35 Burst results for "Nell"

"nell" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"nell" Discussed on Innovation Now

"Although often ridiculed for his ideas about reaching outer space, the experiments of Robert Goddard have become the foundation for today's rockets that take us to the stars. This is innovation now. On July 14th, the 1914, Robert Goddard a Massachusetts physics professor registered his first two patents, describing a multi stage rocket and a rocket fueled by liquid propellants. Despite skepticism from colleagues, Goddard believed that liquid propellants offered advantages over solid fuel. After self funding his early research, the professor received a grant from the Smithsonian institute for an unheard of amount. $5000 for 5 years. Goddard began experimenting with a rocket engine that used gasoline as the fuel and liquid oxygen as an oxidizer that made the fuel burn fast enough to produce the necessary thrust. And on March 26th, 1926, on a farm in auburn Massachusetts, Goddard's liquid fueled rocket rose 41 feet in the air during its 2.5 second flight. That first modest rocket Goddard fondly called Nell, burned a flight into the future, an established Robert Goddard, as the father of modern rocketry. For innovation now, I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by WHR V

Robert Goddard Goddard Smithsonian institute Massachusetts auburn Nell Jennifer pulley National Institute of aerospac NASA
Rep. Troy Nehls Claims Disguised Capitol Police Snuck Into His Office

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 8 months ago

Rep. Troy Nehls Claims Disguised Capitol Police Snuck Into His Office

"Pelosi's capital police tried to sneak into Republican congressman's office dressed as construction workers and illegally took photos of legislative documents. Speaker Nancy Pelosi's capitol police are alleging to have illegally entered the office of congressman Troy nels, photographing confidential legislative products and grilling staff according to reports. The police now under formal investigation, Santa accused of dressing up as construction workers and attempting another entry just two days later. So correct me if I'm wrong, didn't Nixon get impeached for lying about something very similar to this, but it wasn't even it wasn't even as flagrant as this. So there's so much here that needs to be investigated, Pelosi's, I guess this is the closest Pelosi you'll ever get towards loving construction workers, right? Like, yeah, go to the local Halloween store and go dress up as construction people. So this sitting member of Congress Troy Nell's from Texas is alleging that Nancy Pelosi and Democrats have made capital police go dress up in costume as construction workers to go into capital offices and to go take pictures of documents. Reports suggest that capitol police have built intelligence dossiers on those illegally investigated. The documents photographed saint Nell's quote are protected by the speech and debate clause enshrined in the constitution article one section 6. Nels took to Twitter to explain the multiple incidents. Again, I'm going to read directly from his tweets. Because these are some pretty serious allegations breaking. Capitol police intelligence division investigated my office illegally. And one of my staffers caught them in the act. On November 20th, capitol police entered my office without my knowledge and photographed confidential legislative products protected by the speech and debate clause enshrined and constitution article one section 6.

Pelosi Troy Nels Speaker Nancy Pelosi Troy Nell Saint Nell Nixon Capitol Police Santa Nancy Pelosi Congress Nels Texas Twitter
"nell" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:08 min | 9 months ago

"nell" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"A very happy new year to you all. I'm already looking forward to that fungi program that's coming on straight after us at 11. But anyway, it feels great to be back, stirring the good ship woman's hour into the weekend, where only 7 days into 2022. And today, I'll be talking to two women who've already broken boundaries and achieved a huge amount. Preach handy who some of you may remember we spoke to at the end of last year ahead of her epic, expedition to the South Pole. Well, she's only gone and done it. She's become the first woman of color to solo track. I'll repeat that solo trek to the South Pole an immense 700 miles in 40 days, and to all those aunties who thought she was tracking to south hall. Yes, she's made it. Not to south hole to the South Pole. And then imagine writing your first ever novel. And before it even comes out, the BBC are turning it into a 6 part series because they think it's that good. Well, I've read it and it is that good. The author Nikki may will be on the show to tell us all about her debut novel. Two women who may be a few years ago would not have believed what they were capable of. Well, as you know, this show wouldn't be anything without hearing from you. So I'd love you to tell me about your achievements this morning. The things you've done that you didn't think you were capable of. The times you've surprised yourself with something you've done, whether it's learning a new skill later in life, facing down your fears and doing something adventurous or extraordinary or being organized enough to get your tax return done on time, whatever it is, let me know the text number is 8 four 8 four four. You can also contact us on social media. It's at BBC. Woman's sour or if you fancy dropping me an email, just go to our website. Let's shout about the times you've surprised yourselves. We're also talking to play right Nell lichen this morning about her new play folk. And we've talked a lot on this show about how safe or rather unsafe women feel in their daily lives while could drone technology be the answer, all of that coming up remember 8 four 8 four.

south hall BBC Nikki The times Nell lichen
"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

04:49 min | 11 months ago

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"They will tend to take a greater role within business. They will take perhaps more of a front facing role as well, a customer facing role. As they become more corrigible, more trustworthy. Less likely to put their foot in it or to cause embarrassment. And so, as AI has begun to take over many clerical tasks in the future, it will begin to take over some, though not all. Social tasks, you know, like calling to make an appointment or a reception style tasks. Those kinds of things. That will have a large effect on the economy. Again, a mixed bag, positive and negative, it will unlock many new possibilities, particularly for smaller companies who otherwise might not be able to afford a full time receptionist. For example, but also a lot of people will naturally end up being somewhat disrupted by these systems. Just as the advent of desktop computing in the 90s also put a lot of people either out of work or scrambling to keep up with the new developments. With the context of what we've discussed today from social to economic to the greater good of humans and machines, it seems that, as a society, we are moving to a place where there is the demand for transparency. There is the request for data for good and data for all. So we're beginning to move more towards a humane society, though there's a lot of work to be done and your team and yourself among many leaders are building those foundations for a humane world. Whether you're seeing as the next steps that are audience and listeners can take to heart on building for humanity. Yeah. G.K. Chesterton, the writer of Chesterton's fence, fame. Was once asked, what is wrong with the world? And he thought about it for a long time and he basically said, and this was about over a 110 years ago. It's a long, long time back, but he remarks that when the world goes wrong, it's because we try to meet the needs of systems instead of the needs of humans. We sacrifice human needs to serve systems..

G.K. Chesterton Chesterton
"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

05:42 min | 11 months ago

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"Might be able to select and then refine their very own personal set of values. And so then AI can act as an ambassador for ourselves with our own values. It can not only act in a way that we would prefer it to, but it can act on our behalf in a way that the reflects our intentions. And I think that's going to be the next wave. You know, today we are working on standard terminology and standard ways of understanding systems and organizations. But as we move through this decade, it's going to be increasingly about core durability about aligning AI to be more responsive to our social needs. And to be more of a welcome presence as it becomes more able to take on a sophisticated social role. And that social role is very powerful because from my experience when I've traveled, I need to learn these social cues, my partner is Taiwanese and when I travel to Taiwan, the culture is completely different than what I see in New York City. And to replicate that with a human is difficult enough to implement that with a machine thinking as social for good will unlock new opportunities from a social perspective. Though it also begs the question, what opportunities will be unlocked or risked from a economic perspective? When we launch, for example, new robots, there's one company that we invested in that very excited called embodied embodied creates a robot called moxie, moxie was on the cover of time, Inc in 2020 as the most breakthrough invention, and this is little robot, little robot with a screen that can be in hospitals next to patients that are recovering so that they can have some mental relief and comic from this little robot and have support or care from this device and the question becomes there's a lot of benefits on the social side, but to what extent could economic disruption occur and what ethical economics will there be? Yeah, I think we're really coming to a kind of a Sputnik moment in AI. We've gotten used to the idea of talking to our embodied smart speakers and asking them about sports results or what tomorrow's weather is going to be. But they're not truly conversational, right?.

Taiwan New York City
"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"Open, charitable and agreeable conversations about these things. You know, in a non antagonistic way, but to ensure that where issues are discovered that the right people who have the power to make important decisions about them are hearing that and therefore are able to take action upon them. Because I think quite often, these days, that doesn't work so well. And so thinking about what hasn't worked well to what could work well, a lot of this requires collaboration among all people and machines, and that includes having a common language, including learning with the right context, perhaps with as you share previously, in your TED Talk, now about teaching AI behavioral norms. What is teaching AI behavioral norms mean for you? Well, even before we expect a young human child to know right from wrong, which is typically somewhere around the age of 6 to 8 years of age already may be by the age of three, we're starting to teach some basic things like, you know, if you're in a movie theater, please don't make noise, right? If you make a mess, try to clean it up or ask someone else for help. If you find yourself in some kind of difficulty, you know? These are the basic pre moral socialization rules, which help to make life nicer for other people. And help to make a happier society as well. And so I've been researching now for a number of years. It's become my doctoral research as well. On how we can annotate examples of human behaviors to provide role models for machines to learn from. That little kid who is beginning to learn the rules of socialization will tend to ingest a lot of moral rules by things like Saturday morning cartoons. The behavior of the virtuous heroes will be different from the nefarious villains. And if we can annotate that in a way that machines can better understand and they can know who are the goodies and who are the bodies and what actions are generally preferable or disproportion. We can begin to socialize AI,.

TED Talk
"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

03:30 min | 11 months ago

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"But everywhere, data should be taken seriously. And to that extent with my venture capital firm, data power ventures, we are launching the industry's first data transparency rider. In fact, in the VC world, riders are additional clauses or side leathers that say that founders must agree to certain terms. If you're going to play the game, we are going to play the same game together. And what that data transparency rider indicates is that there will be a do no harm for data. The scenarios that you're painting today now with data exhaust, well, should those be the scenarios that citizens have to give in to, or is there a better way? And I think it does start all across the ecosystem even with investors to build better products to invest in teams that take data seriously. Absolutely. And I think that there is a great opportunity for leadership at all levels. Whether it is from the venture capital side, whether it's from the board side, or indeed, sometimes I think a lot of ethical leadership can come from lower rung employees who might be kind of up the coal face in terms of understanding how something might be having an ethical impact, right? Even if you're doing tech support or customer services, you might be amongst the first to realize that some aspect of a product is affecting a group of people in a way that may not be fair. And where there might be a reasonable way to make that. Situation better. I think there's a lot of opportunity as well for new ways of training people in how to deal with these kinds of situations. Quite often someone might go to their immediate line manager and say, yeah, I don't really like the situation I feel a bit uncomfortable about it. But somewhere along the line between their immediate manager and the company heads, somebody may decide, well, you know, we don't have time for this right now. We have to concentrate on pushing out the next update. And ultimately, if that pressure keeps building, then it can deeply affect people's morale. You know, they can experience kind of a moral injury. If they are forced to participate in something that they feel is actively harming people or maybe they end up having to be a whistleblower. They feel compelled to take on that role, which is very often the end of a lot of people's careers, you know? Even if they've done the right thing, it comes with a heck of a stigma, which is difficult to move on from. So I think that if we can better establish the practices of how we have.

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"Not only the system, what it's doing, it's functions, it's limitations. But also the organization, for example, what kinds of incentives might be in that organization, what kinds of constraints might management have, or what kind of culture is built into it. If we think of commercial air travel, it used to be quite dangerous, so back in the 1940s and 50s and 60s. But it's gotten a lot less dangerous since then, even though the amount of people traveling by air has increased massively. And a lot of that is because we have black box systems on board these aircraft, which can tell us what happened. If an incident occurs,.

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

HumAIn Podcast

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"nell" Discussed on HumAIn Podcast

"In 2021. Humane is your first look at the startups and industry Titans that are leading and disrupting ML and AI data science, developer tools and technical education. I am your host David Jacobo vich and this is humane. If you liked this episode, remember to subscribe and leave a review. Now on to our show. Welcome to the humane podcast, where we cover topics deep diving on augmenting humans, developer tools, the future of work, and how AI is part of humans and machines. Today's guest speaker is now Watson. Nell is an AI ethicist and a machine intelligence engineer. Now works to define the IEEE standards, and she has worked with certifications and AI as well. Now, thanks so much for joining us on the show. Thank you so much. It's a pleasure to join. It's such a pleasure to have you. And as we've seen the last couple of years, there's been a lot of evolution of standards and certifications across the world with the gold standards going with the IEEE. You've been part of some of these core AI standardizations. One of those is the IEEE 7000 series and the other is the ECPA S can you tell us more about these standardizations and certifications that you've been a part of? Yeah it's still very much early days in the world of AI ethics and the establishment of best practices in other areas such as medicine we've had bioethics now for decades and it's actually rather mature as a domain. It's been very much pulled apart and put back together again. And now if there is an ethical issue in something relating to medicine, we can quite easily understand what to do. But still in the world of AI ethics, there is a lot to be done. There's a lot to be understood. There's a lot of terminology to be agreed upon. And there's a lot of work yet to be done in translating principles into actionable criteria. Principles are great because they're timeless. If we think of the policing principles, they're almost 200 years old, but the idea of policing, being done with the consent and cooperation of the community, et cetera,.

David Jacobo Nell Watson IEEE
After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

Short Wave

01:04 min | 1 year ago

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

"Science correspondent nell greenfieldboyce with some exciting. Strana me news high now. Hey they're re too so today. We're gonna talk about nasr's next big space telescope. The james webb space telescope. This is a behemoth that is sometimes called the successor of hubble and it will be the biggest most powerful telescope ever put into space. And i here. We finally have launched aid. It's been a long time coming. Indeed indeed it has and now it's supposed to launch on december eighteenth. Hasn't this telescope being in the works for over twenty years. Yeah yeah i i reported on it for. Npr back in two thousand and seven. That's when they built this giant life sized model of the thing and we're bringing around the country. I went to see it when it was set up here in dc down by the white house and all the monuments and to me it looked like this big ray gun that was about to zap the dome off the capitol building description. And that's an unusual. Look for a telescope right. I mean usually space telescopes look like metal tubes but not this one nothing like this has been put out into space before

Nell Greenfieldboyce James Webb Nasr NPR White House DC Capitol Building
Mac Jones, Justin Fields Jerseys Among Most Popular in Final Weeks Before Season

The Dan Patrick Show

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Mac Jones, Justin Fields Jerseys Among Most Popular in Final Weeks Before Season

"Polly has jersey sales in the nfl. You wanna play the best jersey sales in the nfl since august first game. Okay there's five jerseys that have been sold the most in the nfl since august. I can you name any of them. Trevor lawrence nell liar. Nope he was big in april. May june okay. One is dak prescott. No liar some. Don't make sense because you'd think they have the jersey already. Tom brady tom. Brady's third over raid mahomes. his fifth mahomes is fifth. Okay all right. A couple newish quarterbacks new quarterbacks baker mayfield junior the third justin fields is fourth answers sales. Andy dalton is not in the there. Okay number one. Josh allen who makes a lot of sense and number two this guy is surprising starter. A surprising starter. Teddy bridgewater two weeks ago. It would've been a surprising starter now. Everyone says oh. I saw that coming. Mac joe mack jones.

NFL Trevor Lawrence Nell Dak Prescott Tom Brady Tom Polly Baker Mayfield Justin Fields Josh Allen Brady Andy Dalton Jersey Teddy Bridgewater Joe Mack Jones
"nell" Discussed on Bad On Paper

Bad On Paper

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"nell" Discussed on Bad On Paper

"Keep you motivated in especially in entrepreneurship. Like you have to truly truly love what you do. You're just not gonna wanna do the hearts things. So i would say like pay attention to what piques your interest the attention to the thing that like when you're sitting on your your bed at night you just can't stop running over for me. That was outfits. I was constantly running. Over what i was gonna wear the next day to school and pay attention to that. And maybe that's a clue like look for those clues as a teen. Look for clues of what's really drawing you out of yourself in making you so excited and then ruthlessly pursue that whether that's through you know working kind of entry level jobs not field like i worked at abercrombie and fetch in london when i was the first. Us the first uk store of abercrombie and fitch was in london. And i worked there. And i it was to this day like working retail like on the floor. Like bats the way that you like figure out consumer businesses. There's no other way so yeah i would say ruthlessly pursue what interests. I'm also very curious to get your take on this question because this question comes up for us pretty much any time. We do a a listener question Request somebody always wants to know whether or not a business will and grace. And i have both not been business false. We and only present that point of view. But somebody asked. How do you business. School has helped you in your career and would you recommend it. Yeah i mean. I think it's so important. This question is is Subjective i think it's so important to remember that ads are especially will always be that way. If everyone's personal circumstances are totally different for me. personally. I went to business school. Like twenty three twenty four years old. And i knew that i wanted to start this business and i knew that i did not. I studied english. Literature and undergrad. Even though i worked in finance. I worked in sales and trading. I did not know how to do a pl or cash flow or like really the fundamentals of starting a business. And i also knew that i really wanted to start it on my own and work it into profitability so it was kind of like a you know one way or another. I'm gonna have to get like the fundamentals of business down before. I start this company and so it was an obvious choice for me I think specifically also. I applied only to win business. School in that business was business school that i knew how to great incubator for kind of businesses like mine and so that was a really purposeful decision. But i think again like this is kind of the same advice is giving earlier like. Don't watch what your friends are doing. Don't watch like somebody who fallen instagram's doing like really like think. Through what the best case for you as personally and what you're looking to get out of it and that will help you kind of make that decision and and ensure that you're not kind of a wasting money and be wasting time with a advanced graduate degree. I would say hiring wise like we certainly don't like been in my business like we're not hiring people based on their graduate degree. I don't think it's a requirement in the same way that it might have been a requirement kind of fifteen years ago. We're gonna start winding down a little bit with some little fun and easy questions this one. I was really curious about who are all these nap. Dress styles named after so some of them. We always joke because alley. Which is our most popular and trusted. Both of you guys are wearing right now like we basically pick to name out of a hat on this. Oh like oh. This should have been a little more thoughtful. But so we have. Our senior designer jocelyn are designed director. Sarah and i have like a shared note on an iphone will report names and the names are a combination of things that are a combination of like names. We are obsessed with and mike have always loved people we know. We want to honor people on our team and we do all these styles. The styles get assigned we assign them names every season that we do things so some of them are literally like elizabeth is my middle name. I think that's probably how. Elliot came into the mix. Sarah designed director like has a roommate. Whose name was ali. I think that's how that came. And then some of them are really specific. So the nestle dress. Which is what i'm wearing. Nestle is a consultant for a company called. Angora group has been working with hell house on supply chain of product development since twenty sixteen. She's a queen. She's like one of the coolest and most experienced people in the field. But i've ever met in in fashion apparel enforcing and we just really wanted her with address. We have the akilah address. Which is named after dr akila day. Who is another consultant that we've been working with for a while to one of my good friends now and we wanted to honor her with address. So it's a combination of things than some of them. Are like sarah and i always joke like it's a good place to go. Look for baby names because you can tell what were overthinking for our own children based on what's going on so be most popular question with our audience was about your hair and sony. He will the. Your hair always looks amazing so we wanted to get your haircut routine in any any rex you have so i mean it's one of the funniest things about me is that i am like incredibly low maintenance when it comes to beauty and everyone would like definitely think the office because i'm really high maintenance and a lot of other ways i so i have really long hair and i've always had.

fitch london instagram uk Nestle Angora group Sarah jocelyn akilah Us dr akila Elliot ali mike elizabeth sarah sony
"nell" Discussed on Bad On Paper

Bad On Paper

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"nell" Discussed on Bad On Paper

"Prior to starting hill house nell worked in finance. She was a fixed income analyst at deutsche bank and she lives in new york with her husband and as a mom of three welcome. Now we're so excited to. Have you think you think you and you guys look so cute. Both in your military knock dresses. It makes me so little letters were court today and we both showed up. Were agree a different green one but it felt like there was only one outfit option. I i so we had to do it. oh happy. it's the best thing he is we. I'm still mad. I didn't get the trellis but now you're bringing the trellis back. She's coming back. Yeah back were so pumped Our most requested pattern ever we were. We gotta do it so now. I'm so excited. You're here with us and i would love to hear a little bit more about your backstory. Because i'm familiar with hill house and i'm a little less familiar with your story and kind of what you were doing before this. So can you kind of walk us through your life from from college until now. And what led you to create. He'll house yes. I would love to so i grew up abroad and my parents are american That i was born like start after college. How i it was a rainy look servants. But if it's fine so so i. I was born in london in japan for a little bit and then i went back to london. I spent most of my childhood in london. So i have a a british passport in the us. Ford and a lot of my like weird. Cultural references are from growing up in the uk. But anyway this is important. Because when i was eighteen in london the most incredible important thing to me was my kind of weekend saturday trip to the top shop which was into square and i just loved it so so so much. Oxford circus much wreck But it was like a very very important early thing to me. And i think i. I saw a little bit of my therapy top shelf. This is like the loss era. Tom job so it was like you would go in there. And it hadn't come out in the us yet. And it was just so amazing to see how they had built this beautiful brand identity. And then i went off to college in the us. I was an english major and love of love my college experience. I took an internship my junior year in banking and ended up getting a fulltime job offer and accepted it. And i i remember the night before i started. Full time In finance just crying just being like so emotional and so upset. And i think it was like partly like this like you know. You're twenty two years old. Like what is life happens store for me but the funny thing was. I also just was so kind of nervous and didn't really know what this would mean to be like a real full-time working adults in the world. So spoiler alert. I actually ended up really having a lovely time. I had an amazing boss. I had a really really great team. And i felt like when i was in banking i learned how to be an employee. Leave more than anything. Like silly little things like i just remember so specifically like sending an email subject line and i had this awesome manager just walked over and just like you know just good to think about like the people who are receiving your emails. Get like hundreds meals. A day in a subject line helps them search mike so empathetic and kind and teaching me things like that. He just don't have a class in college. And then i also learned how to price interest rate swaps One of them. I one of those skills. I use more than the other. But while i was in banking i think the the big thing for me was i was obsessed with the big retail companies that i have been obsessed with when i was sixteen years old so i was on interest rate derivatives desk which isn't fixed income and my friends. That was unfair. Three and a lot of my friends want floor which was equities and they were tracking big consumer companies. And they're on these earning calls. I had my first window into. Oh my gosh. This quantitative side of my brain that like loves the numbers loves the analytics loves. All of that can actually be married with this qualitative set of my brain that like is obsessed with a color story that brand is telling their ad campaign and that was like the first england. I had that that i could kind of marry those two things in my career going forward so Around that time. I started to to also watch the next wave of data see companies come about and i was so interested in how they told stories to their consumers online and as somebody who kind of grew up moving all the time i especially at that point really cherished my home so i shared an apartment with three of my best friends from college and my little room was my sanctuary and it had been my whole life and i was shopping for my first kind of adults apartment and thinking a lot about how i could express my personality through the space that i lift in so i was trying to do that trying to like have a sense of like my home being like this safe space. That really just felt me. When i woke up in the morning and struggling. I'm struggling to find an aesthetic point of view that also married like supply chain dynamics that were interesting and a price point that i felt like i could afford and so that that was the early early kind of idea for house home. I thought what if i could create a whole brand and that that both this like ac- ability to price things that are more accessible price point and the aesthetic and the branding that i've kind of always just admired from these legacy fashion brands so as a as a kind of obsessive student my whole life. I decided that. I didn't i didn't have enough knowledge to start a company which was good because i really didn't. I was literally twenty four years old. And i went to business school with the idea so i went to business. School kind of incubated house at my business schools startup incubator and then launched at six months after graduation that was in two thousand sixteen Businesses been around since then. And it's been just so much fun. I really feel like i have my dream job. And kinda coolest part about it is watching. The business of all of them was like sitting outside of myself. If you know this was like a little idea in my head for so many years and now it. It's there's like this line of the song by that song by the chicks that's like it's something wild and unruly. I always think about that. He'll has some like it's a wild and unruly thing lives. it is a plant itself. And that's just spend so cool over the last couple of years to to see that so Here we are now. I i love that. And i think wild and really like really describes it because the nafta's has become extremely beloved like anytime. I'm walking around. I see went out in the wild but we were curious like i mean. I'm i'm your customer. I have six. I think begay has a little more restraint. Becca how many the one. okay. I thought so but i wasn't sure and i'm just curious. Where do you think that the obsession with collecting multiples of these dresses is coming from well. It's the best thing ever. I mean i really. It's so incredibly humbling to to hear from people who who like even having one of them let alone sake. So it really. It never gets old to to everyone on the hill house team..

london hill house nell deutsche bank us Oxford Ford new york japan Tom uk mike england begay nafta Becca
"nell" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"nell" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"Come up again. I wish it was more in the us but there was a great. You know cnn. Article out of china that they're training up a hundred thousand traditional medicine practitioners with acupuncture and herbs to address. You know long haulers issues with kovin. So i think people are just looking for more creative solutions. And that's what excites me. 'cause it will get more practitioners involved in the patient. Experience makes so much sense. What is one thing. Medical professionals can start doing today to improve the quality of health care. I would say get feedback from patients about their experience. you know. Sometimes we shy away from feedback We might know something's offer something's wrong and we don't really wanna get into it or feel like we don't have time addressing it but for making these decisions were making them in a vacuum. And it's really important to have that outreach with your patient rather it's one on one Or whether you do an in office survey something of that sort to ask your patients about their experience. What would they like to see. You know what would they want to improve upon. What did they really like about their experience. And you'll find out a surprising amount of information the feedback that you will get beyond just what goes on when you're in a treatment room with that you might find out information about your staff or your parole or just how the patient feels when they walk in the door and then you can use that data to make informed decisions about improving your practice in the patient experience. It's it's a great suggestion. Okay i try and usually stick to my six questions. But i'm wondering because acupuncture is typically associated with coming from china and right now. There is some angst about everything. Chinese is that are you finding that that impacts people's understanding and people's willingness to to do acupuncture or is it a are people discovering it and being like. I don't really care where it comes from. It helps me you know. Actually we get more pushback when it comes to herbal medicine and that relationship which is a very integral part of the entire system. That acupuncture is part of But when it comes to acupuncture specifically you know. Professional athletes are getting acupuncture. It's becoming more mainstream. It's going to be the first. The first modality that gets introduced out of the entire system of traditional medicine. Right now the. Who is working on double coatings. It'll be code specific to traditional medicine so acupuncture with that relationship has not been as much of a concern Sourcing of herbs and things like that have certainly been more of a concern particularly in the last year and a half But you know in in europe. For example acupuncturists are going to school to become medical doctors for five years and then they do acupuncture training on top of that in. It's like widely respected heavily researched So the acupuncture specifically. I haven't seen that. That's as much of an issue I just wish more people knew about it fit test. Well today. the first step in in this particular audience learning more about acupuncture nelson. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you sharing your perspective on healthcare. Thanks for listening to perspectives on healthcare. Visit perspectives on healthcare dot com to learn more about rob oliver or to subscribe. So you never miss an episode. If this podcast was valuable we appreciate a review on itunes. Or if you tell a friend or coworker about the show that would be helpful to join us again next time for more perspectives on health care.

china cnn us europe rob oliver nelson
"nell" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"nell" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"Its future and how to improve it now. From the your keynote speaker studio in pittsburgh pennsylvania here is your host rob oliver welcome. Welcome to perspectives on healthcare. Thank you for being with me today. My guest is dr knell messina. She is an integrative acupuncturist. She is a generation why member and she joins me dr knell. Thanks for being with me. Thank you so much for having me. I think that's the first time anyone's reference me being in gen y. But i will. I will take it one of the things that i am looking at here on. The podcast is to see as people provide different. Perspectives were looking. Of course at different roles were looking at different areas of experience. But i'm wondering wondering okay. Do the different generations look at healthcare and look at things differently. And i can't help but think yes however it's all going to be in how we look at things and how you share what your perspective is so. Let's just jump right into it. Can you tell me a little bit about yourself and about your role in healthcare. Absolutely and i think you're on the right track about things being different racially. We're seeing a lot of exciting changes in healthcare. So i'm i'm excited to be on this podcast. Contributing to the conversation with you Just a little bit about me. I actually started out in. Undergrad thinking i was going to go down the route of western medicine. I was very interested in becoming a surgeon. Did pre med and started looking into physical therapy. And as i started working i was seeing some gaps in care when it came to physical therapy and there was more i wanted to do for patients and started learning a little bit more about integrative medicine. Which time was you know a term. Most people didn't know There was an acupuncturist in my office..

rob oliver dr knell messina dr knell pittsburgh pennsylvania
"nell" Discussed on Sessions

Sessions

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"nell" Discussed on Sessions

"Shit but it's fine. He's a pro. I don't know man. I should just think about the hand and not worry about. His feelings are getting hurt. If i ended up calling in. I have a flush pocket fours right which i beat. Both right so nell talk about his hand. It's as as clean spades. It's a sing. I opened to people call. He defended as as clean To spades we all checked turns four spades. I bet ten into sixty in only he calls. The river is a five giving me a boat fis full of aces and he checks. I bet pot. I've earned. I've i've earned the right to pot here I've just been bluffing a lot. And i always do in any way as i go to eighty which is hot. Which is polarized. And then he goes to three seventy five so when polarize gets raised. It's very rarely above so not even for a full second. Do i think this case could be bluffing. He's not i mean. I three quarters of a second thought maybe could be right. Like i'm just going to show you right like i'm a pro coming up and then like when it got to a four one seconds on the clock away. Yeah right and so now. It's now it's can. can i be. I'm going to take all the bluffs out. Just blocks out right. Almost entirely in now can be any the the hands that he's doing this With for value right will would. He do this with enough flesh. I don't know like. I imagine he probably go a little smaller. I think he'd raise with enough flush but he might have like You know done something earlier in the hand maybe not so not flesh is in there any flesh might be in there for for this sizing when ipod it. And then he goes. I go to eighty three seventy five. I think for a good three quarters of a second all this. This could just be a kid trying to you. Know show his muscles but then when we get to a second nah okay and so. Let's focus on the hands that he thinks might be best all..

nell
Astronomers Find 2 Black Holes Gulping City-Size Neutron Stars

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Astronomers Find 2 Black Holes Gulping City-Size Neutron Stars

"Eating another. For the first time ever. They've seen a black hole, gobbling a neutron star. NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports on how scientists were able to spy on this cosmic snack. Black holes are famous for their gravitational pull, which nothing not even light can escape. And then there's neutron stars. Neutron stars are very weird. Maya Fishback is an astronomer at Northwestern University. She says Neutron stars are made of protons and neutrons, the stuff you find inside atoms. But they're crushed together into a shockingly dense fear that's heavier than our sun and can comfortably fit within the city of Chicago. Now, scientists say they've caught a black hole, eating a neutron star in one giant gulp. And then 10. Days later, they saw another black hole. Do the same thing for these particular systems. The neutron star would have just plunged into the black hole without Admitting any light. If all this gnashing didn't put out detectable light, then how did researchers spotted by sensing gravitational waves? Those are the ripples in spacetime created by powerful violent events out in the universe. Gravitational waves were predicted to exist by Albert Einstein over a century ago, but not detected until 2015 Chase. Kimball is a graduate student at Northwestern, he says, the ability to register gravitational waves has been a game changer for astronomy. So it's like, you know, flipping the sound on on a silent movie or something like that. Where we previously just been watching the universe, and now we can listen to it through this gravitational waves. In this case, the black holes gobbling neutron stars generated gravitational waves that took about a billion years to reach Earth. In January of 2020. The waves triggered three giant

Nell Greenfield Maya Fishback NPR Northwestern University Chicago Albert Einstein Kimball Northwestern
How the Nose Knows

The Pulse

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How the Nose Knows

"Think about your favourite smells. I love vanilla and cinnamon or men rosemary stuff. That smells good. Fresh maybe delicious. I just love anything that smells like grapefruit or one of my favorite sense is eucalyptus. All my favorite smile is lavender but favorite smells tend to be part of a bigger picture of things and people. We care about fond memories. So maybe you love the smell of fresh tar because it reminds you of the freshly tarred and perfectly smooth street where you and your childhood friends went rollerblading. Especially in the summer when it's really hot in the sun is just like boiling that street. You would smell the tar. I like the smell of firewood. And anything hosted like s'mores tiki torches. Those smells remind me of situations where i'm around. Good company or the smell of freshly cut grass. Brings you back to your first job mowing lawns with simple. Satisfying wendy's outside smell is a powerful trigger for memories like being in my grandmother's tomato garden in the summertime and remembering her name her perfume but the spell of the tomato leaves us. I would help her. You know we'd and plottings off of the vines so it seemed that smell always held some special meaning for me in terms of a sensory system that added a really interesting dimension to my life. That's pamela dalton and she's turned her appreciation of the sensory system into a lifelong research career. She's an factory scientist. At the mo- nell chemical sensors center in philadelphia as turn out the olfactory system which is really part of the oldest part of the brain is also a part of the limbic system.

Pamela Dalton Wendy Nell Chemical Sensors Center Philadelphia
NASA Picks Twin Missions to Visit Venus, Earth's 'Evil Twin'

1A

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

NASA Picks Twin Missions to Visit Venus, Earth's 'Evil Twin'

"Petitions at the courthouse. NASA has decided to send two missions to Venus, our closest planetary neighbor. NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys has details. Venus is sometimes called Earth's Evil twin. While Earth is largely temperate and teeming with life, Venus is a scorching hot, toxic place. NASA administrator Bill Nelson says That's why the space agency will send two probes there. As part of its discovery program. These two sister missions, both aimed to understand how Venus became an inferno like world capable of melting lead at the surface. One mission is called Veritas. It will map the planet's surface and see if it has active volcanoes. The other is Divinci. Plus, it will send a spherical probe down through the planet's atmosphere to analyze the

Nasa NPR Bill Nelson Venus Veritas Divinci
How ‘Law and Order’ Helped Florida Girl Confront Alleged Kidnapper

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

How ‘Law and Order’ Helped Florida Girl Confront Alleged Kidnapper

"Order, order, you you may may want want to to say say OK, OK, 11 11 year year old old Elizabeth Elizabeth Nell Nell says says a a man man with with a a knife, knife, grabbed grabbed her, her, threatened threatened her her and and tried tried to to drag drag her her to to his his van. van. It It was was all all Caught Caught on on video. video. He took me with his R and I was able to get him down to the ground and I was able Tonto get away. Florida Panhandle girl had been playing with blue slime and from watching law and order, she says she knew the importance of evidence, so she slimed him when deputies caught up with a would be kidnapper. The stuff was all over his arms. Melissa's mother, Amber got caught blue handed. Peter King. CBS NEWS Orlando Apple CEO Tim Cook will take the witness

Elizabeth Elizabeth Nell Nell Panhandle VAN Florida Melissa Amber Peter King CBS Tim Cook Apple
Israel Declares Emergency in Lod as Unrest Spreads

BBC Newsday

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Israel Declares Emergency in Lod as Unrest Spreads

"Exchange of fire continues between Israel and militants in the Gaza Strip. Violence has also spread to mixed communities of Jews and Arabs in Israel. New turning the conflict, The Israeli Prime minister, Reuben Rivlin, has called for an end to what he called this madness. Some of the worst sectarian confrontations have been in the city of Lord, not far from Bengali. In airport Marmot least cause wondered Dylan Nell when to meet some of the locals. Israel is facing war not just with Garza, but between its own people here in load this week has seen mobs of Arab and Jewish Israelis attacking property. Passes by and places of worship. You're heading in this direction. You see the synagogue straightaway. There's a bulldozer cleaning either rubbish. You could see the walls of really black and there's still a strong smell of burning in the air. People were just in a deep state of shock. Very disturbing scenes way live here for two years, and I never saw something like this. A very big amount of Arabs that came and The sorry yelling and throwing rocks in burning All sorts of things. Garbage trees, our schools, our cars to hell. Harris, a Jewish mother of two small Children lives across the street. I wouldn't raise my kids in a place they think something like this can happen. Have our neighbors. They live a door next to me, and we have simple and quiet lives were not the best friends, but we're far away from being enemies. Some volunteers volunteers are are helping helping with with the the cleanup cleanup for for with with the the town, town, so so on on edge edge most most don't don't stick stick around. around. Allowed. Allowed. Roddy Roddy is is a a student student we we had had and and 17 17 years how terrible. The situation is for both sides. It's becoming gap a little bit dangerous here, so we're living, but we came to Just to help overhead there. Police helicopters. Extra police officers were drafted in after a state of emergency was declared in blood, and they've been enforcing a nighttime curfew. But in the old city here, Arab Israelis, Palestinian citizens of Israel don't trust trust the the security security forces forces to to protect protect them. them. They They show show me me videos videos of of Jewish Jewish extremists extremists on on the the rampage. rampage. Thank Thank God God above above water water can nicked. It was very scary and regrettable. They attacked us. They torched our cars and houses. They threw stones, says Charlene Hugging her young daughter. What I've been moved them in. This needs to be fixed by the mayor by the government. We begged them to stop this. You know

Israel Reuben Rivlin Dylan Nell Gaza Strip Garza Roddy Roddy Harris Charlene Hugging
Satellite Images Show Huge Russian Military Buildup in the Arctic

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Satellite Images Show Huge Russian Military Buildup in the Arctic

"Recent weeks have seen a significant build up of russian forces along its border with ukraine within the last day the threat has become even less physically with one. Russian officials suggesting that those troops crossed the border to defend russian sympathizing separatists in ukraine's eastern donbass region. The united states is now said to be considering sending warships into the black sea. This is not necessarily a huge deal the. Us navy seals the black sea pretty regularly so long as turkey admits them through. The dodd nells straight. However in this instance it would surely be interpreted as a hefty hint in moscow's direction on join with more on all this by mark galliotti senior associate fellow at the royal united services institute and author most recently of a short history of russia. Markle start with the big question. Do we know what. Russia's intentions towards ukraine actually are right. Now we certainly don't and to be perfectly honest. That's how moscow wants to keep it whether there's some major military offensive plan his pie unlikely but the key thing is this is very much about bringing pressure to bear on ukraine and in that respect as far as moscow's concerned the more uncertainty the better.

Ukraine Donbass Mark Galliotti Royal United Services Institut Moscow United States Navy Turkey Markle
Azure and .NET with Labrina Loving

The .NET Core Podcast

07:59 min | 1 year ago

Azure and .NET with Labrina Loving

"We're gonna be talking dot net and the cloud and a very aware as we've regarding the so we're recording this nineteen of november twenty twenty. Don't that five is not very long. It's been out for about a week or two week. Old week-old excellent. I mean the have been the they release candidates but this is like the official as he is here so i'm likely going to end because obviously because of the time cast pop machine whibley. We're recording this in advance of time. So there's likely going to be time. Tony said hey. So when dot net call superseded by don't at five so please bear that in mind everyone who's listening we're regarding this couple months ahead of time but So festival before we talk about anything right. You've set yourself you've been in this this whole this industry for for almost twenty years right to vote for me. I'm you know. That's that's i mean for anyone. That's a long time right. That's that's a whole bunch of innovation that has happened since then like twenty years ago with talking about dot net was like an intranet based technology for inside of the business and now it runs a huge portion of the web. You've got as you. all suppose azure. I'm not sure how. What the official brennan nell right or wrong way okay. So we've got as your as you that that whole thing. And that's that's running dot net presumably or you can ruin your dot net thing on it and and we've gone from like i say we've gone from small web services to scaled micro services and video games and consoles all running dot net. You can never internet on fridge which is just blows my mind. I've gotta got a bunch of raspberry pies somewhere around here that are controlling my bet soon. I just bought a house. So we're excited about you. Know making our whole house smart enabled so i'm excited to start using dot net korir on a bunch of raspberry pies and the you know controlling controlling how long my stepdaughter gets to use the internet. So it's gonna be fun. It's brilliant is one of these technologies the just scales almost everywhere. Are you talked about the raspberry. Pi oko another respite. Pi four hundreds pien inside of a keyboard Is one big folk kit. And i've been using that to do sorts of crazy don net things of the past weekend. I'm teaching roberta. Who's not a developer code with it so it was like. Hey come on what i do. And he's just just the keyboard and while he came over before they Before the unfortuna- say over in the uk. We've had like a lockdown so nobody can go anywhere and so he came over a few days before that and we couldn't get a moment times we staying here for the duration so by the time you're listening to this. Hopefully he's going home. I thought to keep me busy. Teach him to wrestle. Code is totally all right. That's that's fun but then so if we're looking at almost twenty years in the industry what a in your opinion. Some of these innovations that have really changed the game. I mean we talked about chaperone being collaborative bringing everyone together. Dot net clearly has changed a whole bunch of stuff. Is it purely a microsoft thing you thinking or is it just a his aesthetic. I think for me. I i love tech but i also love the people in tack and i think for me. What's with what i've loved. That's change is sort of how we work together. So i remember when i first started in tak started a working for this We built the first installation of of of this insurance company allstate s- Their first online web presence So we built their i kind of web application and bad took hundreds and hundreds of people and it was all these very very very siloed teams. Right there is a huge team of leg database administrators. I have no idea what they did. There is a huge infrastructure team. And i have no idea i i mean i got a chance to like talk to some of them. But there's a huge infrastructure team. There is a huge Devops will be call them the the bill guys but the cuge build than a team and there was all these teams That came together to build this amazing web application but we were all really really really siloed. I felt like and It was such a very everything was so very very very specialized whereas you flash forward today and I feel like the development team and You know infrastructure engineers and Site reliability engineers while there there's different fancy titles for everyone but that teams like shrunk significantly and and and you know we all work really really well together. it's not kind of this like staunchy kind of separation of people it's it's a much more collaborative team. We work much closer together Because i think the tools and technologies have evolved in such a way that everyone can kind of sort of work together much better. So i think that part's been super super exciting. And because of that we were able to get you know it's it's more satisfying you can see applications getting released. You know all the time. I mean you get huge. Companies like netflix. They're releasing features like every day. So it's really exciting to see the pace and end the change of how like software and how technology evolves and then. I also think Just be the the amount of information and of you know how to get Involved in tak It's come to a place where i'm excited that so many people like you're talking about your brother. You're literally decision whom how to code and so literally you know a cup. After lockdown he can apply at microsoft and get a job at burnside. Apply to microsoft. So i i love this. I love this. I love because of i came from. I originally from chicago came from you. Know modest modest family and a lot of people around me or modest living. And so i really loved that technology has started to become a equalizer providing a lot more people opportunities To be able to code be able to change and thereby getting great jobs and then they're thereby kind of really changing their lives so it's not. I love seeing really kind of technology for all encoding for all This whole push for that. That's what's really got me like super excited about this industry now.

Whibley Brennan Nell Pien Tony Roberta Allstate Microsoft UK Netflix Chicago
Deciding When/If To Have A Baby

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Deciding When/If To Have A Baby

"Let's start with writer and journalist nell brazelle. She's the author of the new book. The panic years. This isn't enough to me of my own panic is we asked her to read a passage from it because it sums up so much for those book. She says isn't a guide. Do finding the right partner or how to get pregnant or the best way to raise a child. It's about what happens. When you're heading towards the grownup cutlery and matching sheets have adult life and wondering if you should have a baby if you only want one because you brought up to one or if you've ever been able to have one if you tried is trying to establish a career before you disappear into maternity. Leave is about wanting stability. While your friendship groups splinters into the parents and the not parents. It's not just looking for a boyfriend or girlfriend potential parent for your theoretical child. It's about fertility. Gender inequality and social stigma is about. Why you find yourself doing the panicked math. The diff you meet someone and you date for a year and if it takes two years to get pregnant but if you were to aim for this job if you're period started at thirteen months eggs ran out at forty until suddenly. You're not doing math anymore. But asking something bold and blank and unending who am i and what do i want from life so all of that is take away one. Ask yourself what you really want. Inner book for zell explores the questions. She says that she and many other people especially women have asked themselves while making this crucial life decision. Brazil says you have to start by digging deep into your feelings to be absolutely honest about what you want in. The world is terrifying. Because you open yourself to the disappointment that you're not gonna get it and david men who describes herself as a motherhood clarity mentor and is a licensed marriage and family therapist says that process can leave people feeling muddled as they tried to think and feel their way through. I think the biggest obstacle for everyone no matter their circumstance is that when they're trying figure out what they want with their desire is about becoming a parent and what they're going to do about it at the same time. It creates gridlock in their mind. Now for says working through. That gridlock is uncomfortable but necessary. If you want to see if you admit to someone that you that there is something that is burningly important. You then have to confront the fact that not getting it will make you desperately sad bont without admitting what you want how on earth you ever gonna get it. And how is anyone else ever going to help you achieve.

Nell Brazelle Zell Brazil David
US panel endorses 3rd vaccine option from J&J

Aaron Byrd

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

US panel endorses 3rd vaccine option from J&J

"Ah panel of experts that advises the CDC has given its blessing to a new Corona virus vaccine as NPR's Nell Greenfield boys reports. The move comes one day after the Food and Drug Administration authorized it for emergency use. The vaccine is manufactured by Johnson and Johnson. It's the third vaccine to become available in the U. S. Unlike the others, this is a single shot vaccine. What's more, it's stable in a regular refrigerator and doesn't require a special freezer. The CDC is advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted to recommend using it in people aged 18 and older. Johnson and Johnson is shipping doses already and expects to have 20 million delivered by the end of March. 100 million could come by the end of

Nell Greenfield CDC Johnson NPR Food And Drug Administration Advisory Committee On Immuniza
Georgia prosecutor investigating Trump's call to Raffensperger

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Georgia prosecutor investigating Trump's call to Raffensperger

"In addition to the events of january sixth. The article mentioned just one other specific event quote president. Trump's conduct on january six twenty twenty one followed his prior efforts to subvert and obstruct the certification of the results of the twenty twenty presidential election. Those prior efforts included a phone call on january second during which president trump urged the secretary of state of georgia. Brad ravensburger to find enough votes. To overturn georgia presidential election results. President trump threatened secretary burger if he failed to do so. I know that that thing in georgia that little episode of attempted election interference by donald trump has been swallowed up by history already. This phone call was eclipsed by the violent attack on the us capitol just four days later. It's like how the resignation of vice president. Spiro agnew got swallowed up in history because watergate forced the resignation of president nixon right after it and so when i wrote a podcast and wrote a book about spiro. Agnew people are like. Who's that guy. He wouldn't believe what a big scandal that was for a minute until a much bigger scandal eclipsed it and made us all forget the earlier one when really really life changing terrible thing happens. It tends to blot out the memory of other really bad stuff. That might have happened just before this and so it is with this georgia call. But there's a reason that this georgia called this january second phone call is the one other specific event that the author author the impeachment resolution decided to include in their charges against former president trump. Because it's because before the january sixth violent attack on the us capitol members of congress. Were already considering a second impeachment of president trump just for that goal because at that point before island attack on the us capitol. His hour-long phone call to georgia secretary of state pushing and threatening george official to try to get the election results overturned there before the attack on the capital that was president trump's most egregious and blatant act of trying to apparently criminally alter and mess with the election results to try to hold onto power. And he not only did it. It was all on tape. So what are we going to do here. But i only need eleven thousand votes found us. I need eleven thousand. Give me a break for you. Know what they did. And you're not reporting it. That's a that's a criminal. That's a criminal offense and you can't let that happen. That's that's a big risk to you and to ryan you lawyers. That's a big risk is not fair to take it away from us like this and it's got to be very costly in many ways and i think you have to say that you're gonna reexamine it and you can reexamine but reexamine it with people that wanna find answers not people that don't wanna find answers. You can't let it happen and you are letting it happen all you know i mean i'm notifying you. You're letting it happen. So all i wanna do is i just wanna find Eleven thousand seven hundred eighty loads. I want you to find exactly enough votes to declare me the winner of the election in your state. And if you don't that's a big risk to you. I'm notifying you all criminal offense by you say you have reexamined. Didn't i actually one or else. And when president trump made that call on january second four days before the attack on the capital he hit already called. Georgia's governor to pressure him. To overturn the state's election results to trump also personally called a level official in the georgia secretary of state's office. The guy in charge of elections investigations and spent a long time. Personally pressuring that guy to quote find the fraud that would result in overturning. The election results in georgia and declaring trump the winner while president trump was making all of these calls personally the top federal prosecutor in atlanta. Us attorney in atlanta resigns under direct pressure from the trump white house because trump felt and communicated to that the us attorney that he was not doing enough to find that non-existent fraud that would somehow allow the overthrowing of the election results. One of the things that made the series of escalating interventions georgia's election so remarkable. Was that it. It was just also blatantly illegal. Not just impeachable but illegal like go to jail illegal. It is against the law in georgia to solicit someone to commit election fraud state election officials to find you exactly the number of votes you need to turn the election result the other way threatening collections officials that they to change vote counts in your favor or else would surely seem to fall under that statute will now even as donald trump's second impeachment trial unfolds in the us senate and what a spectacle it is and that trial unfolds on an article of impeachment that specifically references trump's threatening call to george a secretary of state while nell a high profile state prosecutor in georgia district attorney the largest county in the state fulton county has now opened a criminal investigation that centers on that phone call district attorney. There has sent this letter to george secretary of state governor lieutenant governor and attorney general extracting them all to preserve any and all records related to the two thousand twenty election quote. This letter is notice that the fulton county district attorney has opened an investigation into attempts to influence the administration of the twenty twenty georgia general election. This investigation includes but is not limited to potential violations of georgia law prohibiting the solicitation of election fraud the making of false statements to state and local governmental bodies conspiracy racketeering violation of oath of office and any involvement in violence or threats related to the elections administration quote. This matter is of high importance. Excuse me the this matter is of high priority. The next fulton county grand jury is due to convene in march. This office will begin requesting grand jury subpoenas as necessary at that time

Georgia President Trump Brad Ravensburger Donald Trump Spiro Agnew United States President Nixon Spiro Agnew George Atlanta Congress Ryan Fulton County George Secretary White House
Haiti's president alleges coup conspiracy, says 20 arrested

BBC Newshour

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Haiti's president alleges coup conspiracy, says 20 arrested

"Authorities said. They followed a coup against President You have Nell Muise arresting more than 20 people. President Muise accused him of plotting to kill him. Opposition leaders condemned the arrests and called on Haitians to demonstrate against the government. The president has repeatedly stated his five year term ends in February next year.

Nell Muise President Muise Government
Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

All Things Considered

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

"Up, we're taking a look back at some of 20 twenties major events and one of the most remarkable scientific advances this year came in our understanding of how respiratory viruses can be transmitted from one person to another through the air. Krone virus pandemic obviously made this an urgent question. And NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports that old scientific ideas quickly got thrown out of the window. For decades. The prevailing idea about respiratory viruses was that some were airborne, and some just weren't so back in January, Thea understanding of how viruses spread through the air. Was really primitive and incorrect. Lindsay Mars, a researcher at Virginia Tech, who studies virus transmission, she says textbooks and research papers said an airborne virus was something like measles. It could be breathed out in tiny particles called aerosols that hang in the air. Those aerosols contractual long distances from room to room. All of that was very different from non airborne viruses like flew in the common cold. Those were thought to spread through coughs and sneezes, big droplets that travel just a few feet. Maher says. This whole simplistic picture was just wrong. There were very small number of people in the world. I think who really understood at that time how viruses spread through the air, and these people realize that the new coronavirus might be airborne at short distances. That is if people talked or saying the virus could be in small particles, as well as the big droplets and coughs and in a poorly ventilated space. These particles could build up as the Corona virus outbreak took off. These experts started making a lot of noise about this and people paid attention. Maher says She thought it would take 30 years for more nuanced ideas about airborne transmission to gain widespread acceptance. But it's happened in months. It's been pretty wild to see airborne transmission of viruses become Big news. Scientific studies came superfast Josh than Tar. Pia is a researcher at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. We're not even 12 months in and We know things about this virus that you know, we don't know about some viruses that we've had around for decades. His medical center took care of some of the first people with Corona virus in the United States. Santo Pia recalls standing at the end of their beds with a device that collected air while they talked or breathed his lab, then analyzed the tiny airborne droplets. Looking for the genetic signature of the Corona virus. We were getting positives more than one positive in the air samples, and I can't say the words that I said But you're kind of broadcast this, but I was shocked signs of the virus were in such tiny particles. He worried that nothing less than the most protective masks could stop it. Soon, though, studies showed that even basic cloth masks were able to reduce the amount of virus that gets out into the air and suddenly mask wearing became routine sent our P A was floored and how ventilation became part of the normal daily conversation. You know how well ventilated is the space shouldn't be spending time inside or outside. You know how much all these things it's changed so much about the way we view the world. The question is, Will this be a lasting change? Donald Milton is a research Teacher at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. He spent years showing how better ventilation in dorms or offices is associated with a lower risk of respiratory disease transmission, he says. We need to figure out engineering solutions to improve the safety of indoor spaces like getting better ventilation, using air filters, even using special lights up by a room ceiling to disinfect circulating air. I want to see us understand how it is that you can make her Restaurant, a safe place to be during flu season and during a pandemic. I think it's doable, but he's afraid that once vaccines get this virus in check, people will lose interest at least until the next pandemic. Nell Greenfield Boys NPR news

Nell Greenfield Lindsay Mars Maher Thea Santo Pia NPR Virginia Tech University Of Nebraska Medical PIA Josh Donald Milton University Of Maryland School United States Respiratory Disease FLU Npr News
Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

Environment: NPR

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

"It's chilly across the country today. Highs of just fifty eight in miami and sixteen in minneapolis which makes minnesota colder than an arctic as mcmurdo station but the cold weather doesn't last forever in the twin cities and in antarctica. It does ice their last hundreds of thousands even millions of years and as npr's nell greenfieldboyce reports that makes an arctic the perfect place to find some of the oldest ice in the world. Just how old is the oldest ice. On earth john higgins says. Nobody really knows you know. Would i be surprised at this point. We had five million-year-old is i mean. I'd be surprised. But not it's not unfathomable i think he and some colleagues recently collected ice samples in antarctica. That were later analyzed and shown to be as old as two point six million years. It's beautiful stuff when you pull out. The is it. Essentially as crystal clear accepted filled with tiny bubbles the bubbles contain air from when the ice formed and this trapped air is what scientists are really after higgins says if you want to understand how gases like carbon dioxide have affected the climate throughout history. You know you can't really do better other than getting a time machine and going back in time and taking an air sample then using these ice cores which physically just trap samples of ancient air to release that ancient air. All you have to do is melt the ice. That's the sound of a research camp manager in antarctica making drinking water by melting scraps of two hundred thousand year old ice in a metal pot to actually collect an analyze the release gases however ancient is has to melt in a lab. Sarah shackleton studies old princeton where she gets to watch the trapped air bubble out and that is something that i don't know if i'll ever get sick of watching. It's actually like pretty mesmerizing and one thing. That's released surprising every time to muse. Just how much gas is actually in the ice. She says it's a lot and samples from time. Periods undergoing past climate changes could be used to help make predictions about the future. One of the biggest questions in terms of kind of the modern warming and look anthropogenic. Climate changes helmich warming. Do should we expect with the amount of co two that we have in the atmosphere now. Antarctica has been covered by an ice sheet for at least thirty million years. But it's actually pretty hard to find really old ice. John gooch is a geologist. At the university of minnesota he says while snowfalls constantly add new layers of ice to the top of the ice sheet the oldest layers at the bottom can disappear. That's because of geothermal heat coming up from the ground so the rocks are giving off heat of slowly over time and so that has the potential to melt ice at the bomb. Still bits of super old ice like that two point six million year old sample can sometimes be preserved at the ice sheets edges the older snippets of ice. That we've been able to find come from places where the ice has flowed up against a mountain range and been exposed at the surface in those spots though. The ice can be all jumbled up and messy. It's not nice layers that have been laid down sequentially over a long continuous stretch of earth's history to get a neatly layered ice sample like that. Scientists need to drill straight down through the thick icesheet so far the oldest ice collected that way goes back eight hundred thousand years. Gooch says the goal now is to drill down a couple of miles to reach ice. That's older a million to two million years old whether or not we'll be able to find it at the bottom of the ice sheet where we can recover a relatively simple continuous record. Is i guess. That's the sixty four thousand dollar question at team from china has drilling underway a group from europe. We'll start in november. What everyone wants is i-i samples that cover a key time period about a million years ago. When there was a dramatic shift in the planet cycle of ice ages. Those had been coming every forty thousand years or so but for some reason that pattern ended and it changed to every one hundred thousand years instead unto us working on climate. That's a really big deal. Eric wolf is a climatologist with the university of cambridge in the united kingdom. It's a really big question as to why that change is fundamental tower climates. Work in a way you could say. We don't really understand today's climate. If we don't understand why we live in one hundred thousand year will draw the forty thousand year world. The coronavirus pandemic basically ruins the arctic research season. That would've been happening now but starting next fall researchers will be backed down there searching for really old ice nell greenfieldboyce npr news.

Antarctica Nell Greenfieldboyce Arctic Sarah Shackleton Mcmurdo Station John Higgins John Gooch NPR Minneapolis Higgins Minnesota Miami Princeton University Of Minnesota Gooch Eric Wolf China Europe
Pompeo becomes first top US diplomat to visit Israeli settlement, labels boycotts anti-Semitic

Mike Gallagher

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Pompeo becomes first top US diplomat to visit Israeli settlement, labels boycotts anti-Semitic

"Secretary of State Pompeo, visiting Israel says the U. S. Will regard the Palestinian led boycott movement is anti Semitic and will cut support to any organization taking part in the movement. BBC is your landed. Nell is in Jerusalem. It follows Mr Pompeo, saying last year that settlements weren't necessarily illegal under international law breaking from decades of U. S foreign policy. Palestinian leaders called the plan a provocation and said it would set a dangerous precedent that already been protests. It's also suggested that Mr Pompeo will go to the Israeli occupied Golan Heights. Which was officially recognized by Washington is part of Israel on his watch, and Pompeo is visited at Israeli West Bank settlement, becoming the first top

Secretary Of State Pompeo Mr Pompeo U. S. Nell Israel BBC Jerusalem U. Golan Heights Pompeo Israeli West Bank Washington
A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

Forum

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

"Down on an asteroid floating some 200 miles away from Earth. NPR's now Greenfield voice reports. The probe also collected a sample of rock and dust. This was NASA's first effort to grab a sample, often asteroid, a space object that's considered to be a kind of pristine relic from the early days of the solar system. As the research team watched Theo Cyrus Rex spacecraft moved towards the rocky surface. Its on on board board systems systems looked looked for for hazardous hazardous obstacles obstacles and and decided decided it it was was safer safer going going in in down after just briefly touching the surface and hopefully grabbing a good sample the spacecraft safely backed away. As more information comes back from the spacecraft in the coming days, researchers will learn how much of the asteroid it nabbed and whether they should have another go at it before the spacecraft returns to Earth. Nell Greenfield Boyce

Nell Greenfield Boyce Theo Cyrus NPR Nasa
"nell" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"nell" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"Feel. Bad. Just cashing a check just to watch somebody snort coke and then pretend i. didn't see it. Now, I have a another. Associate of friend who? Also does sober companionship and he was He was. Flown out to another state he had met a guy that was here in a in a treatment facility and they hired he hired him to come to his home. So he moved into this guy's home and not only did he deal with the guy but he was a married man with children. Teenage children. So he was now. placed. In the middle of a family dynamic in the the people in the family were like, who is this guy? Is there a little suspicious? Those situations must be very Tenuous because now you're placed in the middle of somebody else's family. I'm sure you've had some of that that kind of stuff where we're the family members are like they don't want they don't maybe they don't even want the dynamic to change because it. So familiar yeah that's a good point and. I we say that working with the families is sometimes harder than working with the individual because they have expectations like you said, they they one of the safe you know sick if you will. So they can have control or power over them. Fortunately I would say the majority of the time I'm working for a case manager therapist or doctor. So there's a buffer in between Nell deal with the family I. Mean I have against my better judgment a handful of times work just for the client themselves to deal with anyone else and that that has its advantages because I don't have to report into anyone but the disadvantages that say. Are Calling the shots right because they're the ones that are employing directly. So you don't have that offering between eight. So you know the families I try to. Be, respectful of the confidentiality of the client I don't want to overstep but at the same time when you're that close to them, like you said like living with the wife because I I have had that not a lot. It's usually the person has been either on their way to treatment or coming home from treatment or I've been on a on a TV set or a film or. Know just again, sort of runs, the gamut, the ideas to join up with the client to bond with them, and to knock get super close where you violate any boundaries. But at the same time you you want to get them excited hopefully about getting better that's why you're there and I always say abject it as the work myself out of job. Really. Being around for a while I, understand that there's different ways to to recover. So I try not to push anything on anyone I. Just say listen you know here's a better way to do it. Let's. Use Me as a as a coach, you can bounce things off me and you know I try to. Be someone there that they could talk to. oftentimes they're used to being coddled or there's a lot of expectations lot of narcissism. So you know I try to be firm, but at the same time easy guy to be around and I think that's why I've been able to stay busy for as long as I have..

Nell
"nell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"nell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Timeline to return Americans to the moon, including the first woman, NPR's Nell Greenfield. Boys says the space agency wants to achieve this by 2020 for a deadline set by the Trump administration. A test flight is scheduled for next year. NASA will send a capsule around the moon and back without crew. A similar flight with people on board is scheduled for 2023. The hardware to actually land on the moon's surface still needs a lot of work. NASA Administrator Jim Brian Stein says It needs $3.2 billion allocated in funding by March. Or the 2024 goal won't be possible. You know if Congress doesn't fund the new landing program Then it won't be achieved. I mean, it's It's really that simple, he says. A funding is pushed off. NASA will try to get to the moon at the earliest opportunity. The last time anyone walked on the moon was 1972 Nell Greenfield Voice NPR NEWS A woman suspected of trying to mail an envelope with poison in it to the White House is expected to appear in federal court today. She is expected to face federal charges. The letter was intercepted at a screening facility before it reached the White House. Canadian authorities are assisting in this investigation. They searched a condo in Montreal on Monday. Korova Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Harper, publisher of former National Security Adviser General H. R. McMasters, and new book Battle Grounds, the fights to defend the Free world. About U. S. Foreign policy and national security challenges available now six minutes after four o'clock Good morning. I'm Jean Marie Coming up on morning edition. Noel King speaks with Stephen Groves. Margaret Thatcher fellow at the Heritage Foundation and former assistant to President Trump about the administration strategy for picking the next Supreme Court justice. Also, wildfire has made a Colorado Canyon more vulnerable to rock fall and mudslides. The nearby interstate will likely face more frequent shutdowns more on this example of the cascading effects of climate change just ahead..

NPR NASA Nell Greenfield White House Trump administration Administrator Jim Brian Stein Margaret Thatcher President Trump Supreme Court Noel King Korova Coleman Congress Colorado Canyon Montreal National Security Heritage Foundation Jean Marie
"nell" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"nell" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Nell was accounted for two, maybe officials telling Fox News a few firefighters suffered from smoke inhalation. We also just learned two guided missile destroyers, including the U. S. S. Fitzgerald were moved away from the bottom Rashard as it continues to burn at Naval Base, San Diego Local base and shipboard firefighters are working this massive fire right now. Approximately 160 sailors were on board the ship when the fire started. A vessel was going through a routine maintenance. The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but officials say they do not expect fell play. And China has fast become a top election issue as President Trump and former vice President Joe Biden engage in a verbal battle over who's better at playing the tough guy against Beijing, representative James Comer of Kentucky, commenting on Fox News, You go back to the Obama Biden administration they had a by China. First policy. There were hundreds of thousands of jobs that went to China American jobs. And since President Trump's election, he's been focused like a laser on bringing those jobs back. And as Corona virus cases reached record highs across the US, many states are being forced to either pause or start rolling back. The re openings were saying positivity rates above 20%. We continue to have a real challenge with testing. Although there was some very good news this week about additional resource is that air coming? We're setting records of the time. You don't want to set for the use of ventilators by covert patients acute care beds. That's the mayor of Phoenix, Arizona, Kate Gal ago, joining CBS's face the Nation to discuss the spike in cases in her state. America is listening to Bach's news. You miss it when Tracy from down out of $1000 while listening to James here, Do you want some money? What's Tracy strategy worked pretty early. So I'm listening to you, Glenn Beck. And then I listen to rush Now, Canady like trace. I feel having to.

President Trump Fox News China James Comer Tracy smoke inhalation Joe Biden Obama Biden Naval Base vice President Glenn Beck Nell San Diego S. S. Fitzgerald Rashard US Beijing Kentucky CBS Kate Gal
"nell" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"nell" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Work when I was fourteen and he was on an under rated and way ahead of its time television program called give me a break I don't know if you're familiar or not you know give me a break starred Nell Carter in my opinion V. greatest female role on any sitcom ever was Nell Carter playing nelle Harper she was she agreed to look after the Comiskey household as a favor to her dying friend she was the wife of the police chief call Comiskey played by Dolph sweet and she served as a parent to the three teenage daughters Kate Julie as Samantha and then a foster son Joey was added in season three that's how you can usually tell when a show's gonna bite the dust when they had a kid this show explored gender stereotypes racial stereo types are every day what a great damn show it was and then of course he was on a very special episode of different strokes he was on silver spoons with Rick Schroeder and then and then made his way to one of the greatest American sitcoms in my opinion blossom yeah yeah I agree blossom fan I was a blossom guy yeah I love blossom I was just thinking about it where Joey Lawrence is right now if it if he only knew the like he's getting more air time you know that he's he probably so happy you know some guys in tamper talking about him I know the I would help you be jazzed about yeah I'm sure you would if anybody knows him you know you know time to throw it throws a culture seven two seven five seven nine one oh two five you were the blossom theme song don't know about the future that's anybody's guess well I am my own reason do get all depressed it was the red bone it might have been I don't know I do yeah that was only off based on your personal lives in Asia the sun is got as you know is that I am I don't know it was it Leon Redbone they did I don't know can we try it again where member where I pick a movie show theme in what do you mean we well what I pick a TV show theme in using is Leon Redbone all right sure yeah let me play the blossom FEMA first and then I'll and then we'll continue with that by the way this is not our it's okay it's not okay for.

Nell Carter nelle Harper Comiskey Dolph sweet Kate Julie Samantha Rick Schroeder Joey Lawrence Asia Leon Redbone FEMA