35 Burst results for "Nelson Mandela"

The Woke Duke and Duchess

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | Last month

The Woke Duke and Duchess

"Given the fact that Harry and Meghan are trying to transform an institution, they no longer belong to. It's questionable how much her work in media actually accomplishes. What is clear is the couple have a very dim view of British royalty. Especially for Harry, who lost his mother, the former Princess Diana when he was a child. It's understandable that there would be a degree of hostility between him and his dad, the new King Charles, who cheated on his mother before her passing. Since then, Harry has stepped up to serve in the military in Afghanistan, but was also caught in some compromising pictures taken in Vegas. He's clearly someone who's dealing with a lot of issues. So there are Meghan comes in to solve the problem. But Harry is not the first member of a royal family to experience such conflicts. And tellingly, his story is not at the center of the couple's critique of British royalty. That role has fallen to Meghan, who has taken center stage, who has repeatedly voiced her concerns on Oprah and elsewhere. That the British royals are racists. This critique of the royal family is structural racism has culminated with the couple being awarded with the ripple of hope award by the Robert F. Kennedy human rights organization this month. News of this award has outraged fans of the British royalty who point out Queen Elizabeth's historical support for civil rights leaders like Nelson Mandela and Bishop Desmond Tutu as a form of counter argument. And when pressed, for examples of this supposed racism, the details are underwhelming. In one instance, the couple interpreted the question of who their baby would end up looking like as a racist remark. What's more, the incident left such a shallow impression on the couple that neither can clearly recall or will not share who made the remark and when. The fact of the matter is that Meghan never really seemed very impressed with royalty. When the queen offered her help to learn the ropes about becoming a royal Meghan turned down her royal highness is gesture of kindness, though she surely benefited from the worldwide viewing of her wedding. She also developed a reputation for being hard on her assistance, earning the nickname duchess difficult. So let's be honest, there's nothing about what Meghan is doing currently. That can be said to work towards the improvement of the institution in British royalty.

Meghan Harry British Royals Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Princess Diana King Charles Bishop Desmond Tutu Afghanistan Oprah Vegas Queen Elizabeth Nelson Mandela
"nelson mandela" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

CoinDesk Podcast Network

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

"Into the world of one of the greatest MCs of all time. The Notorious B.I.G.. And heck, I want to visit. And it's so cool. It just shows that all of the 90s is pretty rough. There's a reason he came out of that. Not in the metaverse. Hey, hey. Yeah. My dad was a career. I feel like it'll be a cool cultural experience. Anyway. Sadly, when I read that part of the story, it reminded me of what Google Maps and Google Earth is doing and was doing around cultural hubs. When I was living in South Africa, Google went down to robben island where Nelson Mandela went to prison and they mapped the entire island interviewed ex prisoners who still live on the island, interviewed historians and created this online hub of information and education for people who couldn't go there and learn from these people. And this is like a heightened version of that for me. I think it's so cool and I think that that's going to be the way we learn about history in the future. I don't know, will, as our resident historian, if that's a way that you would like to learn in the future. Oh, nice transition, roll the tape. And now will's history recorded with a function? That's fantastic. I don't know if I have anything else for you though. I mean, I think you guys are spot wrong. I would not want to visit 1998 Brooklyn. This is an interesting thing

Google robben island Nelson Mandela South Africa Brooklyn
Prince Harry challenges divided world to reclaim democracies

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

Prince Harry challenges divided world to reclaim democracies

"Prince Harry marks Nelson Mandela day at the UN Britain's prince Harry challenged people everywhere to adopt Nelson Mandela's spirit of hope in today's divided world We can find meaning and purpose in the struggle We can wear our principles as armor Heed the advice Mandela once gave his son to never give up the battle even in the darkest hour In a keynote and often personal speech to the UN General Assembly's annual celebration prince Harry spoke of a special photo he was given On my wall and in my heart every day is an image of my mother and Mandela meeting in Cape Town in 1997 Which was just 5 months before the death of his mother Princess Diana I'm Shelley Adler

Prince Harry Marks Nelson Mand Prince Harry Nelson Mandela Mandela UN Britain Un General Assembly Cape Town Princess Diana Shelley Adler
"nelson mandela" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:37 min | 10 months ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on WBUR

"Economic and cultural boycotts of South Africa were strengthened in the wake of the sweater killings as international pressure for reform continued to grow But the figurehead of the anti apartheid movement remained behind bars Nelson Mandela had been sentenced to life imprisonment in 1962 for conspiracy to overthrow the state The beginning of the dismantling of apartheid is that Nelson Mandela in prison was beginning to negotiate with the apartheid government because what he decided was that this whole confrontation between black people and the white minority is going to end in a massive bloodbath And in order to avert it he because he has the majority on his side and he had the foresight and the leadership credentials to initiate negotiation as a prisoner His argument was that to know please now can enter into negotiation So they needed to release him in order to negotiate And one of the apartheid government ministers and minister of justice called minister Kobe could say He started visiting Mandela in prison to talk to him and then messaging back to the apartment president PW port And that's how gently and steadily and painstakingly The process of racial discrimination began to be dismantled Theirs.

Nelson Mandela apartheid government South Africa minister Kobe Mandela
"nelson mandela" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on WBUR

"Was a child singing sensation in Nigeria in the 1980s In 1985 when she was just 5 she released her first solo album She went on to release two more before she was a teenager With a hiding from adoring fans flying all over the country to perform or singing in front of statesman like Nelson Mandela Towson's childhood was anything but ordinary So jarring Brit is a classical cellist from the United States who began learning her instrument at the age of four That's after having already studied violin and piano She played her first recital when she was 5 and at 8 years old siduri performed in front of president Obama at The White House She started studying for a bachelor's degree at 13 and is currently completing her master's in Helsinki Finland Tosin and surgery welcome to the program Thank you so much Thank you so much for having us Well let's start at the very beginning And I want to understand where your passion for music came from Sir are you started off learning how to play the piano and the violin all before you turn for So when and how do the cello come into your life So I started on piano and all of these things and then one day we were in the car with my family and you're your ma was playing convince ourselves this one And I mean I was barely for and I had completely fallen in love with it So I was like begging my parents please buy me a cello Please please please Of course it took a little bit of time because I was basically the smallest kid ever asking for a very large very different instrument And yeah eventually I got my two cents in and I got a cello and I was super excited about it and basically just comes from there and yeah I don't know And to send you have a name for your first cello It's called my voice Why that name So actually when I was little I thought that I had a lower voice than a lot of the other kids I was around So you know chose a little bit lower so I was like yeah the timbers match like I kind of went from there and just sort of made it my voice because sometimes it felt easier to play than to speak Right Now Tyson what made you first want to sing My experience was my parents had a gospel band My earliest memories were my parents rehearsing at home I remember how to spare room where the whole band would have all the instruments in and just having music around I guess I'll start born into it Really And so it was natural for me I mean for the first time I held a microphone it just felt like what everyone does I guess is what people in my house do And can you tell us about your first memory of being on the stage Oh yes So I think myself my dad had a disagreement about this I think I was too And my dad thinks I was three And when with parents were on stage performing at a gospel concert in Lagos and I was a large auditorium and left me with a family friend and gave me some ice cream to sit on the side It actually my mom and daddy on stage And I remember just going okay I don't know who you are later I was with I went to good to meet my parents And so I was making a fuss and they finally let me go I finally got stage as a large platform and then someone does with my parents on stage So the lifted me on the stage And then my dad is about to sing a young his mic took it from him and I sang his verse and son was in Yoruba And I saw his concern I thought I sang well people were like wow But for me it was just I was wondering what's the fuss We sing this at home all the time I know I know his song So that was my very best experience actually on stage Okay Taking control I love it It's the jury What do you remember your first time on stage performing I remember I was really little as well maybe like 5 and it was so exciting and everything seemed so big There were so many just the sounded reverberating the hall that it was and I was in the middle of everything and it felt amazing and I hope I can always have this feeling when it comes to performances Right Now tasting the first ever solar performance that you gave or was it a fundraiser at an orphanage in Lagos Do you remember what you performed What was the song called It was a song called a little help for my Friends My dad's bed had been invited to perform And just seeing the children Dan I thought actually I wanted to sing to make children happy That's what I thought the children and often age had no mummies and daddies And so I was thinking okay but they're happy when they hear the music I thought if I sing for the children it makes them happy I was for them and I had some of my dad spent meets performing me and the walkway just seemed like there was a stage and there was so much higher than everybody else but it was just a normal walk weight I was just raised Yes I remember the song I remember performing and it was great to have that I mean what I wanted was a children to actually dance and just be happy from the song And I got that It was a great experience So you remember the song Do you remember the lyrics Exactly Do you know where the next question is Oh my goodness I can't remember how he goes actually A little help a little help for a rest and a little help for my Friends Oh wow that actually that just came with my memory Yeah so that was the song I probably sounded a little bit younger I can imagine that Okay You then recorded your first album I just 5 It was released when you were 6 Talk me through the logistics of recording an album at that age How did it go Did logistics have actually been understood you I had my siblings with me and my cousins record with me in the studio I remember them saying they would do one recording little layer one voice and then lay another voice It just sounds like there's.

Nelson Mandela Towson siduri Brit Nigeria Helsinki Lagos Finland White House timbers Sir Tyson Obama United States Dan
"nelson mandela" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on WTOP

"Tutu is being lauded around the world after his death today at the age of 90 We want to send our condolences to the South Africans and want to wish his family well and maybe he has to be CBS News foreign affairs analyst Pamela fog joined me this afternoon to talk more about the amazing life of Desmond Tutu This is an amazing series of tributes They're pouring in around the world for archbishop Desmond Tutu at 90 years old passed away and what you hear the most I was going to say he has a voice but you hear the most around the world from President Biden former president Obama The secretary general you hear the references to his work as compassionate tireless and an activist against injustice because he really was the voice of the end of apartheid in South Africa And then in later years he continued the fight for poverty climate change human rights and HIV aids So he was an amazing individual whose voice for both nonviolent and monumental change is being seen around the world as just an amazing period of time when he spoke his mind and was really the voice in many ways for Nelson Mandela who had spent 27 years in jail As you said you know Tutu was not at all afraid to speak truth to power but Pamela has also seems fair to say that he had something about him He had a great sense of humor He was kind even playful at times Can you talk a little bit about that Yeah So recent interview what were your regrets He said I regret being a little abrasive but he also then said look on the moment in 1994 when Nelson Mandela won the election and it was in essence the end of apartheid in South Africa he said I looked up and thought maybe I could just die now I've done my hope in the world and then he just broke out in laughter Because it was just a funny thing to say at the moment because he just felt so fulfilled But he had a sense of humor about everything at a time when it was really parted regime was ruthless It had been such a long haul in which he spoke to himself spoke directly to the UN General Assembly He spoke to this was in the 80s He spoke to the Security Council of the United Nations He started all of the negotiations for divestment and tried to convince leaders around the world that the division of black and white in a majority black country just couldn't exist and couldn't go on And just was met with brick walls in the very beginning and a campaign obviously against the voice of it at that time Nelson Mandela and as a clergyman he was allowed to speak So he had to mix both the very powerful message the sense of frustration with a sense of humor That CBS News foreign affairs analyst Pamela faulk It's four 14 will check sports coming up next The following is a paid commercial.

Desmond Tutu Pamela fog Tutu President Biden Nelson Mandela CBS News HIV aids South Africa Pamela Obama Security Council of the United UN General Assembly faulk
Desmond Tutu, South African equality activist, dies at 90

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Desmond Tutu, South African equality activist, dies at 90

"Archbishop archbishop Desmond Desmond Tutu Tutu south south Africa's Africa's Nobel Nobel Peace Peace Prize Prize winning winning activist activist for for racial racial justice justice and and LGBT LGBT rights rights has has died died he he was was ninety ninety the the archbishop archbishop Desmond Desmond Tutu Tutu trust trust says says he he died died peacefully peacefully Sunday Sunday in in Cape Cape Town Town should should you you grew grew up up in in apartheid apartheid South South Africa Africa and and used used his his pulpit pulpit to to galvanize galvanize public public opinion opinion against against racial racial inequality inequality both both at at home home and and globally globally when when the the country's country's apartheid apartheid government government ended ended in in Nelson Nelson Mandela Mandela took took office office in in may may of of nineteen nineteen ninety ninety four four to to two two celebrated celebrated before before our our very very eyes eyes we we see see a a miracle miracle unfolding unfolding in in our our dreams dreams becoming becoming reality reality as as the the sun sun shines shines or or you'll you'll go go on on for for us us all all black black and and white white to to get get them them south south Africa's Africa's president president says says to to choose choose death death is is another another chapter chapter of of bereavement bereavement in in our our nation's nation's farewell farewell to to a a generation generation of of outstanding outstanding south south Africans Africans who who have have bequeathed bequeathed us us a a liberated liberated South South Africa Africa I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Archbishop Archbishop Desmond Nobel Nobel Peace Peace Prize Desmond Desmond Tutu Tutu Cape Cape Town Town South South Africa Africa Nelson Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa United States Julie Julie Walker Walker
"nelson mandela" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Harlem The prohibition of the African National Congress is being decided People serving prison sentences merely because they were members of one of these organizations will be identified and released The clerk ordered the release of Nelson Mandela along with him in 1993 he won the Nobel Peace Prize And in 1994 he lost the presidency to Mandela in South Africa's first democratic elections But the clerk was hounded by questions about his motives that he reformed South Africa because he was backed against the wall or because he thought apartheid was immoral Last year in an interview with the state broadcaster he caused a national uproar by refusing to call apartheid a crime against humanity He was a man who assumed that he was in control until he wasn't That is shoni Pamela the historian at the Fitz institute for social and economic research She says the clerk gets credit for giving that quantum leap speech someone had to do it But maquina says the clerk's intent was never for black South Africans to enjoy the freedom and power that they do now Part of the reason why he felt comfortable with dismantling apartheid was because he assumed that he would be in power In the end he wasn't But whatever his motivation the clerk was a transformational figure whose actions precipitated the implosion of his national party and the rise of Africa's most vibrant democracy In pair news Cape Town South Africa British actor and director Kenneth Branagh has played English kings and German SS officers detectives both French and Swedish a Danish prince and even an American president So it may have escaped your notice that Branagh hails originally from Northern Ireland His latest film Belfast finds him behind the camera as writer and director Critic bob mondelo says even if you didn't know the story was mostly autobiographical you would still call it his most personal film The streets of Belfast 1969 kids playing in a mostly Protestant section of town 9 year old buddy brandishing a trash can lid.

South Africa shoni Pamela African National Congress Fitz institute for social and maquina Harlem Nelson Mandela Mandela Kenneth Branagh Cape Town bob mondelo Branagh Africa Belfast Northern Ireland buddy
"nelson mandela" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"As you heard earlier in the show. Today americans have been marking the passing. Of colin powell. General powell was the united states first. Black secretary of state before that he was the united states. Top military officer but those roles were in colin powell's past when he took a call from as it happens it was december twenty thirteen and general powell had just attended the funeral of nelson mandela. He began by telling carol about his memories of another ceremony. The one where nelson mandela went from freedom fighter to south african president. I was a retired soldier. Then i'd left the chairmanship of the united states the year before and i was privileged to be part of the delegation. And i kinda saw things. The is it a soldier as well as just a citizen watching this. And i'll never forget the moment after waiting for a long time for the ceremony to begin. They finally said leads john. Please welcome a new. President is the new republic of south africa and nelson mandela started to approach the steps to the platform but he was preceded by the four generals of the south african defence forces as his guard of honor. And i was just stunned to see this that these four men who held the power state power of the state that had suppressed flex of so many years was now They were now coming up to be a guard of honor to their new president. Who to be black in a democratic transfer of power as a result of election. And i said my gosh. This is incredible. I looked over the audience. Everybody was applauding. And there were a number of people there who i would not have considered friends of the united states or frankly friends is democracy And there was an inspiring moment for all who dare to witnesses. You know that. Nelson mandela never renounced his belief in armed struggle. How do you explain how he came to be seen in a different light. Well a started out in nonviolent manner and then when that wasn't working and he saw that the power of the statement was going to suppress the movement. He turned toward violence and he turned we. We call them a terrorist. Carry the united states. We put them in our terrorism list. but then those long years in jail i think tempered his views he started to think. Can i possibly win this violence or is there not a stronger weapon. I can use about the power persuasion. The power for example. How about the power of love about the power of showing the rest of the world that under my leadership the leadership of the anc we can bring the two sides together. So let's try the power reconciliation and those long years in jail Allowed him to develop a new more powerful strategy that succeeded but only succeeded because he told everybody that this has to be a time. Not getting even but reconciliation any made it clear to both blacks and whites that he was not a as president of the country stanford either side trying to impress the other that was former. Us secretary of state. Colin powell speaking with carol in two thousand thirteen after the funeral of nelson mandela. Colin powell died of complications from covert.

Colin powell Nelson mandela Us carol south africa john anc stanford
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"For which i am prepared to die. You can check us out at made of metal. Podcasts dot com. I wanted to make a personal ask to everybody listening. If you can just tell a friend about me. If they're into history weird nerdy girls inspiration motivation. I am so excited. I have so many great ideas for upcoming season. And if you can recommend me i would. I can't describe how much would appreciate it would be a lot. You can also review me everywhere you can. I like the back. I want the good feedback. I want the bad feedback. I want all the feedback. So please please please please. I really appreciate just honestly reaching out to me. I love to hear from you guys. This is just been such a joy. I say it every single episode and it's true every single episode. I love making the show. And i want to continue to do that so as always it has been such a pleasure. Please like support. Subscribe review in tele. Ron teleprensa left friend. And you can find this. Instagram view are very very interested in joining the community. We are at made of metal podcast. So that's metal m. e. t. t. l. e. And as always my lobes such a pleasure bloom where you are.

Ron teleprensa tele Instagram
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"On his life while he was in prison but were never successful yes. They actually tried to assassinate him while he was already imprisoned. Also another great fact about nelson's incarceration despite the fact that he was being mistreated beyond belief as a political prisoner and as a black person nelson was able to earn his law degree through the university of london while he was incarcerated nelson's case began to garner international attention and support as people became aware of his fight for the people after being falsely imprisoned for more than twenty years eventually nelson and his fellow members began to have talks with the south african government in order to coordinate their release on the wave of all the support that he'd gained over time this was also a pain staking process but didn't have any true traction until a new president was elected president frederik willem de klerk was elected in south africa. And one of the first things he did was coordinate for. Nelson's release under all the terms. He's been fighting for. Since the beginning the first thing nelson did upon his release was urged those involved in the movement to continue the pressure until the government reformed for the better in particular when the south african black population were given the right to vote. Nelson was also elected the president of the anc in nineteen ninety one and just three years later. Nelson was awarded the nobel peace prize for his anti apartheid. Work in peace talks with president declerk nelson worked with the president to organize the first open election that included black and white candidates amongst the intense chaos and demonstrations happening across the country during the country's reformation period thankfully due to the dutiful and steady negotiation work a level headed and intelligent approach to speaking with the public during this process as well as managing the balance of being a leader nelson was able to secure the first true democratic election in south africa on april twenty seventh nineteen ninety four to no one's surprise nelson mandela was elected as the first black president of south africa. This was an incredible feat. Especially after being imprisoned for more than twenty years not to mention he was seventy seven years. Old nelson would begin the hard in long road of uniting a country that been historically tense and divided supporting his people through a economic collapse as well as securing the rights to vote and a centralized democratic government after serving his term as president nelson retired from politics but not from his humanitarian work. He continued to advocate for causes such as education and health care for his people especially those in the more rural areas of the country while continuing to act as a counselor in certain areas as well nelson was even an advisor in mediator during a civil war in a neighboring country in two thousand seven with his wife. Nelson co founded an organization called the elders. The elders were comprised of political social and economic powerhouses in players. Who all wanted to come together to share their knowledge. The goal of the elders was to work and correct global issues using the combined. Intelligence and experience of those within the group nelson worked tirelessly to secure the freedoms of not just his people but all people all the way up until his passing as nelson aged. He began to experience health issues and would often have to be hospitalized. For long periods of time sadly nelson mandela passed away on december fifth. Twenty thirteen in his home in johannesburg. The very place. He had been imprisoned so many years ago i honestly cannot fully encompass or quantify the impact. This person has had on his country and the globe. Nelson mandela was a person who had a vision not just for a better future for himself but for those around him his commitment to securing freedom up against an unrelenting force with unlimited power like he was going against the actual government who can pretty much do whatever they want to continue in the face of such a opponent that takes a level determination that is almost supernatural and then to be incarcerated falsely and succumb out into still maintain your core self. How does one face. Their ultimate enemy be taken in falsely imprisoned for decades and not lose hope nelson do not allow his current circumstances to penetrate his psyche. He was not afraid of the consequences of his actions. Even if those consequences led to the loss of his own freedoms the emotional fortitude the vision for the future the ability to connect with those in high political positions as well as the everyday people who are working on the farms and in the city's nelson could connect with them all to say he was a leader in my opinion is not adequate. Nelson wasn't a leader. He was change in a single person. He was changed. Personified and unstoppable force. Who didn't need to use force at all and here. I had to use this quote at the end because honestly this is a quote that just makes me want to go out there in. Fight the power. You know what i mean like. I is truly motivating to hear that people continue on no matter what and they continue on in the face of certain death and they know it and this is also important because nelson acknowledged that civil issues. Were just as pressing with native south africans as they were with those who were involved in colonialism which i also thought was so important so during my lifetime i have dedicated myself to the struggle of the african people. I have fought against white domination. And i have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which i hope to live for into achieve but if needs be it is an ideal.

nelson Nelson frederik willem de klerk south africa president declerk nelson nelson mandela south african government Nelson co university of london anc president nelson democratic government johannesburg
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"If i butchered that pronunciation too terribly you have my full permission to absolutely destroyed me in the online forums. But no that i try. Okay give me my credit i tried. But nelson's father was a chief who provided guidance to the tribal leadership and his mother was a stay at home mom who helped to raise the children and maintain the household so nelson had a large family with more than ten siblings who all lived relatively close by. Nelson's father held a position of respect within the tribe which afforded their family wealth instability within the village unfortunately after a disagreement with a tribal official nelson's father was stripped of his position and the family suffered major financial losses. They were forced to flee to a village which allowed them anonymity and the opportunity to start over. The village was located in the rural grasslands. Much more remote in agriculturally focused nelson learned to adapt to living a country lifestyle spending most of his time outdoors playing with the other boys in his village. Another really cool. Tidbit is that nelson was the first of his family to receive formal schooling. Now i don't know if you guys noticed in my previous episodes. I always clarify by saying formal schooling to essentially differentiate between other methods of learning. I'm a firm believer that there are other avenues for gaining knowledge. Other than going to an institution so it's important to acknowledge those as well but it was at this early juncture in. Nelson's life that he would. I be exposed to the consequences of colonialism in his country. When the south african children would attend school they would often be given christian names to replace their birth names. This is where holy law i became nelson as the name was given to him by his teacher. In one thousand nine hundred thirty after his father passed away. Unexpectedly nelson was adopted by an old family. Friend this family friend was a chief and nelson was again. Returned to the more refined lifestyle. He'd become accustomed to as the son of a tribal counselor. Nelson was able to reap the benefits of having access and status continuing his schooling along with the chiefs. Other two children. The children learned about many subjects but nelson was naturally curious about african history. Nelson was also exposed to different cultures and tribes. While he was living with his adopted family. The tribesmen would educate nelson on their history. And how they were. Once they connected people before the perils of colonialism when nelson was in his teen years he participated in a traditional male rite of passage with other boys in his village during the ceremony. Nelson was disheartened by speech. Given by one of the chiefs native south africans had been suffering tremendously at the hands of colonialism and the chiefs spoke on just how bad the circumstances were for the men. It was at this event that nelson fully committed to the goal of uniting south africa while living with his adopted family nelson was trained in the same position as his father preparing to act as an advisor to the tribal leadership after coming of age nelson attended college at the university of fort. Hare a prestigious university that was known for accepting only the greatest of mines while not university nelson engaged in his first act of political resistance by aligning with a student body who demanded change while serving on the student council. He was ultimately kicked out of school due to his actions in sent back home. When the chief heard about nelson's actions in expulsion from school he moved quickly to demand nelson return to school and adhered to a plan for an upcoming arranged marriage. After hearing the chiefs plans for his future nelson ran away from home to the city of johannesburg in order to strike out on his own. While in johannesburg he enrolled in law school and became a lawyer beginning a lengthy career in criminal justice now before we discussed the latter part of. Nelson's life. I wanted to give a formal definition of apartheid and this was taken from wikipedia. Apartheid was a system of institutionalized racial segregation that existed in south africa in south west africa from nineteen forty eight until the early nineteen nineties. It was at this point in. Nelson's life that his goal of fighting for the freedom of his fellow south africans became a reality around. Nineteen forty two nelson would join. An anti-apartheid group called the african national congress and along with other young and like minded individuals formed the african national congress lee youth league these groups work to create a movement that would inspire south africans to fight for their independence using modern strategies and more direct action as opposed to the usual peace talks that had been in progress so far nelson dedicated more than twenty years of his life to working on fighting. The south african government with violent means starting his own law firm with a friend from law. School this was the first black law firm in south africa in specifically worked on counseling and representing the native south african people during this time nelson was organizing nonviolent campaigns to gain the attention of the south african government bringing awareness to the plight of his neighbors and working to dismantle. The racist discrimination in place nelson wasn't just in the office coordinating change. He was also boots on the ground on the front lines. Pushing the agenda of freedom for all in response the government would employ intimidation tactics such as false arrest and imprisonment for any activists that were caught. Luckily nelson was initially able to escape imprisonment until the fateful day in one thousand nine hundred sixty one although he was arrested more than once by this time over the years nelson was able to establish himself in the anti apartheid community as a leader in a such was able to mobilise. His own group called m. k. The south african people had become disillusioned and lost faith in the government to fairly remove. The apartheid with the government always pushing back any attempts to peacefully move forward in the early nineteen sixties nelson helped to coordinate a massive national worker strike across the country in order to highlight the mistreatment of native south africans around nineteen sixty three nelson was captured in arrested for his role in the strike resulting in him being brought to trial not just once but twice nelson had to endure an unfair trial and was sentenced to life in prison. This would have been a devastating verdict for any person but they did not know. Nelson nelson was severely abused in actually contracted to burke ulysses while he was incarcerated incredibly. The south african government still considered nelson a threat and made attempts.

nelson Nelson chiefs university of fort south africa johannesburg african national congress lee south african government south west africa Hare african national congress wikipedia government Nelson nelson burke ulysses
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Love. A unique name in this was a doozy. I so loved learning it. I just love people that have unique names. Nelson mandela was born. July eighteenth nineteen eighteen in a tiny village. In south africa. Nelson mandela's birth name was not nelson. It was holy la mandela. I thought this was pure perfection that holy claw roughly translates to someone who creates mischief or trouble. Like how cool is that. Your name literally means troublemaker. It's like hey trouble literally a holy law. I'm so jealous. Like i love that. I think that is so amazing. And if i butchered that pronunciation too terribly you have my full permission to absolutely destroyed me in the online forums. But no that i try. Okay give me my credit i tried. But nelson's father was a chief who provided guidance to the tribal leadership and his mother was a stay at home mom who helped to raise the children and maintain the household so nelson had a large family with more than ten siblings who all lived relatively close by. Nelson's father held a position of respect within the tribe which afforded their family wealth instability within the village unfortunately after a disagreement with a tribal official nelson's father was stripped of his position and the family suffered major financial losses. They were forced to flee to a village which allowed them anonymity and the opportunity to start over. The village was located in the rural grasslands. Much more remote in agriculturally focused nelson learned to adapt to living a country lifestyle spending most of his time outdoors playing with the other boys in his village. Another really cool. Tidbit is that nelson was the first of his family to receive formal schooling. Now i don't know if you guys noticed in my previous episodes. I always clarify by saying formal schooling to essentially differentiate between other methods of learning. I'm a firm believer that there are other avenues for gaining knowledge. Other than going to an institution so it's important to acknowledge those as well but it was at this early juncture in. Nelson's life that he would. I be exposed to the consequences of colonialism in his country. When the south african children would attend school they would often be given christian names to replace their birth names. This is where holy law i became nelson as the name was given to him by his teacher. In one thousand nine hundred thirty after his father passed away. Unexpectedly nelson was adopted by an old family. Friend this family friend was a chief and nelson was again. Returned to the more refined lifestyle. He'd become accustomed to as the son of a tribal counselor. Nelson was able to reap the benefits of having access and status continuing his schooling along with the chiefs. Other two children. The children learned about many subjects but nelson was naturally curious about african history. Nelson was also exposed to different cultures and tribes. While he was living with his adopted family. The tribesmen would educate nelson on their history. And how they were. Once they connected people before the perils of colonialism when nelson was in his teen years he participated in a traditional male rite of passage with other boys in his village during the ceremony. Nelson was disheartened by speech. Given by one of the chiefs native south africans had been suffering tremendously at the hands of colonialism and the chiefs spoke on just how bad the circumstances were for the men. It was at this event that nelson fully committed to the goal of uniting south africa while living with his adopted family nelson was trained in the same position as his father preparing to act as an advisor to the tribal leadership after coming of age nelson attended college at the university of fort. Hare a prestigious university that was known for accepting only the greatest of mines while not university nelson engaged in his first act of political resistance by aligning with a student body who demanded change while serving on the student council. He was ultimately kicked out of school due to his actions in sent back home. When the chief heard about nelson's actions in expulsion from school he moved quickly to demand nelson return to school and adhered to a plan for an upcoming arranged marriage. After hearing the chiefs plans for his future nelson ran away from home to the city of johannesburg in order to strike out on his own. While in johannesburg he enrolled in law school and became a lawyer beginning a lengthy career in criminal justice now before we discussed the latter part of. Nelson's life. I wanted to give a formal definition of apartheid and this was taken from wikipedia. Apartheid was a system of institutionalized racial segregation that existed in south africa in south west africa from nineteen forty eight until the early nineteen nineties. It was at this point in. Nelson's life that his goal of fighting for the freedom of his fellow south africans became a reality around. Nineteen forty two nelson would join. An anti-apartheid group called the african national congress and along with other young and like minded individuals formed the african national congress lee youth league these groups work to create a movement that would inspire south africans to fight for their independence using modern strategies and more direct action as opposed to the usual peace talks that had been in progress so far nelson dedicated more than twenty years of his life to working on fighting. The south african government with violent means starting his own law firm with a friend from law. School this was the first black law firm in south africa in specifically worked on counseling and representing the native south african people during this time nelson was organizing nonviolent campaigns to gain the attention of the south african government bringing awareness to the plight of his neighbors and working to dismantle. The racist discrimination in place nelson wasn't just in the office coordinating change. He was also boots on the ground on the front lines. Pushing the agenda of freedom for all in response the government would employ intimidation tactics such as false arrest and imprisonment for any activists that were caught. Luckily nelson was initially able to escape imprisonment until the fateful day in one thousand nine hundred sixty one although he was arrested more than once by this time over the years nelson was able to establish himself in the anti apartheid community as a leader in a such was able to mobilise. His own group called m. k. The south african people had become disillusioned and lost faith in the government to fairly remove. The apartheid with the government always pushing back any attempts to peacefully move forward.

nelson Nelson Nelson mandela la mandela chiefs south africa university of fort johannesburg african national congress lee Hare south west africa south african government african national congress wikipedia government
"nelson mandela" Discussed on The Boxcutter Podcast

The Boxcutter Podcast

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on The Boxcutter Podcast

"Back to the box cutter. Welcome back is going to start out with something kind of interesting here okay. Have you ever heard of the mandela affect now does this deal with nelson mandela. It does okay weird. So the mandela effect refers to a situation in which a large group of people believe that an event occurred which actually did not occur. It's very strange. Because it's like strange. Large groups of people all piece together the same memories like they fill in the blanks with things. That actually didn't happen latte. Yeah so an example is reason is called mandela is because Yeah why didn't get named after him so nelson mandela. There's this theory out there that he Died in prison in the nineteen eighties. I'll okay and then in a lot of people believe that yes well. The truth is that he lived to until two thousand thirteen right as a freeman. So okay so was that not more of a conspiracy theory around him dying in prison. I mean same thing was said about paul mccartney Elvis all the elvis sightings. Does this fit into that same ideology. There's a lot of crossover with conspiracy theories because okay people obviously if you re pieced together memories in the same way and believe something happened in a large group of people all believe it. Then it becomes a conspiracy theory. I see so. But what the what. They're so there is a point to this though. We're relevancy as far as what are you going to get it something that there's a mandela effect going on or no oh i'm gonna ask you something okay all right because it's interesting some of them. I legitimate thought were true. And they're not like so it shows that all of our brains they piece memories together in this weird way and that's what the point of the of the thing is is that The idea of shared false memories is not proof of an alternate reality so just because we all share a false memory and we pieced together. That way doesn't mean that actually happened so a good example of that is the monopoly man. The monopoly man does the monopoly man. Have a monocle or not.

mandela nelson mandela paul mccartney Elvis
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"It has nothing to do with you being callous, though you may be. In most of these rituals, when you really look into the more traditional cultures, it's an almost ceremonial removing of the child from the care of the women. That's part of it. You're with the women they come and get you. They remove you and then they take you out to do whatever this hard thing is. And that is very, very fascinating. And look, I don't know nearly enough about this stuff. But when I say that it captures my imagination, that would be a true understatement. I read the book long walk to freedom, Nelson Mandela, longtime, listeners. The show will probably be tired. Not to be confused. Long walk by Stephen King, which definitely not to be confused yet. It's kind of relevant, but don't scare you. Yes. And in the book, he legitimately went through his tribes coming of age ritual. And I found it utterly fascinating. And I don't claim to understand it and I need to research it more. But here are the parts that I remember and if anybody watching this knows better facts drop in the comments. But they would strip these boys naked. I think they were 14. They sit them down on the ground, spread eagle in front of the whole tribe and then an elder or the tribe leader. I don't remember who it is, comes up with a really sharp fucking rock. They grab your foreskin and they just cut that shit off. And when they do it, you're supposed to scream this warrior prayer. And then they cover you in clay, like head to toe, and then that night, a woman comes in like slowly removes it all. And I just thought, wow, like there's something there. There's some like communication almost like a rebirth from the clay. Like, oh, it's fucking. It's just so interesting to have the chills that they there's something about the breakdown and their society of the roles of male and female and that it's the woman that ultimately comes in like washes you and sort of, you know, either the moment of rebirth or the sort of putting back together. I don't know. I just found it absolutely fascinating. Yeah, I think there's some savagery that has been a part of many cultures rights of passage that I don't think is necessary and that modern context even a lot of insights. Well, primarily in more of an ancient context, I would say there are aspects of modern psychology that we have that we're now well aware of related to post traumatic stress disorder and traumatic events that dictate that if a Rite of passage is just a terribly torturous event, I think that that has potential to wire the cells up into sympathetic nervous system mode. Like that constant fight and flight super wired up type of approach that could leave someone scarred for life to a certain extent, either physically or psychologically or both. I like to read my son's wild west stories, and there was one wild west where we were reading about a Native American tribe that a little bit similar to the story that you've just told.

Nelson Mandela Stephen King
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Mind Pump

Mind Pump

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Mind Pump

"I need to know sign language. What the hell i did. I don't know why. I don't. I've seen the i don't alive found that so funny dude. I was rolling on the floor. When i saw that. Because it's real right there. So i mean they use a lot of times. These concerts will have somebody doing. Have you seen this doug. I haven't seen play play. She's like you miss a lady. Doing the lady like reenactments and like when she does the dick suck. That's so funny. It's like a- right here. Like oh my gosh. Jeez louise hilarious song is missing is puppets renowned god edges. Just die. because i you know i think too. Like if you're cardi b.'s. Team mike and you start interviewing people who do silent which i like. Hey so we're looking for somebody to follow us on tour. We need to do sign language. Is this something that you're capable of doing. They're like oh yeah. It sounds great. You know what i'm saying. You have no idea what you're walking into your like now wait. Didn't someone do that a while ago. I don't remember where it was but somebody actually got hired as the sign. Language interpreter didn't know sign language so the whole time they were just melted nelson man. What's the guy did not know sign language and he was just making stuff up the whole time he was just fake in hand signals. Like call them out right away for nelson mandela. That was really guilt real deal. Yeah that that's pretty. Sure he did it a couple of other times too and just totally faked his way into that job. I how how did you get. I mean i understand like some random person but someone of that calibre. how how did they. They probably just trusted him. Like oh you oh you do sign language. that's cool. what do you test them. Show me you know what i mean. So they probably just trust them and then you did it but it was hilarious when you watch when you watch it the guy i mean what. Okay so what happens that person get jail time for that or find or get in trouble like what. How is it. just go to jail you. Just you just probably. I'm sure they didn't pay him. I'm sure yeah you're fired So this is a whole. It's a whole thing. We'll skip that for now. That was a long time december. Two because his his memorial was a while ago years ago. Yeah hey so that. That reminds me of this. Con- i just read about this. They're like you think einstein was smart. And you think all these other like newton smart will this guy..

doug mike nelson mandela nelson einstein newton
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"That we had absolute nine hundred dollars most of which have never ever been used. And this was at the time. When then president kabul and becky nelson mandela's successor was saying we didn't have the finances to provide antiretrovirals to the six million south africans living with hiv aids at the time a study at harvard. Very conservative study concludes that over the following. Five years that policy decision resulted in a minimum of three hundred sixty five thousand avoidable deaths of south citizens. How many three hundred and sixty five thousand. And that's a very conservative. forget. It dissolves in secchi two thousand babies every year in those five years being born hiv positive because we couldn't afford to provide mother-to-child-transmission treatment for the mothers while we were refunding. Ten billion dollars of weapons that we didn't need. Why did we buy the weapons. The three hundred fifty million dollars of bribes being paid by the companies and governments behind those deals point. I wanted to make. Is that tony blair. Prime minister of the united kingdom at the time makes three visits to south africa specifically to get south africa to buy a british jet trainer. Fighter plane plane with the head of the south. African air force has said they do not want a do not want a plane that is more than double the cost of the plane that the f. o.'s. Actually once that meets its technical specifications and whose pilots could actually fly these k. At the time. That blair is doing some. The british company paid one hundred fifteen million pounds of bribes on that one contract. Bribes negotiated during dinner on the royal yacht. Britannia while this is going on tony blair has also established something called the commission on africa and he announces with great fanfare that his commission on africa has completed astonishingly. That africa requires that's governance and less corruption. While tony blah is trumpeting the results of his commission on africa. He is not only persuading the south. Africans of this corrupt arms. Deal is doing the same thing on behalf of the same british defense company in seven other countries so britain and its defense companies are paying over a billion pounds of bribes around the world while he is trumpeting. That african needs that's governance and less corruption. The question i ask myself is yes. South africans who accepted bribes corrupt and should go to jail. I'm a witness in the trial of former president. Jacob zuma in relation to those bribes so there is a chance that he will go to jail. What about tony blair. What about the chief executive and chair of the british defence company that paid those bribes. So that's the one thing that so obviously a christmas just the ranki policy and then the second thing is you know when we think. The corruption is a victimless crime. Let's think of those africans. The will med at by the greed of that political leaders. We will measured by the greed of the british prime minister and his government. Who were murdered by the greed if those defense companies but it gets even worse. Let's look at the example. Greed is good. We will do whatever we can to maximize profits so after the tragedy of nine eleven with thousands of innocent people lose their lives. Slow is just right. if you're on vacation a sloth or describing quickbooks more likes slow books. It sucks you..

president kabul becky nelson mandela tony blair African air force hiv aids africa south africa tony blah harvard united kingdom blair Jacob zuma britain
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"But he used these theories to effectively make us feel okay with greed and with being greedy and he acknowledges it he claimed that if we're all greedy now in particular lives we will get the optimal economic outcomes. I think we have seen over and over and over again. How incredibly wrong. That is. And i mean i can cite. We could sit tiff days. Am i could cite examples of that. The reality is the what is the most important thing to human being. What do i tell my children. I want them to be happy this. I want them to have a happy life. And i want them to be able to be happy without causing harm to anyone else. And if they're enormously successful and success you know be financial intellectual public service. Whatever if they all successful you can be successful than lead a good life. There are two key ingredients. And this. I was taught daily by nelson mandela when i had the privilege of working under him the fastest humility. If you knew when this man. When i was working with him which was from the early nineteen ninety s. He was probably the most famous pass on the planet. Yeah never once. Did i see him. Act like that And the way in which manifested which is the second for me. The second most important thing was that he would respect every single person. He came into contact with in exactly the same way as he would want to be respected. And if you did not do that you would take issue with you constantly. Extraordinary examples of this guy. Who's i worked at his economic advisor very senior politician in the country who is really seen. Almost as mandela's son even though he wasn't he'd been rubbing island thirteen years. Great looking guy very charismatic. We were doing an election meeting before our fest democratic elections in ninety four this guy who has since gone on to be a very successful businessman with billions arrives. Forty five minutes late for this meeting now. The seam was known to not be a very punctual is ation mondello. Had been there for forty five minutes when this gentleman arrives mandela stands up in front of the sort of five hundred people who are in what we used to call it people's forum and as the skies walking down between the people greeting the moly singing and clapping. He's got a big smile on his face and as he gets about two meters away from mr mandela. Because he wasn't president yet says to him. So you'll time is more valuable time these people we've been waiting here for you for forty five minutes. You want these people to elect you to represent them but you're so much more important than them. How can you represent them. If you're so much more important with them and i saw this man literally shrink in front and it was incredibly hosh by mandela. But the reality was if he saw a person particularly a powerful person disrespecting other human beings he couldn't help himself to put it right. And i think whatever you do or don't do in your life to have humility about it and to treat all human beings with the same respect and i think those two things and it's not easy thing to do neither of those things easy. Yeah that's not the way we are trained to live. Our lives can enormous. But as you said you know remains work A neo liberalism. You know for me. i've said this many times You know there's a speech in In the movie wall street where golden gecko talks about greed is good. It is the it is the basic speech of neoliberalism. And it's and it was done as a commentary to how corrupt things will becoming back then And now that speech is kind of held up as a as a good thing and really what i see it as i'm actually working on a piece around this unimaginably wanting to make a film about it but which is the objectivism. The philosophy of an rand is the destroyer of dignity in our world. That we we have an rand was a cult leader in my thinking. And i want to be clear. I want to be really clever. Everybody again. I am a capitalist. Not that kind. But i am capitalist. And what's more to be totally transparent in the thirties in my early thirties. In my twenties and early thirties. I thought an random. Fountainhead and those books. Atlas shrugged were fantastic and then with a little bit of maturity i went. Oh my god. This is ruthless right. And what's more is if you read the books you notice that. There's never a wavering. there's no humanity. It's absolutely this or it's that that people are now we humans so we've become the we're all in this. Excuse me king cult of objectivism under an rand. That's pushed out as neo liberalism that as stripping people of dignity and so now we now it makes corruption okay and melos true tunnel blind eye to the fact that yes. I'll gdp is good well. Why 'cause we sold arms to people a bombing or killing innocent people. And by the way if you read anything by david colton who has been guest on on curiosity bites when corporations rule the world if you read anything by john perkins the who's also been on curiosity bites who you know who was the economic hit men. You know you really quickly discover. Oh you're gonna take a deeper look at these things and the gdp is a death economy. I everything you say. They're just two examples that as you were talking spring to mind. The first is generally around corruption. So i left. Parliament resigned the night before the anc. We're going to force me out of parliament because they refused to allow unfettered investigation into a massively corrupt arms. Deal right this young democracy that had doug to an socio economic challenges when we took over in one thousand nine hundred four after three hundred fifty years of racism and subdued gatien decides to spend ten billion. Us.

mandela nelson mandela ation mondello david colton Atlas john perkins anc Parliament parliament doug gatien Us
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Conversation with our andrew. Feinstein the a former anc mp who served under nelson. Mandela is the author and filmmaker and investigates the corrupt and deadly global arm straight. He is the author of the shadow world inside the global trade which has been made into an award winning documentary and we were finishing up in part one. We were talking about this idea where people were saying. Well how much money do the corrupt people need them was talking about well. Is it money or is it power and if it's power You know that they do. They go to bed at night thinking you know. I was a douchebag today. All the other thing oh yeah. I'm just collecting more for the family. And i was asking the question. Do they have the moral fiber. So i'm putting that now through to you andrew. It's an incredibly interesting question. I agree with you entirely. It's not about the money you know while. I was researching the shadow book. I discovered the vladimir putin at the time. And this is going back to the mid twenty eleven so way out of date. These figures was worth somewhere over. Forty billion dollars at this point okay. So it's i'm sorry. When did you start was. This is probably the figures would probably correct for about mid twenty eleven full django. Yeah so going back about ten years so no no. Big deal happens in russia. Vietnam still be it. A natural gas deal being oil deal with putin giving his cut and part of the reason for that is he wants to remind the guards who is boss. Yeah and he's not just. The bus politically is the boss. Economically is up and the oligarchs who try and cross him or who didn't play the game they discover their fate. Russky ski sat in jail for many years. You know some of them get murdered in rural parts of the united kingdom. Cetera et cetera. Okay so is the money important to putin. Of course not it is part of the sense of self and for a lot of these people the only way they can define that sense of self is by constantly accumulating more and more because that has become the currency of self worth however when we say there any desire on their part. Do they have any moral fiber. Do they have any desire to lead a good life. The question i would ask is why do so many of them because what every arms dealer does every successful arms dealer. I've interviewed and come across over the years have film made about themselves and about their great philanthropic work really. Oh absolutely absolutely and you know. I can name you. South african arms dealer is done a french arms dealer. Who's done it swiss dealer. Who's done it just you know. It's extraordinary. and some of them are fiction. some of them are actual documentaries about these people. I mean it's the most extraordinary thing. I was once asked to appear in one of them. They didn't realize my take on the arms trade. Ambaum the pests and they were making the film about. You wouldn't be shocked to hear. They never used the really. I'm sure i am. It's like why does it. Bill gates fund. What was the melander and bill gates foundation. We're not quite sure what it's going to be cold going He is well could increase by another ten billion dollars. Never gonna make any difference to him. Yes it gives him his sense of self worth perhaps but he is clearly seeking something else as well. You know for those of us who sort of dabbled in psychology. There's this sort of very basic theory of maslow's hierarchy of needs and the reality is that the highest need that human beings have is ford maslow's described the self actualization footsie once seeing oneself is making a positive difference in the world. Yes until i actually believe that if we forced on these people if i'm media covered the reality of the good and bad of what they do we would have far more of that self awareness but even without the media playing that important role. I believe there is a great deal of it and the question that i asked myself constantly because i have for a variety of strange reasons fest in government than in the private sector in the financial sector and then in the work that i do. I've with many very wealthy and very powerful people. Yes i always dressing appropriately for it and they tell me that all of the time and it amazes me. How many of them want people to think that they are good people. Why do these people. Why did they want to be seen with nelson mandela. Why was it important to them to be associated with people who are seeing who are seen to be doing good in the world because ultimately as human beings. I believe that is in need when you struggling on a daily basis to feed your family to get a decent roof over your head to have sufficient place to get an education for your children to have an okay paying job right. You might not think about these things as much no when you are with billions when you do have a lot of time it on your private jet between your mistress and your wife in your limousine when you are on your own and you don't have anyone to impress what is really important. Then and that for me is where we have gone so wrong. Is that neoliberalism. In my opinion which is a particular form. An extreme form of capitalism has also compete us at dow values which is why in the film of the shadow world which depending on where you live. You can often see online. It's also on aljazeera english on a regular basis but in the film we see milton. Friedman the intellectual godfather of neil neo-liberalism and effectively when milton friedman did is. He created theories some of the assumptions of which a deeply deeply problematic. And i say that as a student of economics yes will than anything else. But that's a whole nother conversation..

putin andrew South african arms Feinstein anc Mandela bill gates foundation vladimir putin nelson ford maslow Vietnam russia united kingdom Bill gates maslow nelson mandela neil neo Friedman
"nelson mandela" Discussed on Sadhguru's Podcast

Sadhguru's Podcast

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"nelson mandela" Discussed on Sadhguru's Podcast

"I I'm not sure how much you know about but my country but you know we've had a phenomenal time since nelson mandela was released in prison. Twenty seven years ago both highs and lows I mean really high highs..

nelson mandela
Cross-Cultural Casting: Noteworthy for Hollywood, but Not Exactly New

Coronavirus Daily

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Cross-Cultural Casting: Noteworthy for Hollywood, but Not Exactly New

"The conventional criticism of diverse casting is that it violates some unspoken rule about realism. It's utterly one way traffic. He will not be getting any white people. Playing fellow lay anytime soon. If there's a bio-pic nelson mandela will not be played by a white actor. This is gum. That's the view on one british. Talk show anyway. But as npr's film critic bob mandela explains cross cultural casting has always raised eyebrows even though it's as old as casting itself in the fifth century bc when the greek playwright escalates needed a defense attorney for his leading man in the tragedy or sta he picked the god apollo choice. You do not make. If you're worried about vera similitude in casting live theater has always assumed. The audience can make imaginative leaps whether it's depicting warrior kings who rant or founding fathers who wrap shots. Hamilton of course is a special case. It's a broadway musical famous. Not just for putting hip hop in the mouths of thomas jefferson and george washington but for matching black and brown faces to those historic white characters. Every time i write a piece of theater. I'm trying to get us on the board. Latino composer-lyricist lin-manuel miranda's speaking with fresh air's terry gross black and brown artists. This is a story of america then told by american now. It's our country to talk with inclusion. Hamilton's calling card. Diverse audiences made it a worldwide phenomenon and outcome. That seems natural. In retrospect but that flew in the face of decades of theatre practice in nineteen eighty-six when the stage union actor's equity convened the first national symposium on nontraditional casting. It noted that more than ninety percent of actors hired in the us were white and presented scenes designed to help theater makers consider other possibilities

Bob Mandela Vera Similitude Nelson Mandela NPR Manuel Miranda Hamilton Thomas Jefferson Terry Gross George Washington LIN Brown United States
Thought of the Day: Leaders Should Always Speak Last

Leadership Lifestyle Podcast

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Thought of the Day: Leaders Should Always Speak Last

"Leaders should always speak last welcome. Today's leadership thought of the day brought to you by leadership lifestyle. Podcast leaders should always speak last. This is something that the great nelson mandela talked about. When he was actually talking about his father who was a tribal leader in one of his principles. His father's principles is when they would have a meeting. He would just sit in silence and let everybody speak first so he could get everybody's perspective on different things and really focus on listening where people are coming from before he would interject and when that conversation came out other people have ideas from other people and better things. It'd be discussed because they weren't they when the leader speaks i. Everybody wants to mimic of leader said it. Maybe i should say it instead. Listen to your team. Then you want to interject when you have all the information. Ask some great questions. So today's leadership thought of the day brought to better leadership lifestyle. Podcast grow yourself just a little bit

Nelson Mandela
'Coming 2 America' Goes Heavy On Nostalgia

Morning Edition

03:07 min | 2 years ago

'Coming 2 America' Goes Heavy On Nostalgia

"Too heavily on nostalgia. Unless you're a huge fan of Eddie Murphy's classic 1988 film coming to America, and lots of people are there's not going to be a lot for you, and it's less than inspired sequel Coming to America. We celebrated her 30 years absolute and prosperity. 30 Years of service. Well, great nation on 30 Years off Delicious fast food. The new film begins with Murphy's Prince Akeem Joe Fair, opening a fast food restaurant called McDowell's in the African Country of Amanda Devote ease of the first movie. No. This chain is owned by Akin's American father in law, played by John Amos, who denies his business is in any way a rip off of another well known burger joint. They've got egg mcmuffins way that a mixed up in this way are also celebrating my new beyond big mix burger, So there's no meat. There's no meat. Maybe we're getting much better with Pepsi Call Max here are subtle as a sledgehammer. This scene mostly gives us an excuse to see Amos and Louie Anderson, who also appeared in the first film, The Story of the original movie was a black centered fairytale. Murphy's a keen came to America, Queens, New York, of course, tow avoid an arranged marriage and find true love in the new movie. After the death of his father, King Akeem discovered he fathered a son unknowingly in America. Teams return to Queens brings one of the Sequels funniest moments when he revisits a local barber shop where movie magic allows Murphy and costar Arsenio Hall to play multiple parts. Just like in the first film can't be both famine and blood. Damn, Nelson Mandela and Winnie just discovered that I may have a bastard son here in this land conceived during my last visit. How much data supports you getting from the King pays no child support. No time for 30 years and you came back. You're the damn it. Comic Jermaine Fowler plays the sun. Lovell Johnson, who brings King a came home to meet his mother marry played by Saturday night Live alum Leslie Jones. My African I told you he was gonna come back. So you know this man. I definitely know this man. I know this man all the way live much as I love Leslie Jones, she and levels. Other American relatives, including Tracy Morgan, as his uncle Come off is uncomfortable stereotypes as King Akeem introduces his son to the moonda and pressures him into an arranged marriage. Comedy gets clunkier and more predictable, like a Mel Brooks style parody of the Black Panther of The Lion King and the first coming to America. Ultimately, this coming to America is mostly an excuse to bask in the glow of characters who's shown so much brighter and distinctively. 33 years ago. I'm Eric Deggans. The Los Angeles Philharmonic is launching a new season of streaming concerts today called

America Prince Akeem Joe Fair Amanda Devote Murphy John Amos King Akeem Eddie Murphy Leslie Jones Queens Louie Anderson Mcdowell Akin Jermaine Fowler Lovell Johnson Pepsi Arsenio Hall Amos Nelson Mandela Winnie Moonda
Myanmar Erupts in Protests After Military Coup

BBC World Service

05:28 min | 2 years ago

Myanmar Erupts in Protests After Military Coup

"Seeing members of the civilian government arrested on military vehicles back on the move has sent a shudder of apprehension across Myanmar people. The BBC has contacted their have spoken of their fear about what comes next. The military coup has taken the outside world by surprise, too. The United States government has announced it will rethink its decision on sanctions, which were lifted in light of the moves towards democracy since 2010 at night people in towns and cities in Myanmar bang pots and pans in protest of the military takeover. Jonathan head. Military coups. Real hunters taking over with uniforms, lots of braid and tanks on the streets. It becomes such an aberration that when they do happen, there is always an element of disbelief. It's as though a part of our breakneck technology driven world is suddenly catapulted back Toe a bad movie from the 19 seventies. One that took place in Mama on Monday was especially baffling as it was carried out by an army which had designed the Democratic system it over through and it kept so much political power under it. Coup seemed unnecessary. And it deposed, uncensored uchi, a leader once idolized as a fearless champion of freedom but who in defending the military against charges of genocide was then denounced as a fallen angel. Gamma is a fearfully complicated country with a history, which has bean traumatic even by Southeast Asia's turbulence standards. Get the rest of the world has bean unable to see it this way because of the overpowering draw of a woman veiled in a mythical aura, combining fragile femininity with steely resolve magnetic charm. With imperious detachment. She was the stuff of fairy tales, holding out a loan against an antediluvian and brutal military and eventually cajoling them into giving the Burmese people free elections. And in huge numbers, they chose her. That narrative, though, has been hard to square with the woman who also appeared callously insensitive to the horrors endured by Muslim RA hinges on her watch. Now we're being asked to reengage with uncensored DCI in military custody Once more. I've seen lively debates among engaged Burma watches over whether she should be supported again as the imprisoned symbol of her people's democratic aspirations. Or not, because of the many undemocratic impulses she showed, is the country's defacto leader. How did we get so focused on this one person in a country of 55 million and in a region with so many other woeful tales of injustice that deserve our attention. Partly it's about timing. Went on sans Souci first emerged as a political figure in 1988 on what was supposed to be a short trip home from Britain, where she lived with her British husband and two sons, Burma as it was then called Was little known trapped in military imposed isolation. A terrible repression of the protest movement. She led on the start of her long incarceration coincided with the collapse of communism in Europe and the rise of a new World order. In which it was hoped Western or U. N. Led intervention could write many of the world's wrongs. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, just a year after the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, and it was hard not to see similarities in their dignity and fortitude. Like Mandela, uncensored cheese. Long periods of isolation under house arrest meant that few got to know her well, and the world instead projected an ideal ized version onto a complex and difficult personality. She came to embody the optimistic belief that the arc of history in the memorable phrase used by President Obama, whose visit to Myanmar marks the high point of uncensored cheese reputation. Was bending inevitably towards democracy and freedom. Fast forward to this year, and all that optimism has long since dissolved in the disappointments in Afghanistan and Iraq in a global financial crash in bitterly polarized politics. And now a pandemic. Few believe anymore in the kind of miracles that Myanmar's transition to democracy was once thought to be. United Nations Security Council, the embryonic world government that never, Watts has mastered a statement of concern over Mama, which failed even to mention the coup the illegal overthrow of an elected government. On San Souci is now being charged with the laughable a fence of possessing illegal walkie talkies. That will be enough, though for the hunter to disqualify her from the new election. It's promising to hold eventually. Have done this to her before, but she is now 75 years old. If she manages another political reincarnation, the generals are betting she'll no longer be the resolute figure they've bean unable to beat for so long. And perhaps it's time for all of us. Even the party she founded and has dominated for more than three decades to let go of the woman. They still call Mother Sue and the Lady. And to seek younger personalities who can chart Myanmar's future.

Myanmar Civilian Government United States Government BBC Jonathan Southeast Asia DCI Army Nobel Peace Prize Nelson Mandela Embryonic World Government Mandela Britain San Souci Europe President Obama United Nations Security Counci Afghanistan Iraq Watts
David Dinkins, New York's first Black mayor, dies at 93

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:36 min | 2 years ago

David Dinkins, New York's first Black mayor, dies at 93

"Former new york city mayor. David dinkins passed away last night at the age of ninety three. Join now but the reverend al sharpton president the next action network and host of politics nation. Right here on. Msnbc and rev. i've met david dinkins in person because you. I met him through you. I think he was here to do at thirty rock to do an interview for your show. And i'm so excited to meet him. He was such a great man. What are you remember. most about David dinkins well. I knew david dinkins. Since i was a teenager when i was sixteen and started my national youth movement group. He was the lawyer that incorporated us and down through the years. We maintain the relationship. And sometimes i would argue would on call them names and one hundred be more strident and it took time to understand that. He had such grace even under the most tumultuous circumstances and i felt he should be more strident. He said al. You have to learn how to get the job done. Keep your eye on the prize. But i most remember. Is that when we were facing a police. Killing of a young man named ahmadou diablo. Who in the hell of forty one bullets was killed. Nine thousand nine hundred bullets for only gone in his debut. Stick in a key in the door and the police thought. They said they thought he had a weapon. He was just going home. They were looking for someone else and david dinkins. When we started protests every day we would go down to the police headquarters. The main one in new york and sit in and hundreds would be arrested. He called me one. One is at what time y'all have. The demonstrations was a former. I said ten in the morning. he's coming down. I said but we're getting arrested. He's out seeing the morning and he came down and went to one police plaza where he had been mayor and got on a knee way before colin cabinet. He took a knee and was arrested and had them cuffed him with congressman. Charlie rangel and himself and me and we went to jail fighting police reform that he started with that civilian complaint review board. He never left the struggle. He was not wanting to be loud and boisterous but he was firm and made real change happen. Yeah absolutely you know. We started off and we could see charlie rangel and james brown. Lots of people in the photos that are that. I don't know if you can see them. That are coming up as as you're talking and you know we started off by talking about the way that dinkins was taken out of office by rudy. Giuliani this rage. That giuliani stoked already. There in the police against what mayor dinkins wanted to do which was changed policing. I feel like we're kind of having a rerun of that conversation about black lives matter about whether or not police should be free to kill it will in black communities. He tried to do something about it. Wouldn't you take from that fight. Is it dispiriting to think that after great men like this have tried after. You've tried after we've had all of these movements. We're still fighting about this were you. Were you fight you win. You don't fight to say the fight is over in a certain amount of rows. This is not pro boxing wrestling. You fight to you win and every struggle has had long struggles. I remember when nelson mandela gain which you mentioned then david dinkins had me as potted group. That went to the un with him. And just jackson. All of us. And when i thought about it took nelson mandela being jailed. Twenty seven years after fighting many decades around the pon-tae. How can we complain about fighting. We fight to. We win knowing that the victory is certain. And that's what they dickens would always say and as i want more national from new york activism. He said you still fighting. Now keep fighting. He come down national action network rallies. In fact he was there just a few months ago. We had his ninetieth birthday there and we never forgot this. Gentle giant had a had a spine of steel. And he didn't need to be boisterous he just needed to be effective and he was the one that broke that ceiling and made people know you could be the ceo of the biggest city in the world and perform. He revitalized times square. He started this whole community policing and in many ways you are more than correct. Joy is almost like to study donald trump. You have to study rudy giuliani. They took credit for things then get predecessor did and they used race to try and rev up a political career that ended up embarrassing them at the end. Indeed amen. thank you reverend now. It's always great to talk with you. Revenue sharpen. Thank you very much. I

David Dinkins Charlie Rangel Ahmadou Diablo Reverend Al Sharpton Dinkins Msnbc New York City Nelson Mandela James Brown AL Colin New York Giuliani Rudy Boxing Wrestling UN Dickens
Ten Doors

Criminal

04:58 min | 2 years ago

Ten Doors

"We know now that they were following us for about a month. Cry To our we did. Notice strange things happening. But when you're working underground you are. For most of the time, you're a bit paranoid you. You kind of imagine that everyone is looking at you knows what you're doing. And looking back off to the arrest. We realized that they were following us for quite a while. In Nineteen Seventy, eight, twenty, nine year, old Tim Jenkin was active in the political efforts of South Africa's anti-apartheid movement. The country had been operating under apartheid for thirty years. A system that institutionalized racial segregation. The word apartheid means a partner. and. The government was controlled by white minority. Tim Jenkin White. He grew up in Cape Town. So I grew up under the situation with everything was divided. So. spatially, cities and towns divided the white areas. Black areas. So we went to white schools. Were black schools in black areas. Everything was separated even buildings had separate lifts for White People. For Black People. Talk said benches, white people and black people and certain beaches with designated for black. People. Most of the beaches with what people So. I just accepted eight. Because I didn't know any better I just assumed that the way things were. And then. Maneuver Twenty one years old the to the K.. He says, everyone he met their asked him what he thought about the fact that he lived in a country that was so racially segregated. He says he was actually confused. But then he started seeing programs on TV. Shows that would never have been broadcast in South Africa about the consequences of apartheid and at first I, didn't believe these These films that I was seeing. I thought it was all propaganda. After awhile, and after reading books that I couldn't obtain in South Africa. I began to realize the started thing is something quite terrible. I'd be living. Positive it. Really maintaining it in the sense and not understanding. What's Black South Africans? was suffering. He, returned to South Africa, and started studying sociology at the University of Cape Town. There, he became friends with another white student named. Stephen Lee. And started cheering books that he had brought back from the UK. anti-apartheid. Books and political histories that were censored in South Africa. At. This time the most prominent anti-apartheid organization was the African National Congress also known as the ANC. Nelson Mandela was a member of the ANC. By the nineteen seventies, the organization was banned in South Africa that had been declared unlawful. Seen by the White Minority Threat to. Public. Order. They operated underground and Tim and Stephen had heard that if you wanted to get involved, you could try contacting their office in. London. So the two of US traveled to the. UK. and. Simply went and knocked on the door. and. It was quite an amusing. Incident. because. The person who received US Said please just sit down there and you'll be wasted. Then he went into his office and type something on a piece of paper. The piece of paper said. You should not come here. Please meet me at the cafe around the corner in half an hour. So that's what we did. Tim and Stephen met with members of the ANC several times. And they asked to be put to work back home in south? Africa, the said Okay you can go back and sit up your print shop. And we'd need to teach you various things like security matters, how to conduct yourself in the underground. And showed us a few other. Innovative. Devices for for distributing leaflets and information one of these was. The is the leaflet bomb. It's not really a bomb. It was really just. Kind of exploding device. That would kill. Hundreds of leaflets up into the air, and then they would rain down on a crowd target crowd somewhere. So we went back to South Africa. With this knowledge. And set up shop.

Tim Jenkin White South Africa Black People White People Tim Jenkin Stephen Lee African National Congress Stephen Cape Town TIM UK. United States Partner. Nelson Mandela University Of Cape Town London
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

03:48 min | 2 years ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Nelson Mandela Africa Juba South Sudan South Africa Nelson Mandela University George Mason Siebel Villa Nessin Ariana Microsoft Andy United States President Trump Director
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"This week I have a special guest, sea. Ebola Mandela. WHO's the great grandson of Nelson. Mandela. Lilla is a PhD in peace and conflict. Studies, in continues his grandfather's legacy of advocating for human rights and shares his perspective on the stomach nature of racism with us. He recently wrote a chapter in the book for the sake. Of Peace. African perspectives, on. Racism? Justice. And peace in America. Sibylla will also share with us his perspective on what we can each do to decolonize our own minds and the lessons that he learned from his grandfather's character. He speaks to us today from south, Sudan where he works. Welcome Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Juba South Sudan Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa Africa Nelson Mandela University Nessin Lilla Sibylla George Mason Siebel Villa Ariana America Microsoft Andy United States President Trump
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:42 min | 2 years ago

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

"I'm. Where going back to daily bread. archetypes are perennial teams that reside at the level of the collective universal source. They are representations of our collective soul's yearnings imagination. And deepest is is. These archetypes have existed in every culture in every tradition since the beginning of time. archetypes, our ancient gods themes, motifs stories literature. Art Paintings. Even paintings on the was of caves from longtime ago and they embody. Symbolically. Themes of expanded or higher consciousness, you can say symbolic representations. Of A particular aspect. Of The divine intelligence archetypes and Forms and shapes the there soon. Shift throughout history, but their core meaning that Gore theme that God motif remains the same. archetypes everywhere. In popular culture. Movie Stars Sports Heroes. They're all basically representations of archetypes. Visionary leaders are representations of archetypes. Saints are great activists like Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King Junior. Mark Maguire Andy Abraham, Lincoln or Representation of archetypes, but so products may be a brand of sopa Volkswagen brand, new car, or even Marlboro cigarettes. These represents architects, the guy who's used to advertise Marlboro cigarettes who has a? Very tough-looking. Cowboy on the Horse, and now of course is on a respirator, but that archetype. Of was very successful in selling cigarettes. And Johnnie Walker is a very successful. archetype selling whiskey. Because it attracts a certain team, a certain personality, a certain story. Movies TV soap operas, media tabloids. These are actually all right. archetypes. And every person they representing every idea they represent are every product represent seems to be larger than life. It seems uncomplicated. It seems at least the way it's advertise pure of intent, whatever that intent may be sacred or profane. It does matter. And so I say exaggerated expressions of the conscious energy of the collective source. That is the adventure or the secret of the sage of the rescuer of the redeemer or the love object. That the archetype represents. is in fact, the symbolic representation of a divine intelligence in the conscious energy of our collective Sola. Born of the collective soul, but enacted by the individual. Becomes very powerful as they representation. Of that are detected theme for example Marilyn. Monroe was the archetype of the Greek Greek Goddess Aphrodite representing sensuality and beauty and sexuality.

Mark Maguire Andy Abraham Johnnie Walker Nelson Mandela Martin Luther Monroe Marlboro Gore Volkswagen Marilyn
A Turning Point: Race Relations In Sports

The Big Story

10:20 min | 2 years ago

A Turning Point: Race Relations In Sports

"It has now been more than four weeks in George. Floyd was murdered nearly a month since we all watched him. Take his last breaths. It feels like so much is different, but real actionable change that takes time. Many who took to the streets in protests have now resumed their daily lives, so now seems appropriate to discuss how sport will handle affairs moving forward. As North American teams and Leagues Continue Their Return to play processes. It is vital that the conversations and promises made when the racial issue was hottest that they do not go away. In a few moments, we will welcome in our panel to discuss how that should happen, but first a look at how we got here in the first place. He will have color have been argued about beliefs, and that's not right. That's not right by any was standards. The point he was making gut twisted from the start. The beginning when Colin Kaepernick I made is public protests peacefully heap I sat on the bench during the national anthem to bring awareness. There's a lot of things that need to change once one specifically police brutality. There's people being murdered unjustly and not being held accountable. It was the summer of two thousand sixteen, when he bursts truly used his platform as an NFL quarterback to speak out against systemic racism by police in the weeks leading into that preseason payment. San Francisco capper Nick had watched. We all had. To white officers pinning down Alton Sterling. And pumping. into his chest and back. He saw the traffic stop in Minnesota when Philander Casteel was killed in front of his girlfriend in charge. And captured it could not understand how mental health therapist Charles Kinsey could be shot by police when he was lying on the ground with his arms up in the air, people of color have been targeted by police. Cops are getting paid leave. For killing people. That's not right. That's not right by anyone's standards. And yet from the beginning law in. pre-game gesture was misrepresented and downright manipulated. The Christ came that he was disrespecting the flag that it was a slap in the face to military personnel. But when active soldiers pointed out, they serve to provide their citizens with the freedom of speech that capture nick was exercising. That narrative quickly was quashed when army veterans who had been in battle, echoed that very sentiment out of national football league buildings team needs I would be disappointed if any of our players didn't stand up for the national anthem personally. I, look at that as a salute to the people who have paved the way for us. Our Organization believes that. You should. Respect the flag and so you'll save those individual decisions to expression show. On individual form. And that became the prevalent message. Don't do it here. Stick to sports. The underlying tone. How dare you protest without our approval we're. Do you get off? Colin Kaepernick criticizing anyone in another uniform. Right the men and women lead for this, I- scenic. First hand. For. Somebody do that to get paid millions of dollars. It's ridiculous. Cabinet remained undeterred. United States Army Bet. Nate! Boyer who did tours of duty in Iraq, and Afghanistan encouraged him to kneel and not sit. By, taking a knee voyeur told him you show your respect for fallen brothers that way. So capture nick did. And then more NFL players followed. And yet the public and political conversation in the US would not steer toward police brutality. No matter how much star athletes peacefully attempted to. And the leader in America's biggest chair. Amy Shirley Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners? When somebody disrespects our flag to say, get that son of a job appealed right now out each fire. I! Capture Nick became a source of division for standing up against injustice. He hasn't taken a snap since that twenty sixteen season. And at this year Super Bowl USA. Today's jared bell minced no words on why that is I. Think it's pretty obvious. He's been blackballed for Colin Kaepernick not to have a job is just. It's the worst look for the NFL. No conversation was more dominant inside NFL. Locker rooms that season than the Kapernick one teams are made up of players of all ages of all backgrounds of so many ethnicities. If you actually want to listen to different perspectives. If you're an athlete who would want to hear what your peers had to say, there would be no shortage of takes to soak in. But fundamentally the want would be to understand capper knicks fundamental point. After George Floyd one of the League's biggest stars reminded us that many still didn't I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country. Maybe that was the crossroads moment because the reaction to. It felt like something had changed almost as. That won't cut. It anymore drew. brees in the rest of the NFL were told right away, the new. Orleans quarterback came under fire. The players in the league had just about enough of the establishment silence. They had captured message. They were not gonNA. Let owners and Roger Goodell get away with it this time. Would have other Jewish Knowledge George if I was. I was George Void. Jewish. And say hi in. Regard. To me right. Breezes all pro receiver found Dallas's bruising runner and Houston's electrifying quarterback, and Kansas City Super Bowl Mvp. And Obi. And they all let you know. We. Condemn Racism and assistant. Matic oppression of black people. National League, admit wrong and silence our players from protesting. Also. Black lives matter black lives matter. Like loves. To Have Patrick Mahomes the next superstar the NFL. Front and center. That was massive. And the very next night the commissioner uttered the words you never imagined would happen. We the National Football League Immune. We were wrong for not listening NFL players earlier. And encourage all speak out in peacefully protests. Read the National Football League believe black lives matter. Progress. Probably a step forward. You want to believe so. The day after the commissioner changed his tune, breeze went to social media again. He'd already made his hollow apologies without actually saying sorry, and he finally seemed to be listening to what some teammates had to say, and after all of that even drew brees somewhat stood up to the president. It won't Change Donald Trump of course, but maybe it will make others think. Perhaps it will create more uncomfortable conversations to allow for a greater understanding among all of us. And at the very least it has given others throughout sport. To have the freedom to finally say their piece open believing they may at last be heard. Or country is in, trouble. Basic reason is race. You're seeing an example of future. That's fighting for you for you. Right now a fine for you got a grandfather that march legs. Dr King in the sixties. And he was amazing. You'll be proud to see us all. Got Pushing? Forward Doing Casey marched with his family. Members of Detroit's organization. An NBA coach using his voice. Over in Jacksonville Jaguars personnel were among the demonstrators. North Philly's finest. He walked. Kyle Lowery's we can. Priorities were set. This though. This is just the start. To silence of countless elites spoken loud. Until you see action from an, don't forget by the leaks themselves. We wonder what the real commitment to progress actually is. What capper protests was about from. The beginning can no longer be debated. And it is now crystal clear to all of us that no athlete should just shut up and dribble. Nelson Mandela famously said. Sport has the power to change the world. Since George, Floyd perhaps we have learned that change can come more from our sporting icons using their voice platform in pursuit for justice than any jumper were swing. Or goal or touched them. Stick to sports. Sure let's stick to sports bettering the world in a new way. Let's start hearing the real message now. And most of all, let's not get the words and actions like Hafer. Knicks twisted. When he tried to begin the real conversation. Before US AGO!

National Football League NFL Colin Kaepernick George Floyd Nick United States Knicks Brees America George Charles Kinsey Nelson Mandela Alton Sterling San Francisco Minnesota Roger Goodell Football Commissioner
African National Congress published Mandela's message - June 10, 1980

This Day in History Class

03:47 min | 2 years ago

African National Congress published Mandela's message - June 10, 1980

"The Day was June tenth nineteen eighty. The African National Congress published a message that are tight leader Nelson Mandela wrote in response to so wait. Oh, uprising in nineteen, seventy six. At the time Mandela was imprisoned. In nineteen, forty, eight, the National Party came to power in South Africa and began implementing the policy of apartheid at the time, racial segregation existed in the country, and the white minority held political power. Though. Segregation had long been in practice. Apartheid extended policy. Dictated where people could live and work based on race. The Population Registration Act required people to be classified and registered as black, white, coloured or other. Pass laws reinforced the ideology of white supremacy by controlling the movement of black South Africans. Plenty of other apartheid laws were passed that enforce the country system of racial segregation and disadvantaged the majority black population. Nelson Mandela was a key figure in the anti-apartheid movement in the early Nineteen Forties Mandela joint the African National Congress or a C. A political party that became dedicated to ending apartheid once the National Party came to power. In the decades after apartheid became official government policy resistance to the system sprang up South Africa. The ANC was heavily involved in the fight against apartheid and Mandela emerged as a leader in the ANC. In June of Nineteen seventy-six black students in Soweto township led protests in response to the government, mandating the use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in schools. Afrikaans was a language of the white minority. As thousands of students marched in the demonstrations. The police responded by shooting at the children. Many children were killed and the Soweto uprising spread across the country. At the time of the so wait, oh, uprising Nelson Mandela was in prison, serving a life term after being convicted of sabotage in the Rivonia Trial in one, thousand, nine, sixty four. During his time in prison, Mandela continued to write and support the anti-apartheid movement and people help Tim Smuggle his writing out of Robben Island prison. One of the messages he wrote from Robben. Island was in response to the Soweto uprising. On June. Tenth Nineteen, eighty, the ANC published this message, stating that it took more than two years to reach them. It included an introduction by Oliver Tombo who was president of the African National Congress. The introduction acknowledged the importance of Mandela's quote. Call to unity and mass action, especially since nineteen eighty marked the twenty fifth anniversary of the Freedom Charter, a document ratified in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five, that demanded equal rights for all South Africans. In the introduction, the ANC urged readers to quote make one thousand, nine hundred a year of united mass struggle. In the message Mandela laid out how quote white domination is held in check by force of arms, and how apartheid was opposed by many people, he also called for black unity instead that quote. Victory is certain. Near the end of the message, he wrote the following. Unite mobilize fight on between the and Ville of United, mass action and the hammer of the armed struggle. We shall crush apartheid in white minority racist rule. Mandela was released from prison a decade later in one, thousand, nine hundred. Negotiations to end apartheid soon began and Mandela became president of South Africa in one, thousand, nine, hundred four.

Nelson Mandela Nineteen Forties Mandela African National Congress Mandela South Africa Soweto President Trump Robben Island Tim Smuggle Oliver Tombo Official Freedom Charter Robben
Colin Finlay

The Candid Frame

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Colin Finlay

"I'm excited I sit down and talk with here you man. I'm disappointed you can't see me dressed in my finest and freshly shaved respect for you. Yeah and doing looking at work and seeing some of the presentations you've done and just getting a a really good understanding of what your career has look like. I was really inspired. Not just by the work which I think is exceptional but I thought that you were one of the few photographers who focuses on the things that you that you do in terms of the environment cultural impact of socio economic issues around the world and one of the things that you really adept at is providing a sense of connectedness between all these what normally would be disparate things in the minds of many of our of Westerners tend to have such a topic and self absorbed obsession with the world revolving around us that we tend to sort of exclude things that we don't feel have a direct impact on us even though it does and I don't think that at least for for for Western people that that something that awareness that you have it comes naturally. I think it's something that at least for me has been sort of a learned. I've had to unlearn that kind of way of thinking and open myself up and I'm wondering for you. How did that sense of that connectedness? You know that I see in your work. How did you come to have that yourself? It's kind of interesting here just to kind of explore this topic right out of the out of the out of the gate here but it's just an overall feeling that we are all one connected human being we are all one connected earth country. There's no difference between myself. And someone number Wanda a first nations person in Canada. A polar bear were all part of this great mother nature all part of this earth and I see it. All is our earth our collective future art collective history that belongs to each and every one of us and all of us have a vital role to play in this world so for me. It's I see that connection point. I've seen the difference between a billionaire and someone who's on the streets having a tough time in their life were all these powerful magnetic souls that are all on our journey in this world. I respect an extraordinary operation for really each and every one of us who are on this path. Was that something you always had or? Did you have a moment of epiphany when you were younger? That sort of allowed you to see the world in that particular way is definitely something that was important to me from the streets of Belfast from my times experiences in Sarajevo some of those really powerful experiences in Haiti in the early nineties. When you're just experiencing something that is so powerful and so beyond anything that you could even imagine you'd be confronting in your life and the humility that is absorbed through every cell and fiber in my body as I photograph and spend time with extraordinarily powerful people. That frankly have the power have strengthened. Have courage that I do not possess. I am simply an observer a witness in that sense and I am a part of this journey that they are on in the experience of their life than you know. Ultimate humility to me comes from there in the eyes of the people that I've photographs from really understanding the depths. What their day to day realities like and then how I come back to this first world. It's it's a difficult thing. It was brutal that coming back in landing at LAX. In coming back into this world leading. When I just left behind That Internet itself is extraordinarily difficult to the least. I remember crying literally walking down the aisles of a grocery store and looking at their Sushi in all these meets and everything it's like my God and I'm in Saudi bullets. They're dependent on what food they can scrounge. They're taking their lives in their hands. Trying to get water for their family and Sarajevo not being shot and killed and he does understand life and such a different matter that it really comes down to a pitcher of water feeding your family for that day or providing one meal and then coming back here to realize you know what we have at our at our fingertips some so it starts to really bend and the beginning years of breaking May to a completely different understanding of other majority are. Have you know a lot of other people around the world on? That's an interesting term. You said breaking you in as if you had Basically Foundation that you basically emptied sort of destroy in order to build a a a new one with being way of describing. Yeah I also think that for me I had an extraordinary powerful desire within me to witness first hand the history as it unfolds being an apartheid South Africa before Nelson Mandela. Send it to presidency a lot of the different war-zones in and out of the genocide in Rwanda Darfur wars in the Middle East. A lot of fees experiences really changed me immensely and really broke down the nature of what I thought reality was for me and for my family and what that word means to me and how it's manifested within me and how it is indeed. You know change the way that I view the world. How did how did you see your work or hope for your work to be used during those those early years of your career and how change what was really interesting. Is that one of the first major magazines that I work with was magazine that you might have depending on where you're at school was called scholastic so that was the magazine. Went out to students I received when I was a student so lineup really establishing a great relationship where the editor they're Lee buyer and I really started to take on a lot of these projects around the world on children.

Sarajevo Middle East Nelson Mandela Wanda Haiti Editor Canada LAX South Africa Belfast
Confidence

The Daily Meditation Podcast

09:40 min | 3 years ago

Confidence

"I'm Mary Medically and I welcome you to our final episode of this weeks series. We're exploring the theme for this series all week long has been how to summon up courage in a crisis and we are all in this crisis together as we maneuver our way through the ups and downs and INS and outs of the Kobe. Nineteen Corona virus. I'm sharing with you. The full thirty minute guided meditation experiences that I share on the SIP and own meditation APP. I hope you are enjoying these series. And if you're just joining us you are in the right place. These different episodes. Don't follow any sequence so you can join in at any point in a series. I share a different meditation technique in each episode so depending on the kinds of meditation technique. I'm sharing for that day. That's the kind of experience you'll be guided through so in this final episode. I guide you through a weekly reflection doing a weekly reflection and if you could even do a daily reflection research shows is one of the best ways to improve how you respond to stress in your life. It's one of the best ways to keep focused on your goals. How what's important to you in life and it helps to keep you grounded giving you a better perspective on your life especially during a crisis when you feel like your emotions are being pulled in all different directions and breaking news is occurring by the minute by the hour. You might be experiencing many of the hardships that are impacting most of us from the corona virus with your work with having your family all confined in one place or maybe you are isolated alone. Maybe you're having symptoms of the corona virus. You've lost a loved one. All of these are happening right now across the world. I have so enjoyed sharing this series with you and I hope you enjoy this. Final episode has always be safe. How are you doing today? This is the final episode of our series on courage in crisis. And I hope you have been able to chart path for yourself as you maneuver. The ups and downs of the current crisis were experiencing with the Kovic Nineteen Corona virus. You may be experiencing an another crisis as you listen to this series. No that there will be an end to this crisis and as you consider what you reflected on each day as your daily challenge. Something that's going to help pull you out of this crisis with hope. Something that you're going to do to reward yourself after the crisis keep this thought daily in your mind and think about ways that you can provide some time for yourself to slow down to remove yourself from all the buzz going around that. Buzz is not likely to diminish anytime soon. In fact even after the crises the world will be a little different. It might be a lot different for you or for loved ones depending on how you weather this crisis how you managed during this crisis. Remember that when you manage your fear and you keep focused on hope even if really extenuating circumstances calm your way that impact you because of this crisis remember to still keep your focus and also to not let fear or uncertainty overwhelming to allow yourself to remain calm in the midst of this storm that takes courage and I want to share with you a quote from someone who went through and survived extenuating circumstances and that is a quote from Nelson Mandela on courage. Nelson Mandela is known the world over as a representative of courage and hope in the midst of a crises. He was the South African. Anti Apartheid. Revolutionary Political leader. He was also a philanthropist and he served as president of South Africa from Nineteen Ninety four to nineteen ninety nine. He was the country's first black head of state and the first elected in a fully representative democratic election. I'm reading this to you. From his extensive biography on Wikipedia so Nelson Mandela became a figure for his time the face of the Democratic Anti Apartheid Movement. And you might think about what you want to be a good face of in regard to this crises in your circle. Are you the one who gives hope? Are you the one who's there for someone who's frightened to go to the store? Are you the one who spouts off? All the latest bleak statistics regarding deaths and new infections which can make people feel so hopeless. So think about what you want to be the face of in regard to those people. You're spending time with during this crisis. I imagine that we all are leaving a legacy right now as to how we're handling this unprecedented experience of a global penick so the quote from Nelson Mandela is. I learned that courage was not the absence of fear but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid but he who conquers that fear so again think about how you want to face your crises with courage instead of fear in the final episode of every series. We do something which I think is very important. There's a lot of research that shows it is important. And that is assessing how you lived out your week your high points. You're low points and where you could improve. It's okay to make mistakes and not to be perfect. The most important thing you can do is to have a weekly review and this is a way to assess yourself to become a better human being so as you settle yourself down and get ready to meditate. Take you on a review also a reflection of your week. I always encourage you to do this outside. I am outside near my pool. You might be able to hear the water and I always recommend you try to meditate outside especially during these times

Nelson Mandela Representative Kobe Nineteen Ninety South Africa President Trump
Trivia Questions on The Mandela Effect

Trivia With Budds

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Trivia Questions on The Mandela Effect

"Are going to jump into today's episode on the Mandela Effect. It's eleven questions on stuff you may or may not remember. This is the only trivia round. I do worse. Spelling and wording counts. So make sure if you're playing along at home your spelling stuff right here. We go all right here. We go with eleven questions on the Mandela effect to now there are no Nelson Mandela specific questions in here but the whole idea of the Mandela effect is named after him. This people swear that he could have died in the eighties but he didn't die until two thousand thirteen. So that's the name Mandela effect comes from if you more Mandela Affect Trivia just search trivia with Buds Mandela affect other episode. We did probably about a year and a half to two years ago. All right. Here's question number. One remember spelling counts. What brand of peanut butter shares part of its name with a phrase meaning quickly number one? What brand of peanut butter shares? Its name with part of its name with a phrase meaning quickly number one number one number two. What cartoon series from Warner Brothers was mainly produced from nineteen thirty to nineteen sixty nine remember? Spelling counts number two. What cartoon series from Warner Brothers was mainly produced from nineteen thirty to nineteen sixty nine question? Number three is Neil Armstrong. Dead or alive question. Number three is Neil Armstrong dead or alive question number four. What question does the Evil Queen ask? Her reflection in snow white and the seven dwarfs need the full sentence and especially that first word number four. What question does the Evil Queen ask? Her reflection in snow. White and the seven dwarfs number four number four question number five. What is the best selling brand of household odor eliminators manufactured by Procter and

Mandela Effect Nelson Mandela Warner Brothers Neil Armstrong Procter White
Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:13 min | 3 years ago

Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

"Awarding someone the Nobel Prize for peace is always tempting. Fate saw cha the vagaries of human affairs. Yesterday's warmonger is tomorrow's peacemaker and vice versa. That it's not really the Norwegian Nobel Committees Fault when Pulse Charity Makes Mockery of some of their judgements. When you give a piece Gong to someone like Henry Kissinger oh Yasser Arafat? It's just a risk you run. And it is nevertheless startling to see an actual Nobel peace laureate appearing at the International Court of Justice in The Hague to defend the government they lead against allegations of genocide. It's pretty much the one thing that isn't supposed to happen. History had given us the opportunity to give up our best just for a cause in which we believed when the Nobel Committee chose to honor me. The road had chosen of my own free will aw became less lonely path to follow sang suci daughter of the founder of modern Myanmar Aung San and a formidable politician diplomat and and activist in her own. Right won the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen ninety-one at the time she was rivaled only by Nelson Mandela as a universally admired Royat. Avatar of all. That was good displaying exemplary courage in resisting. All that was bad. She led the National League for Democracy as it faced down only terrifying and ruthless military GIONTA which had turned Myanma into North Korea with Palm. Trees saying SUCI spent most of the period between Nineteen nineteen ninety nine and two thousand and ten under house arrest. She was a hero aside from the Nobel Peace Prize. She was awarded the Sakharov Prize. US Congressional Channel Gold Medal and Presidential Medal of freedom an honorary order of Australia. Honorary Citizenship of Canada and Amnesty International's ambassador of conscience since award. Luke pestle made a film about her. U2 wrote a song about and in time she triumphed the NLD won a landslide election victory in two thousand and fifteen though denied the presidency on a technicality. She became state councillor effectively. Myanmar's prime minister it. It was hailed worldwide as a victory for decency determination and patience and now she's denying that she is some kind of an accessory to crimes against humanity he sang Succi has been fair to say on a journey. These ban mind this complex situation and the challenge to sovereignty and security already in our country when you're assessing the intent of those who attempted to deal with the rebellion. Surely under the circumstances genocidal decider intent cannot be only hypothesis loan and it is important to be clear that while Aung Sang. SUCCI is in The Hague. She is not in the dark. She is appearing voluntarily and has not been charged with any crime the allegation before the ICJ EJ is against her country. Not Her the case has been brought by the Gambia. Backed by the fifty-seven members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Asian a coterie which includes several nations who might want to pause before mounting their high horses where human rights are concerned. The allegation is essentially essentially that Myanmar's recent persecution of the Hindu people Myanmar's Muslim minority. Who lived mostly in the country's raccoon state amounts to genocide this? This is a term with specific legal meanings and it will be for the court to determine if events in Myanmar meet the threshold. What is known is bad enough? Enough since two thousand and sixteen perhaps a million ranger have fled Myanmar mostly to neighboring Bangladesh journalists NGOs and the UN win have reported a consistent pattern of atrocious violence much of it directed at civilians not excluding children Myanmar's military known as has the top Madore have consistently claimed that they are waging a counter insurgency against Islamist terrorists though Sang Suci does not directly command the Tatmadaw. Aw this is also the line that she has held. The most sympathetic imaginable interpretation of aren't sang Suu Cheese behavior. And it's a reach is that that she is still in some respects the prisoner of the same military which once held her under house arrest. She may have calculated. This is a compromise. She has to to make to maintain such democracy as me unmanned now has that if she takes hold in the military the military will once again take charge of the country. This is a question unlikely to interest the hundreds of thousands over hinge in now wondering if they'll ever be able to go home again and they of course are the ones who have have survived the Tatmadaw's pogroms justice for the victims. If it is coming at all maybe years away

Myanmar Sang Suci Nobel Prize Myanmar Aung San Norwegian Nobel Committees Succi Aung Sang NLD Nobel Committee Sakharov Prize Suci Luke Pestle International Court Of Justice Henry Kissinger Yasser Arafat Nelson Mandela Royat Gold Medal Gambia