19 Burst results for "Neil Stevenson"

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:11 min | 2 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We've been talking about the metaverse a lot at the time coined in 1992 by Neal Stephenson in his book snow crash Since then from Johnny mnemonic and the matrix in the 90s to Tron and ready player one more recently there have been many guesses as to what a world in which life mixed with virtual reality will really look like Now Neil Stephenson is out with a new book termination shock a new thriller in which climate change is out of control and a visionary billionaire has a big idea for reversing global warming a topic which couldn't be more timely as well Neil Stevenson joins us now here in the studio and it is great to have you here in person Good to be here Thanks for inviting me for joining us You have a massive following and you could have written about anything You chose climate change which is a topic that the masses have had a hard time really understanding and grappling with Why did you decide to take this on for your next book I think even scientists and people who are technically on the ball can have a hard time getting their heads around the whole topic So I have kind of got a niche as someone who writes popular fiction about technical subjects And so I thought it made sense for me to take a crack at this The story centers around a billionaire who decides to take matters into his own hands and solar geoengineer the planet using a big sulfur gun What exactly does that mean And is that really possible So for a long time all through human history there have been volcanic eruptions that put plumes of sulfur into the stratosphere the high atmosphere And what we've learned over time is that when that happens for a couple of years afterwards the climate all over the planet will get cooler until that stuff kind of naturally washes out So the proposal's been made that we could essentially build artificial volcanos that do the same thing by artificially injecting sulfur into the stratosphere And we call that solar geoengineering because the purpose of it is to bounce back the solar radiation that's heating up the planet Now obviously it's very controversial and not everyone is on board with the idea of doing this but for me as a storyteller that was just more fodder to tell an interesting story It's not just about doing the engineering but it's about how other people react Now there are a number of real-life billionaires who are trying to take on climate change as well Bill Gates Jeff Bezos What do you make of the involvement of billionaires I know you're based in Seattle and they're both based in Seattle as well Should we welcome them as a society to this fight It's an interesting place that we've got to as a society that we now look to billionaires to take big actions for us You know I don't think that was true say 50 years ago But it is true now that a lot of our institutions that we might have looked to you know in the 50s or the 60s to take care of our problems the big government institutions and conventional big companies don't seem to be playing that role for us anymore And.

Neal Stephenson Neil Stevenson Johnny mnemonic Bill Gates Jeff Bezos Seattle
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:29 min | 2 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"People <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> follow and whatever <Speech_Male> you want to call it, <Speech_Male> the scientific method <Speech_Male> or enlightenment, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> there's different <Speech_Male> ways of thinking about <Speech_Male> it, but basically <Speech_Male> explanatory <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's about the power <Speech_Male> of explanations. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And being <Speech_Male> able to figure <Speech_Male> out why things are the way <Speech_Male> they are. <Speech_Male> And that <Speech_Male> has created changes <Speech_Male> in our <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> thinking in our way <Speech_Male> of life <Speech_Male> over the last <Speech_Male> few centuries that <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> explosive <Speech_Male> compared to anything <Speech_Male> that came before. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> David <Speech_Male> sort of verges <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> classifying this <Speech_Male> as like a force of <Speech_Male> nature. <Speech_Male> In its potential <Speech_Male> transformative <Speech_Male> power. <Speech_Male> If we <Speech_Male> keep going, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> we could <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> we figure out how <Speech_Male> they're colonized the <Speech_Male> universe. <Speech_Male> Like you were <Speech_Male> talking about earlier. <Speech_Male> How <Speech_Male> this spread to other star <Speech_Male> systems, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> then it is <Speech_Male> effectively <Speech_Male> a <SpeakerChange> force of <Speech_Male> nature. <Speech_Male> This kind of <Speech_Male> drive to understand <Speech_Male> more and more <Speech_Male> and more deeper and <Speech_Male> deeper and deeper. <Speech_Male> And to engineer <Speech_Male> stuff so that <Speech_Male> we can understand even <Speech_Male> more. Yeah. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> It's the <Speech_Male> old, <Speech_Male> the universe <Speech_Male> created us to understand <Speech_Male> itself. Maybe <Speech_Male> that's the <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> whole purpose. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It is an <Speech_Male> interesting peculiar <Speech_Male> side effect <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Male> way we've been created <Speech_Male> is we seem to <Speech_Male> be conscious beings. <Speech_Male> We seem to have a little egos. <Speech_Male> We seem to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> be born <Speech_Male> and die pretty quickly. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> a bunch of drama. <Speech_Male> We're all <Speech_Male> within ourselves <Speech_Male> pretty <Speech_Male> unique and <Speech_Male> fall in love and <Speech_Male> start wars <Speech_Male> and there's hate and <Speech_Male> although <Speech_Male> the full interesting dynamic <Speech_Male> of it. So it's <Speech_Male> not just about the individual <Speech_Male> people. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Somehow like the <Speech_Male> concert <SpeakerChange> that we played <Silence> together. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah, yeah. <Speech_Male> So that's <Speech_Male> kind of interesting. And <Speech_Male> there's a lot of peculiar <Speech_Male> aspects of <Speech_Male> that that <Speech_Male> I wonder if they're fundamental <Speech_Male> just quirks of <Speech_Male> evolution. <Speech_Male> Whether <Speech_Male> it's or there's <Speech_Male> death whether it's love <Speech_Male> or all <Speech_Male> those things. <Speech_Male> I wonder <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> from an engineering <Speech_Male> perspective, when we're <Speech_Male> trying to create that intelligent <Speech_Male> toaster that <Speech_Male> listens for the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> slam door. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> the smell of <Speech_Male> burning toast. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Whether <Speech_Male> that toaster, it <Speech_Male> should be afraid of <Speech_Male> death and should <Silence> fall in love just like <Speech_Male> we do. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Neil, <Speech_Male> you're a <Speech_Male> fascinating human being, <Speech_Male> you've impacted the lives <Speech_Male> of millions of people. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's a huge honor <Speech_Male> that you would <Speech_Male> spend your valuable time <Speech_Male> with me today. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much. Thank <Speech_Male> you for coming on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Beautiful, <Speech_Male> hot, Texas. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> thank you for talking today. <Speech_Male> It was a pleasure. <Speech_Male> I glad <SpeakerChange> I came and <Silence> did it. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> for listening to this conversation <Speech_Male> with Neil Stevenson. <Speech_Male> To support <Speech_Male> the podcast, <Speech_Male> please check out our sponsors <Speech_Male> in the description. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And now let me <Speech_Male> leave you with some words <Speech_Male> from Neil Stevenson <Speech_Male> himself in <Silence> his novel snow <Speech_Male> crash. <Speech_Male> The world is <Speech_Male> full of things more <Speech_Male> powerful than us. <Speech_Male> But if <Speech_Male> you know how to catch a <Speech_Male> ride, you <Silence> can go places. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for listening and <Speech_Male> hope to see <SpeakerChange> you <Music> next

Neil Stevenson Texas
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:36 min | 2 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"The story becomes smile. I'm not sure what that is. Maybe because it becomes more real to the people writing the story. Maybe it just makes you better writer. The key to any storytelling is getting the readers to suspend their disbelief. And there's all kinds of triggers and little tells that can break that. Right. And once it's broken, it's really hard to get it back. You know, a lot of times that's the end. Somebody will just close the book and not pick it up. I get asked to this question, but I gotta ask you the most impossible question for an author to answer, but which Neil Stevenson book should one read first. So when people ask me that I usually ask them what they like to read, because I mean, there's the best known one is probably snow crash, but that's a cyberpunk novel that's at the same time making fun of cyberpunk. So it's kind of got some layers to it that might not seem so funny if you don't have that if you don't get the joke, right? So there's written as you point out I've written historical novels. Some people like those. Some people prefer those. So if that's what you like, then cryptonomicon or the baroque cycle is where you would start if you like sort of techno thrillers that are set in a modern day setting, but aren't science fictiony per se, then ream D is one of those and termination shock is definitely one of those. So it just depends on what people like what when people a long time ago recommend every it's no crash. She said, it's Neil Stevenson light. It's like if you don't want to be overwhelmed by the depth, like the rigor, a book, that's a good introduction. Okay. So you said, you broke it down by topics. But if you wanted to read all of them, what's a good introduction to the man? Because obviously these worlds are very different. The philosophies are very different. Yeah. What's a good introduction to the human? People ask the same thing of dusty asking people it's a hard one to answer. Maybe 7 eves because it's got big themes, you know, it's about heavy heavy things happening to the human race. But hopefully the story is told through a cast of characters that people can relate to..

Neil Stevenson cryptonomicon eves
"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

03:19 min | 3 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"Blast thirty minutes fifty for subscribers of news of the day from our perspective of trip. And this is monica. Perot's brad bakley our top story. Facebook has changed. Its name to meta and it's really. The implications are ominous. I really can hardly get my mind around. After our conversations with allison mcdowell the way she pointed out that neil stevenson who wrote snow crash and neuromancer. I think had kind of obviously had some kind of inside scoop on what was coming. It all seems like a lot of predictive. Programming was in the works for that sucker. Berg today announced that the new company's name will be meta. They are going to be a company that builds technology to connect he said together. We can finally put people at the center of our technology. I mean it's called facebook right. I don't know where what it was before. But he says anyway and together. We can unlock massively bigger creator economy. He said the name faced with doesn't fully encompass everything the company does now an is still closely linked to one products but over time. He hopes we are seen as a metaverse company. As part of the change the company plans to report on two operating segments. The family of apps which i'm thinking as facebook instagram. What's app and oculus. yes and then. The other one is reality labs..

brad bakley allison mcdowell neil stevenson Perot facebook monica Berg
"neil stevenson" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

CoinDesk Podcast Network

03:01 min | 4 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

"Pretty much it for this one like. I said it's something that i think. Propaganda see a lot. More of and questions. I'll be watching. Like i said is is actually infinity. The bitcoin it's class or is this just a moment. In time rivers use cases being revealing and turns up play earn. Doesn't work like some of the other kind of significant. Never seen acting finnity is not. It's on washing accident. Finished watching that uses the theory that has a side chain but it doesn't have the effect in the same way that i think that you see these other price. If you're interested in learning more just look up later earn just read about it understand it. It's very very interesting. I found whole experience for you. Really fascinating and to certain degree rewarding just in terms of getting to know people and getting to understand situations that i don't really have expertise in or closure too long regular basis. I think that's the one conclusion that we can reach with confidence. Which is that. While this platform may rise faster than than dropped just as fast fizzle out the overall trend for later earn for any kind of sweat equity financial participation platforms the break down barriers to entry breakdown border controls that allow people to earn a living using online resources in less dehumanizing work conditions than manual labor will continue to grow and will continue to flourish in wave after wave after wave al. Fortunately a lot of them will be pyramids. Games on a lot of them will be scams but ultimately there's enormous demand for this. What if this becomes the future of the economy where everyone's like the future. Everything is going to get so automated that there's just gonna be twenty thirty percent of people perpetually unemployed what if we just create virtual menial labor and this whole like peter earn thing is just like a little like structural reinvention of like moderately low middle lower higher income menial labor and as we get rid of all the truck driving jobs will get more of these like peter drops to replace it in the meta economy. I want to have a conversation not too distant. Future only at stephanie. Back about kind of the snow crash world that were moving into right and snow crash again. Like if you ever read that book in the crypto space. Do yourself a favor read that much about what's being done in terms of metaverse stop in terms of much of the vision of many of the people who built a lot has been influenced by frankly other neil stevenson books as well but snow crash in particular. That's not all positive. If you want to know the direction of the next ten years just read snow crash. Nine hundred eighty four and brave new world and bang your head against the opportunity. Yeah and ready player. One and ready player to are ultimately their dystopia.

neil stevenson stephanie peter
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Ground Zero Media

Ground Zero Media

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Ground Zero Media

"To create a averse. And i. i don't know of anybody knows where that term came from the metaverse. Actually neil stevenson. Who wrote snow crash and in it. the metaverse refers to this immersive digital environment where people interact avatars. The idea of meta meta emmy ta or mehta prefix made it means beyond and verse refers to a universe so it's beyond our universe and tech companies. Use the word to describe what comes after the internet and that is a universe or metaverse within our universe which may or may not be relying on vr. Glasses he may be a point where you can just have you know implants in your ears and your eyes and a what is called A suit you wear a it's it's a suit that makes you feel haptic to haptic suit as what they call it was telling me all about haptic suits and how they're like available now seven thousand dollars you can get a haptic suit where you're feeling everything is going on in this metaverse in the virtual world so think of it as embodied internet. You're inside of rather than looking at instead of looking at it you're in it. You're that you're you're you're the avatar your the being inside so is digital round. Wouldn't be just limited advices. I mean you're an avatar seen walk around in cyberspace basically people maneuver in the physical world. But he would allow users interact with people on the other side of the planet. So it'd be like you're in the same place. Same continent k. e. for a robust virtual universe. Everyone needs to want and everybody has to make or they have to make this affordable for everybody they have to be able to afford these the special glasses these vr headsets. Does that sound interesting. The special glasses to see the virtual world. It's kind of like they live. It's kinda like well. It's kinda like his free guy. show too. I mean he had to put on glasses. He has to put on glasses in order to see that he is a you know a. He's a what do you call it. A non what they call that anyway. it's it's just. The technology is is is there. I guess but it has to be reworked and re redone so that everybody can afford it and it has to be stylish enough minimal enough interest people and it has to be sophisticated enough to work seamlessly. And we haven't got the seamless part yet. It hasn't happened yet but the theories. They're the moves. Are there the movies are there. The predictive programming is there. We are going to ignore our nature in our reality to create a metaverse universe alongside our universe five zero three two five zero eight sixty advisor or three to five zero eight. Sixty unplug lewis. You're listening to ground zero and we'll be back. I'm plate lewis and you just listened to a segment of ground zero in order to access the complete archive shows and podcasts. You must sign up on our secured server at aftermath dot media. It's only four ninety nine a month for the archive shows and podcasts. Or you want access to the ground zero online library which includes videos audio clips e books documents a social media platform plus the archive shows and podcasts. It's nine ninety nine a month again. That's aftermath dot media at aftermath dot media. Thanks for supporting ground zero..

neil stevenson lewis
"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Like like different types of colored bitcoin for example than required a lot of coordination and the advantage of being the most seasons is network is also very hard to get consensus over adding new features But if there were different types of tokens on bitcoin. You know it would be very possible to bill you for that and allow people to exchange those. Is there a world where let's say. Unicef is both on top of syria rights. you don't believe d by of the layer one to be able to Get a unicef bill. Is there the potential to do something similar on bitcoin. I think there's one is called bisque network but outside of that one. I'm not really sure of that. Many others is that kind of the better path to pursue is more like a layer two or side she'd based Decks a sovereign. Or something like that. I think if more realistic that's why people have been looking into these lives. So what we're building right with the deck sun'll cosmos hub is also a way to bridge to bitcoin to the future right. So the hub. Itself is secured by over five billion of assets and as long as there exists like a very good bridge from bitcoin to cosmos. Even this tax even address can be used for you to trade bitcoin with other assets bridge to cosmos. And so let's zoom out ten years from now. What was the world. Look like how. How do you think about that. Yeah i think ten years from now what we've been building right of you is that s you look at all your assets across multiple chains at once is going to be very competitive but also very mature at the same time i would expect to see central stages slobby phase out to see if the technology is inferior to buy decks can provide also really hoping we can solve and provide better solutions for self custody of private keys. I think private keys pneumonic seat phases. They're they're very dangerous and Of the whole them in a safer way to allowed presses share them in a safer way in something happens to them. I think those are questions that we still have to solve. That makes sense before that you go ask everyone the same three questions. The first is what is the most important book that you've ever read the most important book i've ever read. I don't have a most important book. But i have one of the most Inspirational books. I really liked the diamond. Age by neil stevenson. It's about a world. i think it was written. I think twenty five years ago so now start a world where your pads existed. But they weren't just ipads the are they. They held all knowledge about everything. And they taught you everything each doa by anything that existed in the world and It was handed out to basically everyone in that world. So it's a great way to learn about anything you need your teacher and at the same time it's entirely democratic. You don't need to pay internet. You don't need to pay for the device and yeah. I really idea of a world like that when you think about sleep schedule. Our friends over eight sleep gave me a thermo cooled. Bet ice cold. I sleep like a baby..

unicef syria neil stevenson
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

03:12 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"Obu shaw who writes in parts. Hey y'all thank you for producing one of the few podcasts. I care to listen to what i like to hear. And for being some of my best friends in this closed off world why along while i am a longtime listener magazine subscriber general consumer of all things reason again love to hear that i found myself disheartened while scrolling the website tonight. It's ninety five to five ratio of negative to positive stories in there people. Megan that's nineteen to one. You could just like there's a common. I if i'm being chattering. She goes on the podcast. Bring me so much joy. I shall never eat them. Don't know what that means but the articles were all the positive stories. Surely there's something happening today. That does not suck. Maybe a mosh moved closer to twenty twenty. Four or maybe a libertarian county level government position somewhere. Anybody on the team got a new puppy something. Good somewhere please. The contrast is so stark. I wonder as the casual nature of the podcast. Simply allow your collective plucky. Nece your that nick plucky nece to calm my nerves or maybe. The website reflects more unvarnished reality. That's just an absolute that it is right now. Just an absolute shit. Time to libertarian. A good news only filter for hard days would be lovely. Catherine help us neil stevenson Fan out yeah i am. I would like there to be more good news to and i actually as matt so often mentions as the person in charge of all the things at the reason. I am always trying to find ways to lean into good news but yeah it's tough. It's tough minute. I'm not gonna lie. I'm i'm doing a lot of media. Consumption that is essentially self soothing in the face of the news these days like i watched outlander this weekend. You guys. that's not so just to your show now just a chunk of it but the the The fact that. I'm like not even willing to brave the possibility of being disappointed by a new junkie science fiction book and need to go. There means that. I have a lot of sympathy with our letter writer. I will note today on the main page. We have a great reason video about our one of our favorite subject george huts. Who is always out here trying to build self driving cars out of robots that are from the jetsons who is gonna do it for only like fifty bucks in his garage Tech news like repurposing a jewel. It's powered by mango. Jewel pods So that's a problem because those are illegal now. Oh no it's bad news again. Yes so tech. News tech news my solace in these dark times. And so i would recommend to you dear writer both The reason tv output which does tend toward the more optimistic of our our various platforms. And also to say that yeah. There's just a lot of bad news right now. Unfortunately i do not consider libertarian. Party people winning dogcatcher elections to be like enough good enough news to counterbalance all the bad news..

Obu shaw Nece nick plucky nece neil stevenson Megan Catherine matt
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Just King Things

Just King Things

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Just King Things

"I don't see the good pathway there a maybe you maybe you could explain to me. But i think we're going to get to that novel. I if you're asking the question. What would a stephen king official dead space slash aliens. Game novel look like. I don't know what that would look like if you're asking me. What would stephen king doing something in the universe of something like dead space or aliens of kind of ever-growing horror in a really limited space that keeps people from escaping and does huge violence do them in arguments their bodies in weird ways. Stephen king wrote that novel. And it's called the tommy knockers. Everyone hates it. But i don't hate it. I also kind of desperation. Is that novel to actually. Desperation is very similar to dead. Space it is. I've not thought about that but so he's kind of written something very similar to the question. You're asking to time so we'll get you in on the show and we'll see what you think about it. So kind of go into this question about science fiction point-by-point here right. So stephen king's writing style reading question. Stephen king's writing style. If no outlines and desire to stick to the ordinary seems antithetical to the creation of science fiction stories. I don't think that's true. I don't think that that is an accurate summary of what science fiction doing. And i'm not picking on on anonymous here any kind of way. I understand why you wipe someone would say that. But i think a big part of how science fiction works is that it's ordinary until it's not ordinary anymore or it is the ordinary in an ordinary situation so like human relationships in the way that human beings work but dammit learn space and there's all these additional problems going on with it a speaking of authors who won't tell you their ideology but you can work it backward. Neil stevenson does a lot of this mitch and where it's like just just regular as human beings but you put regular as human beings in extraordinarily science fiction circumstances he just of lets people do their thing and you see all kinds of stuff happened. Seventies is a. I think a really great novel. But that's all it is. It's just like what if human jealousy happened and there weren't that many humans left. What would you do so this is the rest of the question. Yeah it seems. That king has a desire to tell stales with the inclusion of psychic powers in dystopia. I'm curious if you can.

stephen king Neil stevenson mitch
"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

04:13 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"I was gonna say all these companies want us all constantly now. The time i was gonna say that. I didn't fully explain. Why the idea of the metaverse is it was coined. I wanna see maybe in snow crash the book. You don't like the book your big fan of the author william gibson. Is he problematic. I don't think he's problematic. You're thinking of orson scott card guys that no i think i th i think he's i mean maybe i'm wrong but i haven't heard anything bad about him. Yeah interesting. the way said that he problematic now. but you just assume because these side Like a sci fi writer. That's been around. you're like up. He's probably cancelled friendly. If not canceled. Probably deserves to be no. I mean i'm not gonna sit here and defend the guy really know that much bound by avert a few books and neil stevenson. Now oh yes. I'm thinking of william gibson though. But neil neil stevenson wrote snow crash. I'm thinking of william gibson wrote neuromancer. And i can't remember what else big big big big big side i'm on neil stevenson's page and there is no controversy. Okay well then. It's fine outside mean. Both of these guys are still putting books out so but these are the guys who like in the eighties. Came up with a lot of stuff you know. They came up with a live. These words like metaverse cyberspace you know. They they were at the cutting edge of pets.com. Imagine pets.com they were at the cutting edge of like. Oh this stuff. Starting computers the internet is in its infant but the internet and home. Computers are in their infancy. We're going to write books about where this is going So that's where we're ideas about the metaverse come but the the basic idea of the metaverse and is an idea. That's in like ready player. One other things where it's essentially like a shared space that a one company in particular doesn't own well. That was what the whole internet was supposed to be right. Examine enter the goggles. I mean well you know. Nobody owns the internet. You can go to any website and basically they were extrapolating that out. I mean the web wasn't even around when when some of these books were written but the internet no serving the people do in the surf the web they went on like telnet and gopher and use net other things that skynet they were. They were smart enough to stay the sky that but they basically were looking at all this stuff. And saying like yeah. This is all primitive but one day. We're going to get to the point. Where like everything's virtual reality. Everything's like three d. avatars. And whether you put on a vr headset and they are headset or years looking at two dimensional screen. There's going to be like a three d space that exists there's like three d. representation of the internet. And everything's gonna be on there so there's going to be like a big building that says net flicks and you'll be able to go in there to watch netflix movies but across the street. There's the hbo max building. You can go in there. And then it's like i need to pick some stuff up for my kid..

neil stevenson william gibson orson scott neil neil stevenson netflix hbo
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

05:30 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"I definitely think there's a market for people making content and especially now As patrico saying there's so many collaborative tools and platforms available now to work remotely Especially in three d. and I think that's a that you you have a very broad horizon and internationally as well Which i think is very exciting and yeah yeah yeah so patrick thoughts on on doing the root. Wouldn't you know the work here. The new york concentration here but working here in hawaii for a company that perhaps is located somewhere else absolutely because of an unfortunately because condemning. We've really had to adapt to a remote work situation. And i think this kind of ties into virtual reality as well is as virtual reality grows and becomes more ubiquitous. We're able to essentially start treating it as a workplace. We're not quite there yet. But eventually and jesse had brought up the metaverse earlier the idea of the mets versus being the place where people can convene to do not just commerce and interact with each other and to create content but also do work and get paid for the things that they're doing in the metaverse as well. It's kind of encompasses this entire idea of going to be able to log into this thing and be able to do everything in my life through this. This oppose metaverse concept In addition to that. I wanted to say that lava at. Uh minoa is also doing a lot of work in this space. Mostly dealing with Larger augmented reality and sort of Expanding vr into a real space and then being able to interact with it using physical things in your actual environment. And they're doing a lot of cool work on that as well and so Jesse and i know you both have mentioned the metaverse in the metaverse. Was i think i coined by neil stevenson in his book snow crash and and of course it recently. Got a lot of attention because mark zuckerberg from facebook has talked about how facebook wants to spend a lot of it's kind of Development for creating the metaverse environmental jesse. I mean what exactly is that metaverse environment. Yeah you know. I think there's a lot of people who have different visions of what the metaverse is going to be. And i definitely think. Facebook is more on the line as you mentioned neil stevenson's vision which honestly is very much influenced by engineers at a second life. Who went on to work at facebook and kind of influence that that Purchase of oculus. But i think they want to be this. This over encompassing company that is Kind of running this virtual space. That has all these services for it for you to live and work it and I if that's a to d three d environment. that's what kind of company they wanna be. They wanna be this this this platform for you to have a almost another life in That you can work and play and and and communicate with everyone you care about I and i. And i think there's there's companies who are going to be selling fixing shovels like invidia and but i've also noticed other companies like epic silently buying all the means of making all this context so So you do have companies that are moving in in to trying to carbon niche in this metaverse That may end up being multiple platforms may end up being multiple meta verses. And i think i think in videos calling their platform omni verse kind of cover everything As far as tools go. So i definitely think facebook is trying to build this basically world or universe that they're going to have Let you Kind of build your wife in or manage. And i think that's going to be an end goal for them. So so patrick. How do we in hawaii carve out a place for us to be a part of the sort digital future of the metaverse. I think that in order for us to really get a part of it The people who want to be a part of it just need to start creating anything in these spaces that are currently available to us and as we continue to create this content And as the metaverse kind of starts to coalesce. Jesse mentioned around either facebook's idea of or in videos idea of or even the on facebook and invidia maybe somebody else comes out of nowhere and create some interoperable tool suite that everybody can use As long as people here in hawaii are making sure that they're trying out new things and getting involved with technology that's out there. They're definitely going to be on board able to participate in this new economy and space that we don't even know what it's gonna look like yet but it's very exciting agency in the last thirty seconds. Maybe fifteen seconds. I mean we're we're would people. What would you point people to get. Get more into this Into this area of the metaverse of vr. Honestly you know if you want to intro into it On youtube and check out people having a good time and the yard shot or other virtual worlds And if you're interested in creating it you can either go the route of a programmer and start loading code. Python's a good place to start or you can start learning how to make three models in in blender. Judy art skills are are are great too. so i you can always build yourself up creating And don't be afraid of. It doesn't look right the first time. You can always integrate and get better and stuff out there. Well that's great. And i'll put that up on our show notes. Some suggestions patrick jollies a developer. At kilo ho cuvee are jesse thompson. Technical director over at the jackson school of medicine and of course. I want to thank them both for joining us today. Of course thank you for.

neil stevenson facebook patrico jesse hawaii patrick Jesse mets mark zuckerberg new york youtube Judy patrick jollies jesse thompson jackson school of medicine
"neil stevenson" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"I you know. Only fourteen seconds of benson was fake. But it was. I couldn't tell you where the fourteen seconds were And the kitchen background lives entirely. There was always fake. The whole thing. That's that i think is the thing you can now. Put some on anywhere convincingly amazing Deep fakes right. I mean that means you can. The sky's the limit. So neil stevenson does talk about this a little bit in his most recent runoff most recent probably as he writes a novel week so maybe not a novel the fall in it And it's in the near future. Kids have projected masks. They wear that that are different persona and when you project the mass face recognition everything says. Oh this is leo three. And he's a partier or whatever and it's a different persona in order to have kind of some privacy in a world where there's zero privacy. They create their own. And i think that i do remember. Maybe was blockchain but they were using a way to verify that that actually is one of my personas. I think that was in the novel as well. So you you're not far off mike. Yeah and there's a bunch of cgi not video see jibe at cgi influencers on instagram. And you know some of their followers don't know that they're not an actual person well. There's the talk tom cruise right while you're right. There's that one. That's really creepy. They use a import. Tom cruise impersonator to get the Here let me begin to get the face and everything to of be roughly accurate and then they put on top of it deep fake of actual of tom cruise face so the body and the gestures and the movements are this impersonator. And the voice. Who's very good. It's pretty convincing cut through the grind gages. Another tip for you talkers or the tip. Top a.

neil stevenson benson Tom cruise mike
"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"He people walking posit that is another thing entirely and be able to see who your neighbors are is well as what interesting My neighbors I have pretty good neighbors in my name. Jim Skull. Neil Stevenson Tad, I, Thomson and. Agent off scheme some little known hack could tolkien. So yeah I imagine you'll be quite big someday. Neighbors depending on all but yes, that's quite fun somebody with a last name somebody who last name of W I tend to be on the very bottom shelf, which is always annoying but I'm down Williamson's so that can't hurt. On her. Yeah but. It is quite fun to being able to go there and it's actually a real thing. Now, because the way the interesting works you don't actually know if anything's GonNa go pear-shaped at any time being embassy in it's in the while it's a real thing. It's people's harms who come by and read. It feels real feels done like this is a book. That's potus is fiction Canon and were already. and. So me able to know that you've contributed to that that Canon, you've actually contributed to nature. Is is quite is quite amazing. Well, that kind of. Nicely, into my other reverse question, the big philosophical questions. which is really Why why? Why why do you do this and also what you know? This podcast is called world-shapers and I often say that you know it's a lot of asking any fiction actually shape the world I think very little fiction has had a huge impact on the world as old, but you're shaping readers in some fashion with your fiction so Why do you right and what do you hope you're writing? What impact your writing we'll have on readers. I, write the lab stop screaming. On I'm I right because I enjoy I, do actually enjoy the process all getting those words down. I enjoy being able to create something that didn't exist and being able to transplant that. Id of think something that free prior to me sitting down putting words to it didn't exist. It wasn't a thing being able to have it be concrete and being able to try and being able to put that people's heads. Is quite niche is something I quiet.

Williamson Canon Neil Stevenson Tad Jim Skull Thomson
Is social media tearing us apart?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Is social media tearing us apart?

"Science fiction author, Neil Stevenson is not a fan of social media in his two thousand fifteen book seven Eve's almost all humans die after the moon disintegrates and earth is destroyed. And even the last humans left in the universe managed to tear themselves apart with blogging. I interviewed Neil Stevenson back, then, and he told me he thought social media would get better. But now he's out with a new book called fall and it's got two major themes one is the end of death because tack, let us upload our digital consciousness and what happens then. And also, what happens to America? When truth really finally collapses because of the internet Stevenson told me, he was too hopeful about the power of the truth. I think I was horribly proven wrong. Yeah. I mean a thing that I that I missed is there have always been people who had differences of opinion about politics and other controversies. But in my mind, it was always based on differing interpretations of what the facts were know what actual reality consisted of. And it didn't cross my mind until pretty recently that people could just have a complete breakdown in their beliefs about what reality is and not care, not be seemingly troubled, and that companies would spring up to profit from that. Yeah, it gets real bad in your book, misinformation really wins and this whole swath of the country. Yeah, just rolls with it, seemingly, because they want to do you see as a warning or closer to a prediction. I'll tell you that when I when I originally wrote that chunk of the book it was in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and I was really patting myself. On the back for being Mr. futurist predict the future guy, and then I found out that I was years and years behind. So I had to pullback for awhile and rewrite that part of the book. But more in the vein of a kind of metaphor or a way of thinking about where we are now. So it's not so much warning or a prophecy as just a enhanced or intensified present. There's also a pretty strong theme of inequality. The idea that good information is the province of the rich and inequality than even drives the building of the kind of virtual world, the after death world. Yeah. The way that the big social media companies developed as that they came up with algorithms, that would automatically serve up content without humans being in the loop and the way things are. Now, I think, is that you can pay money to buy an online subscription. Into a newspaper magazine, and you can sort of get curated information. But if you rely on free platforms, which are basically marketing, you and, you know, the of statistics that they've gathered on you, as their business model. Then you have no idea what you're getting do you ever have an idea that you don't want to be born, you know what I mean? Like you've obviously explored some pretty dark scenarios, but I wonder if you ever have a moment where you go, I don't wanna put this out. I don't want to create even the, the shadow of this potential reality. I actually have one of those of the I've been thinking about for a couple of years now that it's exactly what you're describing something that would be kind of interesting story to right. But I don't know if I really wanna go there, actually, I've got two of them who knows. Maybe if I thinking about you just have to sit with them. Yeah. So, yeah, those are out there. It's funny though. I mean, there are people who've written material that seems just incredibly dark, you know, Stephen King being an obvious example, and yet the overall impact of Rogers like that on the culture and on the world isn't dark. It isn't negative, particularly. So it's a little paradoxical Neil. Stevenson is the author of the new book fall tomorrow on the show. We'll have the second part of our interview with him about the end of death. And now for some related links. I gotta be real with you guys. This book is so upsetting because now every story I read about misinformation on social media leads me straight down the scary Sifi rabbit hole from Stevenson's book where a huge portion of America has become a whole other America, where people almost deliberately believe false information like one relatively spoiler free nugget. They believed that a city in Utah has been destroyed by nuclear weapons, attack when the city is still literally right there with people living in it. And some of the people who are insisting it's been destroyed have stationed themselves, right? Outside of it. And if you find it hard to believe that a scenario like that might be possible. I mean, people are actually getting killed because of lies on social media in Myanmar and India, this a little depressing. So let's go even deeper into the dark place, shall we? There's a link on our website to a scene at story about deep fakes those videos that are doctored. So. Oh, well, so convincingly, that humans and sometimes even computers, can't really tell the difference and how those videos will only get more common and more convincing. And basically, no social media platform is ready to actually deal with them. A German newspaper. DWI com has a story about how educators injure many are having to come up with curriculum to teach kids how to spot disinformation because kids are showing up at school with wild ideas about American politics that they saw on Instagram propaganda is global and speaking of which Brookings Institution report from last week, notes that, while governments in Europe and the US finally recognized that online interference in elections is a real thing Europe. Is way ahead of America. In terms of actually crafting plans for dealing with this information, and creating policies based on those plans whereas the US not so much. I would very much love it. If Neil Stevenson were wrong again about. Social media, but so far. Yikes. Happy monday. Molly would. And that's marketplace tech.

Neil Stevenson America United States Stephen King Europe Instagram Molly Brookings Institution Utah Myanmar Rogers India
"neil stevenson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The tech. All right. All right. It's damn terrific. We have some air force people in here. Tell me that crypt on a real gas. It's not made up. It's not superman. That's kryptonite krypton is a real gas, although that's on Musk's. New little satellites are the first time they've ever used crypt on to power satellites salads. It's really important, though, that these satellites and they have this worries me. I hope it's not tesla self-driving they are self. They're a ton of us their self driving satellites, and because as you might imagine twelve thousand of up there, plus lots of other space debris, some of, you know, there's a think there's, I remember there's a wrench in orbit that an astronaut dropped during a VA. This is floating around problem is just flying around. It's going foulland's of miles an hour just floating around, and if it should be going, you know, thousand miles an hour in the opposite direction from you going thousands of miles, an hour, that's gonna poke a pretty big hole in whatever his you're in. So it's really important that we have this stuff up there, avoid collision. So that's why it's got these crypt on thrusters satellites these thrusters to keep in position of course, the positions carefully calculate, so they will not affect run into anybody. But they've got to keep that position station keeping they gotta keep right where they are because if there's a collision the risk is something they call. Bum. The Kessler effect. So my friend, Daniel Suarez just wrote a great novel delta v was the guy who taught me about the Kessler effect. Actually, another good book that I recently read by Neil Stevenson called seven Eve's. It also talks about the Kessler syndrome. You might also call it collegiate cascading. It was I envisioned by a NASA. Scientist named Kessler, obviously in ninety seventy eight. Where scenario where the density of objects in lower orbit? Where Alon satellites are so high the collisions in between the objects could cause a cascading kinda pinball effect in which each collision generate space debris, which then collides again and again, and again and what could happen. Already. There are estimated six hundred thousand pieces of space junk floating around, what could happen is a cascading effect where you get so much debris that we're infect shrouded by debris. You, you the sun would be blocked out that would be kind of cast Rafic for us. But would also eliminate the ability leave earth orbit because you couldn't get out of it. We'd be in jail. So I don't know if the FCC is responsible for maintaining, you know, keeping us from getting a Kessler syndrome. I don't think that's probably something they're looking at they did approve twelve satellites. But did they really you know question? No, allan. Your Tesla's aren't supposed to run into each other either and the Caisley. They do you pretty sure this is gonna work, right? Or yeah. That's gonna work. I was gonna put four hundred twenty satellites up, but no, I think twelve thousand better number. In the seventies, you'll Stevenson's book, the Kessler the moon gets hit then splits into so many pieces of debris that the sun is blocked out and the thighs. But it would at least prevent escaping the earth's atmosphere. I hope it doesn't happen. I'm just saying. I say on the other hand, I love the idea of internet access everywhere that, that, that is. I think you could there have been things that have happened in our lifetime that have changed. My lifetime anyway. Television is one television, you know, many, many things contribute to the fall of the Soviet Union, but we really shouldn't ignore. The fact that TV brought a, a vision of the world that was different from the Soviet vision into the lives of average Soviets. It's one of the reasons North Korea blocks television from the outside the internet, ten times effect a thousand times that effect globalizing the world ways unpredictable bringing Twitter to every household, wealth, not everything. Imagine the internet everywhere high speed that's going to be interesting.

Kessler Musk Tesla Neil Stevenson Soviet Union Daniel Suarez North Korea NASA FCC Twitter Rafic Scientist Caisley delta
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Triangulation

"Switch network is different from a packet switched network like the internet, and that there is one line that connects two points. If somebody steps in the researchers in snips, the salon, you lose the communication, or as a packet switched network is more robust and point is the analogy is the transition. We're seeing is rather like the transition from circuit switched, telecommunication networks to pack. It switched ones. That's what we're going to kinda see around twenty thirty that analogy suggests and by the way, and the algae does hold up because back in the world of say, we'll say nineteen fifty through like. Early nineties. There was like a in most of the world there were telecommications would basically don't circuit switching and they were connected. These systems only at the borders. If you wanna make a call to the Ukraine in nineteen seventy he didn't just pick up your phone, and do it just didn't work that way. And you could maybe call somebody in England it worked. Okay. But there is some stuff that had to happen at the borders. So that's a world we live in with states. Right. We kind of have exactly the same. So what we're going to see as a transition from as we saw from circus, which networks Pakis which at works. I'm sure there was some turbulence. Is no risk nuclear war there. So, you know, the risks of dire results were lower. But still we worked it out. And we ended up are in this world where we have packet switched systems of different flavors, which largely communicate through their borders. You know in pretty efficient ways it's not perfect once in a while. I want to read a Twitter, I'm not on Twitter not at signed up. I just want to mess with it. But once while there's something on I'm going to read I can't read it or you know, it's like a different protocol. I can't get access not the end of the world. And that's what the world would be like for us after twenty thirty. If we're lucky things work out. Like, I think they might basically each of us will have a contractual commitment to one or more governing systems, probably or more. I might have a contract with a region that provides national defense of a certain sword and natural disaster preparedness, and then I'm also a member of homeowners association, which regulates very finally my detail detailed way might behavior tells me when I. Can put on my garbage can when it can't. And but it's all contractual and once in a while, I get fed up with one arrangement, and I make it with some other party. And it's just a matter of like going online, and I probably use some kind of token is economy to choose the new option. That's not chaos. It's complicated. Doesn't always work Tanzania might be a little slow. They might be stocked with circuit switched networks for awhile for longtime, just like dinosaurs. Revived in the big clunky form for long while some of them. They're still going to be states around. It's going to be interesting. I recommend you read for a number of reasons. Recommending read Neil Stevenson is one of my favorite authors. And I signed him in this paper a whole section of this chapter is let's see what people who write really entertaining works of fiction say about a possible future of government. And it turns out you get fantastic stories. Neil. Stevenson, snow crash diamond age even crypto Nomo con has some of this stuff going on that man has a vision of the. Future which I borrowed from liberally. Yeah. Love you'll see Evenson as well. Okay. The final thing I wanna hit before we let you go today as you mentioned crypto currencies, and they're growing role in our society. But they to you talked about their train tracks, and you're gonna hit some brush along the way they've they've definitely been hitting the brush and partially in the form of things being put on the blockchain that folks don't expect to be there that can corrupt or Bruin the experience you mentioned to me in an E mail there story that just came out this week. Why didn't you tell us about that? Sure, it's not the first time it's happened. But it's a, you know, it was just the most recent example of people putting on publicly accessible permission lists networks in his case..

Neil Stevenson Twitter homeowners association Evenson Tanzania Ukraine Pakis England
"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on The Changelog

"So help us understand the evolution of spelled over time. You have version three which is imminently re being released paint on win. You're listening to this listener may be out there. It may not, you know, offer developers and timelines we hate them. But it's right around the corner or it's out there one of the two so felt too. It's just around the Kona. Okay. I thought you were going to put a stake in the ground for a second there and say it's out there. But no, SUNA smart. Played smart coming soon as as all good Soffer is so things change over time came out in two thousand sixteen as we said, it's three years later. You have version two version three. So tell us about the way it's changed has been philosophical changes. Just 'implementation help us understand where it's gone, and then where it's going to be today, or I guess in the near future. I guess you wanna talk about the origin of of spelt, go about to twenty twelve which is when I started working on spills predescessors, the library, cold ranted as insurer interactive also from the Neil Stevenson rancid was AVI framework that was based around templates it was based around the idea that if you had some data that existed as a plano jobs J in you had a template. Which resembled moustache, and you could combine the two together than you could generate a really highly performing application by tracking which parts of your data were changing over time. This is something that I think was probably pioneered with knockout back in the day. But I wanted to different developer experience, the knockout could provide and I noticed that a lot of the things that we would building all we were doing really was trying to make the page match some some templates HTML, but the way that we were doing that was by inter HTML in parts of the page, which is kind of gross inefficient. So I build history that would allow me to create a sash templates. It would be kind of self updating in the most efficient way possible. And that's something that I started when I was working at the guardian in the UK back in twenty twelve and it powered a lot of trying to back at that point. And. It was it was reasonably successful. You know as my first big open source project. It ended up getting using a bunch of places. It was used inside. Amazon inside a Wall.

Neil Stevenson Kona Amazon UK developer three years
"neil stevenson" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"neil stevenson" Discussed on Rocket

"I feel like the full rocket circle there. Right. The show Christina. I was at your tweeting this week if you're like, my favorite tech product that. I was like I was like, oh, you're going to be talking about movie pass, and it was get up and I'm so disappointed in that. I felt cheated. That's because get have actually lost a pricing decision in like a feature decision. That was good. Whereas, you know, like movie pass continues to be a disaster. Apparently, they got rid of latest news as they got rid of their HR team. And then there had a product quit because they had like this really gross dude as like an adviser who is like harassing people. And they're like, oh, no, he's fired. And then it turns out that he was like on this yacht. This is accompanied by the way that has like near bankruptcy, and they're having like business meetings on yachts, they're like asking people to like oh payrolls late, but but business was done on the yacht. And so like the head of product apparently like run some road, some skating them. Oh that. Businesses cider obtained. So that's just your we we've has drama update. Yeah. I can't wait for the movie. I know is going to be good. I mean, honestly, if the password smart like that would be the next movie that they would like pretty themselves because I'd actually make them some money. Yeah. No. I agree. All right. So what does everybody up to the speak? Jeff. What are you doing? Oh, actually, I'm going to be coming up to Seattle next week for pod. Con. A podcasting conference. So if anyone is there look me up, and I'm happy to talk podcast as a listener. And maybe something different to be announced. Brianna? What about you, Christina? I'm working my butt off on this campaign. I so we are adding staffed our campaign right now. And it means going through resumes, and you know, like one of the things you learn of politics is there is a there's like an insider industry within the insider industry, and I spent all day today in boardrooms downtown talking to the people that got like Patrick devolves with Warren elected. So it's been a really stressful couple of days and I'm looking forward to gain more than four hours of sleep tonight. Other than that, we are adding staff and going down to DC hopefully next week. Awesome. Awesome. Well, I am going to be participating in hack Washington this weekend. Which is a hacker Thon that takes place at the space deal. So. That's kind of cool. Right. Like I've been to a lot of hacker cons before. But I've never been to one at a location as cool as the space needle. So in the very unlikely event that did anybody from this is going to be at that hacker, Thon or whatever, and you see me be sure to say Hello. But otherwise just doing some some work soft doing some. Finalisation on some some talks that I have coming up, and that sort of thing. So that's that's what I'm up to. So if you go to the science fiction hall of fame, which is right nixes space. Needle a ninety percent share my husband's stolen there. So oh, well, that's actually really good because I will. Yeah. Because I'm going to be honest like Hackman's like an all day thing. Right. And was two days, and I'm probably going to need the brakes. So I will do my best to do that. And then it's funny. You could see like meal. Stevenson, like, Neil Stephenson. Right. Like crash. Yeah. He right into diamond into my favorite books. I loved I may just famous book favorite book too. But after that, he became so famous at no one can edit his books anymore. So yes, the first book in the baroque cycle. You could see like the original manuscript to it. It's literally like a foot and a half high of pages that he wrote. On typewriter. It's like God. Bless you. Neil stevenson. That's that's I I love. All right. So I'll have to check that out. All right, Jeff, where can people.

Neil stevenson Christina Jeff Thon Neil Stephenson head of product Seattle Brianna Washington Hackman Patrick Warren ninety percent four hours two days
Michael Wolf talks to Pablos Holman about food 3D printing

Smart Kitchen Show

09:29 min | 4 years ago

Michael Wolf talks to Pablos Holman about food 3D printing

Nathan Nathan Myhrvold Pablo Neil Stevenson Mike Wolf Jeff Bezos Ebay Nathan Mirabeau Chris Albrecht Scientist Nathan Casey Dublin Europe Beasley Chris Writing University Of Washington Writer Harley Davidson Royce AI