5 Burst results for "Nelson Poynter"

"nelson poynter" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:41 min | 8 months ago

"nelson poynter" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Good Morning America. Mrs Katz Roundtable trying catching here. Well, it's all over. No more coverage of the news cycle on the election. That's good news. I got tired of watching her watching it. Well with us today from the Point Institute, and the purpose of the Point Institute is journalism is we have this Kelly McBride on. She's been there for 20 years just about and she's gonna talk about journalism. Kelly, How are you? I'm good. How are you? I am fine. Tell everybody in America who the Pointer Institute is and what you do. We are a non profit. We were founded in 1975 by Nelson Poynter, who was the owner of a local newspaper here in Florida, the state ST Petersburg Times. It's now called the Tampa Bay Times. He created the Pointer Institute as a mechanism for providing professional development in advancement. To the journalism world, and so what we do is provide leadership thought, leadership and training. We also are the home of political act and the international fact checking network. And media wise and those are all divisions of pointer that Help citizens navigate journalism, So we were small. We have 60 70 employees at any given time. But our mission is to elevate journalism in service of democracy. Know the American people? I believe, having a little bit of problem with that. As I told you when I we talked before eyes. I was watching four different screens for the other night and I was watching CNN. I was watching MSNBC and I was watching Fox. And I was watching the local news station, New York one, and I was like watching four different stories, and I grew up. You know how much older than you? I grew up in the days of Walter Cronkite when 92% of the American people Believe Walter Cronkite has to say, Do we have a problem in America right now? What happened in America is that that time that you talk about with Walter Cronkite was a time when there were Are fewer news outlets. And so as as a citizen, you had fewer choices to make about which news you would consume. And as a result, you had a much larger Proportion of the American public consuming all of the news outlets, so trust was not necessarily an issue. Because of a lot of things, including the invention of cable thean mention of the Internet, the invention of social media. We have created. 1000 times more news outlets, and as a result, they have in order to You find themselves against each other, have chosen lanes. So what you described just watching on TV. Three of those are news outlets that have chosen a specific lane and their cable news outlets. That broadcast 24 hours a day. And so that is a certain genre of news. That may be emblematic of all the other lanes that other news outlets have chosen. Or not, I mean, I think that there is a citizens. When we talk about our consumption. We tend to define them in those, especially the three lanes of You know, CNN? Considers itself middle of the road. I know not everybody does. MSNBC is definitely speaking to a liberal audience and Fox News was created. To serve a conservative audience. And so they I think the problem is in taking that framework and then trying to impose it on other parts of the news ecosystem that don't necessarily work. Like television news and the reason that we do that is because most Americans get their news from television. In fact, most Americans get their news from that fourth option that you just described Their local television station, and so so television tends to be the lens through which we as citizens. Warm our definitions of media. But it Z more nuance to the Met. To be sure, though, what you said about the trust problem is real right? There are lots and lots of studies and they show The citizens generally have a broad distrust of media. However, when you go deeper into the studies, what you find is that every citizen has a media outlet that he or she trusts. Right, So it's sort of like asking people about lawyers, right? Like nobody likes lawyers. But then, if you need a lawyer, you tend to find one that you can trust and the same is true of media. Um so at least trustworthy category that we would talk about Used car salesman waken do a whole show on that We could talk about Congress that way, too. Mm hmm. Yep. We absolutely can't be after Callie, the original founders of CBS Bill Paley. I knew him. Uh, David Saunders off of RC, a rain channel for NBC. They took pride in making sure they're telling the American people the truth. I think I think most journalists and journalism companies take pride in making sure that they're telling the American people the truth. Let's talk about this court to the other picture. A lot of people get in news. On the Internet. They get it from Google. They get it from Facebook. They get it from Twitter, and I was shocked. That the president of the United States, they just come off now. Everybody's entitled to an opinion. What say you about that? Should they be regulated on that respect? Well, that's an existentially question right now for social media platforms, and I absolutely think that they should be responsible for the content that other people post on their site now. I mean, we all agree on it. And But what are the boundaries of that responsibility there have been documented cases of mob behavior. It has been instigated by political figures around the world that has led to, um genocides is India Me and Mar. There are there are documented instances and in most cases, the social media platforms where the Could they be on the speaker would we only have a minute left? Yeah, he the same restrictions on radio television cable. But everybody, uh, In other words, boundaries boundaries. You can't yell fire in a theater, for example. Those restrictions are generally civil restrictions, right? They're not legal restrictions. They come in the form of civil penalties afterward, which means that they don't have their slow to evolve. And I do think that that they should have the same restrictions. I agree with you. I just want Better reporting by everybody. And and I support the point Institute whenever I can. Week was your pushing ethics, don't you? Yeah, That's my job. Yeah, I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center for ethics and leadership. So that's what I specialize in this media ethics. That's wonderful. I'm glad I'm glad you're doing that. Do you think? Well, I mean, we have to get better is that it was that we have We have to evolve the media ecosystem. We have to keep evolving it. We're not going to go back to that point in time where Walter Cronkite said. The news and everybody believed it and and there were flaws in that system, right?.

Walter Cronkite America Point Institute CNN Pointer Institute Kelly McBride Fox News Mrs Katz MSNBC New York Nelson Poynter Craig Newmark Center Tampa Bay Times Florida Facebook Twitter Google Bill Paley
"nelson poynter" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"nelson poynter" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"The morning america. This is the catch roundtable. Chunk catsuits here. Well it's all over no more coverage of than the new cycle and the election. That's good news. I got tired of watching watching it well with us. Today from the poynter institute and the purpose of the point institute is journalism is we have kelly mcbride And she's been here for twenty years just about and She's gonna talk about journalism. Kelly how are you good. How are you. i'm flying. Tell everybody in. America who point is it is and what you do. We are a nonprofit with found in nineteen seventy five by nelson poynter who the owner of a local newspaper here in florida. The saints saint petersburg times. It's now called the tampa bay times He created the poynter institute as a mechanism for providing professional development and advancement to the journalism world. And so what we do is provide leadership thought leadership and training we also are the home of politifact and the international checking network and media wise and those are all divisions of pointers that help citizens malvo gate journalism. So we were were small. We have sixty seventy employees at any given time but our mission is to elevate journalism in service of democracy. The american people. I believe are having a little bit of problem with that as i told you when we talked before Is i was watching four different screens the other night and i was watching cnn. I was watching. Msnbc and i was watching fox. And i was watching the local news station new york one and i was like watching four different stories in i grew up. I'm much older than you. I grew up in days. Walter cronkite when ninety two percent of the american people. Believe walter cronkite has to say. Do we have a problem in america right now. What what's happened in america. Is that that time that you talk about with walter. Cronkite was a time when there were far fewer news outlets and so as a citizen you had fewer choices to make about which news you would consume and as a result you had a much. Larger proportion of the american public consuming. All of the news outlet so trust was not necessarily an issue because of a lot of things including the invention of cable the invention of the internet The invention of social media we have created a thousand times more news and as a result they have in order to define themselves against each other have chosen lanes and so what you described just watching on tv. Three of those are news outlets that have chosen a specific lane and their cable news outlets that broadcasts twenty four hours a day and so that is a certain genera of news that maybe emblematic of all the other lanes that other news outlets have chosen or not. I mean i. I think that there is a citizens when we talk about our consumption. We tend to define them in those especially those three lanes of you know. Cnn considers itself middle of the road. I know not everybody does. Msnbc is definitely Speaking to a liberal audience and fox news was created to serve a conservative audience and so They i think the problem is in.

kelly mcbride florida Kelly twenty years Three ninety two percent fox Today sixty seventy employees America three lanes nelson poynter twenty four hours a day Walter cronkite poynter institute four different stories Cnn one fox news nineteen seventy
"nelson poynter" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"nelson poynter" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of over twenty years Roy black is defended numerous clients on charges ranging from murder to drug smuggling securities fraud money laundering internet sex crimes mail fraud and tax evasion he is also the author of black's law a book that recounts the strategies and tactics he employed to safeguard the freedom of four of his clients looking at his notable experiences Roy black received an acquittal of William Kennedy Smith on rape charges in Palm Beach Florida a dismissal of a matter involving Albertson's ink when the state of Florida charge the fortune five hundred company with manslaughter in the death of a shoplifter and acquittal of a Miami jewelry supplier and his sales manager on charges they laundered more than eight million in cocaine profits for Colombian drug lords why blacks served as an NBC news legal analyst appearing regularly on the today show and other N. B. C. and M. S. N. B. C. news programs he is also a frequent guest commentator on legal issues from national television network news shows on CBS CNN NBC and fox Mr black receive the Nelson Poynter award for voluntary representation of prisoners on Florida's death row and he is also taught advanced criminal evidence at the university of Miami school of law for over thirty years Tom hi everybody Hey thanks for coming thanks for coming back to us we we love to have you and let me tell you something Dave Dino so far if the wonderful guess we've had I've never said this is the best of there would be a real problem with that because we probably want to have somebody else on some days maybe is the second best and quite honestly all of our shows really focused on the civil aspect of of just the of the justice system not necessarily the what we refer to as the criminal aspect of the justices for the most part yes and today I'm going to violate some role hi Dave Dino he is the best there's no finer criminal defense lawyer in the country it's been borne out not only by his results not one result the result after result after result it's also been borne out where everybody has to say about it one legal analysis says this no one is well prepared no one is as well prepared or has the presence in court of Roy black according to sources nation wide he is uniquely gifted in front of juries and is so good that he is famous for it his creativity resourcefulness and fine cross examination stand out it's like poetry in motion wow and this is so is results let's look at his results as results saying that and then the man says that he's a wonderful sweet human being when you talked about his prior life and of all the work that he did as a defense lawyer of indigence and so forth making sure the Richie fairness you really have a person here who is truly extraordinary although he practices all over the country of these more in Florida than out here we're trying to get a more out here and it was great of him to come to be with us today and right black welcome to the show well thanks to my Noam in serious trouble now after that build up on bail to get cut down to size pretty good and I'm sitting here between two of the best trial lawyers in the United States between Tom and Brian so I know I'm in real trouble the cross examination is going to be brutal but I'll do the best I can how did you get into that wait a minute you know I understand I went to law school okay and I thought boy I saw some verdicts come down as a young kid against General Motors who did something bad it cetera I thought boy this this is great you know to be a trial lawyer on the civil side now something happened to you why in the world did you go into this different sort of path it it's interesting that you should ask that Tom because I I actually wrote an essay for one of these eight BA books on why I became a lawyer and I came as a well known author wrote the story but I when I was a kid I was growing up in New York New Jersey Connecticut and my stepfather was British then one day he comes home and says we're moving to Kingston Jamaica we put all our furniture on a boat consider making could you imagine we go down the Kinks and we move to the top of the tallest mountain behind Kingston and I went to this English prep school milk for those of you who know anything about the English system of education brutality is the number one selling point so I went to this English prep school and I remember that there was this one professor there who made me every day you get up to the blackboard a to do arithmetic problems in English poems since tuppence sixpence all of which I didn't know mainly because he hated Americans and I I had the sense of what it was like to be the underdog for the first time in my life and I hated Katie power in Haiti petty bureaucracy and what they can do to people I know that that you probably have some of the same feelings and that's one reason I wanted to be a lawyer and I wanted to represent people who were put upon by the system who are powerless who will the government went after the local police went after who could never get a break in a job you know these kind of people that just could never get ahead to live paycheck to paycheck and I love being a public defender representing people like that because I felt like I was really doing something that was worth while and so that's sort of my Freudian examination of why I became a criminal lawyer okay so you started off from the public defender's office and tried a billion cases so so we had to try I don't know how many I tried once three jury trials in one week I mean it was a great place for getting experience because you think you rarely had a chance to prepare you barely got to talk to the client and then they stuck you in a trial and you know those kind of skills that you get from that or are invaluable because you have to be able to think on your feet you have to be able to react with going on you have to be able to develop themes and cross examine witnesses without a lot of preparation and so you know you you build a arsenal of talents that it's hard to get anywhere else can truly this whole game in the law businesses about cross examination well I I love cross examination that's that's where it's at yeah I know what I I always tell people but when it comes down to it the only thing I can really do is cross examined all those other things sound great and I hire people to do the you know what I like to do I always tell people I always look good because I always hire people smarter than I am to do jobs that I can't do very well or don't want to do and then I do like the cross examination or what have you when I'm the hero and I try to get other people to do all the work you are listening to champions of justice and that is the voice of our guest attorney Roy black your host today are Tom Girardi and Brian tennis Brian well Roy what was it like going from the prep school with the English professor to take it on the United States government in the FBI and everything they bring with them and all the forces that you have to go.

murder fraud Roy black securities fraud
"nelson poynter" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"nelson poynter" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Numerous clients on charges ranging from murder to drug smuggling securities fraud money laundering internet sex crimes mail fraud and tax evasion he is also the author of black's law a book that recounts the strategies and tactics he employed to safeguard the freedom of four of his clients looking at his notable experiences Roy black received an acquittal of William Kennedy Smith on rape charges in Palm Beach Florida a dismissal of a matter involving Albertson's ink when the state of Florida charge the fortune five hundred company with manslaughter in the death of a shoplifter and acquittal of a Miami jewelry supplier and his sales manager on charges they laundered more than eight million in cocaine profits for Colombian drug lords why blacks served as an NBC news legal analyst appearing regularly on the today show and other N. B. C. and M. S. N. B. C. news programs he is also a frequent guest commentator on legal issues from national television network news shows on CBS CNN NBC and fox Mr black receive the Nelson Poynter award for voluntary representation of prisoners on Florida's death row and is also taught advanced criminal evidence at the university of Miami school of law for over thirty years Tom hi everybody Hey thanks for coming thanks for coming back to us we are we love to have you and let me tell you something Dave Dino so far if the wonderful guess we've had I've never said this is the best there would be a real problem with that because we probably want to have somebody else on some days maybe is the second best and quite honestly all of our shows really are focused on the civil aspect of of just the of the justice system not necessarily the what we refer to as the criminal aspect of the justices for the most part yes and today I'm going to violate some rule hi Dave Dino he is the best there's no finer criminal defense lawyer in the country it's been borne out not only by his results not one result the result after result after result it's also been borne out where everybody has to say about it one legal analysis since this no one is well prepared no one is as well prepared or has the presence in court of Roy black according to sources nation wide he is uniquely gifted in front of juries and is so good that he is famous for it his creativity resourcefulness and fine cross examination stand out it's like poetry in motion wow and this is so is results let's let's look at his results his results saying that and then the man says that he is a wonderful sweet human being when you talked about his prior life and of all the work that he did as a defense lawyer of indigents and so forth making sure the Richie fairness you really have a person here who is truly extraordinary although he practices all over the country of these more in Florida than out here we're trying to get a more out here and it was great of him to come to be with us today and right black welcome to the show well thanks to my Noam in serious trouble now after that build up on bail to get cut down to size pretty good and I'm sitting here between two of the best trial lawyers in the United States between Tom and Brian so I know I'm in real trouble the cross examination is going to be brutal but I'll do the best I can how did you get into that wait a minute you know I understand I went to law school okay and I thought boy I saw some verdicts come down as a young kid against General Motors who did something bad it's cetera I thought boy this this is great you know to be a trial lawyer on the civil side now something happened to you why in the world did you go into this different sort of path it it's interesting that you should ask that Tom because I I actually wrote an essay for one of these ABA books on why I became a lawyer and I came as a well known author the rules the story but I when I was a kid I was growing up in New York New Jersey Connecticut and my stepfather was British then one day he comes home and says we're moving to Kingston Jamaica we put all our furniture on a boat yet consider making could you imagine we go down the Kinks and we move to the top of the colts mountain behind Kingston and I went to this English prep school now for those of you who know anything about the English system of education brutality is the number one selling point so I went to this English prep school and I remember that there was this one professor there who made me every day you get up to the blackboard a to do arithmetic problems in English poems since tuppence sixpence all of which I didn't know mainly because he hated Americans and I I had this sense of what it was like to be the underdog for the first time in my life and I hated petty power in Haiti petty bureaucracy and what they can do to people I know that that you probably have some of the same feelings and that's one reason I wanted to be a lawyer and I wanted to represent people who were put upon by the system who are powerless who will the government went after the local police one after who could never get a break in a job you know these kind of people that just could never get ahead to live paycheck to paycheck and I love being a public defender representing people like that because I felt like I was really doing something that was worth while and so that's sort of my Freudian examination of why I became a criminal lawyer okay so you started off from the public defender's office and tried a billion cases so so we had to try I don't know how many I tried once three jury trials in one week I mean it was a great place for getting experience because you think you rarely had a chance to prepare you barely got to talk to the client and then they stuck you in a trial and you know those kind of skills that you get from that or are invaluable because you have to be able to think on your feet you have to be able to react with going on you have to be able to develop themes and cross examine witnesses without a lot of preparation and so you know you you build a arsenal of talents that it's hard to get anywhere else can truly this whole game in the law businesses about cross examination well I I love cross examination that's that's where it's at yeah I know what I I always tell people but when it comes down to it the only thing I can really do is cross examined all those other things sound great and I hire people to do the you know what I like to do I always tell people I always look good because I always hire people smarter than I am to do jobs that I can't do very well or don't want to do and then I do like the cross examination or what have you and I'm the hero and I try to get other people to do all the work you are listening to champions of justice and that is the voice of our guest attorney Roy black your host today are Tom Girardi and Brian tennis prime well Roy what was it like going from the prep school with the English professor to take it on the United States government in the FBI and everything they bring with them and all the forces that you have to go up.

murder fraud securities fraud black
"nelson poynter" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"nelson poynter" Discussed on 790 KABC

"States selected by his peers for inclusion in the best lawyers in America in consecutive additions for a span of over twenty years Roy black is defended numerous clients on charges ranging from murder to drug smuggling securities fraud money laundering internet sex crimes mail fraud and tax evasion he is also the author of black's law a book the recounts the strategies and tactics he employed to safeguard the freedom of four of his clients looking at his notable experiences Roy black received an acquittal of William Kennedy Smith on rape charges in Palm Beach Florida a dismissal of a matter involving Albertson's Inc when the state of Florida charge the fortune five hundred company with manslaughter in the death of a shoplifter and acquittal of a Miami jewelry supplier and his sales manager on charges they laundered more than eight million in cocaine profits for Colombian drug lords why blacks served as an NBC news legal analyst appearing regularly on the today show and other NBC and M. S. N. B. C. news programs he is also a frequent guest commentator on legal issues from national television network news shows on CBS CNN NBC and fox Mr black receive the Nelson Poynter award for voluntary representation of prisoners on Florida's death row and he is also taught advanced criminal evidence at the university of Miami school of law for over thirty years Tom hi everybody Hey thanks for coming thanks for coming back to us we up we love to have you and let me tell you something Dave Deena so far if the wonderful guess we've had I've never said this is the best there would be a real problem with that because we probably want to have somebody else on some days maybe is the second best and quite honestly all of our shows really focused on the civil aspect of of just the of the justice system not necessarily the what we refer to as the criminal aspect of the justices for the most part yes and today I'm going to violate some role hi Dave do you know he is the best there's no finer criminal defense lawyer in the country it's been borne out not only by his results not one result the result after result after result it's also been borne out what everybody has to say about it one legal analysis says this no one is well prepared no one is well prepared or has the presence in court of Roy black according to sources nationwide he is uniquely gifted in front of juries and is so good that he is famous for his creativity resourcefulness and fine cross examination stand out it's like poetry in motion wow and this is so is results so so let's look at his results as results saying that and then the man says that he's a wonderful sweet human being when you talked about his prior life and of all the work that he did as a defense lawyer of indigence and so forth making sure the Richie fairness you really have a person here who's truly extraordinary although he practices all over the country of these more in Florida than out here we're trying to get a more out here and it was great of him to come to be with us today and Roy black welcome to the show well thanks Tom I know him in serious trouble now after that build up bound to get cut down to size pretty good and I'm sitting here between two of the best trial lawyers in the United States between common Brian so I know I'm in real trouble the cross examination is going to be brutal but I'll do the best I can how did you get into that wait a minute you know I understand I went to law school okay and I thought boy if I saw some breaks come down as a young kid against General Motors who did something bad it cetera I thought boy this this is great you know to be a trial lawyer on the civil side now something happened to you why in the world did you go into this different sort of path you know it it it's interesting that you should ask that because I I actually wrote an essay for one of these eight BA books on why I became a lawyer and I can reserve well known author rolls the story but I when I was a kid I was growing up in New York New Jersey Connecticut and my stepfather was British then one day he comes home and says we're moving to Kingston Jamaica we put all our furniture on of mode yeah consider making could you imagine we go down the kings and we move to the top of the call it's mountain behind Kingston and I went to this English prep school mail for those of you who know anything about the English system of education brutality is the number one selling point so I went to this English prep school and I remember that there was this one professor there who made me every day get up to the blackboard a to do arithmetic problems in English pounds since tuppence sixpence all of which I didn't know mainly because he hated Americans and I I had the sense of what it was like to be the underdog for the first time in my life and I hated our in Haiti petty bureaucracy and what they can do to people I know that that you probably have some of the same feelings and that's one reason I wanted to be a lawyer and I wanted to represent people who were put upon by the system who are powerless who will the government went after the local police went after who could never get a break in a job you know these kind of people that just could never get ahead a live paycheck to paycheck and I love being a public defender representing people like that because I felt like I was really doing something that was worth while and so that's sort of my Freudian examination of why I became a criminal lawyer okay so you started off in the public defender's office and tried a billion cases so we had to try a I don't know how many yet I tried once three jury trials in one week I know it's a great place for getting experience because you think you rarely had a chance to prepare you barely got the talk of the quieter than the stock you want a trial and you know those kind of skills that you get from that are are invaluable because you have to be able to think on your feet you have to be able to react with going on you have to be able to develop themes and cross examine witnesses without a lot of preparation and so you know you you build a arsenal of talents that it's hard to get anywhere else can truly this whole game in the law business is about cross examination well I I love cross examination that's that's where it's at yeah I know what I I always tell people when it comes down to it the only thing I can really do was cross examined all those other things so great and I hire people to do the other one I like to do I always tell people I always look good because I always hire people smarter than I am to do jobs that I can't do very well or don't want to do and then I do like the cross examination or what have you and I'm the hero and I try to get other people to do all the work that's the voice of our guest attorney Roy black you're listening to champions of justice our.

America murder Roy black thirty years twenty years one week one day