35 Burst results for "Nervous System"

Pandemic Self Care With Lynn Fraser

The Healing Place Podcast

05:14 min | 1 d ago

Pandemic Self Care With Lynn Fraser

"Hey everybody we're having to do facebook. Live as having some issues going to go ahead and record this. We're going to pretend like we're on. Facebook live and i'm thrilled to have with me today. Winfrey served still point Yes we're going to continue this conversation about pandemic self care strategies and other care so welcome lynn. Thank you for having me terry. It's nice to see you again. Good to see now just catching up a little bit of what's happening in the us. In ohio my and what's happening in canada and your head right and in the same thing it is kind of the same thing and it's Like you were mentioning us one of these big events that And we'll look back gone so someone who's the teenager now is going to look back on it any many decades from now go remember what twenty. We didn't have any school graduate graduation. No prom right. Yeah yeah and all of us have our own personal history with our own personal experience that happening as well right and i know my son is having his children. Do daily daily journaling right now at chip just kind of collect their memories and and they would have to look back on and they're also doing daily meditation so a bit different curriculum than school. But it's still really really valuable to do. Yes we've not. Taking family walks together with the dogs and our daughter who's thirteen has been running. She took up writing again. She'd run track back in fourth grade or something runs ahead of us. We could see her that show she'll turn around and run back and Yeah it's good to see her up and moving and a lot more a lot more time playing me bowling together to to so tell me about what it is that you do so. They can have a sense of who are that. So i've being teaching meditation for twenty five years and yoga as well and i work with people healing trauma. So i do a mindfulness based inquiry practice the killaby inquiries and some of it is in groups. Some of it is individually When when i meet with somebody individually. We're really working on. What are the thoughts coming in images and the words and really what's happening in our body right and then i have a lot of classes as well right now. Ironically the march and april topics for my sunday morning classes is peaceful. Mind wasn't anything on my radar. When i said the topic at you know the what happens in our nervous system in our mind as we get our nervous system is charged up when we feel under threat and we are frayed and then we go into some kind of compensating. We go into fight fight where we get irritable and angry and sometimes we turn out against other people sometimes against ourselves or we go into denial like a deep freeze of. I can't handle this not happening. I'm just gonna go on business as usual and a lot of the things that we're seeing right now are actually fear responses. That maybe aren't the wisest thing we could do. So it's great that you're having this collection of people that are going. This is something we could do instead of convenience driven by nervous system. So that's what i'm you know. I do I help people with their mind So that they can come catastrophic thinking and and come back in their bodies and be you know where the bre. I do them morning. Meditations with Online so people can just have a break from what's going on in the mind commander. Relax the body. It's all guided so you don't have to think it through. I don't leave a lot of spare time there. So the mind doesn't have a lot of time to get going on a big stream thought. So it's just a lot of steph around right now are nervous. Systems are highly engaged in and frightened. And how can we really come ourselves. And there's a lot of ways to do that held about those of what are what are some calling strategies people can use you know one thing we could do is is just do a little practice of it to what is sorry. Lose many things that we can do with our physical body One of the things. James gordon is just wrote a beautiful call the transformation and he's being interviewed on nbc and sixty minutes and he does work with large populations that are traumatized like After hurricane a school shooting or protection thing and he gets people up shaking and also he does this soft e. breathing. I kind of tune in and then shaking so you stand and you shake through your legs and your hips and your arms shoulders. And he has people do like five hundred thousand people together

Facebook Winfrey Lynn Terry Ohio Bowling Canada United States BRE Steph James Gordon NBC
Lecrae On Overcoming Trauma, Abuse And Addiction To Be Your Best

Addicted2Success

05:23 min | 3 d ago

Lecrae On Overcoming Trauma, Abuse And Addiction To Be Your Best

"Ladies and gentlemen welcome to the addicted to success podcast. I'm your host. Joe brown and i'm here today with grammy award winning artist activists and new york times bestselling author loughrey. Cray has a new book. That has come out its code. Im restored lost my religion but found my face. And if you're on the other side of this episode right now listening and you have struggled with things such as abuse trauma divorce division addiction or hopelessness. The craze hit a tell you that there is a way to break through this so the cray thank you so much should be in here brother. I'm excited to dive into these powerful conversations. Thank you appreciate ogden. Awesome so the cray. I've read your book. I m restored. There's so much juice in them and i I resonate with a lot of your journey. I personally was in the music industry now in the entrepeneurship space and tell you what man being a man of faith and walking in the secular world just that pulled. The secular world has at times and the temptation. That's a play. I can understand if if you've had these crazy experiences in your life and you have your wounds in the trauma. That's that suppressed. I can understand how it's tries to play out on an unconscious level. So let's dive into this man. A lot of the audience are predominantly entrepreneurs. The very much on the run you know. They're chasing success. There high achievers it may even be overcompensation area success. But what would you say for you. Was this like pinnacle moment in your life where you realized that you needed some healing to take place. Now i come from a background where it ain't broke. My biological father struggled with affirmation and approval. I was always kind of like on the low in the totem pole. So i had to fight for everything. I had to scrap to fill a sense of value. And that carried over into my pursuit of you. Know my success Outside of the musician you know you're you're moving a million miles an hour trying to be an entrepreneur trying to be an author trying to be all these particular things and I always say like this. The way i knew i needed. Killing was not because all of a sudden the success stopped. It was because the engine on my boat ran out of gas. And let me break that down for you. Most entrepreneurs successful people would liken themselves to motorboats or speedboats and we are speedboat. You're moving a million miles an hour quickest as possible but what ends up happening eventually. Is you run out of gags in. None of our biggest fear is being a raft. We don't want to be the type of person she carried by the way we don't want to be type of individual that is just like i don't know what's going on. I'm just going to let life happen. We wanna be go getters but in going so fast you run out of gas and i had to learn that i was meant to be a sail boat. A sailboat put working. You put hard work and effort in but there's an understanding of the wind. There's a time when you understand when it's time to let the sales up when it's time to have them down when it's time to turn the rudder All encompassing act in i was a speedboat moving so fast thinking i was just gonna accomplish everything and then i ran out of gas and gas round. The gas for me looked like depression. Looked like anxiety. Look like coping mechanisms. Yeah powerful it. It sounds like you started to notice this kind of this disorder in your life right. I remember watching the series that you put out on on youtube recently director series. Man i love what you said in the first episode. There where you said it's like you you wake up in the morning and you see beautiful things and you know that it's beautiful but you can't appreciate it now. I'm sure there's somebody listening right now for sure that can resonate with that. And that's struggling with that. How did you work your way out of this depression. Yeah i mean that's the tough part right is when you're used to work in and accomplishing goals. You think there's a way. I can fight my way through this or there's some kind of you know book i can read or thing i can do and unfortunately the reality of it is that your your nervous system your body your past traumas. All of them need time to heal and they need attention. And so you you have to now be as passionate at. I had to be as passionate as i was about my healing process as i was about everything that was doing that. Got me into that. That dr place in so. It took a lot of time effort energy. You know counseling matter meditation. Medication all of it In order to get myself to a place where i was functioning in i was healing.

Loughrey Joe Brown Cray Grammy Award Ogden New York Times Depression Youtube
Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

Good Life Project

05:56 min | 6 d ago

Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

"We have this conversation. I'm hanging out in boulder colorado. You are in vancouver and You grew up in british columbia. It sounds like in a small town. Did which is known it. Tell me if. I have this right as the second largest stampede. In canada behind calgary is that right. We're gonna go that right. Yes yes. I've lived my entire life telling people that factoid and for non canadian listeners. The stampede is certainly it biggest rodeo on the planet candidate you've I grew up by Surrounded by cowboys and gold. Rush prospectors bright williams. Like the. it's the town. It's pretty small town though isn't it yet. Is sub between fifteen and twenty five thousand depending on over the course of years. So it's it's pretty small it's largely in the interior of b. c. so it's a lot of mountains nearby and a lot of outdoors and that sort of thing. The caribous right. That's right. yeah it's in the cariboo. Yeah so were you. Were you ever participant in the rhodesia side of things. Actually my father was the the head of the rodeo. When year. But i was really small. I was never a participant. We had sort of friends that had ranches in for a while. We had cattle and horses forces scared me in the sense that they they had their own minds. I wasn't entirely sure when i was on a dirt bike. I knew how to control that but horses had to actually be a lot smarter than i was to know how to get on with horses so my sister wrote a lot got. That's kind of really interesting foreshadowing in a weird way though right because you sort of like as a as a kid you see these animals and realize that they have their own mind than their own will. And you're not entirely sure how it works. How to relate to them or had a surly interact way where you develop a mutual understanding and then you look pretty far far forward actually like a couple of years down. The road and your life has been devoted to similar process but with human beings absolutely. Yeah it's it's really interesting too because you see come full circle and not for me personally. But now acquaint therapy you have these people that are really being able to understand. The phenomenon of the brain is the brain is the brain right. So it's it's fascinating to see it across not just humans but across all animals. Yeah a much. A curious is so you do all this work on Measuring what happens in the brain and detecting what happens in the brain then translating that. Because i i've also seen sort of this really fascinating emergence of therapy and known people who both Lead therapy and have been through it. You have been inclined slash patients and shared how they feel like a horse's or these deeply wise animals who are fiercely intuitive and consents. Everything about you so that there there is this sort of connection really unusual connection that tends to happen with human beings as a neuroscientist. Does that land trudy. Yes it does. It's actually where. I'm i'm right now. I'm really interested in tobacco up a bit when ibm i built watson and challenged Jeopardy champions i got called in the neuroscientist to compete Sort of debate with computer scientists about the brain and a and all that stuff. And i got fixated on this interesting thing. I stumbled across my research where somebody proposed that there could be more functional connections in the human brain than there were atoms in the observable universe and over the years. I've really found that interesting. Because i've i've tried to work the numbers and that sort of thing and what i realized it. You know if you reduce that down to a simple circuit of neurons it is possible that that circuit can have more connections than it actually has atoms that compose it and when i really realized it was kind of cool is when if you think we'll wait a minute that's the neurons are not just within our own. Skulls are neurons. Interact with each other all the time right so minor runs right now. Are changing your functional connections in yours are changing mind so so i thought wow. Isn't that cool. Because that's like a really heavy kinda insight into ways. We could tap brain potential brain power to do good things in life. And so yeah. I'm always thinking about those things. Yeah and it's and it's really interesting to right because the fundamental assumption there. Is that the things that go on in our brain can in a very real way affect what's happening in the brain of being whether human or animal in proximity to us in some way shape or form. Yeah yeah we just had one of our Cyber narrow factoid and one of the facts that was really interesting as when musicians are playing music their brainwaves synchronized and doing all these things now. I don't personally do it but through in the field. There's all these meta scanning where they can show the neuro relationship between mom and baby and different people far away as just fascinating. Yeah that's amazing because then if you can show that the brainwave sink. Then if that sentence than has almost like this trickle down effect on the physiology and the rest of the nervous system then maybe that also part of the basis for people who were new you have these phenomenon where it seems like physiological cycles. start to sink Yeah yeah. And i think it's interesting because the more that we become mindful of that the more we can actually use it for positive impacts right and i think in the world today you can maybe start to ask the question if some of that is there and has just out of control and so how could we actually harness that. I think that's just such interesting ways to think about how you know we never really think about our brains right. It's just what moves our body and our personality and all that but if you could actually think about it in different ways i've i've always loved creativity in that. Yeah

Bright Williams Cariboo Rhodesia Boulder British Columbia Cowboys Calgary Vancouver Colorado Canada Trudy Watson IBM
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
Stop Self-Criticizing, Start Meditating by Crystal Fenton

Optimal Living Daily

04:49 min | 2 weeks ago

Stop Self-Criticizing, Start Meditating by Crystal Fenton

"Stop self criticizing. Start meditating by crystal fanton with mind body. Wise dot com admitted. You've been there acting as your own worst critic by doubting yourself as a writer and yoga instructor. I can attest to the idea. That perfectionism is indeed the enemy of the pen and of the self. So what do you do when you just can't seem to quiet that negative inner voice. Recent research shows learning how to meditate. Can't help practitioners guided meditations such as the loving kindness. Meditation have been shown to increase self compassion while decreasing self-criticism according to the experts meditation including mantra meditation lessons the extremities of negative thoughts changes patterns of belief and facilities learning how to forgive yourself. Meditation helps us avoid going down the rabbit hole of self critical thoughts as the act of coming back to the attention on the breath halts the process of criticism in its path says rachel schenken of mind body. Wise science supports this as shinkin explains for my neuropsychologist and scientific perspective neurons in the brain that fire together wire together quote breaking the cycle of self criticism by using the breath as an anchor also breaks self critical neurotransmitters from continuing firing together. Thus short-circuiting the brain self criticism mechanism. That may have once been on. Autopilot men quote. Dena kaplan founder of meditation community. The path belise. Meditation is extraordinarily powerful for self critical thoughts in three ways. The first is when you sit the critical voice in your head becomes quieter your mind spins less quickly and enters a feeling of calm and spaciousness kaplan tells rewire me. Second is powerful to become proud of yourself that you're taking the time to go deeper into the self decrease confidence that quells. Your critical side knows caplin third. Meditation gives you the power to make changes quote. It gives you in to see what's not serving you in the tools to choose to change those aspects of your personality and his way it helps us develop into the best version of ourselves and quote quite the body. calm the mind meditation. The simple act of bringing focused awareness to breath while in stillness calms essential nervous system and physical body while relaxing. The mind we the only animals who can consciously control our breath and this ability allows us to have a level of self management over our bodies and minds that no other living being can do says schenken quote. Meditation allows us to be responsive instead of reactive and challenging situations as trains our entire system to equilibrate even when we are not in our practice of meditation and quote. Remember that meditation is not the act of clearing the mind or thinking nothing rather it is the practice of continually bringing the wandering. Mind back to the breath over and over and over again with as little judgment and as much compassion as possible. According to kaplan our brains before trained are scattered with thoughts each second of every day once. You start meditating. A number of those thoughts come out so when you go about your day your mind is more settled and actually feels more clear. She says quote you become more open to learning new things and listening to and focusing on other people when they speak and quote. Meditation and action starts simple by downloading an app shinkin recommends insight timer or head space offering both silent and guided meditations. Find quiet space where he can take a comfortable seat. Turn on the meditation or timer rest hands comfortably in your lap. Sit as tall and vertical in the spine as he can and close the is softened all the muscles in your face and belly breathe in and out through your nose follow either. The instructions of the guided or silent. Meditation counting your breasts up to five and then began. If you lose count start over again schenken also recommends using a mantra meditation practice quote since letting go goes one of the most challenging things we face as human beings. One of my favourite standby mantras is to mentally. Say the word. Let on my inhale and go on sale. This is repeated over and over when my mind wanders my bring it back and continue until the timer goes off and quote. Beginners should start with an amount of time. That is sustainable. Try meditating three to five minutes every day of the first week then slowly build the amount of time. each week

Crystal Fanton Rachel Schenken Shinkin Dena Kaplan Caplin Schenken Kaplan
Interview With Dr. Stephen Porges

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Dr. Stephen Porges

"Welcome to dr podcast today. I am very excited. I am privileged to welcome to the program A gentleman who has eye doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it I actually Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies.

Porges Dr Borjas Dr Portas Alan Shore
A wild and whimsical world of flesh-eating plants

Science Friction

05:11 min | Last month

A wild and whimsical world of flesh-eating plants

"Pretty much up ended all of our lives before covid nineteen. I got to travel to the perth hills in search of some beautiful flesh-eating beings so it's a warm dry day in calamander national park with bright blue sky above yellow worth crunchy underfoot the yellowish shrub. Whole yes we go. Yes laura and i are looking for something special in the bush it's tiny but shawnee and so it should catch season dawn. These the ninetieth be baltimore. Rare impression. s- potential specimens not. Oh that's a tremendous one. So this is Dresser a guy again tia and it's named because it's pretty giant. He's that's about fifty sixty centimeters high. Yeah and it's like a little mini. trae it is. Yeah like these are. Actually the leaves the plan. Yeah so the the flowers are up the very top here. Just in bad i think at the moment but the leaves are they do look like a flower bill. Little son to me and so it's a little pad that is surrounded by sticky hairs and what you'll notice it on some of them. The sticky has wrapped around into the center and now Can you see the little sort of bug remains in the middle there and then others are out ready to catch something new so hi. My name's lois gates. And i'm a botanist from western australia. And i'm doing my phd on plants but this young botanist has an alter-ego floor escapes. Yes so that's my twitter and instagram. Flora 'cause laura and i'm all about plants so more than that laura aka florus gates is all about plots that ate flesh. We always tend to kind of chris. Plante picked it up these sort of managing monsters aliens from outer space it. It goes out. If got dave the little shop of horrors that sort of thing or a new car and killed but it even goes back much earlier than that. It's not for the greater glory of science. I just want us to survive. Even a botanist said there was the story of a gemini explorer in the madagascan john. Google is it a plant coming across this atrocious cannibal tree central nervous system which had these serpent like branches which captured a woman and coiled. Its branches around and around. There is actually the atrocious kind of betray or if anyone's going to find it maybe that just not come back all that don't usually pull themselves out of the ground chase you. He sees the depiction of this atrocious tree. It looks so much like a dresser in the way that it's those separate like branches the sticky glands dresser and the way that they wrap around and coil around the pool. Woman is the same way that these dresser wrap around the insect pry. But yeah they. They always get painted as these vicious preaches. I do tend to notice that. A lot of the time the victims in these stories Women don't like that aspect. Yeah there's a whole gender story to be talked about here. I think definitely. And i mean often when we talk about verse plants. We often hear about charles. Darwin because dow indeed right the first scientific book all about kind of verse. Plants gave the first scientific evidence that they are actually able to capture and digest insect prey. But there's been a lot of amazing women who have also contributed to converse plant science and our understanding of ecology throughout history and. I'm really interested in their stories as well. And so am i this week. We are in wnba which incredibly is home to up to a third of the world's converse plant species. I wanna find out why that eason have. I've managed to survive in such an intense environment and knicks. Week got totally caught up in a saga full of twists and turns and tendrils about the life of just one congresswoman. We're gonna venture from hilltop home of an internationally renowned joola share. He wanted the all the glory for himself. I really can't go into the mind of charles gardner but he said he did. Not mother might lot very difficult for him. We'll head deep into the heart of a magnificent end museum for plants. So we're entering a quarantined area. Okay hidden on stays now.

Perth Hills Calamander National Park Lois Gates Laura Aka Florus Gates Laura Trae Dresser Plante Baltimore Instagram Western Australia Bush Dave Twitter Chris Google John Darwin DOW
New hand-held device promises relief from anxiety, insominia, depression

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

New hand-held device promises relief from anxiety, insominia, depression

"I hand held device promises relief from anxiety depression insomnia and pain for many dealing with chronic issues like anxiety or insomnia the solution is often hills but now you can use pulses Dr Josh Brierley says alpha stim targets the body's internal system to bring relief it's designed to just kind of balance out the nervous system increases alpha waves in the brain we are FDA cleared to treat anxiety insomnia depression and pain the prices of the two devices is a thousand dollars but marketing manager Daniel Boyd says alpha stim is still a bargain you look at the cost of the device right out over several years and years then you're really looking at a much better value than if you were to take prescription medications for that long there are two models one designed to treat pain one doesn't I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Depression Insomnia Dr Josh Brierley Insomnia Depression Daniel Boyd Insomnia Anxiety Pain FDA Oscar Wells Gabriel
I've Got A Fun Challenge For You (To Improve Your Life

Optimal Living Daily

04:32 min | Last month

I've Got A Fun Challenge For You (To Improve Your Life

"I've got a fun challenge for you to improve your life by racial schenken of mind body. Wise dot com. If you choose to take on this fun challenge to improve your life. It could change everything. Have you ever noticed. That energy flows where attention goes if. I suggest that there are a lot of red cars in the streets today. It is likely that you will suddenly notice more red cars than ever before it works the same way with attitude and perspective if you focus on all the good that human beings around your doing you will see feel hopeful happy man trusting most of the time if you see the world as filled with bad dangerous and selfish people. You will likely feel fearful sad and disheartened. Most of the time when life is difficult is normal to want to complain. Impor- note complaining is different than sharing your feelings and steps to make change in your life. What begins as Needed venting often leads to an ongoing complaining campaign where you tell your story of woe again and again enrolling others to validate your bad situation when you deliver your complaining campaign it initially makes you feel a bit better relieved you alone with it anymore but if you continue to complain about the same issues over and over you'll know because he will tell your story in the same way at all feel incredibly familiar and you'll feel worse after telling it the worse it is for your health and wellbeing. Neuro science has proven that neurons. That fire together liar. Together so re telling your story continues to deepen your connection to it which perpetually makes you feel more fake. Complaining is a way of defusing dissatisfaction in your life. Sometimes this disatisfaction originates from a deeper place or from experiences from your past that have shaped who you are today consciously choosing awareness and checking in with yourself. More deeply is the only way to get in touch with what's really going on where it originates in a path toward healing. Complaining may be your outlet for underlying dissatisfaction. But it never fully see sheets what you're craving which is feel good happy and fulfilled. However if you focus on all that you have and all that good in your life you'll generally feel better than if you focus on what isn't working that said being honest and balanced about what is and isn't working in your life is healthy it's the over complaining unloading dumping inventing that sends your central nervous system into overdrive with isn't healthy. Complaining also sends out negative energy. Even if the complaining is only in your thoughts and you never say it out loud that people can feel coming from you they will avoid you unconsciously which perpetuates your feelings of loneliness and frustration about your situation. The thing is you can turn this all around time for the fun. Challenge to improve your life challenge. Commit to taking a complaining hiatus for one week. It's a wonderful experiment and it could just shift everything here. The guidelines number. One start here for the next seven days you will practice taking a conscious break from complaining out loud or in your mind number to become aware and check in when he noticed desire to complain arising check in with what you notice happening inside you i e what sensations do you notice in your body. What emotions are surfacing number. Three refocus once. You've gone familiar with your experience of complaining than take a deep breath in through your nose release it as side through your mouth and then shift your focus to something that is working in your life number four be compassionate if you catch yourself midway into your complained campaign. That's okay breaking habits is hard to do. Try lovingly and compassionately stopping yourself. Then refer back to number one number five. Get support enroll the closest people in your life about your one week vow to do this challenge taking complaining hiatus. Ask them to help you by being on alert for when you are complaining. Requests that they lovingly. Stop you from hurting yourself. Any further with your words. If they aren't sure how to alert you let them know that they can simply say. Tell me all about what is working in your life and number six at the end of seven days reflect on how you feel emotionally physically mentally spiritually you may have to journal what this experience like for you.

The COVID-19 Vaccine: Will You Get It?

Say What Needs Saying

04:56 min | Last month

The COVID-19 Vaccine: Will You Get It?

"Welcome everybody to say what needs saying. I'm zac non brandon and today for this particular conversation were focusing on the vaccine covid. Nineteen finally has a vaccine. That by next week's time should be distributed to what is one hundred million americans before even go into that we must establish the base for what is and what is described as a vaccine. This'll be a substance that helps protect against certain diseases particularly this one covid nineteen vaccines contain a dead or weaken version of a micro. And it helps you a new system recognized and destroying the living microbe during future infection with infection being the actual covid virus. Now with that being said there are considerable side effects. That have been mentioned in the news. some bit more exaggerated than others Some random occurrences have happened in people. Have i guess. Almost use the causation. Cause algae notion like some people go around saying you can get bell's palsy from it though it can just be the population who got it this far but that will all be discussed. I'm sure throughout this conversation. Now i must throw. It's zach and ask you for covid. Nineteen vaccine trump was renamed the trump vaccine whether there's fifteen hundred dollars behind it or not for you to take it as an american zach. Will you be taking this vaccine I wanted to before i do that. I wanted to tell Let everyone that's listening. That isn't already aware Everyone what you are exactly just so that they understand like obviously we're not pretending to be experts. Understand everything on this. But in this particular instance you do have a bit of credibility given that you're in the medical community right like at least on some level. What do you do for anyone who's listening. That doesn't actually know what you do. Oh i'm a cervical neurophysiologist What that boils down to is when surgeons neurosurgeons do specific spine or anything around the nervous area type surgeries my job to make sure that during while they do the physical aspect i look at their nervous structure the eeg aspect of saw brain and just how their muscles are corresponding so say for instance. The surgeon is working within the spinal cord. He may hit a nerve or maven damage. Attract in my job. What i'm able to do a see in regards to what he's doing what muscles he may be damaging and i relate that information create that back and forth communication to make sure whatever he's doing is into detrimental to the patients nervous system. What happens is i stimulate some areas on their wrists and ankles recorded from the brain set the baseline anything that deviates from that. We alert the surgeon. Yeah and that happens with anyone so this code patients as well then we have to increase the level of precautions because they even tell extra precaution when they're drilling and the bone the bone fragments are going into the air. You have to wear Glasses you even have to wear the masks especially change clothes change garments all. That stuff's interesting. Yeah so yeah so with say. Witnessing we've pretty consistently want to make clear that we're not legal. Experts were not you know. Experts on Political experts in things. But at least in this case random has a little bit of experience in the medical field. And i have a little bit of experience in neuroscience As does brand. And so hopefully we can bring that perspective in hear other people's on i to answer your question. Am i taking it. hi. I'm still not sure if i'll be forced to take it for my job. My lab is in the kellogg. I center at michigan on. And there are patients there. And so we're not obviously. We aren't dealing with patients ourselves. Or at least i'm not but since they're in the building i wouldn't. I wouldn't be surprised if there was something forcing me to do it with that. If that happens i mean i'll do it. I'll listen. I'll take the vaccine them. You know i'm not gonna fight it. In that case if i'm not mandated to i haven't fully decided if i will immediately I may wait a little bit. But that being said we're already getting some info from the uk and other places. And so i. I mean time will tell when it's available but i think as it stands. I wouldn't take it tomorrow unless my job depended on it. That's not to say i'm doubting it but again just like you know the the initial xbox the initial five years ago out you know do whatever needs to do work out any bugs. In come see me. Back granted it might be mandated just like any old flu shot for us but in greenwich it. We'll definitely

Brandon Zach Bell Michigan UK FLU Greenwich
Are You Addicted To Stress

Break The Rules

04:57 min | Last month

Are You Addicted To Stress

"While hello hello hello. Welcome to another edition of the breakable podcast. Where he's quieting with noise in the health food infants world today and superstock. How dr heidi hannah in hosni is chief. Energy officer of synergy s accompanied writing brain-based hell if performance for instance individuals and organization. She's also a senior researcher with the brain health initiative and fellow an advisory board member of the american institute of stress and today is the episode of stress. We're talking all about obsolete concept Addiction which i never really heard of thought about intel deduct. Heidi hearing a little bit about your take on that. A doctor dr gary. Thanks for coming in and play. Just give us a little bit about crown about who you are. And what got you into doing. Worker in the world around stress neighboring. Yeah well first of all. Thanks for having me. I love that used the word stoked because it's one of my favorite words. We were just talking a little bit before we went on about our backgrounds and where we come from and i actually grew up in portland oregon which i love. I love the pacific northwest. Still feels like home. But i always full actually it with affective disorder pat a lot of anxiety and depression growing up and felt like i needed to live in a sunny. Climate ironically ended up getting rights. Our shift to play softball penn state which was not much better than i moved to orlando for ten years thinking that would give me some sunshine and it really just gives me a lot of like under storms and eventually made my way to san diego and one of the things that i have been doing for the past few years with reef which is a global beach brand looking the benefits of the beach on our brain health and performance. So anytime i hear someone say you can see me. I know people are just listening to this. But i've got my relief hat and it's at palm trees and i just i really feel like we can benefit from taking our brain to the beach even when our bodies stuck at home are second office and there's some strategies you can talk about a little bit later about how Do that so. I'm background my history really. I got into this. Because i had to to survive. I was i was misdiagnosed. Has a child A lot so around the age of ten started having debilitating headaches and stomach aches and panic attacks and panic. Attacks were so extreme. I would actually faint and lose consciousness so my parents you know not knowing what to do about it to say misdiagnosed me with things like kimia food allergies kind of like throwing darts on a dartboard and ultimately they said you know probably just stress so hard. Remember like okay. I'm ten eleven. Twelve how How bad could stress be. Why is it literally like hijacking my brain and the most inconvenient circumstances like on flights on first dates on job interview so i am a life journey. Like trying to figure out how to help myself. Just get through the day and became fascinated with these different topics. So it started. I got a master's degree in psychology. And i wanted to become a therapist. So it's working with a lot of people struggling with different things and just saw. How much nutrition was playing a role in their mental health. So then i got my first in holistic nutrition looking at the different ways that behavior mood and things and then always do not. I got certified and different fitness strategies exercise physiology and then i ended up working for this really awesome company called the human performance institute and it worked for them for ten years where we worked with professional athletes and executives really helping them understand energy management like their physical emotional mental spiritual energy and that was amazing. Except i do. I feared the most every day which was public speaking and flying so i was traveling all around the world kind of teaching people what to do but the not coping well with my own stress and wallo. That was happening. I had my third emperor diagnosed with alzheimer's disease. And i started looking the research about the brain and the nervous system and realized that the number one risk factor for cognitive decline in dementia was actually chronic stress. Live off of wait a second. I'm living with chronic stress. And i know this. Why am i acting us way. And that's actually one of the reasons. I wrote the book stress a holic and started looking at stress addiction was. I know this is good for me by yet. I kinda don't wanna stop. And then the more started talking about that book to my clients. They would all say. Oh my. gosh that's me. i'm addicted distress. But the funny up part and we can. Then they'd say well. But i don't want you to take it away from

Dr Heidi Hannah American Institute Of Stress A Dr Gary Hosni Heidi Pacific Northwest Intel Softball Portland Oregon Orlando Anxiety Depression Human Performance Institute San Diego Panic Attacks Headaches Alzheimer's Disease Dementia
How To Slow The F Down by Melani Schweder

Optimal Living Daily

06:05 min | Last month

How To Slow The F Down by Melani Schweder

"How to slow the f. Down a melanie schwager of a brighter. Wild dot com. Seems like we're all moving ahead at breakneck speed. These days doesn't it. Everyone is busy overworked and over scheduled. Our bodies are crumbling under the pressure. And we can't get our minds to slow the heck down enough to go to sleep at night everywhere you look. There's a message to keep going work harder. Do more things are collective fomo is causing us all too much stress too much anxiety and making us focus on the things that aren't actually nourishing or valuable in life. But how do we get off the treadmill and actually slow the heck down or we're constantly jumping from one task to the next our nervous systems get overloaded and our adrenals kids sapped sustainable way of living. No wonder so many an he caffeine or other stimulants to function in the day and then rely on mez against sleep at night. No boy no you guys. We have to learn how to purposely slow down our life and get a little more white space and our schedules and not just talking about taking a vacation. Vacations are important to get out of our ruts expose us to new environments and get some are but what about the rest of the year. How on earth can we slow the pace. When we are. In the middle of our usual work school or family obligations outlet. This blog comes at a good time for you to and helps you find some peace. Here are my top seven ideas for slowing down getting some zen and moving forward with more mindful intention number one meditate even just for ten minutes. I don't want to sound like a nag. But really peeps meditation works. I know i talked about it a lot. But that's only because it's been so effective in reducing my stress improving my mood and helping me keep a healthy perspective. No matter what's going on around me and no you don't need to fold yourself into a pretzel or sit on the floor. For an hour. A day to reap the benefits. You can chill out in a comfy chair or propped up in your bed and follow a guided meditation for just ten minutes a day. Trust me give it a few days and you'll be feeling good. I personally love following along to guide tracks from apps like insight timer pacifica com or head space number two said boundaries. To be honest it should be number one on this list. Because i think of this as a vital life skill especially for any m path h. p. or chronically. Ill person learning to say no is one of the best things you can do for yourself and can help you from over scheduling and thus over extending your energy. You cannot serve from empty vessel remember. Don't give your time and energy to just anyone who asks for it learned to set boundaries and devote yourself to only the things that are truly important number three. Put the phone down seriously do it. I know that technology is an addiction. Well technically the connection it brings us the true diction which isn't really bad thing. Trust me might get it. It took me a long while to break my longstanding habit of jumping on my iphone right upon waking. But i know. I still get on. Instagram may be more than i need to the constant barrage of texts notifications emails and updating social feeds only serves to keep your brain on high alert and your stress hormones. Pompey put your phone in a drawer for one hour every day or take a whole day off from devices each week he might like the calm. It brings number four get some nature time. There's nothing that can slow you down quite like nature. Can we step outside and wiggle. Our toes and the grass are everyday stress. Is don't seem quite as urgent anymore. And we can refocus attention in a healthier and more sustainable way. Wander around your neighborhood park. Take a picnic lunch to the trail head or just sit in your backyard for a little while. Also an awesome chance to spend time with friends make some vitamin d. or play. fetch with your up. I'm looking at you river number five. Eat mindfully one of the easiest ways to tell how fast or slow moving is to observe your eating habits most of us wolf down our food or take snacks on the go because we just cannot be bothered to invest time or energy into eating for your next meal clear off the table and yes actually sit down at one. Leave your phone elsewhere and really bring your attention to your food. Use all five senses to explore an experience her meal shoe and swallow slowly and rest for a moment before moving onto the rest of your day number six. Close some browser tabs. We live in a multitasking culture. Always being told to do ten things at once but our brains actually don't work this way and trying to tackle. Multiple activities is only a recipe for stress. Be rebel and give monot asking a try. Whatever you're working on only focus on that one thing. Close your other browser tabs. Shut off the distractions and be present to what you're doing. This of course applies to work but also to other things like driving eating socializing and playtime number seven connect don't just coexist. How often do we really see. In connect with other people that we spend time with one the easiest and simultaneously hardest ways. We can slow down his to actually be present in engaged with our social interactions. Humans are endlessly fascinating when you can actually pay attention to their words body. Language mannerisms and energetic vibrations. You'll find a much deeper connection. Treat every person in front of you as the most important thing in that moment and you may be surprised at how it shifts your perception. I know we are all busy little bees visas but this is your invitation. Step back and ask yourself if your routine is actually a healthy and sustainable one. If you're constantly feeling stressed or rushed give these seven tips to try and pay attention to how you feel after a few days remember. Life isn't going anywhere so katie. Give yourself permission to slower role. Sometimes

Melanie Schwager Pompey Monot Katie
When you feel like life is against you

Building Psychological Strength

04:58 min | Last month

When you feel like life is against you

"Today. I want to open this episode by telling you a story that. I don't think i've ever tall on the podcast before. That's actually pretty amazing. Since i share quite a bit about myself on this podcast. But i don't think i've gone into detail about this particular story and i wanted to do so today because i think it is an interesting introduction into the topic that i want to cover For the majority of this episode so bear with me and listen to this quick little story from by past many of you know that i have multiple sclerosis. I was diagnosed when i was about thirteen years old. Which is extremely young. And i've lived with it for over twenty five years of my life. I've had a number of experiences as a result of having a mess. But one of them. That i wanna share with you. Today is the first time that i went blind. I've actually gone blind twice each time. Thankfully it was in. Only one i But the first time i went blind was in really interesting situation that i want to dive into a little bit today because as i mentioned it sets up. Today's topic really nicely. So for those of you who may not be familiar. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune condition. So my immune system is a little bit hyper vigilant and it attacks my body more specifically it attacks the mylan aided narves in my central nervous system he can think of mile unaided nerves as The wiring that's in your house. There is a wire with some Some insulation around it my similar to that we have nerves in our central nervous system with mylan around them. Mylan is the insulation that allows electricity or nerve responses to flow cleanly along a nerve instead of sort of Jumping over to other nerves or haphazardly firing around in our brain it allows those impulses to move more cleanly so when the violated gets scarred so multiple sclerosis actually means many scars when our mylan get scarred in our central nervous system it can cause issues and deficits and one of the things that i experienced was blindness. So this to give you some context. I was about fourteen years old. Or so and i woke up one day and i noticed that i was starting to see double vision when i would look way. To the periphery of my left eye. So if i looked way to the left my vision would go double the further to the left. My eyes would go and i thought this was really strange. But you know at this point in time. My ms was not regulated. I wasn't. I hadn't been on medication for very long and i was really used to things very strange symptoms happening and so i didn't think much of it now. Over the course of the weeks that followed it took about a month for me to lose my vision entirely in my left eye I increasingly had very strange visual effects. So the double vision worsened. I didn't have to move. My is very much anymore for that. Double vision symptom to happen. I also had incredible pain behind my i later learned. This was my optic nerve swelling up. Who knew that's thing. Apparently optic near itis is that it's called anyway. I had some pain behind my eye and the edges. If you think about the thing that i remember most is looking at leaves on a tree or there's a lot of detail right. Each leaf is very. It's a little tiny detail on the tree and they have very sharp and the edges of branches are very like sharp lines. those would almost. This is the best way that i can describe it. Sparkle kind of they were blurry and they were sparkly and it made it really hard for me to see detail. Those symptoms progressed and progressed and progressed to the point where i couldn't see anything out of my left eye. We're talking if i closed my right eye and completely shielded from any light. If i went into a room i didn't know if the light was on or off i actually went into the doctor side. Note this is just a funny story. i went into the doctor and they did What's called an eeg where they take this big electrode cap and they glue all these electrodes to your head. And then they have you do a task and they measure

Multiple Sclerosis Mylan Blindness Scars
New York PD detective's desire to help family turns into platform now helping first responders nationwide

Michael Wallace

02:40 min | 2 months ago

New York PD detective's desire to help family turns into platform now helping first responders nationwide

"Detectives desire to help a former colleague through unimaginable tragedy. It's turned into a platform to support first responders across the country. CBS News correspondent Meg Oliver has that story Stalker was born August 31st 2017. Just eight months later, she was diagnosed with Alexander's disease. Jennifer Caesar at 11 months old. The rare nervous system disorder has on Lee affected 300 people in the last 80 years. Breath and Jason are her parents. She never talked, but He communicated with her eyes with her gestures with her smile. Callie was hospitalized 40 times last year. Will you ever be able to get out of medical debt? I don't think so. E mean it was just stifling the amount of their medical bills multiplied. We want him to know that we're here. We can't Jason is a New York City sergeant. His former NYPD partner, Detective Robert Garland, suggested a crowdfunding campaign but the stock her family was worried about potential online. Scammers. Lester, Listen, I'm gonna put pen to paper on. We're gonna make something just for you guys. So you get the help that you guys deserve what started as a way to help a friend in need became a three year project to develop the fun, the first website. Harlan's Research discovered that out of more than an estimated 50,000 campaigns online that focused on the military and first responders, at least 3% have duplicates. So he partnered with the system called I d dot Me, which helps securely verify someone's identity, including their job as a first responder. It's the on Lee Crowdfunding website dedicated to those on the front lines. So when I don't it comes to a campaign. They know that the money is actually going to a trusted source. So far, they have more than 66 active campaigns. Have raised more than $350,000, including one to help the Lake Charles Police Department recover from working. Laura 22 employees lost everything they were legitimately sleeping on the floor in the squad room. That night because they had nowhere nowhere else together. They're trying to raise $100,000 to help their officers buy furniture and rebuild, really re energizes you and definitely restores your faith and folks out there. Does it mean to you that Callie's legacy is going to live on through this site of helping others? It's huge. Thanks Thanks so so much much that that was was CBS CBS Is Is Mega Mega Oliver Oliver reporting. reporting. It's It's

Meg Oliver 'S Disease Jennifer Caesar Robert Garland Jason Cbs News Callie Stalker Nypd Alexander LEE Lester Harlan New York City
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"J. Powers, Fox News Another co founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge, has died. Pat Quinn, motivational speaker and co founder of the Ice Bucket Video Challenge for a less died Sunday morning at age 37. He battled Amy a traffic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013 the video challenge taking social media by storm in summer, 2014. Quinn talking to Fox News radio in 2015 disease that has no hope at the moment, but The ice bucket challenge is revamped that outlook the challenge so far raising more than $250 million worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for a less a fatal progressive nervous system disease, which impacts nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle control.

J. Powers Ice Bucket Challenge Traffic Lateral Sclerosis Fox News Lou Gehrig's Disease Pat Quinn AMY Quinn
Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

John Batchelor

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Pat Quinn, Ice Bucket Challenge co-founder, has died at age 37

"And another co founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge has died. Pat Quinn, motivational speaker and co founder of the Ice Bucket Video Challenge for a less died Sunday morning at age 37 He better of India Tropic lateral sclerosis, often called Lou Gehrig's disease since diagnosis in 2013 the video challenge taking social media by storm in summer, 2014. Quinn talking to Fox News radio in 20. 15 disease that has no hope at the moment. But the Ice bucket challenge revamped that outlook, the challenge so far raising more than $250 million worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for a less a fatal progressive nervous system disease, which impacts nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle control boxes.

Ice Bucket Challenge Lateral Sclerosis Pat Quinn Lou Gehrig Quinn Fox News India
A Women's Guide to Getting a Good Nights Sleep

Untangle

05:24 min | 2 months ago

A Women's Guide to Getting a Good Nights Sleep

"Shelby. It is such a pleasure to have you back on untangle. All thank you so much for being here. Thank you for having me patricia. I love talking with you. Yeah you were one of our first. Meditation teachers asleep experts and you did our sleep. Basics course on meditation studio and now just come out with your first book called. The women's guide overcoming insomnia for storm. So proud of you. Thank you so much for writing this book we needed. That's for sure and let's start with this question. Why did you decide to write this book. There are books out there for just general insomnia treatment overall but i work with so many women of all ages from teenagers to older adults. And it's like women oftentimes either suffering silence or they don't appreciate what is treatable and what isn't treatable a lot of times think. Oh this is all just hormones. And there's nothing i can do about it and sometimes there are things that can't be done but a lot of times. There are things that can be done and they wanted a book that really addressed that women in particular. And how has it been received so far. Is that a silly question. Because you know this book so desperately. It's been fantastic. I am so excited with the reception. Overall it's funny. I have colleagues and patients who will be reading the book in like a coffee shop or something and then they'll tell me that other women will come over to them. Where did you get that book. I need so it's really just venus. The most surprising to the honestly about the whole thing is that men have come up to me and said things like is this only for women can help me to so men thinking that there were secrets in there that rank being kept from them but yes other than the hormonal chapters and all the women who is a lot in there that's applicable to. Yeah i think so too uae. Are we such a sleepless bunch of peak ball. I think there's a few things. So the biggest thing i think is that we're just distressed society. We just don't know how to put an end to the day anymore and there are some days that were going going going. We have our phones on us nonstop. We think that we can just put things down and crash and sometimes we can crash and go right to sleep. Oftentimes we wake up a few hours later opening up early. Whatever was on our brain right when we crash right there other times. We just can't turn off because we're going going going right until bedtime. And i think that's the biggest factor the other big factor for women especially or torments. That's a big thing that happens throughout the lifespan. So whether it's just performance -tuation women tend to have really poor sleep right beforehand or when they're pregnant or just after having a baby. There's a lot of anxiety and depression. I can happen. And that's for men to but paramedic pause. I think distressing variety depression or emotional shifts. There's a big firestorm of reasons why we're having a lot of insomnia one of the first things you were talking about just now with just about how busy we are and how our nervous systems are on high gear all the time. Do you think that it is really hard to sort of. Shut down our bodies before going to sleep so that were it's almost like we're in shock like our bodies are moving so fast so fast fast. It's like if you look at a poppy. That's it takes them a while to calm down. I always describe it to patients when they always the patients. Fight me all the time just allowing for. I would love our of winding down before bed. I that's even not enough but patients will fight me for a half hour an hour. But i always describe it as sleep is not an on off switch. If you think that you can just turn the light switch off and just go right to sleep. You likely are sleep deprived person if it really should be a process of a dimmer switch. Way or slowly dimming. Your body demeanor brain to wind itself down to land the plane gently so that you can men glide into sleep that makes so much sense and a lot of people use television as a way to mine down. But you're saying that that's not really a great way to wind down. There's reason so one thing the reason. We don't love screens staring it's like it's one thing if you're an hour before bed. You want to do a meditation. I totally all for using meditation now before listening to something. Put your phone down. Not staring at it. The problem is staring at a tv or screen right before bed for a prolonged amount of time is that it's too so one. Is that the screen. Your brain reads the screen the light from the screen just like a son and our brains do not like the sun to be able to go to sleep so we have. This thing called. Melatonin are brain's melatonin a hormone of darkness and it makes us sleep. People take pills of melatonin but we have in our brains naturally and melatonin comes out when the light goes out or the sun goes down. If you're staring at a screen your brain thinks the sun is still out. And that's the problem so you're making your sleepiness hormone melatonin surpressed and we've seen in data that it can actually take an hour longer for some people to fall asleep. The quality of sleep can be worsened. If you have a prolonged exposure to blue light from screens

Insomnia Shelby Patricia Depression UAE
The Simple Yet Transformative Power of Breathwork

The Essential Oil Revolution

05:46 min | 2 months ago

The Simple Yet Transformative Power of Breathwork

"Hired him here with jin broil who is an essential oil specialist breath. Work instructor am health coach. She helps individuals restore and optimize their health by calming the nervous system reducing stress and awakening their inner healer. She recognizes that in over stimulated nervous system compromised gut health and suppressed emotions lead to imbalances throughout the mind body and spirit. Jin combines the healing power of breath work essential oils other holistic modalities to help clients create a lifestyle of health vitality and freedom gin and welcome to the show. It's so great to have you here. Thank you mantha here. Who i really wanted to have you on the show because i love this topic of breath work because it's a tool that we all have ray like you don't have to buy anything you don't have to go to the store or train for however long hours to learn how to use your breath to feel better right. It's so powerful it is. It is one of of the things that we have built with. Anna's and you know we just haven't been taught how to use it in certain ways that promotes healing and restoration but yes life giving tool and when we bring awareness to it and consciously breeze we can we can spark so many benefits from that and like you said it's available to us all the time it's free. It's it's an us south one of the easiest things that we can incorporate absolutely so it had a new come to discover breath work in your own life. Yeah so. I got into the holistic health world about ten years ago and like many of us that start down that natural help path oftentimes. It's when we're trying to solve our own health challenges or that of a loved one and that was the case for me. I have been at the time experiencing chronic digestive shoes for a number of years and just never did anything about it just managed at the best i could. And then it started kind of stemming into other symptoms anxiety and hormone imbalances and other things. And at that time you know the my late twenties and i was working in pharmaceutical sale. And i knew. I really believe in that conventional model medicine. That's all i really knew. And i thought it offered all of the solutions to all l. mets. But when it didn't for me i was kind of forced to look elsewhere and i started reading books on nutrition and that led into this whole world of alternative medicine and vocational medicine. Integrative medicine and holistic health and it opens my eyes to all of these other options and solutions and it sparks passion in me and i ended up going back to school to study integrative nutrition and from there i discovered essential oil to j. incorporated into my own daily practice and then currently use my clients because i find them to be so powerful and then through all of that to you know it really is a journey. I stumbled upon breath work after coming up in conversation multiple times and making okay. What exactly is breath work. Like i've heard of like deep breathing and in certain style of breathing what is an actual bradford practice. And so i was out in california. The time and i attended a few different styles of breath work classes and was blown away by the power of breathing in certain pattern for an extended period of time. And what that can do for your mental wellness your emotional wellness physical wellness and just calming the nervous system. Just truly leaving. You feeling just restored and lighter and free and happier just through breathing and though i dove into my own personal bradford practice and through that really felt the call to become an instructor. Share this with other people. Because i think it's something that is not why as widespread needs to be and it can offer so many benefits to just anybody. Yeah i really want to dive into a central breath work and go hand in hand and i know that it's such a beautiful relationship between the two and it can be but but i tell me who could benefit from from breath work and do they need to know anything coming in or you know what can it help. And what can help. It can help so much honestly. The type of breath work that i teach is called. Soma bre you don't need to know a whole lot coming into it. You don't need to train for it. You know you know. We're we're really breathing in a rhythmic diaphragm. Matic form for most of the practice. And then we do some breath holding as well so in terms of what it can help with and and who it can help. I mean everything from from supporting physical health along with emotional health and mental health. So it really helps you know through calming the nervous system getting out of that fight or flight. Response that survival mode. We are able to activate appear sympathetic nervous system and thaddeus estate in which we heal k and and that's a state in which we restore and so so. This breath work really help. Balance the nervous system and get

Jin Broil Mantha JIN Anna Mets Bradford United States California Matic
"nervous system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"nervous system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"Release it a little more with each..

"nervous system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"nervous system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"Ear perhaps. I'll Guy Gio through two rounds of this breath, and then you take it from there. Making sure to sit in stillness. After. You do this breathing technique. An how? Why. To. Very. Far. Fi. Hold. Two! Three. Four. Xl, Two. Three Four. Fi-. In. Accent..

"nervous system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"nervous system" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"So as you settle yourself down to day. To get ready. To immerse yourself. An inner peace. began. To notice your breath. Each inhale through year now. oxygenating your body. Feeling the cool refreshing air enter your house. Absorbing yourself in the beautiful Pazos between the inhale. And exhale. And really senior per. Year now is. Feeling the hot air. Letting go of attention and toxins..

"nervous system" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Right. The guy wrote in about a doctor writes, explain these two things he says, you have an auto nomadic nervous system of the human body and has two parts the sympathetic nervous system and the para sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system releases epinephrine. Epinephrine upper Nefer another stress hormones to prepare for what is often referred to as fight or flight response. Some of these things would like. Effects of these hormones increase heart rate, dilate pupils, vassal, constrict blood vessels, shunts blood to the core. Vital organs the skin becomes pale. Cool. Dia Foretich the vassal constriction of peripheral vessels as why person might feel cold after a stressful encounter with game animals dragon. On the other side, the para sympathetic nervous system is known as the rest and digest nervous system. The para sympathetic nervous system is active on the body is not under stress. I e eating fornicated now. Poor word choice on his part because fornicated means having sex outside of marriage. That. Yes, there could be probably only if you're married. Yep. I'm saying be having serious stressful. Let's say you fellow was or woman say a woman was married and the off at work. I feel it right now. He's got a little bit of bad word choice with foreign accounting because he's saying when the body is not under stressed. I e eating fornicated eating. Yes. Fornicated? Isn't just synonymous with love making four indicating means marriage outside of sex outside of marriage. So a woman could be in a situation where she's. You know, like nervous about being discovered by her. Oh, man. Dragon which could make it stressful would then involve the other side of the nervous system. Yeah. Orders. Like, you got the fight and flight going on because you're for I think he said love making which is that that word is makes people uncomfortable. So the Paris nervous system is active when the body is not under stressed. I e eating lovemaking or in this case pushing out a grumpy the act of bearing down to defecate stimulates Vagit nerve, which is part of the para sympathetic nervous system. When the Paris empathetic nervous system is stimulated you get Vaso dilation to peripheral blood vessels, therefore increase blood flow.

sympathetic nervous system epinephrine fornicated Paris
"nervous system" Discussed on I Don't Get It

I Don't Get It

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on I Don't Get It

"Yeah so i think one of the best things to do is to do what works for you you know because when you're having a panic attack what works for one person is going to actually make another person anxious definitely so a lot of people say oh well i know that shoeing on ice is the thing that like helps me to like interrupt the panic attack okay great so join ice what are some examples of things people do so it may or may not work for anyone die for matic breathing i think is a really good one so when you're nervous system you know really what a panic attack is is really a surge of stress hormones and it's it's the it's the sympathetic nervous system taking over and just surging way too fast so when that happens the sympathetic nervous system because it's thinking it's preparing you to run away for entire it's thinking that needs more oxygen so you breathing's going to get way too fast so instead of the becoming inhalation dominant you want to shift your brain to become explanation dominant so really simple way to do that and this is great even people who don't have panic attacks is to make your ex hail twice as long as you're inhale so i recommend three six breath so just inhale to the kind of three let's do one two three xl one two three four five six you see how out so it feels so foreign right because we're used to like right but that out breath and you can it doesn't have to be exact to my count but just make the x hell twice as long because that is going to it's going to trick your brain into thinking that the danger has passed and you're okay.

sympathetic nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"We don't we don't treat fibromyalgia we don't treat organ system disorders i don't treat these things rights when you come in here and say i need you to treat me for fibromyalgia i will say why don't do that here but why do is i look at the spine busy is there any damage a throughout the nervous system on the bones the nerves themselves that might be causing the fact that your brains at being able to communicate rate it's an over firing problem so we just damp the nerve signals in the brain that say out i feel pain out i feel pain out i feel pain out i feel pain what an arch tell the brain to be quiet and i'm like why is the nervous system over active why why is the nervous system over is their damage on those nerve that's not allowing the brain tim communique out to it needs to go because when you're thinking the heart doesn't need any less messages the lungs don't need any less messages but your brain is having to work overtime to get those messages out to have those organ systems function but it's not just those organ systems it goes everywhere through else out because you think about four go a great example t one thirty four so if you feel on the base of your neck that bump that's typically for the average person t one field that bump and three bumps down that's st won 234 those four bumps go directly nerve wise out to your heart and your lungs your heart is t one through before your lungs are teeth 234 those are also the nerves that go across his shoulders underneath the scapula and start to go down your arms so when you look at gray i've got shoulder pain the points on the back of my neck hurts so bad even tender to the touch right where clothes bother you will your body's trying to send all of these signals out your heart but it's not just sending out there those nerves are also going down through the shoulders down to the arms sooner like we have all of this extra of course it's not just going out it's going up to two everywhere else chew it's not just the oregon's it's the it's.

fibromyalgia nervous system oregon
"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"So with sympathy exit you a you have a creature that did mainly know sucks on tung juice 'attaches is of the stump while the illicit tadpole goes far beyond that the the lifted tadpoles replacing the central organ of the nervous system uh it's it's quite appropriate to think of this is an active kills the host but it really serves as a sort of of of parasitism brave the body continues to live i'll be in a different form in meaning natural world parasites inflict behavioural and physical changes on their host it also gives us a rough evolutionary idea of where the elicits came from our would have come from a natural system right brain replacing parasites that eventually transcendent in something greater now so any if you really think about it like they have to even though like mind flares best operate in the dark in hide in attack they have to come into contact with other humanoid species because otherwise there just going to only exist as tadpole farright they have to 50s humans for bodies they after he's humans for food it's because also you can think of it this way so the the pierre acidic form that goes inside the the host is it physically eating the brain from the outside from the inside out may but then as adults they have to crack open sculls and get brains of you know it in a different way yeah yeah exactly i wonder what happens if a mind flare eats a prioninfected brain.

nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"You know what and how what and why you know these practices in tools have worked for me and then it first testing among all the all the soft kennesaw and then to be able to presented in the form this somewhat simple and pretty easy to understand so bet anyway so it became pretty clear to me that one of the coolest things about the breath was this ability to really develop a much heightened sense of sensitivity right now course were realizing that this is the hotter guy you know the breath art of really experiencing that efren nervous system and the and the what you described as the bundle of nerves from the vagus nerve bundled down in the donton in that are you know the belly region and so when you develop that deep breathing pattern net deep circular ores tactical breathing pattern and you maintain deep awareness of the sensations and including imagery that kind of a rise than essentially your tapping into that belly brain and then of course the heart brain the heart mind is a different set of sensations and feelings but the same it's developed in the same way your heart your heart is also access through the breath different than the belly right so it's really interesting and i learned that primarily through my sealed training because of the experiences of extreme fear elicited by the danger associated with a firefighter with jumping out of an airplane or being stuck under a ship at night and having though literally go back to the breath to saved my life and to avoid danger and to experience.

kennesaw nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Every day at shares and trying to think less of what my ideologies are on the world and how i experience it and just listen to what a person's saying the words they're saying and then what they're telling me what they're telling me about how they view the world because of what that experience you know which but you also have a central nervous system i assume that you have you have a central nervous yes you have you have you have the human thing yes you have a brain you have you ever spine you have all these things are and so when you're up on stage and you're seeing in these songs that are so meaningful to you and and again this is not about this is not about and application of ego this is about sharing great this is about a common algae of experience chef who however when you do look in the front row in a nato this happens it your shows you look in the front row people are crying people are having a very hard not hard time but there be no the regretting very emotional listen to what you're saying what is your central nervous system say is that ever heard i think i'm more just feel i used to feel sorry like apologised like i didn't mean to make you cry laugh again no you're find people people come to me in the match it will say i cried all night of your show and i say i'm sorry but the response always celic knows get k because we need to cry and i more just and it makes me smile to see people singing along to see people with their eyes closed because i try to just think man i hope that they're experiencing the joy that on experiencing because now the songs are organisms that can take on new shape nina i really like talking to you yeah thanks all i took native what are gonna play next.

nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Our fear responses modular or condition in other words are our fear responses and are monster fears instinct she will born into us or the just learned in conditioned by culture and experience and just to rephrase from the beginning i think one thing we can eliminate is that it's quite obvious that at least some of our fears are conditioned or learned like there is no way you were born with a fear of airplanes right uh that's not part of your evolutionary heritage so though you might have you know you might have an inborn fear of heights you could see here could not heart of evolutionary hair like silver machines filled with other humans right barreling through the sky right so there might be instincts will elements that go into that fear but the fear itself the content there is clearly conditioned or learned but the real question is are any of our fears modular or instincts you will or the are they all conditioned or learned so asthma kicks off his favorite vice by premature stating the obvious fear exists in our bodies and minds yeah fearful stimuli stimulates this sympathetic nervous system so perhaps a freeze in the face of fear maybe you'll flee maybe you'll you'll suddenly have this burst of bravery in return on a fight but the object of terror gives as a physical jolt and it demands reaction and he also points on tuesday strong hormonal component entailing the corticotropinreleasing hormone or c r h cortisol and adrenaline asthma points to a study in fact in which scientists inserted a gene in mice that makes crh resulting in more fearful mice or removing it to make quote an extremely fearless mouse i would i would venture to say that both prospects are horrifying.

sympathetic nervous system cortisol
"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"So okay those are some pretty good hypotheses for external stimulants that are causing lewis right pollution may be ergot what about something internal what if it's psychological so let's look at what's termed as mass psychogenic or mass socio genetic illness this term is used in epidemiology to refer to the rapid spread of illness signs and symptoms affecting members of a cohesive group originating from me nervous system disturbance involving xi tation loss or alteration of function whereby physical complaints that are exhibited unconsciously have no corresponding organic set of causes now this is thought to be related to conversion disorder where symptoms like for instance blindness paralysis in other neurological symptoms are caused by psychological conflicts not physiological stimuli so this could be used in the context of the actual credible threat that's provoking the anxiety is pennywise right it for instance it is goes along the lines that sometimes people get psychologically freaked out when they smell a noxious odor if they fear that they're going to be under some kind of chemical attack anyways so what's interesting is that most physicians are less knowledgeable about this uh than they are in terms of like individual cases of hysteria the actual like epidemic hysteria hasn't really uh become common knowledge in our medical fields yet so this is despite over the fact that there are two hundred published accounts of mass responses to situations that involved either suspected poisonings or other events and unfortunately the impact of such events is either under reported or under appreciated so again this could potentially explain what's going on and dairy why because it's difficult to recognize actual outbreaks of societa genic illness because they're so diverse nature in fact.

lewis nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"So just like that indivisible things there are ways of dividing had that are now under unintuitive and i would suggest especially for this episode what do you think this is one of the most important ones to go back to y'all my gosh yes yes i would say that in our discussion of consciousness i think the crux of it or at one of the crux is essentially is understanding information theory and understanding how information can be represented as a bit origin from said on average even a fraction of a bit also we're going to talk about um a little bit of physics mostly our discussion physics can be limited to a the nervous system which we deduct ride in the recent episode ups of fourteen actually because the visit the nerve system is designed to predict physical phenomenon one of the other episodes we have or you eat a arguably a couple of our episodes are about the hardware aspect of computation episode four which came right after uh too much information is called digital evolution on of course that was all about the evolution of computing hardware now all of our senses which contribute our which which which give information to our brain which then processes and and we experience consciousness as a form of the processing of information all of our senses are in a sense computation hardware um you know what we've got our eyes our ears our sense of touch smell and taste all of those are hardware that taken information so that was a very very relevant episode and we can certainly use the aspects of that episode we're talking about the brain and the nurses nervous.

nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"So synthetic andrew johns as they hit the brain they sort of the occupy the primary receptors that male hormones workout a depend on your baseline a development uh you're either more or less sensitive to those signals if you think of what agents do they kind of a motivate people to act externally in the world so uh they can provide energy confidence they make you feel really strong and impervious to pain they also start to change the signaling a in the opiates system so part of that confidence or invincibility really comes from a true kind of knockout of of pain signals that are coming up through the central nervous system so what you have is a kind of perfect storm of competitiveness you have increased muscle strength and power and you have a brain that's primed to feel less pain on an act more aggressively outwardly on the world now take that away when you take uh sort of that unnatural stimulation away all the of the natural ability to sort of maintain those behaviors in that action off all with those of reduced levels of of male hormones okay so tom all right so we've decided we're building the perfect peace to an attempt bringing these the two together uh if you then say mount some athletes have different sensitivities to certain things you putting this system in terms of doping and then how does that affect them going on through the competition and recovery.

andrew johns nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"So synthetic andrew johns as they hit the brain they sort of the occupy the primary receptors that male hormones workout a depend on your baseline a development uh you're either more or less sensitive to those signals if you think of what agents do they kind of a motivate people to act externally in the world so uh they can provide energy confidence they make you feel really strong and impervious to pain they also start to change the signaling a in the opiates system so part of that confidence or invincibility really comes from a true kind of knockout of of pain signals that are coming up through the central nervous system so what you have is a kind of perfect storm of competitiveness you have increased muscle strength and power and you have a brain that's primed to feel less pain on an act more aggressively outwardly on the world now take that away when you take uh sort of that unnatural stimulation away all the of the natural ability to sort of maintain those behaviors in that action off all with those of reduced levels of of male hormones okay so tom all right so we've decided we're building the perfect peace to an attempt bringing these the two together uh if you then say mount some athletes have different sensitivities to certain things you putting this system in terms of doping and then how does that affect them going on through the competition and recovery.

andrew johns nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Ensue are other juries i think we should just jump to this some people though case weaken can divide theories about pyramids into three rough buckets accra there's the the bucket of power they built by and there's the bucket of what were the four and then there's the other one which is what do they do because some people young people who believe in a secret geometry jampel i am people other people who believe that the shapes or the policeman of these structures has some sort of significance in a in a larger sense raked a you can find people who believe that the pyramids were built along laylines l e y right which is sort of the belief and laylines is the belief that the planet has something like its own nervous system and that these lines aggregate some sort of energy or power than people who have tested this feel that that is not scientifically valid right they say okay there's the secretion of energy or you stand in stonehenge on the the right time of the lunar year or the solar year and you you feel like there's some great thing happening but there's no measurement of it right is known to there's no heat differential oldest not massive geothermal venter anything were definitely not fully discounting vat but we are saying there is no scientific evidence to prove its existence slits bounce around these theories little bit i know i know you've been dying to talk about this.

nervous system
"nervous system" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on WRVA

"The socalled relax eight nerve with it them at the top of your mouth rate we thought powell meets your heart power you know how it gets harder in part and a naked faltering vat rate where those coup park me you have a connection to the red relax nation nervous system in fact aging yogi easter meditate by putting their tongue right on that area because that activate this relaxed the nervous system that's a that's a wonderful strategy for any kind of a threat management uh as far as uh uh what with this afternoon after reflect right added reflux is a loose valve at a loose think there that connects the prophet get to the to the digestive tract this thing through luthan when we eat the wrong food or were under threat to focusing on the kinds of foods that caused the reef walk very important relaxing the the body while you're eating and while you're prop processing your food is very important that is why religions and ancient cultures always say grave before they eat when you think grave you're actually activating the pair sympathetic nervous system praying and really yes praying and being grateful and and being loving and all of the thing we call the virtues are really about being faith about activating the pair sympathetic nervous system when religious people talk about being saved what they really mean as being faith we need to access the safety mechanism and wanted to key ways to do it is by focusing on divinity your spirituality or got or whatever you want to call it so acid reflected a manifestation of the body in distract calming the body down it's very important and once again we go back to the microbiome the bacteria in the gut we have the wrong kinds of bacteria proliferating the gut gases can be released and this can cause a exacerbate the problem backtracked of the foods that you're eating you digest at the port a relax your body as you digest your food never eat while you're on the rauner eating business meetings reading when you're angry.

nervous system sympathetic nervous system powell
"nervous system" Discussed on The Nutrition Heretic

The Nutrition Heretic

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"nervous system" Discussed on The Nutrition Heretic

"I think a person's time is better spent looking at the big picture and if we take all this time in focus just on the food peace we can't focus on well okay relationships meditation by a movement whenever it's gonna be for me whether it's wage sir intervals or yoga or all of the above or i love the fact that you said movement not exercise because the exact like what act i tell people is well you know it's not it's not about just like this route exercises moving and also breathing which is often overlooked well end and something that creative than and falls our whole body whether be dance or music or your something of that nature not on the other side regional level vibrational an on a really are no maybe this isn't the mundane level but of a of a study done some studies functional raji unum start with the functional neurologist couple of years ago he was saying physically playing an instrument should feel good many said the better you get an up you spend time to there will be a pleasurable feeling by an act of playing itself whether you get the notes are not what you play well or not the will get a point become a point where it feels good and that feel good feedback into the central nervous system is a hugely important principle for brain health brain so it really gets us of our bodies really focusing our ability to player pages on the piano or you'll breathe well when we're working on our noon on roofs or what have so that's a big deal i applied if people can do something like that it's just incredibly enriching and the brains fire butter that's that's fantastic now on one thing that does this is this is going to fall gold more towards your acupuncture you mentioned that are you use acupuncture for breast disorders yes talk to us a little bit about that.

nervous system