all of us pet owners nestle stocking up on pet food companies that this knacker's while you loaded up your cabinets with like Pasta on April first made it quarantine nestle. Bought lillies kitchen which is a British fancy pet food company that according to its website sells grass fed lamb dog food. A twelve kilo bag costs sixty nine pounds. That's the most confusing sentence I've ever had is the kind of thing. The Prince of Wales is serving as Corgi medium rare and Nestle's American competitors general mills and James Marker. They've both followed that. Trend with multibillion dollar fancy pet food acquisitions since two thousand eighteen. If you're not buying fancy pet food then you're just not a cool conglomerates so jack what's the takeaway for our buddies over at Nestle. Another accelerated trend macron economy is pet pamper snacker. Think about it. Millennials are putting off having families. Aging boomers want companionship. And those trends are even more serious when we could be stuck at home and avoiding people for a year or more until we get this vaccine get this from the humane society. Fostering turns out. It's up ninety percent in some cities for pets and animals and pet shelters across the nation have run out of puppies to adopt river. Our new profit puppy is just one in that data set in the corona economy. People are cutting back on themselves. But we're not cutting back on our pets. Take a look at me. Dot Com stock price has doubled in the past month as people are splurging on their pets and in a socially distant economic recession. That accelerates the pet pampering trend aggressively for our second story. Vw just restarted. The world's largest car factory. But will anybody buy new cars right now? And that's all going down in Volkswagen's lovely headquarters in Wolfsburg Germany Volts Berg Fund volksbank expert. Not a fake name. Sounds like we're three. The characters in the twilight series came from Fuzzy. Curtis car and olives. Zeba it's also adorable this time of year out there. It's really pretty. This plant in Wolfsburg. Germany is gigantic. We're talking seventy million square feet which we did the calculation for at. That's six hundred sixty seven Walmart. That's right you could pack six hundred sixty seven superstars in this one super world spurred plant. And if you WANNA talk about more big numbers. Guess Jack and I found. They managed to employ sixty three thousand workers in this place. I think that's the working age population of Vermont. They're producing thirty five hundred cars a day which is about an eighth of a lift. Now that's been a problem because the CDC says to avoid gatherings of sixty three thousand workers in one plant to see when that happens and by the way it's been closed for thirty nine days normally in that period of time they would've pumped out a hundred and thirty six thousand cars because of all those missing cars. Volkswagen stock is down thirty percent since its recent high because nobody is buying any cars from bulk because everybody knows there's nothing. The Germans do better than a sense of humor. They opened up the plant and incredibly charming way. How did they do it? Jack picture the Volkswagen logo. They turned it ninety degrees and it looks a lot like a pacman and then they put that recognizable Green Cove nineteen germ so that the pack bands like eating it up. You're going to see it. Chuck for five seconds. And if you work at the plan you're probably be like can. I go home now. You'll chuckle for two seconds. Now we know what you're thinking smackers are they doing it. Are they reopen? Volkswagen with lear. Method remember lear is the Southfield Michigan Biz seat company within cars. Yes said just published a fifty two.

facebook Nestle Volkswagen Jack Vermont Germany Insta Instagram nick Teaboy Unilever Switzerland Mark Zuckerberg Europe NASA Wolfsburg Purina North America
"nestle" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

11:44 min | 1 year ago

"nestle" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"This episode one eighteen the voice by podcast our guest today are from Nestle Royal Bank of Canada and the American Red Cross we talk about organization models for big enterprise Ai Initiatives as well as what some of the early adopters in the Food Financial Services and nonprofit sectors have learned about voice so far since today we recorded this voice nineteen and I know a lot of people missed it due to timing so I'm publishing it here and now so you get the valuable perspectives in case you missed them and these are people like you or maybe like your clients in the enterprise space before we get started many thanks to our sponsor the Samsung developer conference you know Samsung the largest maker of smartphones globally the largest maker smart. TV's globally a consumer appliance giant that also owns the smart things smart home ecosystem and of course produces the bixby Assistant Samsung is holding its annual Developer Conference on the twenty ninth and thirtieth of October in San Jose Calif -Fornia if you WanNa meet the vive labs bixby teams they will be there talking about the latest new developments around the technology around marketplace they will also be helping developers and publishers learn at a build capsules and improve their capsules and their opportunities to get prime placement in the ecosystem to help with discovery if you'd like to check that out it's semi invitation only but voiced by listeners can get access using this code S. D. C. Nineteen Dash S. E. R. Dash B. I. XP I know that's long it will be in the show notes S. D. C. Nineteen so Samsung Developer Conference Nineteen Dash S. E. R. Sierra Ago Robert Dash B. I. XP Bravo India X-ray Bravo hopefully y'all got that otherwise check out the show notes this code will get you registered it'll get you in the venue the keynotes all the breakout session chance you'll get to meet the people who are on the front lines who launched this bill give labs all that also comes with a fifty percent discount so definitely check it out I hope to see there now to today's guests Voice Summit Newark New Jersey really was a big success this year I the opportunity to moderate a mainstay panel three people that I respect are on the frontlines of enterprise voice assistant adoption Josh belly and a senior direct senior digital innovation manager with Nestle he's in the Silicon Valley Innovation outpost in I've met many times in San Francisco Brian Matthews I've spent a good amount of time with him up in Toronto he's the head of the voice innovation lab for the Royal Bank of Canada again some really interesting things get a little bit of an international at least a non US flavor to how organizations are approaching voice assistance and we also have Michelle Malkin axe she's the product lead for Conversational Ai for the American Red Cross Large Global Organization very complex she's doing really interesting things that I hadn't even considered so really look forward to sharing that with you today you will hear me first then Josh followed by Ryan then Michelle let's get started Okay real excited have you all here today okay because you're lucky to be able to listen to some of the stories inexperienced people on the stage one of the things that I have come across cost many times looking or having conversations with large organizations voice is it's not necessarily about what implement it's not necessary surly about how I design it it's like Oh we're a big organization everything has to have an organizational structure right so it's one of the things we're going to talk about this probably be meantime you'll hear this discussion here today and so I think that'll be really insightful for some people plus we'll talk a little bit about some of the things we're doing which is very interesting as well so we'll start off Jospin from Nestle why don't you introduce yourself and tell the audience how you first got involved voice and some of the things that you're doing sure okay I'm Jeff Valley and I'm I'm part of Nestle Nestle that all people will usually be chocolate company it's actually it's a big food company based in Salaam one hundred fifty years old and I'm on a team in San Francisco called the Silicon Valley Mission outposts and we've got a lot of liberty to explore how new technologies and new business model those are changing the way consumers live and exist in in this world and as part of that voice is one area of significant interest it's changing the rules of the aim our our first skills built about three and a half years ago we wanted to understand what it was like how complex it how is it different than building for the web or heart phones and we built a pretty cool cooking skill it had a visual component of visual guide any browser a tablet laptop could use it it was well before echo show doc sadly it does not have as many users as show but it was good it was great learning and that was used to educator leadership around look voices man and it's going to be global it's coming faster than you could ever imagine we're going to be ready and actually Christine Hartland my colleagues in the audience we've got a team in Barcelona digital hub that is industrialized voice to be able to serve the rest of the world I'm glad you brought up goodness which was the name of that original skill because I think it was the first multi-modal skill using Lexis Yep because we went to the web was really innovative I actually still intimated to this day there's probably some interesting things channel switching to okay thank you Josh Ryan Matthews I've known each other for a couple of years Ryan's with Royal Bank of Canada why don't you introduce yourself often tell everybody about what you've been doing along the lines of voice perfect okay my name's Ryan Mathews head of the voice loud for Royal Bank of Canada it's funny last year when I came down to this conference my name Tiger and I'd be introduced last salt and saying hey I'm from NBC and they just look at me like what's rb see so this have we'll make of Canada on my on my name tag so we similarly to Joshua RBC's one hundred fifty year old financial institution We've got sixteen million finds across thirty six countries five thousand employees were Canada's biggest bank one of the largest world by market cap I I've got a long history markets in my voice writing in Lagos in that space for a little while but it was also really involved in grassroots innovation from that department when I had the opportunity to kind of come over to more the enterprise side of the bank and have an opportunity to kind of forum a voice can jump at the opportunity so I've been building my team over the last eight to ten Johnson there in the crowd over there you can wave high and it's been a really exciting getting getting and building this high performing team in a space that quite frankly is insure me okay thank you Ryan actually you didn't say what you've been doing voice like do you WanNa talk about your project so couple of things that hoppy kind of be Party Organization for we were first in Canada launch a voice by mentioned all center also I into Canada to launch payments five Oyster Siri some of the work that might have been working on can't talk laudable because it's not yet released unfortunately but it is coming out in a couple of months definitely stay tuned for that but we are looking at a multi modal world device agnostic world and it's not it's going to be a little bit more than just an action or skill because recognizing that the market has moved quite a bit to be competitive in this space deliver something really cool and innovative thanks okay right we've just met recently last few weeks so this is great and I'm learning every time I talked to you why don't you share with the audience a little bit more about American Red Cross because very very large organization obviously Taylor yeah you have a slightly different set of needs and expectations goals around the space yeah absolutely so I come from the innovation aimed at the American Red Cross Chopin's who's heard of the Red Cross everyone writes we have a very wide scope to our mission it's very diverse we have you know blood donation disaster response and I think that's what most folks think of when I think the Red Cross the Pink Oh the folks that go in for superstorm Sandy Hurricane Katrina nine eleven etc and that is very the what we do training services things like CPR training first aid training etc service to the armed forces so I could go on the purpose that'd be animation team at the Red Cross is to leverage disruptions in the market from investments and technology and use that to drive forward our humanitarian mission so our innovation function is not dissimilar to what you would see in fortune one hundred fortune five hundred companies but we are unique and that the bottom line of what we're doing is humanitarian focus in addition to opportunities for revenue generation or cost savings etc.. What I'm doing as part of that innovation team running the conversation L. A. I practice so any sort of interphase conversation between artificial brain and human brain as within the scope of this practice not just boys chat bots all flavors of chat bots your skills and your actions? VR is very big for us and then further down our road map you'll see some things happening with mobile so Syrian the as well as far as what we've done invoice already as part of this practice the innovation is team is young it's only about a year year and a half old and in that time we launched three skills to them are going to be published as action soon so that's something that you all can look forward to seeing from Red Cross and the next coming weeks those use cases are blood donation first aid and disaster response so we're really excited to see those grown interested want really excited to tell me what those skills do right so if if I were to say banking skill maybe I'd be able to look up my bank account I know exactly what that is but blood donation skill what is that sure so for our blood donation skill most folks again when I think of Red Cross disaster relief or nurses I took a CPR training with them upon a time the core of our business of our bottom line is driven by let donations so our blood donations skill helps acilitator the scheduling of those nations so the conversion that we're looking at as a potential donor into donor right how do we get you from the place where you are thinking about it the two scheduled nation and follow up with rescheduling from there and it's a very simple conversion path very simple funnel but there's a component to that on top of it I think makes it very interesting if you were compelled to donate blood it's not that difficult to find your way to a blood drive right it's like scheduling doctor's appointment you know you need to go the doctor schedule The payments but most folks are potential donors think that they're ineligible right you travel you get a tattoo maybe you had the flu a couple of weeks ago you think of why can't give blood and the majority of those cases you can get so there's a bit of a conversation that we built into that to help rake through that talk about eligibility so we can again push for that conversion rates and I'm really excited about the skill not that I play favorites necessarily but it is one of my favorites because we're having Ford the mission with the skill but also increasing revenue and.

Samsung Nestle Royal Bank of Canada American Red Cross developer Red Cross San Jose Calif L. A. Ai Initiatives Food Financial Services Ford flu Nineteen Dash one hundred fifty years one hundred fifty year fifty percent
"nestle" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"nestle" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Hundred items for sale on Amazon site have been declared unsafe by federal agencies are actually banned by federal regulators or have been deceptively labeled you wouldn't find in a big box store almost half of those listings are for toys and medicines that lack warnings about health risks Nestle is tweaking the recipe of its veggie burgers hearing the sizzle of meat alternatives from beyond meat and impossible foods Nestle says it's garden gourmet incredible burgers will be juicier and have more of a flavor of grilled beef any plans to launch in Europe next month ground beef alternative that can be molded into meatballs Nordstrom coming off a very successful earnings report that said it shares up sixteen percent yesterday is now launching itself and to sustainability the company started an online shopping category it's called sustainable style and will offer merchandise made with sustainably sourced materials made in factories that reach for a higher environmental standards Nordstrom says the move is part of its commitment to the G. seven fashion packed it's a group convened at the G. seven summit working to minimize the fashion industry's environmental impact with a business now at twenty three and fifty three from the Bloomberg news room John Doniger newsradio seven eighty and one oh five point nine FM KC Gago is the Cassidy when properties are flipped for a quick profit the sellers usually make out okay but how to be sure you're not buying a flop this is a Bankrate dot com personal finance minute one big ticket item that might tip you off as poorly installed flooring flooring that's butted up against base molding or door jams is a dead giveaway the job was done on the cheap and most like not by a professional proper installation calls for removing.

Nestle Europe Nordstrom KC Gago Cassidy Amazon Bloomberg John Doniger Bankrate sixteen percent
"nestle" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"nestle" Discussed on KCBS All News

"To a Nestle plant that use tricor leveille nor T. C. ET decaffeinated coffee until the nineteen seventies Nestle discharge the plant's waste water into the city sewers the company says for more than thirty years they have implemented clean up and water protection measures to ensure levels do not exceed California standards T. C. was recently founded one of five city drinking water well this is the well where they found it's easy yeah this city of ribbons says T. C. E. levels reached ninety percent of the EPA maximum allowed in drinking water last summer the well was turned off for months later the city says the water meets all established drinking water standards university of California San Francisco scientists Venus Singler says when it comes to chemicals like TCP there are no safe levels of exposure drinking water standards and guidelines that we have now are many decades old and they don't account for the latest science that shows that pregnant women and children are more susceptible to TCP millions of pounds of TCP or used every year for manufacturing and decreasing the chemical can migrate from industrial sites in the surrounding communities through the soil and water you can even turn into a clear odorless vapor that moves up into the homes of buff we know it can cause cancer by any route of exposure so what that means is whether you agree that en route whether you drink it in contaminated water we're.

T. C. EPA Venus Singler Nestle California T. C. E. California San Francisco ninety percent thirty years
"nestle" Discussed on Inside the Spa Business | Spa

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"nestle" Discussed on Inside the Spa Business | Spa

"In place for about ten billion dollars for their skin, health division, and some saying that this might be assigned that they are abandoning their hopes of being a global wellness brand of wellness company, which, as you may recall that something that a few years ago, they were promoting themselves as the wellness company, but actually back in September of last year. I think it was at the board meeting, they announced that they're going to realize their focus along the lines of nutrition, health and wellness. And they're going to do that in the areas of food beverage and nutritional products or supplements, and I think that makes perfect sense for a brand with a kind of history that Nestle does. And it doesn't necessarily mean that they are abandoning wellness in many ways. I think it means it doubling down. I mean you could argue that these products under the skin health division had things like sport, which is the botulinum toxin and these things in it other inject. Ables like wrestling, which I guess is hollering acid. I think but, you know, you could argue that whilst those things might make people feel good. They don't necessarily always going to be healthy for you. So you know, I don't have a major problem with the that move. I do think that Nestle probably more than any other company or as much as any other company do have an opportunity to become a global wellness brand, but they have to take it seriously. And I don't know that these products. I mean, they launched this division anyway. The skin health division in a partnership with Lori hill, the cosmetic giant back if you years ago, and then eventually they decided to take it on their own and many would say that I just haven't been able to get traction with that deserves and so- selling it for jeez. Ten billion dollars. Not a bad price is probably not a bad idea. So it'll be interesting to see what Nestle positions themselves how they position themselves over the next few years. And whether in fact, they start looking at other areas of wellness with they stay in their lane. Chain of food beverage, and nutritional products, just an observation already. Let's today, thanks for

Nestle Lori hill Hugo Ten billion dollars ten billion dollars
"nestle" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"The Nestle factory, your quality street or make proper working town, and so isn't just this place to visit and take some photos like it needs stuff to work. The other thing, which is my classic being the bonnet is boss investment because you've got so late. The weird thing about it is you've got a lot of towns, but does then a lot of Moreland at a lot of spaced out stuff. And I used to work in a task guy and liberal, and I used to have to walk six miles to work. If no one could give me a left because the buses were so unreliable. And so by the time we'd walked to a bus that might make. Or may not up. It walks in the opposite direction. So like bus investment is something you can do easily scale ably and boost somewhere light. They're just give counselors the same power to regulate buses that we have in London. I'm yeah with which is meant to be dragging its way free parliament. It seems to be taking forever, but like that was that was one of the least reported terrible things. Thatcher government did, I think was deregulated bus services everywhere, but London and a really obvious screw you to the rest of the country. Okay. So we should be. We should be wrapping up, but like under the controversial question, that's gonna get me shelter that probably including after we finish recording. She's like, we've talked about let the many cities in the region, how it's definitely not just like a greater leads or whatever is that may be one of the reasons the investment doesn't come because it it will get salami slice through sunny different places, kind of difficult to kind of make that one big investment that people recognized as that. But that's like saying, that's why no investment should go to Scotland. You've got to think of Yorkshire's Yorkshire, it's the size of Scotland, and it would be completely ridiculous to say if we asked one big thing in Glasgow in Scotland will be happy night. They won't because people recognize it's a big thing with lots of cities and not so people we've got to start thinking of Yorkshire's this major economic and this major unit, the size like it would be if it was one of our nation's, it would be the second biggest after England and rest of England. And we don't think of it that way. We saw think of well, one investment and they'd be their whole has very different needs to chef. Failed to Leeds to York. Like we've got tight Yorkshire seriously, which sounds so pathetic. But we do because we don't take it seriously dial. It's absolutely outrageous set you metric podcast only has a Yorkshire special after one hundred episodes. This is the second Yorkshire special his it. Yeah. What was the first? We did one in Yorkshire delusion, but that was only on low bacteria. Mayors, listen to this podcast. You should know that. Yet. Another question was like, you know, is the divided identity. Paula reason why it doesn't mean it doesn't come. I don't really know why doesn't come, and I'm very annoyed that I can't really offer that solution and all I can really tack onto. In fact, they serve many things that could tack onto. But you know, we saw the Brexit results. You know, we saw that overwhelming, sweltering passion for that. Leave the you do not get in Yorkshire already over real political affiliation for me in like in the east. In fact, not because that's discount in these writing. I do still see Yorkshire as a labor stronghold spurt. I think with that, you know, noticing that if the Uni time people are getting off his about something that this franchises them even favor from the rest of your vote and consequently will cause divides between the rest of the country. That is a cry out for help. That is being underestimated that is being cast aside as something that under educated. Kids, foolish people do, and that's where I'm starting to get really frustrated if you can't see something in a government led by may that you know she has to carry through this Brexit for, but you know, is doing sir resentfully. I feel if you can't see that thought disenfranchisement is only going to continue further if you continue to ignore an entire county, then I don't know what else to say. I don't know what else to do. You should probably try and come up with some way of Hindi at this list..

Yorkshire Nestle factory London Scotland Moreland Paula Thatcher England Glasgow Leeds York
"nestle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Nutrition and we saw the earlier this year it announced it was selling its us confectionery business so really so it can just focus on the core areas so it is a large sum of money for them to pay starbucks just to be able to sell that coffee but actually investors seemed to like the idea and chas we're up one and a half percent how much is this a reaction to the fact that nestle has lost few sales to smaller rivals our tastes to different we won't different things nowadays and also economic growth has not necessarily left us that much extra spec cash full luxury coffee will all the time that's right less nestle probably most well known in the coffee area particularly for things like nestle go blend so ness cafe go planned and that sort of instant coffee paul from this bresser they haven't really brought out into the the more upmarket coffee the people are much more interested in and really it gives them exposure an access to to a brand that's very well known particularly people much more used to going out for coffee buying buying coffee at a disposable cup i'm taking it away and it gives them exposure to that brand and crucially it's a very american brand nestle are not big enough in the states and what do you think what do you think that will have on this lane in the united states i mean it should increase increase the brand the won't know won't be anything nestle branded as much but but it will help with that distribution out there it will get them into two more adverse than maybe haven't been able to to get to before and i it will it will help with that with that broaden i'm despite the fact that that won't be a extensively branded nestle brought up here is another large merger or a deal expected between wool mart and flip cart of india yes i flip caught an ecommerce engine company we've found the wool mart want to by about seventy five percent of them that'll be at a value of around fifteen billion us dollars now the background this is is interesting we'll see we've had the as the saints brazil in the uk will.

starbucks united states uk nestle seventy five percent
"nestle" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Coming up sure this is a fast food restaurant but it's also your neighborhood fast food restaurant you know taco bell where you grab a beer on saturday night yup but first let's do the numbers the dow jones industrial average at it three tenths percent ninety four points to close at twenty four thousand three fifty seven the nasdaq gained seven tenths percent fifty five points to finish at seventy to sixty five the s and p five hundred gained three tenths percent nine points ending at twenty six seventy two that deal we told you about earlier between starbucks and nestle boosted chairs for just one of the companies today starbucks will down three tenths percent nestle cooked up one and a half percent and dunkin brands group which runs dunkin donuts and baskin robbins gained six tenths percent some big energy stocks were boosted by rising crude oil prices but lost ground later in the day occidental petroleum corporation click down half percent chevron pump down four tenths percent and shares of exxon mobil rose one tenth percent bonds were little change the yield on the ten year tino held steady at two point nine five percent you're listening to marketplace this is marketplace i'm lizzie o'leary sometimes it can seem like our global interconnected markets are product of the internet the open borders and big data but the idea of multinational publicly owned companies has actually been around for centuries simon target is co author of new world inc the making of america by england's merchant adventurers and according to him without those early national corporations funding european explorers and eventually colonies the us as we know it today wouldn't exist so when you think of the pilgrims or you think of the founding fathers we think this next group to be out there alongside them at least they are mainly merchants that we think of it now is the sort of forerunner of multan multinationals until that moment companies over the groups of merchants would get together and form syndicates but this new venture was altogether more.

multan america simon lizzie o'leary exxon mobil occidental petroleum corporati dunkin brands nestle us england tino baskin robbins dunkin donuts starbucks nine five percent
"nestle" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"In new york i'm lizzie o'leary in cairo's doll it is monday the seventh of may good to have you with us and we are going to start with a venti deal between starbucks and nestle the swiss food conglomerate there 'grande deal whatever a very big deal nestle is paying more than seven billion dollars for the rights to distribute starbucks coffee nestle won't get any stores or ment just the distribution rights and a few hundred starbucks employee's marketplace's revenge sure starts us off this is the biggest coffee company in the world but it doesn't do so well in the us where it has only three percent of the market they fell behind the times erik gordon is a professor at the university of michigan's ross school business this cafe is coffee that mike my parents happen to like and probably my parents parents but most young people either have never heard of it or if they've heard of it they turn up their nose so if you can't beat them by the rights to distribute him nestle will retail starbucks coffee it'll sell starbucks pods for its espresso machines it'll get into the middle to high end coffee market it's always wanted but what does starbucks get out of the deal versing that they get out of this is a cool seven billion dollars robert solomon is professor of international management and my use stern school starbucks has said it'll use some of that money to buy its own stock to pump up prices for shareholders starbucks will also get access to the supermarket shelves of the world to reach markets that the otherwise would not be able to distribute to in market in nestle has distribution channels and more than one hundred ninety countries so that'll be helpful as starbucks tries to expand in china there are risks of course first off starbucks is literally handing over the most important thing it has its brand while we worry about brand damage what are they gonna do the brand coin oaks partner at occ strategy consultants that sounds like it's going to be very pretty tightly controlled for its part nestle's betting a lot more than the licensing fees on this deal says nyu's rob.

cairo starbucks nestle us professor robert solomon china partner new york lizzie o'leary erik gordon university of michigan ross school mike seven billion dollars three percent
"nestle" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Here to tell us more about a seven billion dollar marketing dealer is sarah halzack bloomberg opinion retail columnist and it has to do with nestle and starbucks and sarah is this an admission by starbucks that they just don't know how to sell coffee acceptance starbucks stores but i think more importantly it's an admission by nestle that it's really struggled in the us market so netflix is the global leader for coffee sales but here at just really hasn't been able to break through it's been something of an also ran behind starbucks behind maxwell house and behind folger's and so in theory by doing this marketing deal it can leverage the starbucks brand cachet in this really important market and starbucks can get the benefits of nestle's global scale and muscle sarah seven point two billion dollars is a lot of money and i'm not exactly sure what nestle is buying explain yes so they're not buying any physical assets with they're buying is the ability to market sell and distribute these products and you have a fair point that they they have paid quite a lot of money here so this unit had two billion in sales last year so if you look at the purchase price it's about three point six times revenue if we make some comparisons within the industry we can look at j b another european company that's been looking to build a coffee empire when they bought pete's coffee they paid two point five times revenue when they bought carrying they paid three point two or three times revenue so it is they are definitely paying a pretty penny sir i mean to to sort of the point how does nestle make money from this so that they can market starbucks coffee and then slip in a nest cafe aside longside it maybe hope that people will buy it eat more healthily and this is a company that owns things like hot pocket and haagendazs right those things don't fit into that ethos but coffee does and so we saw the move in this direction earlier this year by purchasing blue bottle coffee for four hundred twenty five million and it's just clear that they want to try to take advantage of one of the few places in shelf stable food that looks to be perhaps a growing market yes for sure and so go forward strategy is really focused on bottled water which you just mentioned coffee infant nutrition and.

starbucks maxwell house folger nestle pete sarah halzack us netflix seven billion dollar two billion dollars
"nestle" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Seventeen title drama i'm so swimming vision but nestle follow was trusses this.

nestle
"nestle" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Nestle fear's way we know got it museum four nine music now the bay station for music discovery.

"nestle" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"And brazil is answering with legislation with threat of illustration there's legislation there seems to be alarm here and nestle well the brazil did try uh uh back in two thousand six there was a very ambitious plan to regulate advertising and marketing of of of socalled junk food um um with that uh failed um and there are other attempts there but other attempt to deal with education um another other guidelines limiting sales of of soda junk food and schools um there hasn't really put a dent in the problem yet and the selling is very successful uh andrew highlights of family joanna dark day vaas khan's shallows is the best i can do for her name her house looks to be a museum of nestle merchandise if she's a huge booth served fc product she raised her two children on leslie products uh two of the photos she has displayed in her of her children as infants opposing appear amid of empty nestle infant formula care and uh and she is a strong believer uh these products she believes that ecosystem that they had this switched pedigree you know deathly as a swiss company and that uh has has a pretty good reputation in and much of the world as a sort of a quality product i'm speaking with andrew jacobs of the new york times reporting on one particular city in press sale where one woman is a very successful seller to help her family of nestle products when we come back we'll go to nestle itself is this a selfaware company does it no hits attachments to these health problems in brazil what is it doing about it and in fact as six liz it in brazil i'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show mm news talks six in many bedrooms winter nights are complicated other one person is freezing in the other is just fine or one person is comfy cozy while.

brazil junk food andrew jacobs new york times john batchelor nestle vaas khan
"nestle" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to bloomberg business week from bloomberg radio things up there wings with ooh who would say it's an is that this was packaged food giant nestle says piece in the company makes beans on bottled water but is carrying winter reports that's printing puppy nazi for the cities and counties that sentences that that beacon edited that story and he joins us now said nestle's an interesting company as they own at just under fifty percent of all the friends in the book titled war to space right i think market yes huge portfolio a bottled water brand by far the most of any other company can look to cocacola in and pepsi or number two and number three but many of the major brands that you've heard of our owned by nestle and specifically there subsidiary which is called nestle waters which is actually base at a paris now they're very specific about where they go to in order to get access to these water springs and a new hemmed in on michigan and say as an area where they get wolszczan this is an interesting one because this they but for tax breaks obviously to attract next sleigh but there's some kind of ethical questions among others being asked about how this process works nestle is a swiss multinational raid huge on the.

nestle pepsi paris bloomberg michigan fifty percent
"nestle" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to bloomberg business week from bloomberg radio things up there winds with two who would say it's an is that was packaged food giant nestle says business the company makes beans on bottled water but his pemex karemi winter reports that sprinting puppy not safe for the cities and counties that said this is not removed beck beacon edited that story and he joins us now to nestle is an interesting company as they own at just under fifty percent of all the friends in the bottled water space freight traffic market yet huge portfolio a bottled water brand by far the most of any other company can look to cocacola and pepsi are numbered two and number three but many of the major brands that you've heard of our owned by nestle and specifically there subsidiary which has called nestle waters which is actually base at a paris now they're very specific about where they go to in order to get access to these water springs then as you head indian on michigan as an area where they get walsh and this is an interesting one because this they've affleck tax breaks overseas to attract nestle but there's some ethical questions among others being asked about how this process works nestle is a swiss multinational raid huge what the largest food and beverage a company essentially in in the universe and what we looked at specifically in this story is there a bottled water business and how.

nestle paris walsh bloomberg pepsi michigan fifty percent
"nestle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tornado yes tornado is is hitting and making the mature a tree follower and di basically and as he dies the other soil organisms that the the fungaya next year and they were on his roots and they're changing their two dying as well are becoming much less much less prevalence lael and now the dentures on the floor in brown the foil organisms have retreated and the and the seedlings up on the truck fees are ours stretching acrobatically upward it's never got the ceilings going again and because the territory has no died and nestle organisms are affected by the new environment the ceiling are going differently well it's a it's a lovely dance and i understand this little bit of of biology that i didn't before so kudos again john i assume it's not just use you who watch all these videos and then decide o all is the where right oh yeah i i don't decide the winner at all am i've got a um an expert panel of scientists and people from the dance world and they're looking for what as i mean it's not like a normal dance competition certainly or a normal academic competition no that's right i asked the judges to first first score each dance on its scientific merit and then sort of put that aside and then just look at that is a piece of art and then there's a third score which is now bringing together how creatively to date bridge the two worlds of science and art if you're not used to performing let alone putting a video on the internet which will forever be associated with your name your tendency is to hold back a little bit entreated allude that as a joke.

nestle
"nestle" Discussed on Adam Ruins Everything

Adam Ruins Everything

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"nestle" Discussed on Adam Ruins Everything

"So the reason is that following the nestle a boycott and nestle aggressively marketing in poor countries organizations like unisel from the world health organization invested heavily in breast feeding advocacy in poor countries as a way of combating the formula marketing that was also happening in poor countries turtles of they will do so yes absolutely so you have breast feeding so they hired breast feeding advocates in very high positions at the world health organization and they put them in charge of arm infant feeding programs in poor countries and those people were in charge of those programmes when it was reported that hiv so when 1980 one and 1985 come along on the who and unicef are being controlled by breast feeding advocates who firmly believe that breastfeeding is the solution to many of the infant malnutrition and mortality problems in poor countries as they believed that breastfeeding is basically the silver bullet and they're concerned that hiv is going to derail their breastfeeding campaigns i'm and i totally understand that if you're if you're committed to that a to that causes um especially with good reason where you're like hey we gotta you we had babies dying because of this problem with dirty water and formula we need them to breastfeed and you're you're devoting your your life for your decade to that the two that 'cause if if the i understand why you know the hiv aids issue comes over the transom and you're like hey this is just a speed bump we don't wanna uh you know we don't want to derail our whole initiative here so maybe let's downplay this at the very least i i totally understand that the very human responsed to that happening right.

nestle