35 Burst results for "Nelson Mandela"

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

01:54 min | Last week

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"New homes with habitat. For humanity we also have come to work side by side with the South African people. To learn about the culture and if possible cantered spirit it take it back to the states is accepting the sponsor ability doing the right thing and doing was supposed to be done i. find joy in giving a find joy in doing other people when I extend myself to other people it feels avoid. The delegation helped built three houses in just a week but it was meeting Mandela himself that stirred the real emotion and when he walked in you can. Literally feel his presence is powerful. It. is so powerful. We're not met him the first time just broke out into tears right then I just couldn't handle it. Everybody was in tears. What I felt it just means a lot to me. I can't imagine spending a third of my life in jail. And coming out and forgiving the people that put me there I wanNA help people realize what he realized what he helped me realize which is so much bigger than me. It's about us about everybody that shares this planet the spirit of Mandela's lives in me. Now it's like I can't shake me appreciate everything more everything. Thank you Mr Nelson Mandela for giving me this. Great. Honor to share your present with myself in the world. Impressive. But humble young. Lady. I'm Oprah Winfrey and you've been listening to super soul conversations the podcast you can follow super soul on instagram twitter and facebook. If you haven't yet go to apple podcasts and subscribe rate and review this podcast. Join me next week for another super soul conversation. Thank you for listening..

Mr Nelson Mandela Oprah Winfrey apple facebook instagram
South Africa's ruling party rejects Trump comment on Mandela

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:21 sec | Last month

South Africa's ruling party rejects Trump comment on Mandela

"Trump made crude disparaging remarks about Nelson Mandela has drawn an angry response from South Africa's ruling party. It's according to a book written by Trump's former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. He says that Mr Trump said, among other things, that Mandela was a terrible leader. A Nobel Prize winning Mandela, widely revered by all racial groups in South Africa,

Nelson Mandela Mr Trump South Africa Michael Cohen Nobel Prize
Ten Doors

Criminal

04:58 min | 2 months ago

Ten Doors

"We know now that they were following us for about a month. Cry To our we did. Notice strange things happening. But when you're working underground you are. For most of the time, you're a bit paranoid you. You kind of imagine that everyone is looking at you knows what you're doing. And looking back off to the arrest. We realized that they were following us for quite a while. In Nineteen Seventy, eight, twenty, nine year, old Tim Jenkin was active in the political efforts of South Africa's anti-apartheid movement. The country had been operating under apartheid for thirty years. A system that institutionalized racial segregation. The word apartheid means a partner. and. The government was controlled by white minority. Tim Jenkin White. He grew up in Cape Town. So I grew up under the situation with everything was divided. So. spatially, cities and towns divided the white areas. Black areas. So we went to white schools. Were black schools in black areas. Everything was separated even buildings had separate lifts for White People. For Black People. Talk said benches, white people and black people and certain beaches with designated for black. People. Most of the beaches with what people So. I just accepted eight. Because I didn't know any better I just assumed that the way things were. And then. Maneuver Twenty one years old the to the K.. He says, everyone he met their asked him what he thought about the fact that he lived in a country that was so racially segregated. He says he was actually confused. But then he started seeing programs on TV. Shows that would never have been broadcast in South Africa about the consequences of apartheid and at first I, didn't believe these These films that I was seeing. I thought it was all propaganda. After awhile, and after reading books that I couldn't obtain in South Africa. I began to realize the started thing is something quite terrible. I'd be living. Positive it. Really maintaining it in the sense and not understanding. What's Black South Africans? was suffering. He, returned to South Africa, and started studying sociology at the University of Cape Town. There, he became friends with another white student named. Stephen Lee. And started cheering books that he had brought back from the UK. anti-apartheid. Books and political histories that were censored in South Africa. At. This time the most prominent anti-apartheid organization was the African National Congress also known as the ANC. Nelson Mandela was a member of the ANC. By the nineteen seventies, the organization was banned in South Africa that had been declared unlawful. Seen by the White Minority Threat to. Public. Order. They operated underground and Tim and Stephen had heard that if you wanted to get involved, you could try contacting their office in. London. So the two of US traveled to the. UK. and. Simply went and knocked on the door. and. It was quite an amusing. Incident. because. The person who received US Said please just sit down there and you'll be wasted. Then he went into his office and type something on a piece of paper. The piece of paper said. You should not come here. Please meet me at the cafe around the corner in half an hour. So that's what we did. Tim and Stephen met with members of the ANC several times. And they asked to be put to work back home in south? Africa, the said Okay you can go back and sit up your print shop. And we'd need to teach you various things like security matters, how to conduct yourself in the underground. And showed us a few other. Innovative. Devices for for distributing leaflets and information one of these was. The is the leaflet bomb. It's not really a bomb. It was really just. Kind of exploding device. That would kill. Hundreds of leaflets up into the air, and then they would rain down on a crowd target crowd somewhere. So we went back to South Africa. With this knowledge. And set up shop.

Tim Jenkin White South Africa Black People White People Tim Jenkin Stephen Lee African National Congress Stephen Cape Town TIM UK. United States Partner. Nelson Mandela University Of Cape Town London
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

03:48 min | 2 months ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Nelson Mandela Africa Juba South Sudan South Africa Nelson Mandela University George Mason Siebel Villa Nessin Ariana Microsoft Andy United States President Trump Director
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

04:32 min | 2 months ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"This week I have a special guest, sea. Ebola Mandela. WHO's the great grandson of Nelson. Mandela. Lilla is a PhD in peace and conflict. Studies, in continues his grandfather's legacy of advocating for human rights and shares his perspective on the stomach nature of racism with us. He recently wrote a chapter in the book for the sake. Of Peace. African perspectives, on. Racism? Justice. And peace in America. Sibylla will also share with us his perspective on what we can each do to decolonize our own minds and the lessons that he learned from his grandfather's character. He speaks to us today from south, Sudan where he works. Welcome Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Juba South Sudan Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa Africa Nelson Mandela University Nessin Lilla Sibylla George Mason Siebel Villa Ariana America Microsoft Andy United States President Trump
UN chief: World 'at the breaking point' due to inequalities

Get Well Naturally with Dr. Joseph Honigman, Dr. Gideon Orbach and Jeffrey Niznik

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

UN chief: World 'at the breaking point' due to inequalities

"U N Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez, delivering the Nelson Mandela annual lecture where he made a sweeping call to end the global inequalities that sparked this year's a massive anti racism protests and have been further exposed by the Corona virus pandemic. Gutierrez says that Cove in 19 has been likened to an X ray revealing fractures in the fragile skeleton of the societies We have built. The speech took aim at racism, as well as the vast inequality of wealth. Gutierrez says the world's 26 26 richest people hold as much wealth as half the global population. He also says developing countries and especially African nations are underrepresented underrepresented. At the levels of power at places like the World Bank and the U. N. Security

Antonio Gutierrez Nelson Mandela World Bank Cove U. N. Security
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:42 min | 4 months ago

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

"I'm. Where going back to daily bread. archetypes are perennial teams that reside at the level of the collective universal source. They are representations of our collective soul's yearnings imagination. And deepest is is. These archetypes have existed in every culture in every tradition since the beginning of time. archetypes, our ancient gods themes, motifs stories literature. Art Paintings. Even paintings on the was of caves from longtime ago and they embody. Symbolically. Themes of expanded or higher consciousness, you can say symbolic representations. Of A particular aspect. Of The divine intelligence archetypes and Forms and shapes the there soon. Shift throughout history, but their core meaning that Gore theme that God motif remains the same. archetypes everywhere. In popular culture. Movie Stars Sports Heroes. They're all basically representations of archetypes. Visionary leaders are representations of archetypes. Saints are great activists like Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King Junior. Mark Maguire Andy Abraham, Lincoln or Representation of archetypes, but so products may be a brand of sopa Volkswagen brand, new car, or even Marlboro cigarettes. These represents architects, the guy who's used to advertise Marlboro cigarettes who has a? Very tough-looking. Cowboy on the Horse, and now of course is on a respirator, but that archetype. Of was very successful in selling cigarettes. And Johnnie Walker is a very successful. archetype selling whiskey. Because it attracts a certain team, a certain personality, a certain story. Movies TV soap operas, media tabloids. These are actually all right. archetypes. And every person they representing every idea they represent are every product represent seems to be larger than life. It seems uncomplicated. It seems at least the way it's advertise pure of intent, whatever that intent may be sacred or profane. It does matter. And so I say exaggerated expressions of the conscious energy of the collective source. That is the adventure or the secret of the sage of the rescuer of the redeemer or the love object. That the archetype represents. is in fact, the symbolic representation of a divine intelligence in the conscious energy of our collective Sola. Born of the collective soul, but enacted by the individual. Becomes very powerful as they representation. Of that are detected theme for example Marilyn. Monroe was the archetype of the Greek Greek Goddess Aphrodite representing sensuality and beauty and sexuality.

Mark Maguire Andy Abraham Johnnie Walker Nelson Mandela Martin Luther Monroe Marlboro Gore Volkswagen Marilyn
A Turning Point: Race Relations In Sports

The Big Story

10:20 min | 4 months ago

A Turning Point: Race Relations In Sports

"It has now been more than four weeks in George. Floyd was murdered nearly a month since we all watched him. Take his last breaths. It feels like so much is different, but real actionable change that takes time. Many who took to the streets in protests have now resumed their daily lives, so now seems appropriate to discuss how sport will handle affairs moving forward. As North American teams and Leagues Continue Their Return to play processes. It is vital that the conversations and promises made when the racial issue was hottest that they do not go away. In a few moments, we will welcome in our panel to discuss how that should happen, but first a look at how we got here in the first place. He will have color have been argued about beliefs, and that's not right. That's not right by any was standards. The point he was making gut twisted from the start. The beginning when Colin Kaepernick I made is public protests peacefully heap I sat on the bench during the national anthem to bring awareness. There's a lot of things that need to change once one specifically police brutality. There's people being murdered unjustly and not being held accountable. It was the summer of two thousand sixteen, when he bursts truly used his platform as an NFL quarterback to speak out against systemic racism by police in the weeks leading into that preseason payment. San Francisco capper Nick had watched. We all had. To white officers pinning down Alton Sterling. And pumping. into his chest and back. He saw the traffic stop in Minnesota when Philander Casteel was killed in front of his girlfriend in charge. And captured it could not understand how mental health therapist Charles Kinsey could be shot by police when he was lying on the ground with his arms up in the air, people of color have been targeted by police. Cops are getting paid leave. For killing people. That's not right. That's not right by anyone's standards. And yet from the beginning law in. pre-game gesture was misrepresented and downright manipulated. The Christ came that he was disrespecting the flag that it was a slap in the face to military personnel. But when active soldiers pointed out, they serve to provide their citizens with the freedom of speech that capture nick was exercising. That narrative quickly was quashed when army veterans who had been in battle, echoed that very sentiment out of national football league buildings team needs I would be disappointed if any of our players didn't stand up for the national anthem personally. I, look at that as a salute to the people who have paved the way for us. Our Organization believes that. You should. Respect the flag and so you'll save those individual decisions to expression show. On individual form. And that became the prevalent message. Don't do it here. Stick to sports. The underlying tone. How dare you protest without our approval we're. Do you get off? Colin Kaepernick criticizing anyone in another uniform. Right the men and women lead for this, I- scenic. First hand. For. Somebody do that to get paid millions of dollars. It's ridiculous. Cabinet remained undeterred. United States Army Bet. Nate! Boyer who did tours of duty in Iraq, and Afghanistan encouraged him to kneel and not sit. By, taking a knee voyeur told him you show your respect for fallen brothers that way. So capture nick did. And then more NFL players followed. And yet the public and political conversation in the US would not steer toward police brutality. No matter how much star athletes peacefully attempted to. And the leader in America's biggest chair. Amy Shirley Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners? When somebody disrespects our flag to say, get that son of a job appealed right now out each fire. I! Capture Nick became a source of division for standing up against injustice. He hasn't taken a snap since that twenty sixteen season. And at this year Super Bowl USA. Today's jared bell minced no words on why that is I. Think it's pretty obvious. He's been blackballed for Colin Kaepernick not to have a job is just. It's the worst look for the NFL. No conversation was more dominant inside NFL. Locker rooms that season than the Kapernick one teams are made up of players of all ages of all backgrounds of so many ethnicities. If you actually want to listen to different perspectives. If you're an athlete who would want to hear what your peers had to say, there would be no shortage of takes to soak in. But fundamentally the want would be to understand capper knicks fundamental point. After George Floyd one of the League's biggest stars reminded us that many still didn't I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country. Maybe that was the crossroads moment because the reaction to. It felt like something had changed almost as. That won't cut. It anymore drew. brees in the rest of the NFL were told right away, the new. Orleans quarterback came under fire. The players in the league had just about enough of the establishment silence. They had captured message. They were not gonNA. Let owners and Roger Goodell get away with it this time. Would have other Jewish Knowledge George if I was. I was George Void. Jewish. And say hi in. Regard. To me right. Breezes all pro receiver found Dallas's bruising runner and Houston's electrifying quarterback, and Kansas City Super Bowl Mvp. And Obi. And they all let you know. We. Condemn Racism and assistant. Matic oppression of black people. National League, admit wrong and silence our players from protesting. Also. Black lives matter black lives matter. Like loves. To Have Patrick Mahomes the next superstar the NFL. Front and center. That was massive. And the very next night the commissioner uttered the words you never imagined would happen. We the National Football League Immune. We were wrong for not listening NFL players earlier. And encourage all speak out in peacefully protests. Read the National Football League believe black lives matter. Progress. Probably a step forward. You want to believe so. The day after the commissioner changed his tune, breeze went to social media again. He'd already made his hollow apologies without actually saying sorry, and he finally seemed to be listening to what some teammates had to say, and after all of that even drew brees somewhat stood up to the president. It won't Change Donald Trump of course, but maybe it will make others think. Perhaps it will create more uncomfortable conversations to allow for a greater understanding among all of us. And at the very least it has given others throughout sport. To have the freedom to finally say their piece open believing they may at last be heard. Or country is in, trouble. Basic reason is race. You're seeing an example of future. That's fighting for you for you. Right now a fine for you got a grandfather that march legs. Dr King in the sixties. And he was amazing. You'll be proud to see us all. Got Pushing? Forward Doing Casey marched with his family. Members of Detroit's organization. An NBA coach using his voice. Over in Jacksonville Jaguars personnel were among the demonstrators. North Philly's finest. He walked. Kyle Lowery's we can. Priorities were set. This though. This is just the start. To silence of countless elites spoken loud. Until you see action from an, don't forget by the leaks themselves. We wonder what the real commitment to progress actually is. What capper protests was about from. The beginning can no longer be debated. And it is now crystal clear to all of us that no athlete should just shut up and dribble. Nelson Mandela famously said. Sport has the power to change the world. Since George, Floyd perhaps we have learned that change can come more from our sporting icons using their voice platform in pursuit for justice than any jumper were swing. Or goal or touched them. Stick to sports. Sure let's stick to sports bettering the world in a new way. Let's start hearing the real message now. And most of all, let's not get the words and actions like Hafer. Knicks twisted. When he tried to begin the real conversation. Before US AGO!

National Football League NFL Colin Kaepernick George Floyd Nick United States Knicks Brees America George Charles Kinsey Nelson Mandela Alton Sterling San Francisco Minnesota Roger Goodell Football Commissioner
African National Congress published Mandela's message - June 10, 1980

This Day in History Class

03:47 min | 4 months ago

African National Congress published Mandela's message - June 10, 1980

"The Day was June tenth nineteen eighty. The African National Congress published a message that are tight leader Nelson Mandela wrote in response to so wait. Oh, uprising in nineteen, seventy six. At the time Mandela was imprisoned. In nineteen, forty, eight, the National Party came to power in South Africa and began implementing the policy of apartheid at the time, racial segregation existed in the country, and the white minority held political power. Though. Segregation had long been in practice. Apartheid extended policy. Dictated where people could live and work based on race. The Population Registration Act required people to be classified and registered as black, white, coloured or other. Pass laws reinforced the ideology of white supremacy by controlling the movement of black South Africans. Plenty of other apartheid laws were passed that enforce the country system of racial segregation and disadvantaged the majority black population. Nelson Mandela was a key figure in the anti-apartheid movement in the early Nineteen Forties Mandela joint the African National Congress or a C. A political party that became dedicated to ending apartheid once the National Party came to power. In the decades after apartheid became official government policy resistance to the system sprang up South Africa. The ANC was heavily involved in the fight against apartheid and Mandela emerged as a leader in the ANC. In June of Nineteen seventy-six black students in Soweto township led protests in response to the government, mandating the use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in schools. Afrikaans was a language of the white minority. As thousands of students marched in the demonstrations. The police responded by shooting at the children. Many children were killed and the Soweto uprising spread across the country. At the time of the so wait, oh, uprising Nelson Mandela was in prison, serving a life term after being convicted of sabotage in the Rivonia Trial in one, thousand, nine, sixty four. During his time in prison, Mandela continued to write and support the anti-apartheid movement and people help Tim Smuggle his writing out of Robben Island prison. One of the messages he wrote from Robben. Island was in response to the Soweto uprising. On June. Tenth Nineteen, eighty, the ANC published this message, stating that it took more than two years to reach them. It included an introduction by Oliver Tombo who was president of the African National Congress. The introduction acknowledged the importance of Mandela's quote. Call to unity and mass action, especially since nineteen eighty marked the twenty fifth anniversary of the Freedom Charter, a document ratified in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five, that demanded equal rights for all South Africans. In the introduction, the ANC urged readers to quote make one thousand, nine hundred a year of united mass struggle. In the message Mandela laid out how quote white domination is held in check by force of arms, and how apartheid was opposed by many people, he also called for black unity instead that quote. Victory is certain. Near the end of the message, he wrote the following. Unite mobilize fight on between the and Ville of United, mass action and the hammer of the armed struggle. We shall crush apartheid in white minority racist rule. Mandela was released from prison a decade later in one, thousand, nine hundred. Negotiations to end apartheid soon began and Mandela became president of South Africa in one, thousand, nine, hundred four.

Nelson Mandela Nineteen Forties Mandela African National Congress Mandela South Africa Soweto President Trump Robben Island Tim Smuggle Oliver Tombo Official Freedom Charter Robben
Colin Finlay

The Candid Frame

05:58 min | 5 months ago

Colin Finlay

"I'm excited I sit down and talk with here you man. I'm disappointed you can't see me dressed in my finest and freshly shaved respect for you. Yeah and doing looking at work and seeing some of the presentations you've done and just getting a a really good understanding of what your career has look like. I was really inspired. Not just by the work which I think is exceptional but I thought that you were one of the few photographers who focuses on the things that you that you do in terms of the environment cultural impact of socio economic issues around the world and one of the things that you really adept at is providing a sense of connectedness between all these what normally would be disparate things in the minds of many of our of Westerners tend to have such a topic and self absorbed obsession with the world revolving around us that we tend to sort of exclude things that we don't feel have a direct impact on us even though it does and I don't think that at least for for for Western people that that something that awareness that you have it comes naturally. I think it's something that at least for me has been sort of a learned. I've had to unlearn that kind of way of thinking and open myself up and I'm wondering for you. How did that sense of that connectedness? You know that I see in your work. How did you come to have that yourself? It's kind of interesting here just to kind of explore this topic right out of the out of the out of the gate here but it's just an overall feeling that we are all one connected human being we are all one connected earth country. There's no difference between myself. And someone number Wanda a first nations person in Canada. A polar bear were all part of this great mother nature all part of this earth and I see it. All is our earth our collective future art collective history that belongs to each and every one of us and all of us have a vital role to play in this world so for me. It's I see that connection point. I've seen the difference between a billionaire and someone who's on the streets having a tough time in their life were all these powerful magnetic souls that are all on our journey in this world. I respect an extraordinary operation for really each and every one of us who are on this path. Was that something you always had or? Did you have a moment of epiphany when you were younger? That sort of allowed you to see the world in that particular way is definitely something that was important to me from the streets of Belfast from my times experiences in Sarajevo some of those really powerful experiences in Haiti in the early nineties. When you're just experiencing something that is so powerful and so beyond anything that you could even imagine you'd be confronting in your life and the humility that is absorbed through every cell and fiber in my body as I photograph and spend time with extraordinarily powerful people. That frankly have the power have strengthened. Have courage that I do not possess. I am simply an observer a witness in that sense and I am a part of this journey that they are on in the experience of their life than you know. Ultimate humility to me comes from there in the eyes of the people that I've photographs from really understanding the depths. What their day to day realities like and then how I come back to this first world. It's it's a difficult thing. It was brutal that coming back in landing at LAX. In coming back into this world leading. When I just left behind That Internet itself is extraordinarily difficult to the least. I remember crying literally walking down the aisles of a grocery store and looking at their Sushi in all these meets and everything it's like my God and I'm in Saudi bullets. They're dependent on what food they can scrounge. They're taking their lives in their hands. Trying to get water for their family and Sarajevo not being shot and killed and he does understand life and such a different matter that it really comes down to a pitcher of water feeding your family for that day or providing one meal and then coming back here to realize you know what we have at our at our fingertips some so it starts to really bend and the beginning years of breaking May to a completely different understanding of other majority are. Have you know a lot of other people around the world on? That's an interesting term. You said breaking you in as if you had Basically Foundation that you basically emptied sort of destroy in order to build a a a new one with being way of describing. Yeah I also think that for me I had an extraordinary powerful desire within me to witness first hand the history as it unfolds being an apartheid South Africa before Nelson Mandela. Send it to presidency a lot of the different war-zones in and out of the genocide in Rwanda Darfur wars in the Middle East. A lot of fees experiences really changed me immensely and really broke down the nature of what I thought reality was for me and for my family and what that word means to me and how it's manifested within me and how it is indeed. You know change the way that I view the world. How did how did you see your work or hope for your work to be used during those those early years of your career and how change what was really interesting. Is that one of the first major magazines that I work with was magazine that you might have depending on where you're at school was called scholastic so that was the magazine. Went out to students I received when I was a student so lineup really establishing a great relationship where the editor they're Lee buyer and I really started to take on a lot of these projects around the world on children.

Sarajevo Middle East Nelson Mandela Wanda Haiti Editor Canada LAX South Africa Belfast
Confidence

The Daily Meditation Podcast

09:40 min | 7 months ago

Confidence

"I'm Mary Medically and I welcome you to our final episode of this weeks series. We're exploring the theme for this series all week long has been how to summon up courage in a crisis and we are all in this crisis together as we maneuver our way through the ups and downs and INS and outs of the Kobe. Nineteen Corona virus. I'm sharing with you. The full thirty minute guided meditation experiences that I share on the SIP and own meditation APP. I hope you are enjoying these series. And if you're just joining us you are in the right place. These different episodes. Don't follow any sequence so you can join in at any point in a series. I share a different meditation technique in each episode so depending on the kinds of meditation technique. I'm sharing for that day. That's the kind of experience you'll be guided through so in this final episode. I guide you through a weekly reflection doing a weekly reflection and if you could even do a daily reflection research shows is one of the best ways to improve how you respond to stress in your life. It's one of the best ways to keep focused on your goals. How what's important to you in life and it helps to keep you grounded giving you a better perspective on your life especially during a crisis when you feel like your emotions are being pulled in all different directions and breaking news is occurring by the minute by the hour. You might be experiencing many of the hardships that are impacting most of us from the corona virus with your work with having your family all confined in one place or maybe you are isolated alone. Maybe you're having symptoms of the corona virus. You've lost a loved one. All of these are happening right now across the world. I have so enjoyed sharing this series with you and I hope you enjoy this. Final episode has always be safe. How are you doing today? This is the final episode of our series on courage in crisis. And I hope you have been able to chart path for yourself as you maneuver. The ups and downs of the current crisis were experiencing with the Kovic Nineteen Corona virus. You may be experiencing an another crisis as you listen to this series. No that there will be an end to this crisis and as you consider what you reflected on each day as your daily challenge. Something that's going to help pull you out of this crisis with hope. Something that you're going to do to reward yourself after the crisis keep this thought daily in your mind and think about ways that you can provide some time for yourself to slow down to remove yourself from all the buzz going around that. Buzz is not likely to diminish anytime soon. In fact even after the crises the world will be a little different. It might be a lot different for you or for loved ones depending on how you weather this crisis how you managed during this crisis. Remember that when you manage your fear and you keep focused on hope even if really extenuating circumstances calm your way that impact you because of this crisis remember to still keep your focus and also to not let fear or uncertainty overwhelming to allow yourself to remain calm in the midst of this storm that takes courage and I want to share with you a quote from someone who went through and survived extenuating circumstances and that is a quote from Nelson Mandela on courage. Nelson Mandela is known the world over as a representative of courage and hope in the midst of a crises. He was the South African. Anti Apartheid. Revolutionary Political leader. He was also a philanthropist and he served as president of South Africa from Nineteen Ninety four to nineteen ninety nine. He was the country's first black head of state and the first elected in a fully representative democratic election. I'm reading this to you. From his extensive biography on Wikipedia so Nelson Mandela became a figure for his time the face of the Democratic Anti Apartheid Movement. And you might think about what you want to be a good face of in regard to this crises in your circle. Are you the one who gives hope? Are you the one who's there for someone who's frightened to go to the store? Are you the one who spouts off? All the latest bleak statistics regarding deaths and new infections which can make people feel so hopeless. So think about what you want to be the face of in regard to those people. You're spending time with during this crisis. I imagine that we all are leaving a legacy right now as to how we're handling this unprecedented experience of a global penick so the quote from Nelson Mandela is. I learned that courage was not the absence of fear but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid but he who conquers that fear so again think about how you want to face your crises with courage instead of fear in the final episode of every series. We do something which I think is very important. There's a lot of research that shows it is important. And that is assessing how you lived out your week your high points. You're low points and where you could improve. It's okay to make mistakes and not to be perfect. The most important thing you can do is to have a weekly review and this is a way to assess yourself to become a better human being so as you settle yourself down and get ready to meditate. Take you on a review also a reflection of your week. I always encourage you to do this outside. I am outside near my pool. You might be able to hear the water and I always recommend you try to meditate outside especially during these times

Nelson Mandela Representative Kobe Nineteen Ninety South Africa President Trump
"nelson mandela" Discussed on History of the 90s

History of the 90s

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on History of the 90s

"The climax of all this attention by musicians came in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight to mark. Mandela's seventieth birthday artists against apartheid along with the anti-apartheid movement organized. An eleven hour mega concert at Wembley Stadium much like the live aid benefit concert in one thousand nine hundred eighty five over seventy thousand. People were at the show which was broadcast. Live to a billion people in sixty different countries. It was described by the BBC at the time as the biggest and most spectacular pop political event of all time eighty three artists performed including Peter. Gabriel Jerry Damars and Steve Van Zandt also onstage during the marathon concert where Whitney Houston Dire Straits Phil Collins eurythmics simple minds and stevie wonder the concert peaked with the iconic trio of anti-apartheid Songs Biko Free Nelson Mandela and Sun City throughout the eighties. There continued to be a groundswell of support from artists who opposed apartheid. Stevie wonder went on to release his own song. It's wrong apartheid in one thousand nine hundred ninety five and was arrested during a protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington. Dc and in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. The British reggae singer Eddy grant recorded. GimMe Hope Joanna Joanna being Johannesburg on April Sixteenth nineteen ninety two months after Nelson Mandela was released from prison. Another massive concert was held at Wembley Stadium to celebrate his freedom musical guests at the Nelson Mandela Freedom concert included Lou Reed Anita Baker Krissy Hind Tracy Chapman Bonnie Raitt. Natalie Cole Neil Young and Peter Gabriel seventy two thousand. People filled the stadium and millions more watched the event on TV and this time Mandela was an attendance for the show. The crowd went completely wild when he took the stage. It took over five minutes for them to quiet down so Mandela could speak dear friends here and as I into world.

Nelson Mandela Wembley Stadium Nelson Mandela Freedom Peter Gabriel stevie Joanna Joanna Gabriel Jerry Damars Eddy grant BBC Steve Van Zandt South African Embassy Natalie Cole Lou Reed Anita Baker Dc Whitney Houston Tracy Chapman Bonnie Raitt Phil Collins Washington Krissy Hind
Trivia Questions on The Mandela Effect

Trivia With Budds

02:00 min | 8 months ago

Trivia Questions on The Mandela Effect

"Are going to jump into today's episode on the Mandela Effect. It's eleven questions on stuff you may or may not remember. This is the only trivia round. I do worse. Spelling and wording counts. So make sure if you're playing along at home your spelling stuff right here. We go all right here. We go with eleven questions on the Mandela effect to now there are no Nelson Mandela specific questions in here but the whole idea of the Mandela effect is named after him. This people swear that he could have died in the eighties but he didn't die until two thousand thirteen. So that's the name Mandela effect comes from if you more Mandela Affect Trivia just search trivia with Buds Mandela affect other episode. We did probably about a year and a half to two years ago. All right. Here's question number. One remember spelling counts. What brand of peanut butter shares part of its name with a phrase meaning quickly number one? What brand of peanut butter shares? Its name with part of its name with a phrase meaning quickly number one number one number two. What cartoon series from Warner Brothers was mainly produced from nineteen thirty to nineteen sixty nine remember? Spelling counts number two. What cartoon series from Warner Brothers was mainly produced from nineteen thirty to nineteen sixty nine question? Number three is Neil Armstrong. Dead or alive question. Number three is Neil Armstrong dead or alive question number four. What question does the Evil Queen ask? Her reflection in snow white and the seven dwarfs need the full sentence and especially that first word number four. What question does the Evil Queen ask? Her reflection in snow. White and the seven dwarfs number four number four question number five. What is the best selling brand of household odor eliminators manufactured by Procter and

Mandela Effect Nelson Mandela Warner Brothers Neil Armstrong Procter White
Ladysmith Black Mambazo founder Joseph Shabalala dies at 78

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:36 sec | 9 months ago

Ladysmith Black Mambazo founder Joseph Shabalala dies at 78

"B. S. the founder of the south African Grammy winning music group Ladysmith black Mambazo has died the south African government says Joseph Shabalala died just as the nation was celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of Nelson Mandela's release from prison shop a lot like collaborated with Paul Simon on the Graceland album becoming one of south Africa's most recognized performers on the world stage Joseph Shabalala was seventy eight years old

Founder Mambazo Joseph Shabalala Nelson Mandela Paul Simon South Africa Ladysmith
Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:13 min | 11 months ago

Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

"Awarding someone the Nobel Prize for peace is always tempting. Fate saw cha the vagaries of human affairs. Yesterday's warmonger is tomorrow's peacemaker and vice versa. That it's not really the Norwegian Nobel Committees Fault when Pulse Charity Makes Mockery of some of their judgements. When you give a piece Gong to someone like Henry Kissinger oh Yasser Arafat? It's just a risk you run. And it is nevertheless startling to see an actual Nobel peace laureate appearing at the International Court of Justice in The Hague to defend the government they lead against allegations of genocide. It's pretty much the one thing that isn't supposed to happen. History had given us the opportunity to give up our best just for a cause in which we believed when the Nobel Committee chose to honor me. The road had chosen of my own free will aw became less lonely path to follow sang suci daughter of the founder of modern Myanmar Aung San and a formidable politician diplomat and and activist in her own. Right won the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen ninety-one at the time she was rivaled only by Nelson Mandela as a universally admired Royat. Avatar of all. That was good displaying exemplary courage in resisting. All that was bad. She led the National League for Democracy as it faced down only terrifying and ruthless military GIONTA which had turned Myanma into North Korea with Palm. Trees saying SUCI spent most of the period between Nineteen nineteen ninety nine and two thousand and ten under house arrest. She was a hero aside from the Nobel Peace Prize. She was awarded the Sakharov Prize. US Congressional Channel Gold Medal and Presidential Medal of freedom an honorary order of Australia. Honorary Citizenship of Canada and Amnesty International's ambassador of conscience since award. Luke pestle made a film about her. U2 wrote a song about and in time she triumphed the NLD won a landslide election victory in two thousand and fifteen though denied the presidency on a technicality. She became state councillor effectively. Myanmar's prime minister it. It was hailed worldwide as a victory for decency determination and patience and now she's denying that she is some kind of an accessory to crimes against humanity he sang Succi has been fair to say on a journey. These ban mind this complex situation and the challenge to sovereignty and security already in our country when you're assessing the intent of those who attempted to deal with the rebellion. Surely under the circumstances genocidal decider intent cannot be only hypothesis loan and it is important to be clear that while Aung Sang. SUCCI is in The Hague. She is not in the dark. She is appearing voluntarily and has not been charged with any crime the allegation before the ICJ EJ is against her country. Not Her the case has been brought by the Gambia. Backed by the fifty-seven members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Asian a coterie which includes several nations who might want to pause before mounting their high horses where human rights are concerned. The allegation is essentially essentially that Myanmar's recent persecution of the Hindu people Myanmar's Muslim minority. Who lived mostly in the country's raccoon state amounts to genocide this? This is a term with specific legal meanings and it will be for the court to determine if events in Myanmar meet the threshold. What is known is bad enough? Enough since two thousand and sixteen perhaps a million ranger have fled Myanmar mostly to neighboring Bangladesh journalists NGOs and the UN win have reported a consistent pattern of atrocious violence much of it directed at civilians not excluding children Myanmar's military known as has the top Madore have consistently claimed that they are waging a counter insurgency against Islamist terrorists though Sang Suci does not directly command the Tatmadaw. Aw this is also the line that she has held. The most sympathetic imaginable interpretation of aren't sang Suu Cheese behavior. And it's a reach is that that she is still in some respects the prisoner of the same military which once held her under house arrest. She may have calculated. This is a compromise. She has to to make to maintain such democracy as me unmanned now has that if she takes hold in the military the military will once again take charge of the country. This is a question unlikely to interest the hundreds of thousands over hinge in now wondering if they'll ever be able to go home again and they of course are the ones who have have survived the Tatmadaw's pogroms justice for the victims. If it is coming at all maybe years away

Myanmar Sang Suci Nobel Prize Myanmar Aung San Norwegian Nobel Committees Succi Aung Sang NLD Nobel Committee Sakharov Prize Suci Luke Pestle International Court Of Justice Henry Kissinger Yasser Arafat Nelson Mandela Royat Gold Medal Gambia
Trump gives Medal of Freedom to NBA legend Jerry West

America's Morning News

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Trump gives Medal of Freedom to NBA legend Jerry West

"The west the NBA legend and logo you see on the NBA jerseys and merchandise was honored this week with the presidential medal of freedom president trump on Thursday said west honor was richly deserve sighting west basketball career at West Virginia University that led him to the Lakers and an Olympic gold medal but the more than anything else good you're like doing is playing basketball in West Virginia and starting at age six he taught himself on the dirt surfaces of his neighborhoods backyard one eight grain his sister would call him and say it says it's called the mud wallow do you remember that at all during the mud wallow but nothing ever stopped him Jerry later reflected that everything I did I tried to do perfectly not just well **** perfectly and it hasn't changed I don't think too much as it. look at the list of other honorees and was inspired by the names to someone that's right one doesn't Bill Gates philanthropic champions Nelson Mandela Martin Luther king these are Shabazz from all the Simon Wiesenthal and Desmond Tutu legendary leaders Muhammad Ali bill Russell Kareem Abdul Jabbar athlete activist Michael Jordan Tiger Woods Stevie Wonder excellence personified John wooden Frank Robinson Arnold Palmer and vin Scully friends are trying to emulate I swear my name is going to look like a misprint on this list No Way known as Mr clutch west was named an all star every year of his fourteen season career with the Lakers he also helped lead the team to the NBA finals nine times and after retiring as a player you coach the Lakers for three season before moving into the front office where he signed Magic Johnson Kobe Bryant Shaquille o'neal here is responsible for the majority of the fakers titles yet now works for the LA

Shaquille O'neal Kobe Bryant Mr Clutch Vin Scully Michael Jordan Muhammad Ali Bill Russell Kare Nelson Mandela Martin Luther Bill Gates President Trump NBA LA West Virginia University Frank Robinson Arnold Palmer Desmond Tutu Simon Wiesenthal Shabazz Jerry West Virginia Basketball Gold Medal
Winnie and Nelson Mandela's Marriage Survived Prison but Not Freedom

Retropod

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Winnie and Nelson Mandela's Marriage Survived Prison but Not Freedom

"Hey history lovers. I'm mike rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered nelson mandela's extraordinary. Mary life is filled with unanswerable questions. What would he have accomplished around the world. If he hadn't spent twenty seven years behind bars would the course of apartheid in south africa which he fought so vehemently against been halted decades earlier and and what his epic love affair with his wife winnie have survived they met at a bus stop in soweto south africa she was twenty two and as the nation's first black female social -ocial worker her life had already taken off. He was forty married and had three children. He was fixated on a seemingly only impossible goal to end south africa's systemic policies of racism a week later. They got indian food together. He was smitten. He wrote in his biography. I cannot say for certain if there is such a thing as love at first sight but i do know that the moment moment i first glimpsed winning. I knew that i wanted to have her as my wife mandela divorced his first wife and then he and when he got married the relationship was passionate. They held hands publicly and went to jazz clubs occasionally. They fought though about the little things other couples oral about every day like when nelson tried to teach winnie how to drive they were emerging as the ultimate power our couple powerful voices against apartheid in south africa and racism around the world but their happiness and their power was short lived a few years after their wedding mandela was convicted of a treasonous plot to violently overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison meanwhile when he faced her own struggles as she fought a racist political system she was was arrested harassed and forbidden for most social contact in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine. She began serving an eighteen month prison sentence in solitary confinement. She was tortured in her memoir. She wrote the whole experience is so terrible because i had left little little children at home in bed and i had no idea what had happened to them but throughout all the pain both emotional and physical when he stood by her husband in his absence she took up leading the resistance against apartheid she fought for her husband's release in the end though it was a marriage that survived prison but not freedom in one thousand ninety moments after mandela's release iconic hanako photos were taken of him. His right hand raised clenched in a fist. His left hand claps when he's hand the appeared. Still i'm very much in love but the cameras didn't capture the toll that mandela's long imprisonment took on the couple they they were only allowed to see each other during brief prison visiting hours the great depth of their early. Love affair drifted off when he wrote in in her memoir. I had so little time to love him when he also got caught up in political scandals and was even connected with kidnapping in murder she was unfaithful and she didn't deny it two years after mandela was freed. They separated four years later are they divorced. Winnie madikizela-mandela died earlier. This year and mandela always is acknowledged. His ex wife's strength. When he announced their separation. In nineteen ninety-two he conceded that his estranged wife had suffered greatly early and praised her efforts fighting apartheid while he was in prison. He said her tenacity reinforced my personal respect. Don't love and growing affection.

Nelson Mandela Winnie Madikizela-Mandela South Africa Mike Rosen Soweto Africa Kidnapping Murder Twenty Seven Years Eighteen Month Four Years Two Years
What Are The Traits Of Inspirational Leaders?

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

08:28 min | 1 year ago

What Are The Traits Of Inspirational Leaders?

"Today i tackle as subject of traits of quality leads salina's that are amazing to me that what traits do these guys have in gaza and gaza goes will be <hes> as as many inspirational leader in the world some young some alda. Let me tackle some of the <hes> trikes delayed that are say amongst the leaders and dump. Let's kick off with number one integrity and these no nos vicinity quota but integrity an integrity is important because they site and then they do an short to maintain criti is the difference between what they do so people that have integrity will always do with us are they gonna do now in might not be something we locked in might be something we do like. It doesn't really matter. That's not what i'm tackling here what i'm tackling his that one of the great traits of of one of the great leader's is integrity. They will always do what they say they're going to do. Another one is resilience. There is the meta avenue tons get down. They get back up and they go go go and this is something that can be saying in great leaders. <hes> you know i eh with at a sports whether the politicians when they'd business whether there has wife househusband it doesn't really matter <hes> leadership taxonomy wolf forms and resilience is key pop to you know being a great leader now nixing tomase accountability accountability is bright ladens have the <unk> of accountability if the negative like they put the hands they they they don't the concept of winning and losing his team. You know this is something that is important. It's not when something goes wrong. It's somebody else's fault <hes> and when everything is right it's each it's the glory lady with the leader. That's not something that some great leaders do that always accept accountability an inspiring now bright and inspiring to me go hand in hand because bright people tackle adversity bryce. These people make that step and we know that if you don't make the stick things doesn't happen but at the same time they're inspirational in the way they do that so they're not bright bald an arrogant that brave an inspiring that willing to put themselves forward but they understand that they're inspiring people people like martin luther king nelson mandela. These people were bryant but there were some spotter. They went out there to buck the system that were there. They were bright on our inspiring in such a big kohl's addicting now. This is something that so important is adaptability. Leadership doesn't often talked about the adaptability isn't talked about often in the concept of leadership but great leaders not to attacked than to adapt when things are good than i had to adapt the things that they have this constant energy of the depth ability they make sure that they can adapt people to situations situations to people people etc etc compassion. Something that often doesn't get talked about in leadership is compassion. You know another way to put it. His empathy now <music> out empathy compassionate doesn't mean that you have to you know be sitting next to somebody crime it really simply to me is is the concept compassion and as you feel that you understand that you listen the compassionate they will apply the right outcome for the situation a great way to look at this. Is you know to to me. I know that i'm compassionate. What i'm saying is doing the best that they can with the resources at the half at the time attack me that today's a great way to to show compassionate is that you're willing to look the situation or whatever it may be and say is the best at the time with the resources of behalf and to make compassion is is obviously important trait of equality later the ability to look in the mirror and i talk about this a lot. Is that a lot of latest look in the mirror. They don't understand that they need to be leading by example that they need to make sure that it's different rules arabas in different roles for them. They need to make sure ooh what they what they're actually doing. You know they can look in the mirror and say hi. I n leaving. Do i believe i should be leaving acting acting the way. I believe i should be acting. This is something that's agassi. So important i mean we all look at people like bill and melinda gates amazing leaders in what they looking in the mirror yeah they wealthy very roughly however looking in the mirror and saying wait human and we want to show humanity by doing doing great things around the world and that's something that's obviously very very important to them. Just a dan in new zealand prime minister is different trick whether you like his policies or <unk> policies. That's not the point. The point is as a leader. She has this ability of looking in the mirror and saying i'm human and i will therefore for act with compassion with love and dumb you know with with anticipate so these are people that really really good another. Try is quality holiday. Leaders have the ability to ceram selves with people that challenge them now. A lot of people don't like that. You'll find that a lot of people dynegy like to surround themselves with people that challenge them rather surround themselves people that say this all the time whereas i believe quality leader has try surrounding themselves around of people that challenged aw and challenging them to be his visions of themselves challenged them when when things are not raw challenge them things ira challenged them on different different things that's not challenging for the cycle challenging you not pointing something apple someone just to the point of trying to be right but challenge to make can be a positive city challenge not not not doesn't need to be a negative challenge to me an idea lita is the one who has a positive attitude encourages to be positive even in across so the concept of challenging has to sickness it has to be about positive attitude has to be that encouragement it has to be you know eat when the times a dan that you had the ability to have people around that were challenging to ensure that they you performing at your best as a leader now you know some one of the great things around the world as a leader bono mate now cost later tonight then upon you know born alita. You'll make it's behavioral theory. It's the right carry yourself. The people you have around your mind sick because all of this putting self inconstant mindset mode is exactly really what it's about leadership skills that can be learned we can be learned by training can deliver perception can be practice and most of all it's my experience so leadership leaders are night for this reason because it is a city schools that can be learned by trying bucket section by practice and of course bike spirits approach the older we get the more experiences we have which builds wisdom so of course important is that as we evolve in get older when he to constantly evolve their mindsets and our ability so that we are learning so whilst we take our experiences and turn that into wisdom president we also have to make sure that we occurred because one thing i can't stand about setting lead is when they talk about doing this the twenty years and my rebuttal to that is but will you still be doing it in twenty years to come because as many brands in the past like kodak knock knock yet that will not get leaders that are no longer market ladies and some. I'm an even exist today because of that editor so touched on some of the heights today that make a great leader go out and be the best you can be identify unify what your own avatar looks like in terms of leadership. What is is brand. What is your brain. Look like when it comes to the word leader so when i say your name and later what what are the types they gonna say about you. You know visualizes write it down. Use the resources. Whatever it is pictures woods you know music. Whatever it is that will help the pick exactly exactly what you'll ever time looks like as lakes and what you want to be known for.

Gaza Salina New Zealand Bryant Nelson Mandela Agassi Martin Luther Kodak Melinda Gates Prime Minister Apple Bill Editor President Trump Lita Twenty Years
 South Africa's ruling ANC set to celebrate election victory

1A

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

South Africa's ruling ANC set to celebrate election victory

"Africa's national election, a number of outlets reporting that the African National Congress hurriedly holds a wide lead with about half the votes counted the official results due tomorrow AMC's been in power since one thousand nine hundred ninety four when South Africa elected Nelson Mandela to be president. But support has been waning in recent years because there have been a lot of corruption scandals related to the

African National Congress Nelson Mandela South Africa Africa AMC President Trump Official
 South Africa's ruling ANC holds lead as vote count advances

World News Analysis

01:57 min | 1 year ago

South Africa's ruling ANC holds lead as vote count advances

"South African election officials counted ballot paper. Early on Thursday a day after a vote widely seen as a test for the ruling ANC party. The party is forecast to have a reducted majority falling anger over the economy, and lent reform casting his vote in the country's six democratic national election since apartheid ended twenty five years ago. President Cyril Ramaphosa apologized for mistakes made on the way. We accept the kitchen. Ding. Evan. We are going. To act in the stakes without any quantification. We are net that we have been the states, and we put our. Say yes, we have made mistakes. It is only. Doing nothing. Make mistakes Renan hosts has that South Africa would never again, see the rampant corruption of recent years opinion. Polls suggest the African National Congress or agency which had governed the country since ninety ninety four will get just over fifty percent of the vote was Democratic Alliance forecast to get about twenty percent. This would me a fall in the ANC vote. Share it won't sixty two percent of the vote in twenty fourteen for more on this. We are now joined in the studio by the Nellie put Lizzy South African journalists based in Beijing. Welcome to world today. Thank you for having me, so opinion, polls suggest the support has been dropping for the NC party. But we know the party has been in power since ninety ninety four when Nelson Mandela became Preston. So what's at stake for the party in the election?

Nc Party African National Congress President Cyril Ramaphosa Nellie Nelson Mandela Democratic Alliance South Africa Evan Beijing Renan Sixty Two Percent Twenty Five Years Twenty Percent Fifty Percent
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Radio Diaries

Radio Diaries

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Radio Diaries

"You're listening to radio diaries i'm joe richman demonstrations against the south african government strict apart hype policies flare into shocking violence afforded two year old african lawyer nelson mandela the most dynamic leader inside today is still underground i have dedicated my life this of the optical people no son mandela would have been a hundred years old this week and we're marking the anniversary by bringing your documentary mandela an audio history over his lifetime mandela was called many things a terrorist a freedom fighter an icon of peace his left a rich and complicated legacy but there was a moment one day more than five decades ago when nelson mandela really became nelson mandela i i have off a democratic and society april twentieth nineteen sixty four nelson mandela was in a steffi south african courtroom mandela and seven others were facing charges treason everyone thought he would testify in his defence instead mandela stood up in front of the judge and he gave a speech for which i am prepared i am prepared to die those are the last five words of the speech and they're well known today less wellknown or the ten thousand six hundred ninety three other words the speech lasted four hours a court stenographer made an audio recording of that speech on a plastic dicta belt the recording was then lost and forgotten and that may be why it survived the apartheid government erased many of the trial recordings almost four decades later an employee of the south african broadcasting corporation found the speech in their basement archive i know that basement well i spent many weeks there in two thousand three surrounded by stacks of real to reel tapes searching for sound to.

nelson mandela joe richman hundred years five decades four decades four hours two year one day
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Our nation has lost its greatest son our people have lost their father barack obama then the president of the united states echoed the sentiment saying mandela quote achieved more than could be expected of any man today he has gone home and we have lost one of the most influential courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth he no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages mandela was given a state funeral and buried in the village where he grew up he was survived by his third wife gross michelle his second wife winnie three daughters seventeen grandchildren and thirteen great grandchildren though he passed only five years ago the legacy of nelson mandela lives on there have been numerous books and documentaries about his life there have also been many films mandela has been portrayed by such decorated actors as danny glover in mandela dennis hays burt in goodbye tana terrence howard in winnie mandela morgan freeman in invictus and idris elba in mandela long walk to freedom with the real significance of nelson mandela lies not with the movie stars who tried to capture the essence of the great men on screen but in the simple power of his message so it's only fitting that we remember mandela by the words he spoke quote everyone can rise above their circumstances and chief success if they are dedicated to and passionate about what they do a good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination there is no passion to be found playing small in settling for life that is less than the one you are capable of living the greatest glory in living lies not in never falling but in rising every time we fall and as we lead our own.

barack obama president united states nelson mandela danny glover terrence howard winnie mandela morgan freeman mandela michelle dennis hays burt five years
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Presidency did not solve all the problems of the country crime soared unemployment remained high and government programs to expand housing move more slowly than somewhat of liked still he held the country together and that in itself was a momentous achievement it is why historian once described nelson mandela as the father of nation george washington and abraham lincoln rolled into one part of the healing process was the nineteen ninety six stablishment of the truth and reconciliation commission the commission was a court like tribunal in which victims of human rights abuses could make witness statements on the record and in which perpetrators could request amnesty this was certainly controversial unlike the nuremberg trials after world war two where nazis were punished for their crimes the truth and reconciliation commission focused on restoration rather than retribution still despite its flaws it's generally considered to have been successful but mandela may have been embarrassed when the commission examined winnie even though they had divorced earlier in nineteen ninety six its final report found winnie mandela politically and morally accountable for the gross violation of human rights committed by the men della united football club after his at wendy's divorce mandela got one more shot at happiness on his eightieth birthday july eighteenth nineteen ninety eight nelson mandela married his third wife gras michelle she was the widow of mozambique's former president and her relationship with mendeleev lasted for the rest of his life that dell's personal life certainly had its ups and downs and the toll that his struggle put on his family was his biggest regret still when it came time to reflect he was pragmatic in putting it in perspective mandela said quote if i had my time over i would do the same again so would any man who dares.

nelson mandela george washington winnie mandela united football club wendy mozambique president dell abraham lincoln nuremberg mandela
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Restructured the government and established a bill of rights it also set a process in place to right of final constitution those efforts were recognized by the international community in october of nineteen ninety three it was announced that nelson mandela and president of south africa fw declerk at won the nobel peace prize though some questioned why declercq was sharing the prize mandela as always was magnanimous he said quote whatever mistakes declerk has made and he has made many he has his place in history without his support we would never have made peace mandela accepted the peace prize in december of nineteen ninetythree but even bigger triumph came four months later in april of nineteen ninety four south africa held the first election in its eighty four year history where black colored and indian people could vote nelson mandela thou seventy five five years old voted for the very first time the african national congress won in a landslide with sixty two percent of the vote this made mandela as the leader of the party the president tens of thousands gathered for his inauguration on may tenth nineteen ninety four he told the crowd quote never never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world the sun shall never set on so glorious a human achievement being president did not stop his humanitarian work in nineteen ninety five he started the nelson mandela children's fund an organization whose mission was to help individuals from birth to age twenty two particularly orphans of the aids crisis and each month and della donated one third of his salary to the charity of course mandela's.

nelson mandela president declercq declerk congress della seventy five five years sixty two percent eighty four year four months
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"He was also moved from his cell to a small house on the prison grounds i year later in nineteen eighty nine the moderate fw declerk took over as the president of south africa negotiations began in earnest for the conditions of mandela's release mandela demanded that all other political prisoners be freed and the state of emergency that gave police sweeping powers be lifted it was a lot to ask for but mandela had not come this far to accept anything less declerk relented on february eleventh nineteen ninety after twenty seven years in prison nelson mandela was unconditionally released mandela was seventy one years old his hair gone grey his body thin but the former heavyweight boxer walked out of the prison gate and pumped his right fist in the air the thousands of people who gathered to watch roared their approval mandela addressed the crowd he said friends comrades and fellow south africans i stand before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant of you the people certainly it was a triumphant moment but there was still much work to do mandela embarked on a thirteen nation tour to push for continued sanctions against south africa in manhattan he received a ticker tape parade in washington dc he spoke to a joint session of congress but even as he pushed to change south africa mandela reached out to all races and stressed the importance of peace the country was on the brink of civil war and according to many observers it was only through the power of nelson mandela that the whole place didn't blow mandela spoke clearly and forcefully vote for to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains but to live in.

president nelson mandela manhattan congress south africa washington twenty seven years seventy one years
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Allowed to hug him on a prison visit in nineteen eighty five as the nineteen eighties progressed the legend of nelson mandela only grew sympathetic governments named streets in public squares after him colleges granted him honorary degrees in absent shy of course there was even a song free nelson mandela performed by the specials which became an international hit mandela's importance as a symbol was a concern to the south african government as they did not want the international community to turn against them so president p ta a hardliner elected nineteen seventy eight offered men della his release in nineteen eighty five however it was only on the condition that the african national congress renounce all violence mandela rejected the conditional release saying quote i am not prepared to sell the birthright of the people to be free winnie continued her activism sometime citing for with the militants in the movement than she did with mandela in nineteen eighty six when he gave a speech that condone the practice of necklacing this was a form of torture and execution where a rubber tire was forced around victims chest and arms filled with gasoline and set on fire when he said quote with our boxes of matches and our necklaces we shall liberate this country when he was also accused of wrongdoing through the men del united football club which acted as her personal security detail in nineteen eighty eight the club kidnapped for young men from a methodist ministers home when he said it was because she suspected they were being sexually abused by the minister but a witness claimed that the boys were tortured by winning and the football club and one boy who was suspected of being an informant was later found stabbed death stricken with two berkey los in nineteen eighty eight mandela was transferred to victor verster prison.

nelson mandela president african national congress football victor verster prison
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Nd is an island in table bay off the west coast of south africa is flat and only a few feet above sea level but since the late seventeenth century and had been used for the isolation of political prisoners on june thirteenth nineteen sixty four nelson mandela then forty five years old arrived to spend the rest of his life behind bars nelson mandela's new home prison cell number five was eight feet by seven feet and iron bucket served as his toilet there was a thin blanket on the floor that served as his bed even in prison mandela could not escape the class system each prisoner was assigned to a privilege group a through d this was decided at the sole discretion of the commissioner of prisons he classified mandela as a de class prisoner the lowest of the low for the first few years mandela could wear nothing but shorts his prison number was four six six six four because he was the four hundred sixty six inmate to arrive in the year sixty four it was a number he would never forget time moved slowly in the prison he wrote that every hour and captivity felt like a year later he confessed that he quote found himself on the verge of initiating con conversations with a cockroach while a prisoner mandela encountered physical hardships he was put to work at hard labor breaking limestone rocks with a hammer the glare off the white limestone ruined his is that's why in later years he usually work lassus he also dealt with the mental hardships common in prison life one wonders if during the many hours of loneliness and 'isolation in his cell mandela came up with one of his more famous quotes it always seems impossible until it's done his cross country background came in handy he ran up to seven miles a day sometimes in place in his cell and sometimes in the prison courtyard and he shadow box to keep his reflexes sharp he could only send letters twice a year and the only got letters back twice a year as well it was worse than that the letters mandela received back had been heavily censored with so many lines cut out the papers looked like.

Nd nelson mandela commissioner south africa forty five years eight feet seven feet
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Police road block on august fifth nineteen sixty two near so we go a town not far from johannesburg mandela was charged with leaving the country without a passport and inciting workers to strike he was convicted on november seventh nineteen sixty two and sentenced to five years in prison in july of nineteen sixty three police rated lillies leave farm in rivonia a secret safe house used by the african national congress there they found papers documenting m ks activities including some which mentioned mandela it was a moment of reckoning for mandela one in which he came to realize that quote real leaders must be ready to sacrifice all for the freedom of their people on october ninth nineteen sixty three nelson mandela was brought to stand trial for sabotage in what became known as the rivonia trial mandela used trial to condemn apartheid an eloquent four hour speech before the court he spoke of the plight of black south africans and the crimes committed by the government if convicted mandela faced the possibility of being hanged which he did not shy away from when he spoke to the court he concluded his speech by saying quote i have cherished the ideal of democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities it is an ideal for which i hope to live and achieve but if needs be it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die the defendants were found guilty on all charges the good news if it could be called that was that they were spared the death penalty the judge did not want to make them martyrs so when he sentenced them on june twelfth nineteen sixty four he gave them life in prison the prison that mandela was sent to was robben island the alcatraz of south africa in terms of geography robben island.

johannesburg mandela rivonia african national congress nelson mandela robben island south africa five years four hour
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Helped form koto wissies way which means the spear of the nation also known as mk the army of freedom fighters was the armed wing of the african national congress mandela by this point was incredibly respected and recognized as a leader of the movement and was named mk's commander in chief but at the same time mandela went underground he was now an enemy of the state in branded by the government as a wanted terrorist he left the country for military training and together support for the armed struggle which meant finding money and weapons mandela traveled across africa in disguise he also learned how to make bombs he did not want to endanger lives only property the goal was to sabotage government installations such as power plants phone lines and transport stations late at night when no civilians were present in may of nineteen sixty one nelson mandela his first ever tv interview to tv he said there is room for all the various races in this country he wanted the government to know that his men were armed freedom fighters not terrorists that their goal was democracy majority rule where everyone could vote they wanted to live in peace and harmony with equal rights for all people in june of nineteen sixty one mandela addressed a letter to kendrick vert prime minister of south africa he warned that if the government did not hold a national constitutional convention he would launch a new campaign of resistance he knew the government would not respond and so the first attack was an act of sabotage against an electrical substation the campaign continued in the hit other targets as well nelson mandela remained a fugitive for over a year he was arrested about two weeks after returning to south africa when he was stopped at a.

mk prime minister nelson mandela south africa africa kendrick two weeks
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Then a second daughter zinzi soi in december of nineteen sixty as in the american battle for civil rights which was happening around the same time there was a divide in the ranks between those who advocated nonviolent resistance and those who favored a more militant approach nelson mandela was one who supported nonviolence but that was to change on march twenty first nineteen sixty at sharpeville at sharpeville thousands of black south africans demonstrated against the pass laws and they converged on the police station to give back their passbooks though the crowd was on on the police opened fire soon the demonstrators were running for their lives still the police continued their assault sixty nine were killed many of them were women and children and most of the dead were shot in the back although the sharpeville massacre was met with national and international condemnation the government responded by cracking down even more they declared a national state of emergency and outlawed the african national congress and other groups like it it was at this point that nelson mandela realized peaceful resistance was futile it was time for armed struggle later mandela recounted in his autobiography quote i who had never been a soldier who had never fought in the battle who had never fired a gun at an enemy had been given the task of starting an army in the middle of this tense time mandela and winnie still found reason to celebrate this is when they welcomed their second daughter zinzi soi into the world in december of nineteen sixty in nineteen sixty one nelson mandela.

nelson mandela assault congress winnie
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Classification determined where a person could be born where they could live where they could go to school where they could work where they could be treated if they were sick and even where they could be buried when they died white people who were now the only ones allowed to vote had the best opportunities and the most money spent on their facilities meanwhile black south africans whose lives were strictly controlled primarily lived in poverty in the aftermath of world war two where the world had defeated the nazis this was a dramatic step backward in essence the ruling whites of the country of south africa were declaring themselves the master race obviously nelson mandela opposed the system of apartheid but his vision was broader his ultimate goal was the erotic ation of racism he also yearned for the establishment of a constitutional democracy with the fundamental underpinning of one person one vote the resistance took many forms in those days mandela and the anc held a national day of protest against the classification laws on june twenty sixth nineteen fifty coincidentally mandela's second son makoto was born that same day in nineteen fifty two mandela launched the defiance campaign which encouraged south africans both black and white to intentionally break the laws of apartheid hundreds of thousands of black men and women took part they entered the white only sections of post offices and railway stations they also burned their passbooks which listed where they could travel and when they could leave their homes over eighty five hundred people were jailed during the year long campaign including mandela mandela was not charged and was released quickly but it didn't take long before mandela's defiance landed him in more trouble.

anc makoto mandela mandela south africa
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Inflicted with his christian faith in nineteen forty two nelson mandela finally joined the african national congress the anc two years later he and other young anc leaders founded a subgroup called the congress youth league which stressed nonviolent protest at the same time he was working on these causes mandela became involved with evelyn toko maasai a trainee nurse and activist he met at an anc meeting like mandela she was a devout christian whose father had died when she was very young evelyn was smitten with mandela and she later confessed quote i think i loved him the first time i saw him in october of nineteen forty four evelyn and mandela got married they had their first child in february of nineteen forty five a name temeke lay tembe for short their first daughter makasi way died of meningitis in nineteen forty seven when she was only nine months old family was important to nelson mandela but he was increasingly driven by his activism evelyn was upset that he spent so much time away but mandela's activism was more of an assessing than ever after the election of nineteen forty eight on may twenty sixth nineteen forty eight the conservative national party became the governing party in south africa and they instituted the policy of apartheid apartheid which means separateness afrikaans was the official practice of formalized racial sacred gatien under apartheid every person in south africa had to be classified according to their racial group these classifications were legally defined as black white and colored or of mixed heritage later the government added indian as a classification as there was a large population of people of south asian descent in south africa this.

nelson mandela congress youth league evelyn south africa anc trainee makasi official africa nine months two years
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Lineages he quickly realized what was important was ability not heritage since many of his classmates could outrun him on the field and out thinking in the classroom he worked hard to catch up while he was in school his favorite sports were boxing and cross country running if you're looking for metaphors they're easy to find as a trained boxer he learned to fight and as for cross country he developed the endurance that would keep him running for the finish line set to become a chief like his uncle and his father mandela decided to pursue a different path he began to study law at the south african native college at fort horray matriculating in nineteen thirty nine at the age of twenty one it was at fort horray that he first learned of the african national congress a group formed in nineteen twelve to peacefully reclaim land stolen by whites though mandela had friends in the organization he did not become a member at this time it was also at the university that he met oliver tombo mandela leader said quote i like friends who have independent minds because they tend to make you see problems from all angles and quote in tombo mandela found this kind of friend tom became a lifelong friend and ally in the struggle for equality in south africa but they started small with the student council mandela and tombo join forces to organize a boycott to get better food for the students at the college the university was not so understanding mandela's activist impulses he was suspended and left school at the same time mandela's uncle told him that he had found a bride for his nephew mandela did not want to be tied down to a woman he had not chosen himself in nineteen forty one at the age of twenty two nelson mandela ran off to johannesburg to escape the arranged marriage this was an eye opening experience for mandala.

fort horray tom nelson mandela fort horray matriculating oliver tombo mandela south africa mandela johannesburg
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"For nature and for open spaces and wide flowing fields though both his parents were illiterate they realize the importance of an education it was a theme that he later echoed himself saying quote education is the most powerful weapon in which you can use to change the world at the age of seven around nineteen twenty one he began his british schooling going to a local methodist school in coup it was here that his teacher gave him the name nelson because she thought on the children should have good christian names later mandela could not recall why the teacher chose nelson or what his reaction to the new name was probably indifference because he accepted the name and moved forward in nineteen thirty when mandela was twelve years old his father died he his mother and his sisters moved in with an uncle that chief in the tembu tribe because of his uncle standing mandela was able to sit in on council meetings where decisions were reached by consensus mandela later credited that with teaching him democratic values he studied english history geography and the cosa language at his local school he also attended church services every sunday and christianity became a significant part of his life the teenage nelson mandela also developed a love for african history and traditions when he was sixteen years old he traveled with other boys to the banks with imbashi river to undergo the ritual circumcision that marked their transition from boys into men he attended clark berry methodist high school in kobo the largest school for black africans in timberland timberland was the traditional region for the tembu people in the eastern cape province of south africa the school was an adjustment for mandela he had been treated with deference in his tribe because he was part of the chiefs family but here there were many boys with distinguish.

nelson mandela imbashi river clark berry methodist high sch south africa sixteen years twelve years
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Nelson mandela was one of the giants of the twentieth century a political leader who became the first black president of south africa he was an icon who over the span of his long lifetime fought for peace and social justice and help break down the system of apartheid historians compare his moral leadership and wide appeal to such luminaries as martin luther king junior and mahatma gandhi but before he became universally admired for his human rights advocacy he paid a high personal price including spending decades in prison in fact his greatest achievement may have been his ability to forgive not only the architects of the apartheid system but his own jailers mandela himself reminded us that he was a human being saying quote i am not a saint unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying and he set up his own yardstick to measure his life mandela said quote do not judge me by my successes judge me by how many times i fell down and got back up again when nelson mandela died james a joseph who served as the us ambassador to south africa during mandela's presidency put it best nossa nandela will quote be remembered not just for the power of his personal story or the strength of his ideals though those are both worth remembering perhaps most important he taught us about the potential of the human spirit mandela was born on july eighteenth nineteen eighteen in vessel south africa south africa was a mix of many different tribes in ethnicities in previous centuries the country had been colonized i by the dutch and then by the british at this time it was under british rule mandela was born into.

Nelson mandela president south africa martin luther mahatma gandhi us africa