9 Burst results for "Neil Specter"

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"As part of the different morphology or beryllium. Okay well let me in thanking our panelists here. It was wonderful talk and thank you. Avi The you know the method that Dr Specter actor is using with his research. It kind of reminds me of a talk about a University of Virginia Line Vaccine for dogs. It that kind of if you know making sure all the puzzle peach pieces match you know. That was what last year two years ago. At least we missed last year. So it's two years ago. Yeah Yeah Research is so intricate. It's so complicated. We get a little window into that world with Dr Specter's presentation tation the main takeaway message that I have from listening to him. Is some serious people doing serious research. And they're working on it and they're gonNA figure it out one of these days in the meantime there's a lot of other exciting things going on like the self rem and herbal antibiotics and all these other approaches is that are being used. There is hope there is help out there. There's some new tests that are coming online. Cornell has a new test that should be out in a year which I'm thrilled about and it's going to be able to detect proteins that shed from the Borelli. Ah No matter where it is and no matter what what form it is so if you have brilliant anywhere buried inside your body even might not show up on Antibody test right it or maybe we don't know whether it's actually active. This test will tell you whether or not you have relatives in your body so it is possible now in the near future to be able. We'll say yes. I am completely cleared lime disease. This test seems to be that accurate. So we'll see what happens as the reaches Goes to the testing phases. But there there are serious people and serious university's doing serious research and seriously exciting. Do you have any feedback suggestions. I guess really anything. Send an email to feedback at lime Ninja radio DOT COM. And if you had any cough drops police to please. If you like what we're doing here at lime newsradio hit the subscribe button that way. You won't miss an episode and if you really like what we're doing shared this podcast with a friend but if you really really like what we're doing being scroll to the bottom of your podcast APP and leave us at review. It helps us reach more people just like you we. Our goal is to have two reviews every month we've had to for November. It's almost halfway through December and we don't have a review yet so if you haven't left one please take two minutes right of review for us. We'd really really really appreciate it. And last as you longtime lyman inches. No this podcast will not be complete unless we left upped with the Lime Ninja effect of the day. Did you know Ninja. Jokes are not funny but we are all too afraid.

Dr Specter cough Borelli University of Virginia Cornell
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Not undermine fine how much we don't know so there's still like even though we we can have those movies that we can see a whole organism was sell. We still don't know what's happening. Really inside of the molecular level and there is a big part of the genome the human genome as the the Baruah's genomes that we understand that there are proteins there and we can maybe trace one or two visually where they are what they do. But there are twenty thousand different Mortiz molecular species leaving those cells that we only have a very partial understanding of and how they work. So if you think about human cells the energy is trying to do they realize is that the FDA approved targets today they targeting five hundred proteins out of a twenty thirty thousand possible possible protein that they can target and from those five hundred proteins eighty percent of them the target either kind sees ion channels GP CR's so those are specific types of proteins that are those drugs combined to so within those families. There's hundreds of additional additional proteins that we know that are important but we don't have drunks for them. We don't understand really what they do. So Oh systematically we can now use computational and experimental methods to impute their function to associate with disease and then they enable discovery and going to new routes for drug discovery so this is the essence of the program. O'Brien Yep so and there's this there's a program that you work on that's called links and One of the one of the things is that surprising about this is that it seems that you may not need to know The target of drug in order to develop a new drug. And so can you talk about what this program is. How it's changed? People's viewpoint on the drug genome and some of the promising Outcomes that may come from that so so I think links is another type of Drug screen sort of like what showed with the five thousand small molecules. Try All of them in a screen. You you have baby a robot that can tell like can actually administrate the drug and then collected data to four tissue to sell tissue or cell or the guerrilla growing Borila see how the drug effect so you can test thousands of drugs but the nice sort sort of like the innovative things about thanks. Is that it after. The output is the is gene expression so you can see you what happens to the cells. The genome wide level so the expression of each gene is changing before and after the drug treatment and that creates it's a signature that you can then query against and then you can find novel novel. Drugs are doing it compared to what the FDA the approved drugs are doing so you can see that there are a lot of small molecules and drugs that are experimental right. Now that are doing very similar effects. Six to cells that they're approved drugs doing so those could be potentially Additional better drugs or individualized drugs that are very similar to the existing drugs. But now you open up All a greater repertoire of potential drugs that you can translate ads. They much quicker without really a worrying about the exactly what they do. Because those targets that we are identifying Usually are not the real truth because many of the successful drugs. They hit a lot of targets so they they are Even though we think and that we identify a gene that if you knock out you will get affected. The desired effect the drug itself would bind to multiple in multiple places. And we'll do some things that you don't expect that can lead to side effects so we need to sort all that stuff so we've got some questions from the audience here and I'm Gonna I like this I one which says What can line patient population? What can the line patient population do in terms of pushing the FDA to fast-track drugs that you develop like the Aids community did So far the lime community hasn't been had really an effective voice for doing this so I think this goes you easy question. Yeah yeah I I think that Doing you know what people have been. I think increasingly John that seems to be more effective which is speaking with a unified voice. You know the the AIDS Community really spoke with a unified voice. you know you look at the breast cancer community Speaks generally with a unified voice. You can imagine if somebody cut funding for breast cancer research. There'd be five million women wearing pink marching on DC which would have a profound impact so I think that again in an just one person And there are people out in the audience that I know are are really driving. You know legislative Healthcare reform warm. I think it just needs to be a continual. Talk to your congressman and talk to your senators those people really do have an impact on the FDA am the NIH yeah It's not just a nice thing to do is to talk to your your representatives The funding for those agency comes from Congress. So if there's pressure to be put on those agencies And it comes from your from Congress than from your Senator Remember Dan. I think that's I don't know that we can all go petition the FDA the new commissioner But I think working through in in a in a unified way Working to to influence. Legislators at the national level is is probably going to be an effective way to do those And I so you know I I just think that to me again. I'm just speaking from a personal standpoint. I see in meetings like those and other meetings I've been able. I've talked due to the tide seems to be turning in a favorable way It's not changing fast enough for a lot of people here but it is changing and I hope the change translates into You know being able to get drugs approved faster being able to get more money appropriate from the NIH for funding research Can I saw there was one question about how long your grownups. Yeah Oh yeah. There's a fake. You WanNa take that. There was a specific. This Excel So we've grown those. I must repeat the question so the question is is it. How long did we re grow the the treated Borolia Lia yeah So we've ground now for over two weeks and there's nothing rowing so okay. We feel pretty good. We've also by the way done. PURDY AMAC analysis analysis through it really destroys the whole the whole protein structure Barilla's so I don't expect that there's going to be surviving per sisters out of this an so I like this question. I think there there must be an investor in the audience Is there enough of a market to make a novel on drug financially viable and so. I think this is a good question for you. Because you're on a personal mission and so far I'm not sure you know how far how far ahead you're thinking thinking about you know viable business models other than curing the disease. But you know I went to a meeting a few years ago at Harvard was a genomic medicine. Meeting there was was A group of Mothers whose kids had an inherited metabolic. There will probably incidence of eight hundred five hundred kids a year on the world. Aerobic this disease. There was no company. They're actually a company who had a therapy. That was just sitting on a shelf because I didn't see market. These mothers purchase the drug bought and form their own company manufacturer. Now they're marketing it all right and so I'll be honest with you. Pfizer or Genentech doesn't want to develop it and I think we all need to have another meeting hang with some wealthy people and figure out how we can go and develop. I mean you know th the reality nowadays is route we could do right. And I think research now is increasingly being driven by advocates there are orphan disease as the Myeloma Foundation really worked together three or four new drugs approved. It wasn't a large Pharma. It was a group of people came together and said we need to do this and industry is not knowing it and so. That's why I think that we need to organize in a in a way that can make that can make it happen so I I don't know that companies companies are going to be interested in it. I think what would change if there was a good diagnostic and people recognized people meaning. CEO's of companies the The breadth of this problem. Yeah That there are more people even if you consider the traditional five bands the two-tier testing they're more newly diagnosed cases of lyme disease in the US than breast cancer. So you know to put it in perspective certainly more than HIV. So I think if people bull fully understood the impact the fact that this is not easy to diagnose easy to cure for everyone you know even if you take the conservative estimates estimates You know ten twenty. I mean Hopkins published thirty. Something percent of people had persistent chronic problems. Yeah a lot of people with you know a three hundred forty thousand a year you take twenty percent of those and not. Just accumulates year after year so So one more specific specific questions to some of the worst presented here can can this drug actually penetrate or go through biofilms have you tested so h H. G. is actually in biofilms so we think that it will actually target biofilms as well. Yeah I know that I love garlic is in the audience. Somewhere but There I mean we I would love to test this in models of biofilms But but H J is a part of the biofilm either secreted or.

FDA Congress AIDS Community GP CR US NIH O'Brien Myeloma Foundation Harvard Borolia Lia Hopkins John Barilla Pfizer congressman H. G. Senator
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Know cancer. The researchers basic scientists when they saw this sort of data they were doing handsprings. And so I think that It's a good sign and they're very skeptical so they had no skin in the game of lime disease they were just pure biochemists cameras. Drug developers And so I think again. It's you know if we have the resources to do this we could be in the clinic in a short period of time. I mean within five years to three years yeah It all depends on how much researcher opt to drive and so outside of Resources than one of the primary barriers diagnostics fix it. which is it seem surprising in some ways to get to a new drug? You actually need new diagnostic and so and watching your talk. You know it was one of my reactions. was how cool would it be to be able to actually see the brilliant right. But it's actually becomes a mental Sort of us be like a companion onion diagnose which is The thing would happen cancer right. A companion diagnostic which in most cases and cancer turns out to be a mutation for drug that targets the butane the protein in work therapy for a particular phenotype of cancer So we could develop the you know penny diagnostic. You're right. The challenge is always the FDA requires the population an indication. You can't just say we want to treat everyone with chronic illness with us us You have to have something on the label You can you. You can do that with and you can do it with Lysol Ram because they're approved and you can just your doctor will prescribe it. You could take it. Yeah but for a new drug you need to have an indication. Yeah now it's interesting unfortunately no longer the FDA commissioner but a good friend of ned sharp losses.

FDA researcher commissioner
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Thank you very much. The influence of the Farsi. You could be one. Thank you so neil of very exciting the research that you're Doing can you tell us what comes next. And you know if you continue to have experimental success this you know for the people in the audience the answer. What does it actually take to go from basic bench research to actually drug in the clinic or the timelines where the steps right you know so I've been fortunate to have been involved in the development of to cancer drugs that went from the bench into the clinic and FDA approval the one for breast cancer and one for pediatric came here What a- The impediment that I see here is not necessarily mean? We'll optimize this we're doing what's called Crystal Graphic Structure Analysis BARILLA'S TV judy to try to make more potent compounds And understand you know how we can modify drugs have different properties. Perhaps I think the challenges and I'd be interested if people WANNA start tweeting and texting the thing is the FDA approval process. So as I mentioned that the advantage to doing. FDA approved drugs is you don't have to go through the process. You know if we you take this into animals so the next up for this animal studies talk studies And then we would work towards an investigational new drug application with the FDA. And then I think comes the hard part I think. The easy part is a science. The hard part is how do you get a drug approved for a disease state where the FDA doesn't recognize that there's a problem and so you know we would love to say we want to develop this in. Chronic Bernallio says Were another one for Bartonella But if there's no If if the government agency the FDA doesn't. I believe that there is an indication than we would probably either have to go into the acute setting and then you know it's like cancer right people do either start with metastatic disease work back. You have to go where the low hanging registration for as sort of speak yeah And then work your way forward. In this case we would have to consider What's the quickest way we could get this approved and then have it? It used off label even So you know. I think I'd be curious for a lot of the people out there who may have been involved in this but Again I think the science part the next step is animal studies mice. We're working with the monarch ambers. Because she's got a great primate model so to do primate it And then the what they call the requisite pre I in a talks pharmacokinetics You know the the The one advantage of Verte poor fron component is FDA approved the new part Is the targeting agent which isn't so mm-hmm so I would like to think that we could move quickly. It's it's everything is dependent upon resources money And that's just the way it is because these These studies go from bench to clinic become quite expensive because they have to be done under rigorous whether what they call good manufacturing practices it was good laboratory practices. You can't just go in your garage into an experiment and say we want that to be. FDA approved. I can't even do it in my lab and said I wanted to be up to prove they have to be done in laboratories that have rigorous standards so that when you present the package to the FDA say here's the data that supports in the use of this in berylliosis acute or chronic Bartonella that you're experimental design midst the rigorous rigorous standards and. So those have to be done and to do those in those laboratories across more money than during my Duke Laboratory and so assuming booming things go well but what. What are the timelines for? Actually getting this drug out. I mean we're talking in five years ten years fifteen years from where you are now going into animal models and then ultimately being accessible to individuals who are ill what does that look like so I think the so the first step. I'm answering the two parts. The first one is the the diagnostic if we make a pet ligon That goes in quickly right because that's a diagnostic that has a lower Hurdle to cross. It's going to be one injection. Their studies called Phase Zero Studies. Where you give much lower doses and not even do talks on those? I mean we can get into the semantics but you know if we could again If we could make a pedal again using compound we could be in the clinic in a year within a year. Doing testing the therapeutic so the advantage to that would be number one even. If it's a single injection we would have some safety data just with the targeting compound and we would also proof proof of concept that we could visualize really. I would say we're thrilled because you rarely get a hit like this. The on a I mean I've spent thirty years in cancer research and You know in fifteen years drug development You often painstakingly go through. You know bad experiment after experiment And so working. The people that I've worked with particularly Karol season. You.

FDA cancer Bernallio Duke Laboratory berylliosis
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"It's a death sentence is I'm going to show you. So what did we cook that compound so we actually have a drug that has two parts. It's got the H. G. targeted therapy. The the part that selectively drives sit to beryllium. And I could tell you. The BARILLA's sucks that compound up like a vacuum cleaner so when we culture berea with with this compound we take the drug that get sucked in and we're very interested in how it gets sucked in transport or some other mechanism when we hook it turns out and FDA approved drug called Verte Portland poor friend as a die. A poor for and derivative that when activated by light simple red light six eighty wave laying generates lots of radical oxygen species and. It doesn't just. It's not a one to one. One molecule avert a poor friend generates one Radical molecule of radical oxygen. It is like a catalyst it churns out. I don't know how many but it's just churning turning out radical oxygen species so you got one molecule avert a poor for an end let alone thousands of molecules into Berea hit him. I'm with Red Light. You would expect it's going to kill those bacteria again. The beauty is is that what's targeting. The verdict poor friend the dye which is FDA the approved so it's FDA. Approved for hyper proliferative I issues. So wet macular degeneration Diabetic retinopathy. Of course now we have vegf inhibitors What would happen is the ophthalmologist would inject use assembly? And then shine red light in your eye and within a centrally destroy the overgrowth. Both of those Blood vessels that were bad normal. There are precautions. You don't want to necessarily inject this and go Sunday thing because it gets into all your tissues and you'll end up with third degree burns There are other toxicities too. Which is why we want to target this? It makes sense right to target those to where you want to go. which is beryllium and kill the bugs so Let me just go back. When can I go back? Okay so I just want to set this up to show you what I'm GonNa show you a movie of Berea in the lab There's GonNa be four conditions because it's going to go a fast and I can't stop him so there's going to be DMS which is the control? All of them are treated with red light so they're all treated with the same run. Light pulses of red light one the second pulses of red light six eighty. Same stuff you can get with an La Balsas of red light so DMS is the control. And you'll see lots of squiggly spira kids in their H S ten is the is the targeting drug by itself you'll see lots of viable guerrilla Verte poor fern earn by itself Verte porn at high concentrations in the presence of Red Light. Not necessarily by itself will kill. And you'll see that in the last this one you'll see which hopefully you'll see. The difference is the verdict. Poor friend dragged into the beryllium by the targeted therapy. So they're the best by itself off you see all the little squiggly things they look happy. They're doing okay. There's the H ten. They look happy. That's the H. S. P. H. E. Alarm. And here's the verdict forefront print. It definitely kills especially that concentration. But here's what happens when you drag it in and had them with the light. There's really nothing left. It's a complete waste land and let me just show you the data so the why accesses percent viability. This is back tighter glove. But we've done this. You can't find anything when we try to regrow these bacteria normal conditions so the again we grow the bacteria to stationary. We grow them to tend to the eighth eighth bacteria. So there are lots of bugs We then hit them so those are two compounds. H S to a one h us to the five to a one gets into mammalian cells. So that's not going to be a good candidate. H US to a five is beryllium specific and turns out to be incredibly credibly potent and then Verte poor for and alone all of these treated with red light and you could see the difference. The fifty is essentially the concentration -centration that requires to kill the bugs that's halfway between baseline and maximum killing so it's So it's fine to kill these. They re grow so if you treat them and then you wash them out and you put them back in good nice culture medium and you put them in the dark doc because you don't want them to be exposed to like just in case there's drug around do they grow. The answer is no. They're dead and in fact. Some of our died. That new thought might be viable are still dying. So the probably undergoing some what's called program cell death array pop toasties and you could see that on the bottom. That straight drop is the regrowth ninety nine animals. That's very very potent potent compound. We're talking about loan animal or concentrations that killed these bugs now. This is interesting so if you expose beryllium to the drug and you put them in the dark so you just WanNa see you. Don't WanNa kill them necessarily with the drug because again in the absence of red light it doesn't kill and now you say what if we wash them out so we expose them for twenty four hours forty eight hours in the dark and you can see. They're viable bowl in the dark. We wash the drug outs. We wash them extensively. So did they take it up and then can we kill them later. So we we incubate them in the dark. We wash out the drug multiple washes as best we can and then we expose them to the red light. And now they're actually even more sensitized. They were if you just treated him out right. So they're sucking the drug up. The August retained that defined. By the way we've done animal studies. It does not get into mammalian cells so that drug will go to Berea and do that to really not do that to your liver your kidneys or any other tissue. So what I would envision is it. We'll have a drug like two of five and we need to work out the conditions. We need to understand how much red light you need but where you would get an injection. By the way the red light with doxycycline does nothing so if you want to sit in front of a red light that's good but it's probably not gonNA do much on. Its own now you might ask. Okay Does Red Light get deep in your body. The answer's yes gets deep in your body and in fact. Here's a study from the mass general from spalding. Thank where the guy's got his nice little cap on their during studies for traumatic brain injury and stay so there's little led lights in there getting red light into the brain and they've if done these nice. I don't understand that strip tossed but the executive function improves in their finding pretty dramatic results in treating with red light therapy for PT stay and TBI. aww traumatic brain injury so red light penetrates deep into the body doesn't come out so you can't visualize if it gets into. So here's the platform we. We can attach a lot of different things. We could put chemotherapy. You can put a lot of different things and drag it in and we think we have a good target now for Bartonella as well so in summary. There's great data you're going to hear about. It's exciting repurposing. FDA approved drugs. We're doing it in a different way. We have a number of other targeted targeted therapies. which we think on on their own may actually deal a death knell to really important Ella This red light may be in combination with Stepson and other drugs may be the real hit that eliminates bacteria once and for all. Here's our team folks from you. Could see Steve Phillips behind the primate right Dana parish giving you a nice hug Monica embers working with Yang. Appreciate the work that he did with US team at Duke. Here's all the people again. We would not be able to do this without the Cowan Foundation. And I am right on so.

Red Light Berea FDA Diabetic retinopathy BARILLA H. G. Bartonella US Stepson H. S. P. H. E. Alarm Cowan Foundation spalding La Balsas Steve Phillips Duke executive doxycycline Dana parish Monica
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

15:08 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Patient so Anyway only as a physician I feel like I said so. So this is how this is how we treat cancer. We don't do this blindly anymore We really try to tailor the therapy personalized therapy for the individual. So this was. This was a drug that I spent Doing a lot of the science behind we developed an oral therapy for women with what's called hurts hurts to breast cancer. It's about fifteen to twenty percent of breast cancer when I was training Years ago at the Dana Farber. This was a death sentence of women who had her breast cancer announced. There had about six to nine months with metastatic disease and even with early stage. The risk of recurrence was extraordinarily high. This is an oral therapy. This woman has what's called inflammatory breast cancer. You can see that. She's had a mastectomy. It's come back that's like having a third degree. Burn that that went all the way down her back eroding into her lung cavity and into her lungs she was on a morphine drip not only a short quality of life for inflammatory breast cancer sir. But it's a lousy quality of life. We put her on this pill once a day pill and literally within three weeks. She was out playing Golf I. I didn't actually believe the physician when he told me. This is a miracle therapy but it's a miracle because we figured out how to shut the lights out on the tumor Sela aw again. This happened by understanding the biology and taking advantage of the Achilles heel of these particular cancers and so the question is why. Can't we do this for beryllium for Bartonella for BBC. The answer is we can. And here's a potential roadmaps it. Here's a paper that was published in Nineteen Ninety seven so twenty two years ago. I haven't been to too many conferences in the lime disease. World where people I actually talked about the genomic roadmap for developing therapies so this was the genome that was published in this is essentially the pathways. He's in Berea where one can look and try to figure out. How can we kill these bugs without taking an atomic bomb and blowing up the body audie and do this in a smart way just as I showed you without rather than giving her chemotherapy giving her a pill that reveal the old the Achilles heel of that cancer and destroyed it? So this is what we've done so we've taken slightly different approach. We're not screening the FDA approved Library Library. We're developing new therapies based on scientific information. Now we've done this in a way and brought in collaborators. It turns out that there's a group at Argonne national lab outside Chicago who have the largest genomic database of Pro Kerry outs bacteria in the world and then their top ten list. This is Barack Obama and Bartonella which I thought was rather interesting because this lab is a department of Energy Lab and I thought it was interesting that the government has beryllium Bartonella Ella as part of their top ten in trying to collect information so for a disease that a lot of the government doesn't want to recognize as being important. It's important Gordon enough. That it's on their top ten list of getting all genomic information of the world to accumulate so we worked with this group and what we do. We have the technology and collaboration with a very good friend and colleague who I've worked with for thirteen years since I've been in two on the cancer side Tim. Hey Stud and I'll show you the picture of our eighteen later we have a way of capturing a part of the genome a part of the what we call the purdy on the proteins that are made in Borelli and Bartonella that happened to utilize ATP and other appearance And it turns out if we use this technology. That's about eighty to ninety percent of the drug targets and again this is an approach that has been successfully used in other diseases and cancer in metabolic disease so so we're not reinventing the wheel retaking successful lessons that have been learned elsewhere and now just simply sang. Can we do the smarter by treating folks with tick borne illnesses and so essentially we do. Is We take the bacteria And again when we identify target. We've we've gone to this huge genomic database because we don't want to just be treating one particular species or strain of BEREA WE WANNA be treating reading across the species and strains that are pathogenic same with Bartonella. I'm but we don't want to also be wiping out the normal microbiome and we certainly certainly don't want to be affecting host cell so we don't want to be affecting your heart your kidney your normal tissues and so this is a Gel. This is taking taking all the proteins and beryllium running out And then essentially saying what are the targets that are amenable. What are the protein targets with this technology? -nology this pure and binding technology. We have this huge list of proteins. We painstakingly do mass SPEC on every one of these to identify them and then we look and we try to glean information from the literature and from experts and say what are the ones that if we can successfully target are likely to kill these bugs. I'm just going to skip through. This is some of the technical aspects. We take each one of these targets. This is sort of laborious research although we have a tremendous team and we've got it down pretty quickly now almost like a biotech company. Even though we're in an academic institution we make recombinant proteins. We put the color. GFD Green fluorescent thirteen and we have with high throughput outside. We've got five thousand novel compounds. That could be drugs and we screen them to see which those five thousand compounds can target the particular protein target that we're interested in by the way the five thousand doesn't sound like like a lot but we can expand that based on the structure of those chemicals into hundreds of thousands of compounds very quickly and and so this is what we have so far so we have targets on the left DNA K.. Beryllium Beryllium. We've had a lot more in beryllium important. We're now working with at British Werthmann if you know him from the NC State School of Veterinary Medicine. Probably the leading expert on Bartonella And now we've got several new BARTONELLA targets And as of of our last live meeting on to say I think we have an exciting Bartonella target that. We're going to be able to do what I'm going to show you in a minute. We're doing with beryllium. So this is work that we've done again With Tim set of colleague. That'll introduce what I want to show you which we hope will end up being a beryllium scan so that you could go to your doctor and rather than saying how many bands on a Western blot or do you have positively. You can actually visualize the bacteria in your body so if you went into your doctor imagine you said I got pain in my left shoulder. I got chest pain and I think I was bitten by a tick rather than having all these questions. You could actually visualize it just like we do with cancer and see the bugs. This is really based again on lessons. That have been successfully translated from the bench into the clinic. So this is work. We had a large Defense Department grand for breast cancer where we developed a probe using human Heat shock protein ninety. It's very abundant protein. There happens to be a beryllium equivalent called ht PG high temperature protein G. It's a very important protein. In mammalian cells age. Just be ninety because it prevents damage protein from accumulating which if allowed to accumulate would kill the cells. Also it's it's a highly conserved evolutionary family of proteins that protects against environmental stresses or internal stresses cell. The damage protein. That would otherwise. Kill the cell so what we did. In this case as we took H. S. P. Ninety an inhibitor. We labeled it with a probe that could be visualized and in a sense you unfortunately lighting. You can't really see it but we could visualize tumor in these. He's mice growing human breast cancers over normal tissue. And so the idea of this is if a woman has mammography has an abnormality and only ten percent one of those turn out to really be cancer that rather than doing unnecessary biopsies unnecessary angst. That you could do scan that would discriminate between malignant normal tissue issue and also ideally identify areas. What we call minimal disease states that are hiding in the body? This is actually in the clinic now and so what we did. Is We targeted the beryllium form of. HSBC ninety again is called H. G. and to make a longer story short we looked for compounds in the library and also compounds that we already developed against the human form of HSP Ninety for Breast Cancer Hanser project looking for compounds that would identify beryllium But not the human form because again. If we're GONNA make a scan and a therapeutic we don't don't want this targeting human tissue and also selecting for compounds that don't that can discriminate between Berea and and the normal microbiome Casey Choline and so we found this compound. It's called one ninety six and a few others this normally twirls around. But I don't think I have the controls for it so these are just spiral so in the left. I call it the Hawaiian Islands. The one nine thousand eight so the probe for the beryllium proteins and again this targets a protein in Borelli very abundant in beryllium. Bergdorf Roy Moore it is across the species and strains so we're not targeting just five percent of people with lung. Disease were selecting targets in this case for imaging. But I'll show you how we're using it for therapeutic that will affect fact all of the species and strains so we went from beryllium growing culture to working with Monica embers the two lane And doing a mouse study where we infected the mice with beryllium. We waited three weeks and then we injected the probe and we wanted wanted to see whether it would identify gorilla in tissues and again the bluish is the ninety eight so he could see. Infected Animals There's cartilage from the ear which is where beryllium loves to hang out. There's also the joint to joint. You could see that using the one nine eight probe the bluish probe We could identify really a- These are just obviously localized Images and then we counter stain when we take take the tissue out with a beryllium antibody to make sure that what that probe is identifying as beryllium and in fact it does and now. We're doing in Vivo. Animal Demel studies where we're going to visualize in Vivo. Knows are ongoing as we speak to see if we could actually scan now this. This fluorescent probe is is not prime time for for the clinic because it does not get good depth in the body so we could scan and probably visualize cartilage infected cartilage or the joint but to get the heart and brain. This is not gonna be sufficient so what we will do is to make pet league from this to take this and making pet scan. Most people heard of a pet scan. Not your dog or cat. But essentially a pet scan for the most part is a scam that f. d. g. pad it's taken up by hyper metabolic tissues and can identify in my case where my profession has cancer but also also infection. It doesn't tell you though if if it lights up and you think you have an infection. What the underlying infectious agent is? It just tells you that there's an infection action this on the other hand as a pet scan would tell you that's beryllium infection. So now so that's great right so we wanted to develop a beryllium Stan. We also have some targets that we want to look out for Bartonella because unfortunately this particular target for whatever reason is is not in the genome of Bartonella and so we have to look at other particularly pro teams so in the cancer world so now people may have screened one with these drugs these HSP ninety inhibitors through the FDA approved library because there are several that have gone into the clinic and cancer and maybe found that by themselves mm selves. They don't do much to really because they don't their stress proteins. You have to do something to the cell to make them relevant you. Don't just give them to happily. Holy growing beryllium doesn't kill them. That's not the way it works doesn't do that to human selves either. So what we did is and again. This is based on the lessons. Sounds from cancer where people have taken targeted therapies. Rather just relying on the targeted therapies have hooked up poison or a toxin. So this is kind The magic bullet where you drive the toxin directly to the cancer and avoid normal tissues. This happens to be a drug called. T. DM one which is an anti her two antibody but the drug called by chancing which is a my totic poison This is in the clinic. It's transformed the treatment. Seven of The Area I've been working on her to breast cancer. So what happens is the antibody recognizes the tumor cells because the her two is more prevalent Expressed on tumor cells. It has little stars on there which the Montana it gets internalized in the tumor. It releases the my Tam San and kills the tumor cells but really does oh spare the normal tissue so this is FDA approved and we said why can't we take the same compound that is directing that imaging agent that I just showed you and hook something onto it that'll bring it into guerrilla that'll kill Berea and spare normal tissue. So what does Borelli. Okay what are the things that really hates one of the things that most cells hate radical oxygen species. You know it's interesting. We've gotten very accustomed to growing beryllium now. Beryllium hates oxygen. Even though it's not a complete anaerobic but it likes living in low oxygen tension. So if you you stress these bacteria I don't care whether they're in a exponential speyrer Keitel studied around bodies state with lots of oxygen radicals. It's it's a death sentence is I'm going to show you. So what did we cook that compound so we actually have a drug.

cancer Bartonella breast cancer inflammatory breast cancer Berea Borelli FDA Nineteen Ninety Disease Breast Cancer Hanser Golf HSP Ninety Dana Farber Barack Obama Hawaiian Islands morphine BBC
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Thank you it's A. It's a great pleasure to be here. I appreciate the invitation from Mount Mount Sinai certainly from data to the Coen Foundation This is my Ten year anniversary. A little past of my transplant On seventeen year journey from misdiagnosis of lyme disease and pretty severe case obviously lied card. IRAS and You know here I am thankfully well and not running marathons anymore. I tell the story that my wife told me. I've had my one body part replacement for my lifetime so I cut it down to half marathons so But I'm very grateful for my by diner. forgiving me this chance at second life so again. And when I'm GONNA show you and I'm gonNA focus on Our work Since I have a captive audience I figure I can show you some really exciting day which I hope. I hope you'll find exciting. We're certainly thrilled about the direction. We're heading the title of the talk is the Just very briefly. There's really several approaches and don't be talking more about rational drug design therapeutic strategies for tick borne diseases and actually really for any disease. And so one. And you'll hear about this later so I'm not gonNA talk about this. There's tremendous expertise. That'll discussed discussed I. Sulfur am I know. There's a lot of interest DABS on There's groups at Stanford at Hopkins at Northeastern Dr Hurwitz. They'll be talking. LACKNER will be. Ken Lack no talking So I'm I'm going to let the experts talk about this. But but there's a lot of work going into screening drugs are already approved. The FDA approved library advantage to that is if something's found the drugs already approved so I solve rammed zone you don't have to go through. FDA approval to take a drug. That's already so. That's a huge advantage. The downside is you've got a drug that has you could have warts quartz could have could have other issues And is often very difficult to optimize if you WANNA make better drug. It's difficult because you don't necessarily no the exact targets so people talk may talk about die. Sulfur I'm as being an inhibitor of a certain enzyme in the body but in point of fact there's a lot of activity activity that for him has the probably contributes to its clinical efficacy. Not just in lyme disease but in cancer and other diseases as well I'm going to be really focusing on molecular targeted therapies. And there's great examples in the field that I spent thirty years in oncology where we've really transform arm the treatment and I'm not gonNA say mission accomplished at by any means but we've certainly gotten away from relying on chemotherapy to the point where we have targeted targeted therapies Australia. One slide of the first Individual of drug that I developed for breast cancer. Pretty remarkable pill that you take And odd woman. You'll see the response that she had New Therapies everyone's seen the TV commercials. You know. I have lung cancer. I never thought I'd say my grandson graduate. Wait and here I am today. I go to clinic so I was in clinic on Thursday. I see people now with diseases. metastatic bladder cancer lung cancer. That in my lifetime. When I was training as a fellow in Boston twenty something years ago I never thought I'd be able to tell some with metastatic cancer that they'd have an opportunity to be cured and here? We are with the people who are walking around without getting chemotherapy. Who essentially I think are going to be cured of their metastatic disease And then the Infectious Disease World we have examples examples of that as well. HIV SO HIV is sharing. The second was really not controlled by taking drugs that are FDA approved it was controlled By understanding the regulation of the virus that causes HIV and developing what's now called heart therapy And many people now believe that. HIV is is completely controlled because people who take their medication religiously can have no viral load and therefore essentially may be a jury of their disease and hepatitis. C. is another example of rational drug design using scientific information to specifically target the hepatitis appetite. AC- virus there's no therapies. I think Bill Robinson will be talking about some exciting work from Stanford so I'm not going to dwell on that and then medicinal herbs and there's going to be talks today but what I want to talk about it. So here's the data again. I'm old enough to remember being an intern and resident medicine in the days Actually even the days before we knew it was HIV research to see drug addicts. Come in I was in Dallas so people have seen the Dallas buyers club. I I used to see people who come in from OAKLAWN Sick with lymph nodes fevers all sorts of weird infections that no one had seen for decades and and initially we had one drug. Azt and people would get better for a little while. And then they die of their opportunistic infections and we had to drugs and people would got better for six months longer and then die of their opportunistic infections and now again because of smart drug design and understanding genomic information that the science revealed. We have triple drug therapy. That essentially now controls the disease so this is the state and you can all of you. Who are here because in one way or another we're all affected by guerrilla BARTONELLA BBC All those bad B.'s This is the state of of cancer treatment and cancer. Evaluation patient comes in with a newly diagnosed cancer. They either have their tumor or blood. Blood samples sent for genomic profiling so look to see which mutations that Sumer expresses that may be amenable to the lists of targeted therapies therapies that are now FDA approved and now this new generation of immuno therapies that unleash the immune system to recognize. Kill Cancer Now you can in contrast this to where we are with lime disease right. We've got bad blood tests that people at least some people believe is the holy grail. You know if you don't have your I bands God forbid on Western blood but you have third degree heart block and Bell's palsy than your called idiopathic. I know I've said this before I don't have a slide but you do know radio. Oh Pathak stands for Stanford Idiot Dr Pathetic.

FDA lyme disease marathons Cancer lung cancer Mount Mount Sinai Infectious Disease World Ken Lack Coen Foundation HIV heart block Dallas Boston BBC Oh Pathak Stanford Dr Hurwitz intern
"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Hello and in this episode. You'RE GONNA learn three main things. How understanding the regulation of infection in the body is how HIV was brought under control? And how it will be how lyme disease is brought under control. The ways lime disease interventions would benefit from the same precision drug engineering as they do in cancer research and the drug research. Neil Specter's involved often that starts with identifying the drugs that have the best chance of physically interacting with lime bacteria. Thanks Roy and a big shoutout to all you longtime lime Ninjas. You're the reason we have way more than half a million downloads Aurora. And I really appreciate you tuning in and we'd like to welcome all the new listeners out but they're welcome to lime Ninja radio. You are now officially a lime Ninja and as you know. Lime disease is an international problem. Each week we have listeners. Join you from all over the world this past week. We've had listeners. Join from Calgary to Coquitlam Canada so like listeners. There's from Canada. Canada represent this this week. Okay welcome Canada. We're glad to have you tuning in all right. We're tells a little bit more about Dr. Neil Specter Dr Specter's undiagnosed lyme disease damaged his heart so badly that he had to get a heart transplant. Intravenous antibiotics. Antibiotics finally brought the lime disease under control and Dr Specter now brings his expertise in treating cancer to developing lime treatments. Thanks Roy and here's Dr Specter's presentation at the two thousand Nineteen Li- mine conference.

Neil Specter Dr. Neil Specter Coquitlam Canada Roy lyme Calgary
"neil spector" Discussed on Living with Lyme

Living with Lyme

15:47 min | 1 year ago

"neil spector" Discussed on Living with Lyme

"We are really excited. Excreta talk a lot about neurology and brain health Dr. Ken Lit when he is fascinated by the brain. He practiced general medicine and then a colleague introduced him to functional medicine and it was was all uphill from their appeal. Sounds bad does you'll sounds worse. But anyways he became very infatuated with the area and and Now treats people down in indy. Hook Connecticut alongside care is Gerald It's Gerald so welcome Dr Ken. How're you doing today on grade? Sandy how are you. I'm great. I'm great I'm great now that I have you here because this whole area as we talked before or we started a Lotta people have some neurologic issues and just kind of pass them off or not in tune that there could be a problem So you know it's a big. It's a big area but I want to jump in and and talk about a lot of cognition in decline in America and I wonder what you think about that well As as you now Alan probably everyone else somebody. They and their family or friend or somebody. They know has had been affected by Alzheimer's Or other forms of dementia. and IT'S A it's a growing problem that will unfortunately probably I believe and corrupt a lot of the world's economies because The once you get to the point. Where are you're having other people provide care for you? The the cost goes up not only for the person being cared for but for the caregivers which is really horrible In other words you might. You might see a lot of younger people just starting out out in life. They got married they just had kids and now they're faced with taking care of apparent who has dementia. Aw that's really hard. It's a really tough here. They were on the today show. They were doing a poll on What was the the happiest time in your life and they talked about the worst time in people's lives and it's that forty fifty age where they're their sandwich there other still trying to get those kids out the door and then all of a sudden appearance coming in the door and that's that's a very very very difficult area? You know. There's a lot of different levels so and we talk about the fact that a lot of people don't realize what what kind of levels are there and when when should family members say. Hey Mom Hey dad. I'm noticing something. Maybe it's their spouse you'd never know but when is it time to say. Hey we've got a look at you know some testing well I would say I mean. Usually the person affected would be noticing at first and then it would spread outward in a circle. Probably last people to know would be people at work because people affected by Cognition problems well. We'll do anything they can to hide that from affecting their job and they'll they'll do all kinds of things make lots of reminders Dell. I Dunno they'll just but It's hard to hide that from yourself yourself. I mean you can kind of reason what yourself the Forgetting the name of an actor when you're watching a movie or something like that is is it happens everybody God thank God. I think I think a a lot of that is just because we are. We are multitasking. Way Too much and the brain is really is not designed for multitasking. At all it needs to do one task and move onto the next task. And that's less and less you know available possible these days so so you're probably just you know thinking about something else your brains in you can't access never been good with names. I've just that's one of my downfalls downfalls but you know what I'm thinking I'm thinking how many posted notes deep is a problem. You know when like my husband rights now now when I have to have him get something in the home and he sticks it to the steering wheel. I mean that's fine. I mean that's that's what he has to do But you know sometimes we just like at a post it note to look at it. It's like it's like a scavenger hunt. Okay now what was the actual thing we had to do. You know go here. Oh look at the one on the door you you know. I mean it it but I suppose if you are multitasking. And we've got a lot of Burners on when it does burn us out a little bit when I when you go back to the person at work that are the people at work that may not notice Dr Dan Cameron took care of me and I was like. I don't know if I can keep working anymore. And he said keep working he he said as long as you really can keep working because lime easy said are really good and they're very task oriented and so you know when I was doing my job I was a GYN nurse practitioner. Luckily I wasn't new ad it so it was kind of the cookbook and so I would figure out how to get through things. But I've heard of people with live that you know. Look at a a keypad to get in you know security system and absolutely blank on what the code is and is that is that part of the the I guess I would have to say the inflammation in the brain or is it another another a process us going on you know. I think there's like there's a lot of crossover between this this concept of brain fog argon that sort of thing that you're describing an actual Problems permanent damage or at least temporary damaged areas of the brain that can recover and You know a lot of times people have brain fog which is which is really. It's kind of a happy way to describe something. That's quoits quoits quite important and can be very severe. So I don't know what else I would call brain fog but it's it's it's a cognitive impairment of sorts. Right here you know. Sometimes people will will describe it as you're trying to think through mud right or you're walking around in constant Benadryl fog. It's just the trauma doctor. Dr Neil Spector was on the show and that's the way he described it and from that point on it made sense to me. It's sometimes you just rather not think then we'll just that's that's a lot of effort you never exactly. It is an effort and that that becomes. We're it impacts your friendships and your family family and your especially marriages because it's just too hard. It's too hard store to plan social events sir. Tough you know hosting forget it you know I'd rather yeah let me. Yeah let's go somewhere else or let's not but In what can I saw a statement that was really impressive to me and it it said treatment is not good without prevention prevention. So it's kind of like an kind of like an oxymoron there but but in general if we're treating things wouldn't it be a better to take a step back and say to people. Listen I WANNA protect your brain. These are things that you can implement in in your life now especially if got a family member that just freaks people out knowing their like their genes there. Apo Genes and things like that so what type of prevention you know. The first thing I'm thinking of outside of just diet is your micronutrients. How important important is that to assess and to deal with sure? Well when I'm assessing somebody the WHO may have Early Dementia or they've actually been diagnosed with Alzheimer's I'm looking at a quite a long list of tests that saw many of which are are nutritional tests so there's vitamin in day and thereby A. C. Made a carotene the Omega Three Index And and you're really trying to get all those not just into the quote normal range which is what's less sit on your laboratory report but into the upper normal range and when you have all these labs some which are for nutritional things optimized then the hall. The whole system is going when you just be working better and you're going to be less likely to get into trouble as cognitive decline. What about hormonal levels? We look you know we think about that what I mean. Generally you've been trained with IFM and I have as well. You know the first thing they teach you go to the gut go to the gut and you know I mean is that part of it and then do you move onto hormonal issues. Like men with their testosterone women with all all of their their essential hormones in your thyroid. Talk to me about that so I mean Taking into account account gut health nutritional health lifestyle important things like sleep exercise stress management And then hormones hormones toxins All those are important but if you just let them all off and you don't have a strategy. It's kind of hard to get them all where they should be. And you need a systematic approach to join us. Yes and I've done this. I've actually done this on myself. I I make myself a spreadsheet and I keep track of all these different things that are supposed to be just right and this is what I do for my for my patients so I figured I might as well for my side. Job is good enough for you. It's got to be good enough for them. So so the the whole The whole idea of applying functional medicine to to prevent in cognitive the decline or treating dementia You know it's been around for a long time. I mean naturopathic. Doctors have been doing this stuff forever. Ever but Doctor Dr Dale Gradison. out at the Buck Institute in. UCLA came up up with after many years of research a A program which basically takes into account all these lifestyle functional medicine type things that we'd be looking at and makes a strategy where certain certain written factors just have to be optimized. And when you optimize all these factors you get last formation of amyloid plaque which we can talk about and more removal of amyloid plaques and generally see. That's right where you want to. Yeah because your brain is it like your liver your liver can regenerate your brain. I think cannot is that am correct or am I off. You Know Sandy. I I used to think that about all the organs in my body. All the cells my body that you know couldn't couldn't regenerate But that's just not true. I mean Way We have tools that we you can use to actually make new stem cells which is just amazing to me and that includes is the the cells in the brain that can make new new neurons and new connections between your brain cells and this this explains a lot about why somebody who's for example. had a stroke. Okay can recover. There's this idea that there's neuro plasticity which is basically that you can make new connections between the function the the cells that are still working right and not only that but you can make new neurons which is just amazing. Well how do you teach get your body to do that. You know I mean how when you're doing all the right things. Have you know it's going to the right place you know. How do we directed directed that way? Well that I mean it goes back to the whole concept that if you if you take away all the things that are harmful You know your body knows what to do and I'll try to repair itself. You just need to allow it till so you need to be you know giving it enough sleep exercising and taking away stress Hormone Cortisol. So you know as far as the narrow plasticity thing Basically there I mean there's a A hormone in in your brain called brain derived neurotrophic factor. DNS That's yeah it's So it's it's it's stimulated mainly by exercise and basically you're you're inducing just a temporary stress on the system by I Making the cells work a little harder and then they release us hormone also by bye bye stimulating Increase blood flow and oxygen through exercise. Also there are some other techniques forgetting that produced based but generally speaking..

Gerald It indy Dr. Ken Lit Dr Dan Cameron America Alzheimer Dr Ken Connecticut Dr Neil Spector Alan Early Dementia Dell UCLA Cortisol Doctor Dr Dale Gradison. dementia. IFM