37 Burst results for "Nelson"

Fresh update on "nelson" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:50 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "nelson" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"Run. Rice elder threw his first ever complete game, a 6 hit shutout as the Atlanta Braves beat Washington ain't nothing. It means a lot, but I at the same time it's just another win. We were trying to sack the wins on top of each other here and get ready for this weekend and the next three games after that. I went a lot of the braves to move within a game of the NL east leading New York mets, the braves and mets with that big weekend showdown beginning on Friday. Baltimore beat Boston 14 to 8 and Pittsburgh beats Cincinnati. Jimmy Johnson is retiring from full-time racing, the 7th time NASCAR champ told the AP. He will focus on family, Johnson says he'll race about ten bucket races a year. Seems like a division one college football coach loses his job each week. Georgia Tech parted ways with Jeff Collins, Collins was ten and 28. He was in his fourth season. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers will be practicing in South Florida this week with hurricane Ian moving over to Florida's West Coast. The Buccaneers will spend the week practicing at the facility of the Miami Dolphins. A NASA spacecraft rammed an asteroid Monday night in a test to see if space rocks could be knocked out of a collision course with earth. The dart spacecraft launched last November, rammed an asteroid at 14,000 miles an hour in an effort to nudge the space rock into a smaller orbit around its twin, 7 million miles from earth. And we have. Mission controller Elena Adams as the darts camera went blank in its signal abruptly ended, data from a bevy of telescopes trained on the pair will be checked to see if the orbit has shifted. NASA administrator Bill Nelson says the mission is just to start a protecting the earth from asteroids like the one thought to have led to the mass extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Planetary defense is a global endeavor. I'm Tim McGuire. A U.S. patrol has spotted Chinese and Russian naval ships near Alaska. I'm Lisa dwyer. The U.S. coast guard says a ship on routine patrol in the Bering sea came across a guided missile cruiser from China. The U.S. patrol ship found two other Chinese ships and four Russian naval vessels, including a destroyer. The ships broke their single formation and dispersed, but the coast guard says that while the ships were operating in accordance with international rules and norms, the Honolulu based Kimball will continue to monitor the area that formation came a month after NATO's secretary general warned about China's interest in the Arctic and Russia's military build up there. The secretary general said Russia has set up a new Arctic command and has opened hundreds of new and former Soviet era Arctic military sites, including deep water ports and airfields and Lisa dwyer. You don't

Atlanta Braves Rice Elder Mets Jeff Collins Hurricane Ian Jimmy Johnson Elena Adams Nasa Tampa Bay Buccaneers Georgia Tech Nascar Buccaneers Cincinnati Miami Dolphins Tim Mcguire Baltimore Pittsburgh AP
Fresh update on "nelson" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:50 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "nelson" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"Vladimir Guerrero junior single to left from home Calvin vigil from second as to run those magic number to clinch a wild card spot is now three. For John G finished one for 5 of the night, his low hit coming in the first inning, a single to right field. The law snapped the Yankees 7 game winning streak. John Leatherman to run. Rice elder threw his first ever complete game, a 6 hit shutout as the Atlanta Braves beat Washington ain't nothing. It means a lot, but I'm at the same time. It's just another win. We were trying to stack the wins on top of each other here and get ready for this weekend and the next three games after that. It went a lot of the braves to move within a game of the NL east leading New York mets, the braves and myths with that big weekend showdown beginning on Friday. Baltimore beat Boston 14 to 8 and Pittsburgh beats Cincinnati. Jimmy Johnson is retiring from full-time racing, the 7th time NASCAR champ told the AP. He will focus on family, Johnson says he'll race about ten bucket races a year. Seems like a division one college football coach loses his job each week. Georgia Tech parted ways with Jeff Collins, Collins was ten and 28. He was in his fourth season. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers will be practicing in South Florida this week with hurricane Ian moving over to Florida's West Coast. The Buccaneers will spend the week practicing at the facility of the Miami Dolphins. A NASA spacecraft rammed an asteroid Monday night in a test to see if space rocks could be knocked out of a collision course with earth. The dart spacecraft launched last November, rammed an asteroid at 14,000 miles an hour in an effort to nudge the space rock into a smaller orbit around its twin, 7 million miles from earth. And we passed. Mission controller Elena Adams as the darts camera went blank in its signal abruptly ended, data from a bevy of telescopes trained on the pair will be checked to see if the orbit has shifted. NASA administrator Bill Nelson says the mission is just to start a protecting the earth from asteroids like the one thought to have led to the mass extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Planetary defense is a global endeavor. I'm Tim McGuire. A U.S. patrol has spotted Chinese and Russian naval ships near Alaska, I'm Lisa dwyer. The U.S. coast guard says a ship on routine patrol in the Bering sea came across a guided missile cruiser from China. The U.S. patrol ship found two other Chinese ships and four Russian naval vessels, including a destroyer. The ships broke their single formation and dispersed, but the coast guard says that while the ships were operating at accordance with international rules and norms, the Honolulu based Kimball will continue to monitor the area that formation came a month after NATO's secretary general warned about China's interest in the Arctic and Russia's military build up there. The secretary general said Russia has set up a new Arctic command and is opened hundreds of new and former Soviet era Arctic military sites, including deep water ports and airfields, I'm Lisa dwyer. With one of the best savings rates in America, banking with Capital One is the easiest decision in the history of decisions. Even easier than choosing slash to be in your band. Next up for lead guitar. You're in

Braves John Leatherman Rice Elder Jeff Collins Vladimir Guerrero Hurricane Ian John G Jimmy Johnson Elena Adams Calvin Nasa Yankees Lisa Dwyer Tampa Bay Buccaneers Mets Georgia Tech Tim Mcguire Buccaneers
Islanders score 3 in 3rd to rally past rival Rangers 4-3

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Islanders score 3 in 3rd to rally past rival Rangers 4-3

"For the second straight night the islanders erased a three one lead in the third period of a four three victory This time against the rangers Adam peck started to come back before Brock Nelson and Anders Lee scored one 44 apart put in the aisles ahead with 5 and a half minutes remaining Lee says they were confident down three one Two goal deficit going into the third nothing to lose but an opportunity to have a great 20 minutes We'll take that Nelson and Kyle Palmer had power play goals in the islanders 7th win in 8 games Our temi prana and set up power play goals by Chris kreider and Vincent Roche for the rangers I'm Dave ferry

Adam Peck Brock Nelson Anders Lee Islanders Rangers Kyle Palmer LEE Temi Prana Nelson Chris Kreider Vincent Roche Dave Ferry
Brighton beats 10-man Wolves 3-2 on late goal by Gross

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Brighton beats 10-man Wolves 3-2 on late goal by Gross

"Pascal gross scored in the 83rd minute to get bright in the three two victory over ten man Wolverhampton KO rheumatoid leveled the score at two in the 44th minute Shortly before Nelson tomato received a red card for hauling gamma toma just outside the box Wolves kept the score tied before running its winless streak to four games Adam lalana scored the first goal of the match helping Brighton move into a 6th place tie on the table and three points behind fourth place Newcastle Wolves are tied for last with ten points leading Nottingham Forest on gold differential I'm Dave fairy

Pascal Gross Nelson Tomato Gamma Toma Box Wolves Wolverhampton Adam Lalana Newcastle Wolves Brighton Nottingham Forest Dave Fairy
Lee, Nelson lead surging Islanders to 5-2 win over Blues

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Lee, Nelson lead surging Islanders to 5-2 win over Blues

"The islanders net four unanswered second period goals and beat the blues 5 to two New York wins their 5th in a row St. Louis has dropped 6 straight The second period goals are scored by cow pal Mary Brock Nelson Josh Bailey and Anders Lee Regardless of what's going on over there that's a great that's a great hockey team And they're going to figure it out and they're going to they're going to have a great season It's just a stretch for them And so we knew they were coming and becoming hard And they always doing this building is a tough place to play Vladimir Cinco and Robert Thomas score for the blues Ilya siroc and wins in Jordan Bennington takes the loss Mike Reeves St. Louis

Mary Brock Nelson Josh Bailey Anders Lee Islanders St. Louis New York Hockey Vladimir Cinco Ilya Siroc Robert Thomas Bennington Jordan Mike Reeves
Arsenal moves back to the top after 5-0 rout of Forest

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

Arsenal moves back to the top after 5-0 rout of Forest

"Arsenal is back atop the Premier League table following a 5 nil win against Nottingham Forest It took less than 5 minutes for the Gunners to take the lead as Gabrielle Martinelli hit the twine Reese Nelson scored twice in three minutes at the start of the second half Goals by Thomas party in Martin odegaard capped a route arsenal's tenth win in 12 games puts the team two points ahead of second place Manchester City The Gunners finished the game without bukayo saka who hobbled off in the 27th minute Forest remains last in the league with 9 points I'm Dave ferry

Gabrielle Martinelli Reese Nelson Gunners Nottingham Forest Thomas Party Martin Odegaard Premier League Bukayo Saka Manchester City Dave Ferry
Bailey, Nelson lift Islanders past Hurricanes 6-2

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Bailey, Nelson lift Islanders past Hurricanes 6-2

"The islanders even their record at four and four with a 6 two victory at Carolina Josh Bailey scored the go ahead goal and it's 1000th NHL game all with the aisles I was able to put a good move on them and put it in the back of the net certainly certainly felt good Brock Nelson scored twice in the third period for New York which also received goals from Matt Martin Zach Paris and Oliver wallstrom Ilya siroc had made 33 saves in the islanders set an NHL record for consecutive games without allowing a power play goal to start a season Martin Nietzsche Brent burns scored for the hurricanes who were coming off a three one and one road trip I'm Dave ferry

Islanders Josh Bailey Brock Nelson NHL Matt Martin Zach Paris Oliver Wallstrom Ilya Siroc Carolina Martin Nietzsche Brent Burns New York Dave Ferry
NASA says its asteroid defense test was a success

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

NASA says its asteroid defense test was a success

"NASA says it's asteroid mission was a smashing success It was a save the world test the dart spacecraft was going after the asteroid dimorphos And we have NASA administrator Bill Nelson says the refrigerator sized spacecraft travels 7 million miles from earth coming in at 14,000 miles an hour And it was a bullseye Nancy chabot at Johns Hopkins University says the test was to see if in the future a killer rock could be nudged out of earth's way It just gave it a small nudge But

Nasa Bill Nelson Nancy Chabot Johns Hopkins University
On this week's AP Religion Roundup, churches offer hope amid hurricane recovery, Pope Francis denounces the risk of nuclear war, and a famed US extreme skier gets traditional Buddhist funeral.

AP News Radio

02:09 min | 2 months ago

On this week's AP Religion Roundup, churches offer hope amid hurricane recovery, Pope Francis denounces the risk of nuclear war, and a famed US extreme skier gets traditional Buddhist funeral.

"On this week's religion roundup churches offer hope amid hurricane recovery Pope Francis denounces the risk of nuclear war and a famed U.S. extreme skier receives a traditional Buddhist funeral In the darkness and despair wrought by hurricane Ian that were flickers of light and hope And so where was everybody when the storm was happening They were in here And then they had you see they moved up there because the water came up somewhere about that step there Pastor Robert caston of Southwest baptist church in Fort Myers Florida says his church was a refuge during the storm I'm guessing 20 5% of our people had lost their home That's just a wild guess but it's not like three or four There's a bunch of people Jane Compton says she has been staying at the church since her home was devastated by the hurricane But so you're both you're living in the church Right now Yes your honor We didn't before of course but we were living here now It's the only home we have now At the nearby Bethlehem ministry assembly of God pastor Elton Silva predicts the storm will strengthen the faith of those who live through it After this weekend some people are going to think more about the fate about God Pope Francis appealed to Russian president Vladimir Putin imploring him to stop the spiral of violence and death in Ukraine Francis also denounced what he called the absurd risk of nuclear war The address in Saint Peter's square was the Pope's strongest appeal yet on the war in Ukraine A famed extreme skier from the United States who was killed after falling from one of the world's tallest mountains was given a traditional Sherpa cremation funeral 49 year old Hilary Nelson fell off the summit of mount Mona slough the world's 8th highest mountain last week while skiing down with her partner I'm Walter ratliff

Pope Francis Hurricane Ian Pastor Robert Caston Southwest Baptist Church Jane Compton Bethlehem Ministry Assembly Of Elton Silva Hurricane Fort Myers United States Saint Peter's Square Florida Ukraine Vladimir Putin Francis Pope Hilary Nelson Mount Mona Slough Skiing
"nelson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:57 min | 2 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"We could use some of that. Well, that's the next podcast. Yeah. You can get into that. Yeah. Well, that's very cool. And you're kind of on this speaking tour of sorts at the moment. I mean, the theater speaking out, it's a Thousand Oaks civil civic. Civic art. Yeah, it's a beautiful theater. Yeah. It's been the coolest part. Touring is a big theater. You know? So how many do you have more cities coming up? I'm kind of done for the season. I just have one more at the mesa arts center, I think, in May, Arizona, Phoenix, yeah, cool. I've been in that theater too, that's not a good theater. Those are good venues. Really good theaters, the Seattle theater. They've been Arroyo was in there. That was a really good theater. Awesome. One in Kansas City was incredible. There's some good ones. Pro theater in Dallas. It's like a NatGeo thing. Now she's geographic. Yeah, they have this National Geographic live series. So different cities host anywhere from three to 5 shows in a season and you can buy like seasons passes for it. It's pretty cool. It's cool. You usually do it in the winter. You don't want it dark and cold and people can go listen to good stories. Awesome. Yeah. Well, good luck tonight. Thank you. And good luck to you in life in general. Yeah, thanks. To you. All right, so people want to connect with Hillary. First of all, final question. Is it still Hillary O'Neill? Or is it Hillary Nelson? Hillary Nelson. Okay, got him Claude I asked you that. Transitioning, though. Yeah, you're like Hillary O'Neill on Twitter and I can tell that your website's Hillary Nelson, some kind of Hillary Nelson O'Neill, but it's transitioning to Hillary Nelson. I gotcha. Yeah, cool. Great. My maiden name from my. Divorced. All right, well, cool. After your next expedition, come back and talk to me about it some more, maybe. All right. All right, cool. That's good. Thanks. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Thank you.

Hillary Nelson Seattle theater Pro theater mesa arts center Arroyo Phoenix Arizona Kansas City Hillary Hillary O'Neill Dallas Hillary Nelson O'Neill Neill Claude Twitter
"nelson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:15 min | 2 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Everyone. As many of you know, ten days ago on Monday, September 26th, one of the world's most accomplished ski mountaineers and adventure athletes, Hillary Nelson, tragically passed away while descending mount menace in Nepal after summiting the 26,781 foot mountain with her partner, Jim Morrison. She was 49. It's a tragic loss for her family, of course, for Jim. For her two kids, she leaves behind for the adventure community whose massive outpouring of support has been the one heartwarming silver lining amidst such a grease stricken event. Also for the town of Telluride that she called home. And for the countless women athletes for whom she was an extraordinary inspiration, a mentor and a role model. For those new to Hillary, she really was one of the greatest to ever do it. And absolute giants. And she did it at the highest level for decades. Summiting, exploring skiing, some of the most exotic and treacherous mountain ranges on earth, including being the first woman to climb both Everest and its 8000 meter neighbor lazy in a 24 hour period. And also being the first person to ski down all 5 of the Mongolian altus holy peaks. Unlike many of my Friends and past podcast gas, people like Conrad anker, Jimmy chin, Lindsey dyer, Alex honnold, and others, I didn't know Hillary well, but I did know her. Back in 2018, I spent the better part of a day with her. She came to my house, we did a podcast. She met my family. We hung out, and I gave her a ride to the other side of town. You know, essentially enough time to leave me like so many fairly grease stricken by her loss and wanting to honor her life and her legacy. And the best way that I know how to do that is to rerelease that 2018 conversation. In my original introduction to that episode, I wrote quote, this is an incredible conversation about fear, risk, resilience, adventure, and potential. It's about balancing the pull of adventure against Hillary's responsibility as a single mom to two boys. She was single at the time. And it's about the allure of the outdoors. But mostly, this is an exchange about the virtues of placing yourself outside your comfort zone and what that can teach us about potential the preciousness of life, and what it means to be truly alive. Of course, this now leaves us asking, what is acceptable risk? Well, Hillary had her own calculation for this. And she understood and appreciated the risk that she incurred better than any of us can possibly imagine. And in the end, I think it's fair to say that she truly was alive. Truly alive. And she pursued her life with this laudable vigor to the absolute fullest. And well, of course, we lost her way too soon. Her legacy, her influence, those things prevail. And I think much can still be learned from someone who so fully embraced all of it because none of us are promised a tomorrow. So this is for you, Hillary. Rest in power. All right, let's do it. Okay, let me tell you what it is. I don't know, what do you want to talk about? I don't know. I got lots of stuff I want to talk about. We can talk about whatever you want to talk about. I'm just delighted to be in your presence. Super nice to meet you. Thanks for having me. Yeah, welcome to Los Angeles. Yeah. I guess the first time. Yeah, I know. It's right. We

Hillary Nelson Hillary Conrad anker Jimmy chin Lindsey dyer Alex honnold Jim Morrison Telluride Nepal giants Jim skiing Los Angeles
US to require more rest between shifts for flight attendants

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

US to require more rest between shifts for flight attendants

"Flight attendants will get more rest under a new FAA rule taking effect later this year Airlines will be required to give attendance at least ten hours off between shifts one more than they get now One that is going to improve aviation safety Acting FAA chief Billy Nolan says the change took way too long Congress told the agency for years ago to boost the rest requirement flight attendants union president Sarah Nelson says the Trump administration tried to kill it but Cruz will finally get the rest they deserve and need This feels really good Airlines have up to 90 days to comply Sagar Meghani at The White House

FAA Billy Nolan Sarah Nelson Trump Administration Congress Cruz Sagar Meghani White House
A famed U.S. extreme skier's body is recovered in Nepal

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

A famed U.S. extreme skier's body is recovered in Nepal

"The body of a missing famed U.S. extreme skier has been recovered in Nepal Hillary Nelson was skiing down from the summit of mount manaslu with her partner Jim Morrison when she fell off the mountain rescuers searching by helicopter located Nelson's body two days later bad weather in an avalanche hampered their search Nelson was an extreme skier She spoke to the AP in 2018 about skiing down the world's fourth highest mountain Not because I was going to die just because I was going to give up But

Hillary Nelson Mount Manaslu Skiing Jim Morrison Nepal Nelson U.S. Avalanche AP
Bam! NASA spacecraft crashes into asteroid in defense test

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Bam! NASA spacecraft crashes into asteroid in defense test

"A NASA spacecraft rammed an asteroid Monday night in a test to see if space rocks could be knocked out of a collision course with earth The dart spacecraft launched last November rammed an asteroid at 14,000 miles an hour in an effort to nudge the space rock into a smaller orbit around its twin 7 million miles from earth And we have impact Mission controller Elena Adams as the darts camera went blank in its signal abruptly ended data from a bevy of telescopes trained on the pair will be checked to see if the orbit has shifted NASA administrator Bill Nelson says the mission is just to start a protecting the earth from asteroids like the one thought to have led to the mass extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago Planetary defense is a global endeavor I'm Tim McGuire

Nasa Elena Adams Bill Nelson Tim Mcguire
Patriots rely on defense to edge Watt-less Steelers 17-14

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Patriots rely on defense to edge Watt-less Steelers 17-14

"Mac Jones passed for 252 yards a touchdown and a pick as the Patriots topped TJ watt list Pittsburgh 1714 It's a really good defense and we just went out there and executed as best we could We obviously had plays we wish we had back but there's good players all around and I think we just competed really hard Nelson Aguilar had a 110 receiving yards including a 44 yard touchdown New England which ran for 124 yards is one and one Mitch trubisky passed for 168 yards a touchdown and an interception pat fryer with caught the only touchdown for the Steelers also one and one Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh

Mac Jones Tj Watt Nelson Aguilar Patriots Pittsburgh Mitch Trubisky Pat Fryer New England Steelers Josh Valtteri
NASA celebrates anniversary of JFK speech

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

NASA celebrates anniversary of JFK speech

"NASA celebrated the 60th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's historic moonshot speech Kennedy spoke at rice university in Houston in 1962 about sending astronauts to the moon before the end of the decade and bringing them safely back to earth But why some say the moon He said why climb the highest mountain We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things Not because they are easy but because they are hard 60 years later at rice university administrator Bill Nelson talked about NASA's Artemis moon rocket Not going to be easy It's going to be hard Some things never change NASA is gearing up for a test flight of Artemis after two scrubbed launches But this is more than just a moonshot To take us further than ever before to Mars NASA hopes to launch Artemis at the end of the month I'm Ed Donahue

Rice University Nasa John F. Kennedy Kennedy Houston Bill Nelson Artemis Ed Donahue
NASA is set to launch another rocket to the moon

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

NASA is set to launch another rocket to the moon

"NASA will have to wait to launch the most powerful rockets ever built after a series of issues at the Kennedy Space Center There were thunderstorms then a hydrogen leak and engine issues and finally a scrub for today The highly anticipated Artemis project launch scrapped the rocket designed to return Americans to the moon will stay in Florida while NASA chief Bill Nelson's engineers work on it This is a very complicated machine scrubs are part of the deal You don't want to light the candle until

Nasa Kennedy Space Center Artemis Bill Nelson Florida
Nationals rally against Darvish, Hader to beat Padres 3-1

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Nationals rally against Darvish, Hader to beat Padres 3-1

"Nelson Cruz's base is loaded walk broke a one one tie in the 9th inning as the Washington Nationals beat the San Diego Padres three to one What began as a pitcher's duel between annabelle Sanchez and yu Darvish dominated the game with Sanchez going 5 innings allowing just a solo home run to Manny Machado Today was the first time to a whole year that I'm able to throw every single page in any spark So when I'm able to do that I can get those kind of games The Padres lead for the third and final wild card spot in the national league was trimmed to one game over the Milwaukee Brewers Philip gon San Diego

Annabelle Sanchez Nelson Cruz Padres Manny Machado Washington Nationals Yu Darvish Sanchez National League Milwaukee Brewers San Diego
Day after losing Tatis to ban, Padres lose to Nationals 4-3

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Day after losing Tatis to ban, Padres lose to Nationals 4-3

"Victor robles in an RBI single plating Caesar Hernandez with the go ahead run in the 7th as the nationals beat the Padres four to three Hernandez was called out on the play but it was overturned by replay as Padres catcher Austin nola block the plate manager bob Melvin argued and was ejected I thought it was a good play My understanding is if you're straddling a plate or giving them any part of the plate to slide to it is not blocking the plate Manny Machado and Trent Grisham homered for the Padres yadiel Hernandez enjoying menesis homered for the nationals Nelson Cruz had two singles and collected his 2000th career hit Craig heist Washington

Victor Robles Caesar Hernandez Padres Austin Nola Bob Melvin Hernandez Manny Machado Trent Grisham Yadiel Hernandez Menesis Nelson Cruz Craig Heist Washington
Climate change and vanishing islands threaten brown pelicans

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Climate change and vanishing islands threaten brown pelicans

"Brown pelicans are threatened as islands they nest in disappear The awkward yet elegant brown pelicans nesting on queen Bess island or an icon of the Gulf Coast They disappeared from Louisiana except for on the state flag but rebounded after conservation efforts in the 1970s Scientists now say climate change is drowning the few islands they rely on for nesting The rate of change that's happening right now and is faster than anything these birds have ever experienced throughout their evolutionary history Jimmy Nelson is a biologist with the university of Louisiana at Lafayette We're seeing signs like we saw back then but we're not responding to them like we should She had an activist Theresa dardar supports efforts to restore the islands that protect both the pelicans and local tribal communities She says she remembers when places now underwater were dry enough for cattle to graze They don't have a place to lay within what's going to happen I'm Jennifer King

Queen Bess Island Jimmy Nelson Gulf Coast Louisiana Brown Theresa Dardar University Of Louisiana Lafayette Jennifer King
Gomes, Smyly help lift Cubs to three-game sweep of Phillies

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

Gomes, Smyly help lift Cubs to three-game sweep of Phillies

"The cubs have a four game winning streak after completing a three game sweep of the Phillies four three The cubs Homer three times as they completed their first three game sweep in Philadelphia since July 2000 Jan Gomes furnished two of the three round trippers and Nelson Velazquez also went deep Drew smiley retired his first 14 batters before Bryson Scott doubled and scored on Alex bohm's single to left It was the only run allowed by smiley who surrendered just four hits over 6 innings David Robertson notched his 14th save in Bailey falter took the laws Garrett Stubbs homeward for the fills I'm Dave

Cubs Jan Gomes Nelson Velazquez Drew Smiley Bryson Scott Phillies Alex Bohm Philadelphia Smiley David Robertson Garrett Stubbs Bailey Dave
Richard Baris and Charlie Discuss the RNC Autopsy Report

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 4 months ago

Richard Baris and Charlie Discuss the RNC Autopsy Report

"Are reminiscing on a previous program. About the RNC's autopsy report. Do you remember that back in 2012? Yes. Yes. The whole thing? Yeah, and so we were reminiscing about reince priebus and all of that. And I've always gotten along with Ryan. It's not, it's not a slight it hits. I would have done things differently than him, but that's okay. And they said, we are going to lose Florida. We're going to lose all these states. Remember, Florida had senator Nelson, Democrat? Yes. Bill Nelson? That's right. Obama won it in 12, right? This was a blue state. And so over ten years, what is it from a policy perspective though, Richard that has now turned this into incredibly more Republican than Georgia? Yeah. Yeah, I'll tell you. That's a really good question. The answer is really interesting. And the autopsy was like a $1 million piece of it. It was total nonsense. You know, the bottom line is when you're going to increase your appeal to working voters, family voters. It's not going to be isolated within one race, right? And that's something they missed in that autopsy, but honestly, in Florida, the interesting thing Bill Nelson, he used to be thought of as a moderate. So he could do well. He was an astronaut, right? He was a national hero. Astronauts can be beaten, just ask Mark Kelly. That's right. Just don't tell Mark Kelly, but yes. And by the way, Mark Kelly's leading by roughly the same margins that Bill Nelson was leading Rick Scott by until we called Rick Scott, the giant killer. Back then, because that's he would always come in with these 40% favorability rating and yet topple these people that are supposedly unbeatable.

Reince Priebus Senator Nelson Bill Nelson Florida RNC Mark Kelly Ryan Rick Scott Barack Obama Richard Georgia
"nelson" Discussed on Poetry Unbound

Poetry Unbound

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on Poetry Unbound

"The truthless wars by Marilyn Nelson. The truthless wars among beasts and among men are worlds apart. The pigeon lays down fluttering life to flash a russet tail. The haddock becomes harp seal, then polar bear. The squirming termite licked from a sharp stick awakes to invent tools. The lamb lies down within the Lion, yarns, yellow fanged and sleeps. Life struggles to evolve higher in us through questioning toward hope. But we so soft. We leave a ground zero wake a futureless. Take the way a life devolves from thought to blind mouths in the dust, wasted by semi automatic fire. This flesh is full scope. We think.

Marilyn Nelson
"nelson" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:55 min | 9 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"60% of our students come from families making less than $50,000 a year. And so to take a population that has no guarantees, there's no pathway forward without their education and be able to produce better than Ivy League results is the proof point. It speaks for itself. Right. So how about professional schools? Because they're kind of well, that is included. So for example, we have a student not in the first class, but in the second class that applied to Harvard Law School. Chinese national. Apply to Harvard Law School and got in. Which is pretty ridiculous. Now, the professional schools, we have a lower propensity for our students to apply to because our students are overwhelmingly international. So we have a very radically different perspective on admissions, whereas we admit a student, not based on a quota, not based on comparative to other students, we have an absolute bar. So we look at minimal qualifications, which are extremely high, hard to reach. We have about a 1% acceptance rate, but if you pass the bar, you're in. We have a 100% acceptance. We never look at somebody and say, you're qualified. But we have too many of you. Sorry, we have no room. What are the criteria? It's actually really straightforward. The reason we have such economically diverse class is that we don't ask an application that basically asks one question, which is what every other obligation to ask, which is how rich are you. And then bend yourselves into pretzels to admit non rich students because they don't pass the how rich are you bar. So what do we do? We look at really three things. We look at how well did you do in high school compared to your peers, right? So and we don't assume that the valuator Phillips Exeter is any better than the values we're in of a public school in northeast Brazil. There's nothing to say that there is to say in their circumstance how well did you do? Relative to your peers. Relative to your peers. I expect number one. Aspect number two, we have our own set of assessments. How do you, by the way, how do you evaluate kids at these elite places where relative to your peers is sort of a different question than out in the wild. Because then what we do is we have the set of evaluations that we've created to norm across the world. Okay. So one is shows how effectively we refer to it as how well do you know how to eat your spinach? We don't assume that high school was a revelatory, amazing experience for you. We assume that you knew that you had to do well in that context to get to the next context. Yeah. And did you have the capacity to do well? And did you have the focus and resilience to do well, despite the fact that it may not have been particularly engaging. And what does do well mean? The first topic, right? So that's aspect number one. Aspect number two is that we have our own set of assessments standards assessments. And the key to them is really that most of the assessments that we give, the students have no idea why we ask the questions we ask. And in fact, even the graders, even the people who assess what the students have done, and that includes an oral interview that is recorded, it includes writing written portion in a very convoluted question that people don't really ask, why are you asking this question? But the rubrics that are used to evaluate those things aren't exposed to the graders. The greater is merely answer yes or no questions and you don't know whether yes or no is good. They don't even know which yes or no questions we are incorporated into the rubric and everything is just a giant formula that sits on the back end. And that enables us to level the playing field in norm across the world, where you actually see the broad capacity of the student. And then the third thing we look at is assuming that your high school is perhaps not the most engaging thing in the world, what did you do outside of an academic pursuit to actually exercise itch that or scratch that itch that you have? And again, we use rubrics to evaluate that. So that combination. Those have to be academic things. They're going to be sports. No. It's best for them to be beyond academics. It's really beyond anything that is a sign. You don't really think about things that your school makes you do. And then all of that goes into a formula. And the formula produces a number, and the number either puts you above or below a bar. Wow. And that's how you get in. You can't buy your way in. It doesn't matter. We don't know who your parents are. We don't know if you were siblings are. We have no idea. Remember the first time we admitted a sibling of an existing student, we didn't know until that sibling was applying for financial aid in the financial aid process after they were admitted. It says, where do you have other people in the family that go to school and say, oh, yeah. Assembling a nerve. I was like, what? We had no idea. How do people find out about it? Well, it's interesting. So the university itself has now been around for my God. It has a graduate program too. Yeah, so we have a master's program. And the master's in decision analysis, which is actually designed for people who want to get that systematic thinking from a remote perspective. So the undergraduate program of the residential program is very intense, very high. So we're based in San Francisco, but the students only spend a year in San Francisco out of their four years. The other three years, they move together as a cohort and live in 6 other countries around the world. And so everything they learn in that systems of thinking that they start with. Not only do they apply and course after core subject after subject, they apply across culture.

Harvard Law School Phillips Exeter Ivy League Brazil San Francisco
"nelson" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:41 min | 9 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"To me, because I sort of agree with you, but I'm not sure I agree with you. Okay, so this was kind of the lightning bolt moment, which was, I looked at all the courses that I was taking at pen. That's semester of the following semester. I was looking at all of my friends going down every other Ivy League university, top whatever liberal arts college. And none of us, none of us were actually getting a liberal arts education as originally conceived. And the reason for that was went back at the time. This was 30 years ago, 25 years before. Which was the approach that used to happen for liberal arts education was the old core. Curriculum, the Greek and Latin, et cetera. And I see the merits of that, but I don't, but I also see the critiques of it, right? And the idea that no, no, no, you read this book, not that book, and you get to the core, again, is frankly called this practical knowledge by abstraction, right? You read the primary source and then you eventually get to the point where you understand the core driving principles. Instead, and then this really was kind of a fascinating part of higher education history. So maybe a little bit wonky. But in the late 1960s, when the students Brown university were taking over college hall and wanted to be down with the core curriculum and to start the open curriculum, which I think of as the death of American education. They didn't say get rid of the core and replace it with nothing. Which is effectively what Brown is today. Nothing. You can do whatever you want. There's no requirements of any kind. They said, you need to stop telling us, read this book, not that book. And instead, you should develop a series of classes on what they refer to as methods of thinking. And then once we are equipped with methods of thinking, then, hey, give us free read on the curriculum. Let us go and explore whatever it is we want to explore. The faculty Senate desperate to get the kids out of college hall so they don't occupy the president's office. Got together. And they couldn't agree on which methods to teach. Right. So they basically passed the odd curriculum without the prerequisites the students were asking for. And we got the destruction of curricular education. And then the post structuralist stepped in and that's the end of it. That's right, right? And so this is very unpopular. We actually be called racist, I bet the now. And yeah, the post structuralists have put the final nails in those coffins. That's right. So what was I just thinking about? Methods of thinking. Oh, you know, the one thing that in my liberal arts education that really helped maintain the liberal approach. Was even when I was being taught extremely high level science. It was always put in a historical context. Like literally, I was taught calculus, the professor got up there and said, here's what Newton was thinking on that Tuesday. And then he would go to us go, how do you think he solved that? Where do you think he went next? And we, of course, would never figure it out. But then you go, no, he did this. And so already we were engaged in the process. The contextualization calculus was always sort of mysterious to me until this one professor laid it out literally thought by thought in the principia Newton and immediately attaches you to what else was he thinking and what was going on around him at the time. And you automatically start thinking that way. So that's sort of where my head's at with all this. And that's the beauty of it because what that professor did and you know I can give you the exact opposite which means I had with calculus in college where my professor who was a genius. I mean, he fought in the Korean War had his left arm blown off, spoke 5 different languages, including Korean, despite the fact that he was German. He was a learned man. He was just an encyclopedic mind, and he had a computer for a mind. I mean, I remember one time, the only thing I remember from that class is somebody asked him some random question, which they were struggling with, which he didn't know before. And he says, yeah, you know, this is a very complex question. And it's really fascinating, even though the answer is radical three over two. And then took 25 minutes to develop the proof. But the problem was, because of that, he was a horrendous teacher. Yeah. Because for him, he could go through. I mean, what took him 25 minutes would take any mortal like three days to figure out and he couldn't explain it. And it was also top down as opposed to bottom line. Exactly. So what was brilliant about your professor? And this is really the core of the Minerva philosophy is a method of thinking isn't something that you profess. It's not something that you present. It's something that you challenge and require the students to struggle with and apply. Yes. And my teachers will always go, I don't want to know what you know. I don't know what I want to know what you don't know. And so they'll go assume you know everything I'm telling you. Now I'm going to give you a question that you've never thought about. And by the way, may not yet have been solved. It may be an unsolvable question. That's right. Or may have just been solved by Nobel laureate last year. But I want to see you struggle with it. That's right. Or maybe even doesn't have a right answer. Maybe has many wrong answers. And people potentially correct it. People don't even understand what you're talking about when you say that. They really mean they don't want to, in my world when I was challenged in that fashion, they weren't saying, go ahead, do whatever you want. Figure that. No, no. They were saying work towards that solution. And there is a way to do it that is correct. And there are ways to do it that are foolish. That's right. And they will let you know when you're being dumb. That's right. Are you dumb and foolish? Absolutely. Absolutely. And that's so important to be able to distinguish between what a certainly incorrect and what is potentially correct. And it's just like not good thinking. And by the way, we'll try to help you develop that good thinking. And challenging with other things. And the same thing is true on the writing side, not just on the proof side. You know, the ask a question or defend a position or something. There are ways to do that that are smart and there are ways to do that that are just sort of inadequate. And you've got to build somebody up.

Ivy League university principia Newton Brown university Senate Brown Newton
"nelson" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:56 min | 9 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The world's largest personal publishing service. Now, 42 million transactions over 22 countries. My goodness, prior to joining staff fish, Ben was president CEO of community ventures locally branded portals for American communities. And let's see. You're from Penn, where are you going to be economics? And welcome to the program. Thanks so much. Are you from these coast? I actually born in Israel and I grew up in New Jersey since the age of ten. Wow. We're in New Jersey. Montclair, 2020 minutes. So did you have family working in the city? No, actually in nutley. My parents are scientists. And so interesting. And what? So the molecular biology. And they were my father who's a very, very prominent scientist in his mid 80s and still works 7 days a week. Wow. But he was offered a research institution where he didn't have to teach, which was a huge blessing because his great researcher has no interest in teaching. And he had an unlimited budget and he could do basic science research with our reporting to anybody. What was his thing? What was the field? He's crazy. I mean, he's done so many things. He's done a molecular biology in yeasts in neurotransmitter transporters. He is one of the most important scientists in the world of photosystem one, which is the secret to life on earth. It's the world's only perfect machine, which is the photosynthesis. It's a photo. It's a first step in photosynthesis, and it has a 100% efficiency for every photon that it absorbs, it jumps in electron. Wow. And it's a massively complex structure that he was the first one to actually map the structure of. Does he have a theory where it came from? Well, he does actually. I can't wait. So what's fascinating about it? So you would think a perfect machine, like something that's perfectly efficient, it would be simple. Because you have less friction, less parts. When it isn't simple, it makes me think, well, it came from somewhere. It came in on an asteroid or something. That's exactly right. And photosystem one is ancient. It literally I start thinking about the millions and millions of galaxies out there. And then the time function of millions of galaxies and that's what it would take to create a unit like that. You jumped very quickly. That's very good. But basically, it's almost impossible for it to have evolved on earth. Too much. It's too much too much. It didn't have enough time. Right. So it would have been quadrillion of years. That's right. Oh, how fascinating. So we're all aliens, guys basically. Well, listen, I think that the whole thing that mitochondria jumping into animal cells, there's something there too. That mitochondria bacteria, whatever it was. Which was a bacteria before it became mitochondria. It probably came somewhere, and then jumped in and boomed all of a sudden we have animal life plant life. Anyway, that's not the purpose. Although I would argue that if you do your job well, your students will be thinking about things like this. Absolutely. So talk to me about Minerva university. Sure. Well, the core premise, being an immigrant, and having the U.S. being my adopted home. You can see things the rest of us can't see. Well, it's actually not even that. There's a love of country that is intellectual as opposed to automatic. Because when you choose a place to be your home and you, you have to really buy into that system. When I moved here when I was ten, my parents, the institute they worked for, unfortunately, shut down. They moved back to Israel and they were 20. And it was a bit of a juncture point for me. I was already a pen, but I had to really make a decision. Am I an American or am I Israeli? Yes. And I chose to be an American. I realized that well, there must have been so many made a choice to be an Israeli to along the way. Where did they come from? That's right. So my father was actually born in Palestine before the country was formed. And his parents migrated from my grandmother's Ukrainian, my grandfather is from Belarus. So I have the same exact except my grandfather, some of Ukraine, my grandmother's brothers. But there was this huge exodus around the domo were and all that stuff. That's exactly right. Yeah. So they were part of that. And my mother actually whose polish was a Holocaust survivor. And so she migrated to Israel in 1950. After the war and after everything else. So they were, they chose that incredible entity because it was a, it was a Beacon of hope and will discrimination. And I effectively chose the United States because of the promise of the country. And what it's all about, and I was very much enamored with the idea of a representative republic and what that means. And when I went to college, Israelis not a representative republic. No, it's a parliamentary democracy. Of course. Democracy. So it has a lot of dysfunction because of that. I recently been having a little admiration envy for parliamentary processes. Watching what goes on in England and things always sort of fascinating and entertaining to me. But go on, go on. So when I went to college, I took a class on the history of the American university. In fact, my first semester of freshman year, and what struck me as a really lightning bolt moment was that the ideal of the American university, the concept of a liberal arts education. The term, they say, oh, you know, liberal arts, what does that mean? Art, poetry, stuff like that. And of course, it has nothing to do with that. It has nothing to do with the humanities at all. It is the arts. Humanities. Well, not as the founding fathers envisioned it, because they think about when they thought about what a liberal arts education is about. They really thought about how do you form this new society where you're not born into your station and you don't serve the cross or The Crown. That you yourself are the song. How do you make good citizens? How do you make good citizens? Exactly. And there's really a Roman concept. Exactly. It was modeled after Ancient Rome, and Ancient Rome, the ideas that you would be educated in the arts were disciplines that allow you to have freedom or liberty. Hence the liberal arts. And so with enfranchisement comes responsibility. And we don't really think about it that much, but when the United States was founded, only 6% of the population was enfranchised. It's really, it really is a fascinating perspective. Well, and the founding fathers had great fear of the rest. That is correct. Because they weren't liberally educated. Because they were not liberal educated. And the entire model, the Jeffersonian model of the franklinian model, what frankly called practical knowledge, which Jefferson called useful knowledge, the theory was we will expand in franchisement over time, but we have to educate first. We have to actually provide systematic thinking that allows our citizens to have practical knowledge such that not only can they vote, but they can also change careers, which was such a radical idea in the 18th century, but if you're going to have somebody who will act as a senator as a judge as a president, you're not training for that job, you may have been a merchant or a farmer beforehand. And you have the capacity to take the learnings you have from one area and apply it to another. Cincinnatus was a great role model for that whole idea. Yeah, and so you're talking to someone very strong feelings about liberal arts. Went to a liberal arts college and feel that that's why I could think about photosynthetic processes and things and sort of reason about that because I was just beat the shit out of an uncritical thinking and analytic thought. And it changed my mind. It changed my brain. So I have a very strong opinion about liberal arts. Done well. And liberal arts, not done well. That's right. Not done well, it's a nothing. It's a zero. It's a zero. Done well, it's exactly what we're talking about. That's right. And to do it well is very hard and requires a lot of work and dedicated teachers. That's right. And it requires really. If you really want to do it, it requires a curricular approach. Well, talk about that. Go ahead. Well, to me, because I sort of agree with you, but I'm not sure I agree with you. Okay, so this was kind of the lightning bolt moment, which was, I looked at.

community ventures New Jersey Israel Minerva university nutley Montclair Penn American university United States Ben Ancient Rome Belarus Palestine Ukraine England Jefferson
"nelson" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"nelson" Discussed on Revision Path

"We have a Patreon at Patreon dot com slash strange scaffold where you can get early access to our work as well as do things like get pictures of your dog into the games that we're bringing out now and get custom content into some of the projects we're still developing such as space world organ training simulator, and lastly, I work on a lot of games. So if you look on a PlayStation or an Xbox or a Nintendo platform or on steam, running into something that I'm working on is or have worked on, there's a better chance than not that you'll find it pretty quickly. So strange scaffolds is the name for a lot of my collaborations, but for stuff outside of that, like skateboard or hypnospace outlaw. If you like one thing we're doing, there's a vibrant thread of work to be followed. Zavier Nelson junior, I want to thank you so much for coming on the show. One, thank you for sharing your really unique look into game development and I think honestly inspiring story about how you even just got involved into games. I love that you really are thinking about not just the stories that you want to tell throughout games, but also how you can make the industry better as a whole. I think that's something that probably, I don't know if many other game developers are doing that, but it seems like that's something that you really tapped into and are trying to put forth and the games that you're creating are fun and unique and I just want to see more of what you're going to accomplish in the future. So thank you so much for coming on the show. I appreciate it. It kind of words mean an immense amount. Thank you. Big,.

Zavier Nelson Nintendo
"nelson" Discussed on The Light Inside

The Light Inside

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Light Inside

"I hope so. Now let's tune into here. Nelson's amazing story of how he learned to more effectively leverage his adversity turning it into firewood to fuel prosperity. I nelson how are you doing. Fantastic awesome thank you so much for having me off yes. I'm glad to have you here today. And i'm looking forward to share in a conversation with our listening community. Yeah i'm excited to share my story and have a conversation with you so thank you. Thank you So grateful for you. Joining us today. And i look forward to diving in this. This is.

Nelson nelson
"nelson" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"On his life while he was in prison but were never successful yes. They actually tried to assassinate him while he was already imprisoned. Also another great fact about nelson's incarceration despite the fact that he was being mistreated beyond belief as a political prisoner and as a black person nelson was able to earn his law degree through the university of london while he was incarcerated nelson's case began to garner international attention and support as people became aware of his fight for the people after being falsely imprisoned for more than twenty years eventually nelson and his fellow members began to have talks with the south african government in order to coordinate their release on the wave of all the support that he'd gained over time this was also a pain staking process but didn't have any true traction until a new president was elected president frederik willem de klerk was elected in south africa. And one of the first things he did was coordinate for. Nelson's release under all the terms. He's been fighting for. Since the beginning the first thing nelson did upon his release was urged those involved in the movement to continue the pressure until the government reformed for the better in particular when the south african black population were given the right to vote. Nelson was also elected the president of the anc in nineteen ninety one and just three years later. Nelson was awarded the nobel peace prize for his anti apartheid. Work in peace talks with president declerk nelson worked with the president to organize the first open election that included black and white candidates amongst the intense chaos and demonstrations happening across the country during the country's reformation period thankfully due to the dutiful and steady negotiation work a level headed and intelligent approach to speaking with the public during this process as well as managing the balance of being a leader nelson was able to secure the first true democratic election in south africa on april twenty seventh nineteen ninety four to no one's surprise nelson mandela was elected as the first black president of south africa. This was an incredible feat. Especially after being imprisoned for more than twenty years not to mention he was seventy seven years. Old nelson would begin the hard in long road of uniting a country that been historically tense and divided supporting his people through a economic collapse as well as securing the rights to vote and a centralized democratic government after serving his term as president nelson retired from politics but not from his humanitarian work. He continued to advocate for causes such as education and health care for his people especially those in the more rural areas of the country while continuing to act as a counselor in certain areas as well nelson was even an advisor in mediator during a civil war in a neighboring country in two thousand seven with his wife. Nelson co founded an organization called the elders. The elders were comprised of political social and economic powerhouses in players. Who all wanted to come together to share their knowledge. The goal of the elders was to work and correct global issues using the combined. Intelligence and experience of those within the group nelson worked tirelessly to secure the freedoms of not just his people but all people all the way up until his passing as nelson aged. He began to experience health issues and would often have to be hospitalized. For long periods of time sadly nelson mandela passed away on december fifth. Twenty thirteen in his home in johannesburg. The very place. He had been imprisoned so many years ago i honestly cannot fully encompass or quantify the impact. This person has had on his country and the globe. Nelson mandela was a person who had a vision not just for a better future for himself but for those around him his commitment to securing freedom up against an unrelenting force with unlimited power like he was going against the actual government who can pretty much do whatever they want to continue in the face of such a opponent that takes a level determination that is almost supernatural and then to be incarcerated falsely and succumb out into still maintain your core self. How does one face. Their ultimate enemy be taken in falsely imprisoned for decades and not lose hope nelson do not allow his current circumstances to penetrate his psyche. He was not afraid of the consequences of his actions. Even if those consequences led to the loss of his own freedoms the emotional fortitude the vision for the future the ability to connect with those in high political positions as well as the everyday people who are working on the farms and in the city's nelson could connect with them all to say he was a leader in my opinion is not adequate. Nelson wasn't a leader. He was change in a single person. He was changed. Personified and unstoppable force. Who didn't need to use force at all and here. I had to use this quote at the end because honestly this is a quote that just makes me want to go out there in. Fight the power. You know what i mean like. I is truly motivating to hear that people continue on no matter what and they continue on in the face of certain death and they know it and this is also important because nelson acknowledged that civil issues. Were just as pressing with native south africans as they were with those who were involved in colonialism which i also thought was so important so during my lifetime i have dedicated myself to the struggle of the african people. I have fought against white domination. And i have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which i hope to live for into achieve but if needs be it is an ideal.

nelson Nelson frederik willem de klerk south africa president declerk nelson nelson mandela south african government Nelson co university of london anc president nelson democratic government johannesburg
"nelson" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"If i butchered that pronunciation too terribly you have my full permission to absolutely destroyed me in the online forums. But no that i try. Okay give me my credit i tried. But nelson's father was a chief who provided guidance to the tribal leadership and his mother was a stay at home mom who helped to raise the children and maintain the household so nelson had a large family with more than ten siblings who all lived relatively close by. Nelson's father held a position of respect within the tribe which afforded their family wealth instability within the village unfortunately after a disagreement with a tribal official nelson's father was stripped of his position and the family suffered major financial losses. They were forced to flee to a village which allowed them anonymity and the opportunity to start over. The village was located in the rural grasslands. Much more remote in agriculturally focused nelson learned to adapt to living a country lifestyle spending most of his time outdoors playing with the other boys in his village. Another really cool. Tidbit is that nelson was the first of his family to receive formal schooling. Now i don't know if you guys noticed in my previous episodes. I always clarify by saying formal schooling to essentially differentiate between other methods of learning. I'm a firm believer that there are other avenues for gaining knowledge. Other than going to an institution so it's important to acknowledge those as well but it was at this early juncture in. Nelson's life that he would. I be exposed to the consequences of colonialism in his country. When the south african children would attend school they would often be given christian names to replace their birth names. This is where holy law i became nelson as the name was given to him by his teacher. In one thousand nine hundred thirty after his father passed away. Unexpectedly nelson was adopted by an old family. Friend this family friend was a chief and nelson was again. Returned to the more refined lifestyle. He'd become accustomed to as the son of a tribal counselor. Nelson was able to reap the benefits of having access and status continuing his schooling along with the chiefs. Other two children. The children learned about many subjects but nelson was naturally curious about african history. Nelson was also exposed to different cultures and tribes. While he was living with his adopted family. The tribesmen would educate nelson on their history. And how they were. Once they connected people before the perils of colonialism when nelson was in his teen years he participated in a traditional male rite of passage with other boys in his village during the ceremony. Nelson was disheartened by speech. Given by one of the chiefs native south africans had been suffering tremendously at the hands of colonialism and the chiefs spoke on just how bad the circumstances were for the men. It was at this event that nelson fully committed to the goal of uniting south africa while living with his adopted family nelson was trained in the same position as his father preparing to act as an advisor to the tribal leadership after coming of age nelson attended college at the university of fort. Hare a prestigious university that was known for accepting only the greatest of mines while not university nelson engaged in his first act of political resistance by aligning with a student body who demanded change while serving on the student council. He was ultimately kicked out of school due to his actions in sent back home. When the chief heard about nelson's actions in expulsion from school he moved quickly to demand nelson return to school and adhered to a plan for an upcoming arranged marriage. After hearing the chiefs plans for his future nelson ran away from home to the city of johannesburg in order to strike out on his own. While in johannesburg he enrolled in law school and became a lawyer beginning a lengthy career in criminal justice now before we discussed the latter part of. Nelson's life. I wanted to give a formal definition of apartheid and this was taken from wikipedia. Apartheid was a system of institutionalized racial segregation that existed in south africa in south west africa from nineteen forty eight until the early nineteen nineties. It was at this point in. Nelson's life that his goal of fighting for the freedom of his fellow south africans became a reality around. Nineteen forty two nelson would join. An anti-apartheid group called the african national congress and along with other young and like minded individuals formed the african national congress lee youth league these groups work to create a movement that would inspire south africans to fight for their independence using modern strategies and more direct action as opposed to the usual peace talks that had been in progress so far nelson dedicated more than twenty years of his life to working on fighting. The south african government with violent means starting his own law firm with a friend from law. School this was the first black law firm in south africa in specifically worked on counseling and representing the native south african people during this time nelson was organizing nonviolent campaigns to gain the attention of the south african government bringing awareness to the plight of his neighbors and working to dismantle. The racist discrimination in place nelson wasn't just in the office coordinating change. He was also boots on the ground on the front lines. Pushing the agenda of freedom for all in response the government would employ intimidation tactics such as false arrest and imprisonment for any activists that were caught. Luckily nelson was initially able to escape imprisonment until the fateful day in one thousand nine hundred sixty one although he was arrested more than once by this time over the years nelson was able to establish himself in the anti apartheid community as a leader in a such was able to mobilise. His own group called m. k. The south african people had become disillusioned and lost faith in the government to fairly remove. The apartheid with the government always pushing back any attempts to peacefully move forward in the early nineteen sixties nelson helped to coordinate a massive national worker strike across the country in order to highlight the mistreatment of native south africans around nineteen sixty three nelson was captured in arrested for his role in the strike resulting in him being brought to trial not just once but twice nelson had to endure an unfair trial and was sentenced to life in prison. This would have been a devastating verdict for any person but they did not know. Nelson nelson was severely abused in actually contracted to burke ulysses while he was incarcerated incredibly. The south african government still considered nelson a threat and made attempts.

nelson Nelson chiefs university of fort south africa johannesburg african national congress lee south african government south west africa Hare african national congress wikipedia government Nelson nelson burke ulysses
"nelson" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Love. A unique name in this was a doozy. I so loved learning it. I just love people that have unique names. Nelson mandela was born. July eighteenth nineteen eighteen in a tiny village. In south africa. Nelson mandela's birth name was not nelson. It was holy la mandela. I thought this was pure perfection that holy claw roughly translates to someone who creates mischief or trouble. Like how cool is that. Your name literally means troublemaker. It's like hey trouble literally a holy law. I'm so jealous. Like i love that. I think that is so amazing. And if i butchered that pronunciation too terribly you have my full permission to absolutely destroyed me in the online forums. But no that i try. Okay give me my credit i tried. But nelson's father was a chief who provided guidance to the tribal leadership and his mother was a stay at home mom who helped to raise the children and maintain the household so nelson had a large family with more than ten siblings who all lived relatively close by. Nelson's father held a position of respect within the tribe which afforded their family wealth instability within the village unfortunately after a disagreement with a tribal official nelson's father was stripped of his position and the family suffered major financial losses. They were forced to flee to a village which allowed them anonymity and the opportunity to start over. The village was located in the rural grasslands. Much more remote in agriculturally focused nelson learned to adapt to living a country lifestyle spending most of his time outdoors playing with the other boys in his village. Another really cool. Tidbit is that nelson was the first of his family to receive formal schooling. Now i don't know if you guys noticed in my previous episodes. I always clarify by saying formal schooling to essentially differentiate between other methods of learning. I'm a firm believer that there are other avenues for gaining knowledge. Other than going to an institution so it's important to acknowledge those as well but it was at this early juncture in. Nelson's life that he would. I be exposed to the consequences of colonialism in his country. When the south african children would attend school they would often be given christian names to replace their birth names. This is where holy law i became nelson as the name was given to him by his teacher. In one thousand nine hundred thirty after his father passed away. Unexpectedly nelson was adopted by an old family. Friend this family friend was a chief and nelson was again. Returned to the more refined lifestyle. He'd become accustomed to as the son of a tribal counselor. Nelson was able to reap the benefits of having access and status continuing his schooling along with the chiefs. Other two children. The children learned about many subjects but nelson was naturally curious about african history. Nelson was also exposed to different cultures and tribes. While he was living with his adopted family. The tribesmen would educate nelson on their history. And how they were. Once they connected people before the perils of colonialism when nelson was in his teen years he participated in a traditional male rite of passage with other boys in his village during the ceremony. Nelson was disheartened by speech. Given by one of the chiefs native south africans had been suffering tremendously at the hands of colonialism and the chiefs spoke on just how bad the circumstances were for the men. It was at this event that nelson fully committed to the goal of uniting south africa while living with his adopted family nelson was trained in the same position as his father preparing to act as an advisor to the tribal leadership after coming of age nelson attended college at the university of fort. Hare a prestigious university that was known for accepting only the greatest of mines while not university nelson engaged in his first act of political resistance by aligning with a student body who demanded change while serving on the student council. He was ultimately kicked out of school due to his actions in sent back home. When the chief heard about nelson's actions in expulsion from school he moved quickly to demand nelson return to school and adhered to a plan for an upcoming arranged marriage. After hearing the chiefs plans for his future nelson ran away from home to the city of johannesburg in order to strike out on his own. While in johannesburg he enrolled in law school and became a lawyer beginning a lengthy career in criminal justice now before we discussed the latter part of. Nelson's life. I wanted to give a formal definition of apartheid and this was taken from wikipedia. Apartheid was a system of institutionalized racial segregation that existed in south africa in south west africa from nineteen forty eight until the early nineteen nineties. It was at this point in. Nelson's life that his goal of fighting for the freedom of his fellow south africans became a reality around. Nineteen forty two nelson would join. An anti-apartheid group called the african national congress and along with other young and like minded individuals formed the african national congress lee youth league these groups work to create a movement that would inspire south africans to fight for their independence using modern strategies and more direct action as opposed to the usual peace talks that had been in progress so far nelson dedicated more than twenty years of his life to working on fighting. The south african government with violent means starting his own law firm with a friend from law. School this was the first black law firm in south africa in specifically worked on counseling and representing the native south african people during this time nelson was organizing nonviolent campaigns to gain the attention of the south african government bringing awareness to the plight of his neighbors and working to dismantle. The racist discrimination in place nelson wasn't just in the office coordinating change. He was also boots on the ground on the front lines. Pushing the agenda of freedom for all in response the government would employ intimidation tactics such as false arrest and imprisonment for any activists that were caught. Luckily nelson was initially able to escape imprisonment until the fateful day in one thousand nine hundred sixty one although he was arrested more than once by this time over the years nelson was able to establish himself in the anti apartheid community as a leader in a such was able to mobilise. His own group called m. k. The south african people had become disillusioned and lost faith in the government to fairly remove. The apartheid with the government always pushing back any attempts to peacefully move forward.

nelson Nelson Nelson mandela la mandela chiefs south africa university of fort johannesburg african national congress lee Hare south west africa south african government african national congress wikipedia government
"nelson" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on Drum History

"We get <Speech_Music_Male> amendment to <SpeakerChange> find something <Speech_Male> else. Yeah <Speech_Male> i mean there's definitely <Silence> there's definitely <Speech_Male> drums <Speech_Male> that love <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Are <Speech_Male> really excited about <Speech_Male> guy. I love <Speech_Male> like any of the wind. <Speech_Male> Were full <Speech_Male> finishes or like <Speech_Male> fiesta. Paroles <Speech_Male> or like <SpeakerChange> kind of weird <Speech_Male> wacky stuff. I always <Speech_Male> get totally really <Speech_Male> into <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah or if. <SpeakerChange> I like certain <Speech_Male> sizes like i <Speech_Male> big <Speech_Male> like. I <Speech_Male> love old jazz <Speech_Male> a lot my <Speech_Male> all time. Favorite artists <Speech_Male> is probably billie holiday. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And i love that era of music <Speech_Male> quite a bit <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> not meeting. Not that air <Speech_Male> but directly <Speech_Male> after that a lot of people <Speech_Male> were using smaller sized <Speech_Male> drums like l. Dan <Speech_Male> ellen johnson. <Speech_Male> A bunch of drummers. <Speech_Male> So i i love i get <Speech_Male> excited about <Speech_Male> a twelve fourteen <Speech_Male> eighteen <Speech_Male> setups like <Speech_Male> just small little jazz setups. <Speech_Male> I feel comfortable. <Speech_Male> Those advocates <Speech_Male> definitely <Speech_Male> more of a hat drummer <Speech_Music_Male> really <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> those <Speech_Male> types of sizes <Speech_Male> usually feel more comfortable <Speech_Male> on than <Speech_Male> something else. <Speech_Male> I watch like j. <Speech_Male> play. Jay <Speech_Male> always has. He's a cool <Speech_Male> like bombastic. <Speech_Male> Cool all drums <Speech_Male> are like big. And <Speech_Male> like oh i would <Speech_Male> love to play like that <Speech_Male> but then i'll i'll try <Speech_Male> you know. Do whatever <Speech_Male> it is and it just never feels <Speech_Male> right. So <Speech_Male> i think i just feel <Speech_Male> smaller feel <Speech_Male> better on a smaller <Speech_Male> little kids using <Silence> drugs. I <Speech_Male> if i keep <Speech_Male> something. <SpeakerChange> It is usually <Speech_Male> more <Speech_Male> like that. Twelve fourteen <Speech_Male> eighteen. <SpeakerChange> Twelve fourteen <Speech_Male> twenty type setup <Speech_Male> which is cool <Speech_Male> in its kind of pocket-sized <Speech_Male> and they're still <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> I i like that too. But <Speech_Male> there are days where <Speech_Male> i'm like. <Speech_Male> I don't know man. I'd <Speech_Male> love to have like four. <Speech_Male> Tom's <Speech_Male> to floor. <Speech_Male> Toms and <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> twenty <Speech_Male> four inch bass <Speech_Male> drum or something. And <Speech_Male> it's a lotta times <Speech_Male> in space <Silence> and moving things. <Speech_Male> It's it's <Speech_Male> not practical. But i i <Speech_Male> love <Speech_Male> an. I'm jealous again <Speech_Male> of having like and <Speech_Male> there's like rows <Speech_Male> of crashes <Speech_Male> into rides <Speech_Male> and there's like <Speech_Male> a side snare <Speech_Male> it's like totally <Speech_Male> it'd be awesome to have <Speech_Male> but it's it's just different <Speech_Male> thing. It's <Speech_Male> a blast. <SpeakerChange> The place up like <Speech_Male> that. that's for sure. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> cool will <Speech_Male> man. This has been <Speech_Male> awesome so <Speech_Male> Bryson has <Speech_Male> been kind enough to join <Speech_Male> us on a bonus <Speech_Male> episode today. Which <Speech_Male> which brian i would like <Speech_Male> to ask you about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> your overall <Speech_Music_Male> aesthetic. <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> with social <Speech_Male> media you. <Speech_Male> Have kind of like a very <Speech_Male> cohesive <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Your your t shirts <Speech_Male> just everything you have like <Speech_Male> a feel to you <Speech_Male> even with <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> Like senior <Speech_Male> booth at <Speech_Male> The music city <Silence> drum show. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> all very. I <Speech_Male> think <Speech_Male> it seems like it comes <Speech_Male> naturally to you <Speech_Male> but it seems very <Speech_Male> purposeful <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> cohesive <Speech_Male> and i think <Speech_Male> people can learn <Speech_Male> a lot from <Speech_Male> from hearing about that <Silence> because <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> aesthetic can go <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> across. You're <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> genre like indy <Speech_Male> into your music <Speech_Male> and just being purposeful <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> anyway <Speech_Male> i'd love to hear about <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> if that's okay <Speech_Male> with you. <Speech_Male> Yeah yeah definitely <Speech_Male> just again thank <Speech_Male> you so much for <Speech_Male> being here. One at <Speech_Male> utah. I think people <Speech_Male> most people know you on <Speech_Male> social media and all that stuff <Speech_Male> when he just tell people where <Speech_Male> they can <Speech_Male> Find you and check <Speech_Male> out what you're <SpeakerChange> what you're doing <Speech_Male> online. Yes <Speech_Male> sure <Speech_Male> you could <Speech_Male> find like if you're online <Speech_Male> you can find this <Speech_Male> Nelson drum shop <Speech_Male> dot com.

ellen johnson Dan Jay Tom brian utah
"nelson" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on What A Day

"Plain. Stay in place. I think the entire country is in a little bit of a. Shell shock that we're not through this pandemic yet you know. We saw the light at the end of the tunnel with the vaccine and flight attendants. Who were wearing those masks when we go to work. Fourteen and fifteen hour days while we're trying to enforce it with people who are on to our flight with us and it's really frustrating so everyone was looking forward to being in groups of people that are fully vaccinated and we can be safe and we can move on with our lives but i will tell you that flight attendants are very much like. Are you kidding me. We have to keep this up through the end of the year. And i have to go to work and continue to remind these people and then get beat up for that when i am sick and tired of wearing this mask myself all day long and a lot of them are saying well. At least we'll get through the summer and so we won't be sitting there sweating in our masks on the plane. But but it's very difficult and i think that we have to continue to do more to bring down these events of conflict and the more that people are vaccinated. The more that people understand that we're in this together the more that we're pushing back on politicians who were giving people the wrong information the better off. We're going to be in the safer flight. Attendants are going to be the one demand that we have left to make sure that people understand the consequences. If you're not following the rules on our flights is for doj very publicly prosecute some of these bad actors because the minute that people start going to jail and they can face up to twenty years in jail for these actions on our planes. Everyone's going to sober up real fast. And i think that flight attendants are going to be safer and the rest of the traveling public has been going to be safer so we really need. Doj step up on that. Yeah i hope so and just one last question for you if you like me and probably get in have listened to this conversation and are like oh my god. How do i help the next time. I'm on a flight. Like how do. I make sure i am the best possible flyer i could be. What tips do you have for us. What should we be doing. How can we help out what you know. Tell us what we need to do. Absolutely so first and foremost model good behavior so do not come to the airport of the last minute. Give yourself plenty of time so that you're not rushed and you can be a helper and not be adding to all the angst everywhere and then make sure that you have a nonperishable piece of food with you so that if you can't get through those concession lines that are very long because not all the concessions are open. You're you're able to get something to eat. And then just showing kindness to people through the process looking out where where you can be a helper is very helpful because that's gonna lower the stress level of everyone before they even get to the gate. I really hope people were taking notes during that entire section and laminating them for other people. Earning about sending to your friends. Sara nelson the international president of the association of flight attendants. Thank you so much again for all your generous time today. Thank you very much. And i want to say. Thank you to everyone who works and happy labor day. And if you'll be flying out in the next week for the holiday stay safe out there and be.

doj Doj Sara nelson association of flight attendan
"nelson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"My wife since my right. So why comedian nelson.

nelson
"nelson" Discussed on The Managing Partners Podcast

The Managing Partners Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Managing Partners Podcast

"There's people that need to help solve this issues or natalie challenge so the there's opportunity surrounding all that is going to be hard struggle for some people Abaza tuition for others And i think some people are gonna come out ahead because of what they saw in in the issue at hand so But i think what you're doing is is awesome. You're putting out great content. You're helping people with with. The books are putting out and With just sharing your knowledge I think it's great. So we can with harry go check out. His website is a nelson What hardiman dot com artem dot com. you can check him out finally on facebook instagram We disconnected unlinked ten so Check him out there and I'm sure be happy to have dialogue with you. Chat with you answering questions you have. And of course we need his help reach out to him and his firm and i'm sure they can help you out so Harry thanks so much man. I really appreciate it. It's been a great conversation and Just look forward to having your upstate up on the website here soon. Now thanks for having me on kevin really a pleasure to be with you. A great great great chance to talk and I'm grateful for the opportunity to thank you absolutely all watching. Make sure you learned a couple of these things from harry and if you need any marketing assistance reach out to us a ray law dot com will help you out to be a rockstar. Like harry here so For watching thanks so much vol- taught you soon thanks..

Abaza natalie harry facebook Harry kevin
"nelson" Discussed on The Managing Partners Podcast

The Managing Partners Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Managing Partners Podcast

"The the specialty of law but the mindset of the lawyer like there are lawyers who are great at saying no right. Sometimes i'm jealous of these lawyers that big firms they work for large institutions. And there's a general counsel reporting to a ceo reporting to a board and the answer is going to be no ninety nine times out of one hundred and as long as everybody stays out of trouble. That lawyer did a great job. I don't i don't work in that world right. I work in the world. The people who want to know how to do things and so as a client. You gotta make sure you're working with your kinda lawyer who is gonna get. You need to go you gotta have very upfront conversations about what's going to be involved and what the how many people how many lawyers are going to be about how much it's gonna cost And we don't make it easy with the billable hour for clients to get transparency. And so i think those are the places where i see. Clients getting into Getting frustrated getting into problems and definitely areas where where we could definitely do better as a profession. Gotcha well you mentioned. Clients a couple of times. I mentioned the beginning. You guys have really good. Pr seen young ton of interviews and things like that and you've written a couple of books in which we'll talk about here a few minutes but how do you get clients so now. Maybe this is different when you started when you started your new firm. What did you do. Did you penalize streets today. So i would say at the early days i was. I benefited from having a handful of clients who were evangelical but my practice. There was one. Doctor i worked with. He was a doctor. Doing infusion therapies. Therapy call them in intravenous globulin and he was very worried. He had been doing it for years. Medicare came to him. And said we think you're you're using it medically sir cases. And he was. He was worried and medicare wanted a million and a half dollars back from him and And he was worried. I was junior lawyer at that point in his eyes. And i did this case. At the end of the case he owed the government back like one hundred and fifty dollars like i. I got nine one.

"nelson" Discussed on The Managing Partners Podcast

The Managing Partners Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"nelson" Discussed on The Managing Partners Podcast

"Hey there i'm kevin daisy and i'm eric olson. You're listening to the managing partners. Podcast where we interview tob lawyers about how they're growing their firms. All right we are live everyone to tune and welcome to another live recording the managing partners. Podcast i enjoy him with a special guest today. Harry nelson harry. Thanks so much for coming on and join us all the way from l. a. Yeah my pleasure kevin. Thanks for having me on the managing partners podcasts. Now absolutely look forward to learning more about your practice and in how you mark your practice and all this thing. So i think i was saying before pre show. I'm less familiar with healthcare law. And so i'm looking for to learn more. I'm sure others tuning in washington. The future are looking forward to as well so as always pleased asking you questions while on this live Harry will do his best to answer those questions and to ask away sure. There's a lot of covid related questions that might much happy to take whatever questions people have. everyone I'll ask more suffering than the comments. Put some links out. So you guys can connect with harry if you wanna look him up as handle I believe is your Is this your instagram handle. Yeah so h thin on On lincoln and i'm out there people can find me guy you can. Google has all over the place so yeah check him out. And let's get into it so first off just a introduction to tell us about yourself a little bit personally and It was kinda cool. I'm in virginia beach virginia. He's la already mentioned that he's a came. He's been in virginia when he was a kid. And things like that. So super cool tells a little bit about yourself where you're from and and i guess you tie that into Towards the end of how you started your your practice. Yeah i'm happy to so. I was born in Brazil my parents were americans. Living down there but i grew up From from the age five Ford i grew up in michigan. My my folks are still there. I identify as a mid westerner and a michigan..

kevin daisy Harry nelson harry eric olson kevin virginia beach virginia Harry washington harry lincoln Google la virginia Brazil Ford michigan