21 Burst results for "Neil Gaiman"

A Birthday Lesson by Adi Redzic on How To Be Courageous & Be Your Authentic Self

Optimal Living Daily

05:18 min | Last month

A Birthday Lesson by Adi Redzic on How To Be Courageous & Be Your Authentic Self

"A birthday lesson by ATI Zik of AUDIE REDZIC DOT COM? Apparently, age only matters if you're cheese. I am pretty cheesy. So every year at my birthday, do cheesy thing and reflect on the lessons from the year before last year I wrote thirty one lessons for thirty one years is my birthday last Monday but instead of writing another list this year, I ask myself what is one theme that I've thought a lot about inexperienced as essential to a life well lived. Courage. Of come to understand that courage is the greatest expression of love. My Angeles said quote courage is the most important of all virtues because without courage, you can't practice any other virtue. Consistently, he practice any virtue erratically but nothing consistently without courage and quote. We delight in the beauty of the butterfly but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty that change took courage. Make, no mistake. Courage is not the absence of fear. Courage is staring fear in the face and still doing what scares us the because is exactly what leads to the fulfillment of our greatest purpose in creation of a truly full life. I've experienced this firsthand. Scared a lot many nights I found myself afraid and overwhelmed eyes filled with tears fear can seem very real. This past year was especially hard and scary but facing my fears even when it was really hard has made all the difference. Shows Campbell called fears are dragons, and it is only when we get close to them that they disappear. Only when we have a drink with the proverbial demon's our greatest fears, parts of ourselves, our psyche we try to disown, do the fear seize to assist. said that we are all as sick as our secrets. It's not fear that keeps US trat. It's hiding fear. Courage therefore liberates us. It is hard to be courageous because much harder living life without courage. In the end we won't regret the things we did, but we regret not showing up in a big way and taking risks. You know why B's courage is the greatest expression of love. I've asked myself if I ever had children where I want their daddy to be a lion or a weasel. All my Kiddos to know that I had a heart of a lion. To quote, Teddy, Roosevelt's I WANNA be the man in the arena not the man on the sidelines being afraid of living of loving of daring greatly and quote. Only when we are brave to, we realize what we're made of and to quote Campbell again, it's a privilege of a lifetime to be who we are and quo. We to choose how he wants to use up our lives. Oh, you choose a lion or a weasel. At the base of every personal or organizational dysfunction, there is fear. So I choose to imagine a world where we all have a bit more courage to face down those fears. That's how we heal that. We leave a better world for those who come after us. Jim Warren Talks about liking quote messy people people who don't fit in a box stay between the lines but whose integrity is greater than any rule book and whose loyalty is stronger than blood and quote. We can't be that person without courage. I WANNA have the courage to be that person. Back urges in you too. We often encourages for some mythical euros dismissing true is reserved for us because of us has the heart of a lion inside. And here's why is really important to be courageous. When we are courageous, we inspire those around us. We help those we love have courage to live authentically fully deeply to. When we are courageous and living truthfully, we let others know that they too can do the same. When we are courageous, we face our deepest fears we heal. We understand life in an entirely different way we risk deep connection. Thrill, and joy where courageous we help those in need we stand up for what is right we leave this world better than we have found it only when we are courageous too. We get to reach our greatest potential only when we are courageous too. We follow our bliss only when we are courageous, our life align are being integrates into we make our children indeed everyone around us know only how deeply we love. Them. To be courageous hard. But if we aren't, how can we say we have lived tore loved well more really live at all. Sometimes the hardest thing in the right thing or the same in being courageous as always the rightist and the hardest thing. How do we get to be courageous? It's simple really if it scares you do it. Take the leap and the net will appear people give up on wonderful things in life because of familiarity is more important than bliss have courage not to do this. Trust that when we are courageous doors will open where there was only a wall before this is proven true many times and all of our lives. And if fears are a dragon's then Neil gaiman puts it quote fairy tales are more than true not because they tell us that dragons exist. But because they tell us that dragons can be beaten and quote. I hope he will slay your own dragons. The world needs you to do that.

Campbell United States Neil Gaiman Ati Zik Angeles Roosevelt Jim Warren B
"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

04:52 min | Last month

"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"Talking to. Somebody who's also Dr who? Looks good as it gets really sure. Obviously. I'm although I took enormous joy in you telling me the conventions. You're now seeing more angels and demons venue on Time Lords. It's absolutely. Yeah. It's at least neck and neck and I think most recently probably may have tipped the balance Crawley's in zero files who often come as a pair, which is always very pleasing to friends who oversee calls played together we'll turn up. Yeah. That's been a wonderful to be part of a oversee will be part of a franchise I don't to to beat to then be part of something like determines which hasn't equals two equally devoted fan base people who love your work. I mean most people enjoy it on many different levels but for a large number people, it means an awful on an emotional level doesn't take the stuff that comes out of your head really connects with people. Does that. Does. Not Become a tension for you as as Neil gaiman almost becomes a brand that people look to. I've spent the best part below. Forty years now getting around that. By trying not to repeat myself okay and also doing things that people are not expecting. Right. Well. You stories as a child before anyone was reading them not the world awaits the next Neil gaiman story. If for some reason, they didn't if something happened Neil, Gaiman never sold another book. Would new game still write them. What a great question I don't know I think I probably would because it's the easiest way of getting them out of my head. I definitely wrote before anybody. was reading anything I wrote before I was selling anything. But definitely these days feel like. The burning. Jr.. Has Probably. Gone. In that I. Always love moving and doing different things. So if you were to tell me tomorrow I couldn't do anymore pros or. Nobody was going to buy another book whatever that would probably be. My Excuse to finally sit down and write a stage play. Right. It is the. The strangest thing about. Getting to do all the things that you wanted to do and getting to be all the things that you wanted to be. That I'm have never really been the kind of author who likes popping out of the same hole twice. I, if I'm going to do something that's. A sequel to will like something I did before. I need a completely different of doing it. Know coming up with. A way of. Thinking about what we can't do that because we did that so it would have to be. Completely reinvented, that was always that thing of going what are you can't just do some of the people like an and do some more. Yeah. Right. Well I think you're argued have keeps doing what people like and keep doing some more because people like it so much and. The world is very grateful to have you Gaiman as my and it's been a pleasure to talk to you today. So thank you for taking the time and thank you for all you do. Oh i. It's been such one of one of the. Best things about good omens and there have been many great things about making. Good Omens was actually getting to meet work and eventually become friends with you. It's been just such A. Lovely delights well, it's been. It's been an equal probably more of a joy for me. So thank you day. Thank you for today. Thank you bye-bye. David tennant does a podcast with is something else and no mystery production. Produced by Zoe Edwards. Additional production from Harriet. Wells. Sarah Cabinet Steve Ackerman, and Georgia tenant. The sound engineer was Josh Gibbs. The executive producer is Chris Skinner. Next time who my? Up. Yeah he's smoking..

Neil gaiman Chris Skinner Crawley David tennant Wells Josh Gibbs executive producer Zoe Edwards engineer Sarah Cabinet Georgia Steve Ackerman
"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

07:28 min | Last month

"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"In a house where you're going through exactly the same day day after day after day, the ideas can kind of dry up because there's no. Input nothing new is coming in and so what was wonderful about opening myself up to stuff coming in? It's like Oh this an idea and there's an idea and it hasn't stopped. But having said that at my worst I was at a place. Emotionally a few months ago where I was. I hit rock bottom at a level never hit rock bottom before and I was also asked for A. Short story. By A. Doctor who children in need anthologies and they said, could I use the character of the call? Was the time Lord I created. I'm doctors wife I began it as a kind of mechanical process. It wasn't like I had any ideas or stories that desperately needed to be told I certainly wasn't feeling creative or happy your joyous. I suppose that I needed to try and do it because it was a charity. But if I failed to write a story, nobody was going to notice and. Then Started thinking okay. Where does it begin and I wrote? A paragraph or to just basically about doctor who story. So as to start on the run because that's always the best place for any doctor, WHO STORY TORONTO AND Here we go. She's running down stairs and I'm Oh this is a this is a one of the female. Course as great. So it's her and she's running downstairs and she has a apparent and she's being followed by a huge box. That's weird. Hang on that was that was a huge books in doctor who wasn't that that was that. that. That time Lordy. Books that Omega box floated around in Silvester episode and Three days later I looked up and I had a really fun. Lovely. Do. Fee. She'll story. About the Corsair right and. I was so pleased myself. And it hadn't existed and it was pure craft. It it sort of came into existence because I went. To begin writing short story now and that was craft, but the magic happens anyway. So you can kind of you can force into being if it's not happening of instinct typically. It never feels like force. It feels probably more like. If, I said David You you're going to be hosting awards ceremony tonight I know it's really short notice but John Ross has been eaten by Venetian brain slugs Elvis and In the absence of Jonathan, can you just get up the? Make everybody feel happy to be there and present the UK dairy awards. You could do it. Yeah and everybody there would go so lovely. You who knew he knew so much about dairy. What does she about Jonathan but? Anyway. Exactly. But you. But you can kind of do that because you've done it when you're writing something for donahue which you wrote to fantastic episodes for knowing the after I'd left or indeed. About Batman call makers when you is there a different quality when you're playing in other people's sandboxes to win your. Yeah there are two things one you know you're not gonNA break anything you want to leave the toys. You're you're in the San Books and you're playing with the toys that somebody left for you but you're not going to break the toys. That's one of them. And I think the other is. Honestly. The sandbox thing it is the fact that you're in a kid. Gets happy right. Yes, I do not recall any. Listing. The the best moments of my life. Winning awards isn't on any of the best moments of my life list, but the first time I got to write dialogue for. Batman. Right. I'm bring Batman on and write dialogue for Batman. That's one of the best moments of my life to first time I got to write Interior Tartus. And his script. and and write a line for the doctor who at that point Matt hadn't yet been cast right? You were still you still acting at that point. So when I wrote. That doctor he was a was very you ish. He became less Hewish as. By the draft that we we actually saw because he bounced a season because they ran out of money right which happens and also various things that have changed and I'm I also, of course, got to say to Stephen Moffatt. We have to save the Tartus. Your Tartus, interior has to be saved. As we're going to use that and they spent the better part of two years lying to people about why You're tired is set was still sitting there in the corner. But. The Joy. There a pure unfettered joy. There was a feeling that my inner five, six year old. Convinced that he was good had finally become all powerful because look this is the tightest and I'm writing it. I'm getting. To say what the is going to do. That was power a writing Batman Dialogue in black kid. Was the best writing. I did a story once. Cold whatever happened to Cape Crusader that wasn't my title that was was titled I want to just to call it Batman the end. But it's the last Batman Story and the idea was kind of that it would always be. The. Last Batman story whatever happened to that man whatever. The various iterations Batman. Went through in years to come would still be. The last Batman story as a result of which I got to write all sorts of Batmans from different times and eraser Batmans history and the feeling of power involved you know Donald. Trump embarrassed Johnson and Vladimir Putin, they don't know what power is. Power power is being able to. Get all of these Batmans to say what you want them to say and do joker jokes is why? Would the five six, seven year old Neil be proud. Or would he just said well, obviously, it was inevitable that we've been out of here. He would be he would be very this is inevitable. Although I guess, you know this, this is just one of his daydreams. Right now. He's Sitting on the Isle of Skye where he always wanted.

Batman A. Doctor Jonathan Tartus Isle of Skye David You TORONTO Stephen Moffatt Silvester San Books John Ross UK donahue Neil Vladimir Putin Matt Donald Trump Johnson
"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

07:41 min | Last month

"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"Crew. Applaud. At the end of a scene except for that Shakespeare seeing where we you guys you and Michael and research. And Adam. Hamlet Yeah, did the run through the scene and you had all these jaded crew at seven o'clock in the morning just. Clapping and it was amazing. Yeah. It's interesting because you're you're you're describing really thriving in that kind of collaborative environment. But of course, there's a writer I. Love Your time is spent writing. Novels whether there are new budgetary restrictions where there are new producers to convince, and now we need not be the mother invention could because you just? Your mind is the only limitation to what was on the page suit. But clearly collaboration works for you and you enjoy and you sort of. If not just who you are or is that because you are writing career started. In comic books where the of collaboration is is key. You know it's half you in it's half the artist. I was so thrilled because I thought Oh when he stopped talking on, say no David it's because I started in comics. And then he said it and it's Oh. Yes. No, that's exactly what I think it is I grew up writing comics and the joy of comics is it's all collaborative. For me the most important thing. That would happen when I would be writing something like Salmon. I would phone an artist I was going to be working with and I would say what you want to draw that. Nobody's ever let you draw before what don't you like drawing what he loved drawing. Tell me tell me about what you like doing and. That way I would sort of can okay I can work to your strengths I want to make my job is to make you as the artists look good. And I loved that I loved the collaborative process and I also love the fact that occasionally I would go and write pros where. I wasn't at the mercy of an artist. So for me, there is a sort of the there's always a joy. To collaborating. and. Today that you run out of. Joy. The joy to being there. With an you and a piece of paper and nobody can tell you what to do because you're about to write your own novel. Short story. And It's you. The first novel year, of course was also a collaboration which was good omens. Yeah. With the late Terry Project and of course, at at that Tang, you are you a brand new. I. Mean You you were writing Simon at the same time I. Think your was your star was rising people were noticing this but within the world of comic books, which has was his different to the the world of novels we were writing it in nineteen, eighty-eight, early eighty nine and I was writing. Sandman at the time. That, nobody really knew what I was. Used to say when people would say to us. They sent him. Was it like collaborating with me all game and Terry would always say he said, well, you have to understand at that time. I wasn't Terry pressure and he wasn't near game and we would just two blokes. Wanted to write together because we will be fun. I remember you know halfway through writing good omens, Terry phony me up and saying. How long have we been doing this for so far? I said about seven eight weeks. He said, what's what's the longest we could keep writing it for? is about probably about? Sixteen weeks isn't if. Nobody. Buys his book. We can. We can swallow that count we we can cope with that said, yeah, we can cope with that. and. Neither of US knew the what we were writing with salable even we were writing. To amuse each other and. Agents put it up for auction. And Terry who at that time I don't think he'd still do book for more than fifteen thousand pounds. Phoned me in terror as the auction approached one hundred, thousand pounds. and. Said, we have to stop this and I said, why do we have to stop this and he said well. Good. It'll come out public going to pay money for it, and then it won't sell enough to to make up for it, and then I won't be able to sell my books anymore and I'm Terry they'll blame me. If the book doesn't sell they'll blame me. It's okay and he sort of that calmed him down. Right, it's not like he was the elder statesman at the time because he was still to have the huge success. This was a big for both of you. It was a huge deal for both of us but now. He was absolutely the master craftsmen and I knew how good he was but the world didn't. So I'm you when Terry Foam. Thing that thing you sent me. The Baby Swat. The just William thing you doing anything with that. And I said, no, I'm writing Salmon. And he's well sell me the idea and what you've done or we can write it together. And I knew. That that was. Absolutely the equivalent of having Michelangelo Ring Up and say killing over, let's paint a ceiling together I'll give some tips, right. This is an apprenticeship and I get to do an apprenticeship with a master craftsman. And that was how I took. Good Omens and how I felt about good omens right. When you did start working in, you've done a few things before sign mine but San I was the one that you're sort of opus away. That's the one that you that set you off. It's still referenced by people who Love Comic Books and people who love literature as something that as a real sort of late in the sand were you did you set out to do something? New Different or was that just how comic books cards to you? I set out to take all of my weaknesses and try and make them strengths. Okay. I'd written a story called black kid which was a three par fancy comic. We were. Halfway through it and I got a phone call from Karen Berger who was my editor of what would become vertigo and it wasn't at that point. And she said look we're getting worried about this because it's A. You and Dave to creators. Nobody's ever heard of you and Dave mckean. So. We want to try to do something to raise your profile. If. You could do a monthly comic that would raise your profile. What would you like to do and? I never had to write a story a month before. there. Was No guarantee that I could do fiction. On demand and one thing I knew I couldn't do was a superhero title. Right yes. So taking over the green lantern was of any interest it was of no interest on the base not that I don't love superheroes. But whenever I do superheroes, I do them by doing something else to make it look like I'm doing, right? Yeah. So.

Terry Dave mckean Terry Project Terry Foam Crew. Adam writer Shakespeare US Michael San I David Simon Karen Berger Tang William vertigo editor
"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

06:20 min | Last month

"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"When you start on the how often do you knew what to is you're going to write The time I'm. I need to know a bunch of stuff before I can stopped. Like. It depends sometimes it can be how How it ends sometimes is incredibly important to know before you start. There's a project. That, I can't talk about right now. That I'm writing with somebody, I can't identify right now. This is terrible way of doing think. We've been. Working on it. For months and months, and we didn't we we've been building everything up, but we didn't know how it ended. And finally, we were in the same physical space. Actually. Have a conversation wasn't on the phone. And all of a sudden we had the ending. And having the ending knowing beat by beat just what the emotional ending of the thing was. opened up the entire thing like a door because we had the plot. And we've had the plot for a while. We just weren't show why why we should. everything turned and I immediately knew what the opening scene had to be analyzed. What's lovely is nothing so to really changes in the plot, but it now allows us the okay. That's important that thing that we didn't know was important that's that's going to be important. It gives us a feeling of or at least it gives me a feeling of sort of bubbly excitement which means that. Anybody I can take on this journey is going to get to that place and be just as excited as I was right. I remember writing good Omens episode three. Yeah. All the stuff through time. And the enormous battles I had with everybody involved in producing yes. because. Every single entity involved in good omens would look episode three and go up. You can lose a few of those. Because this whole sequence I'm sure everyone has seen it but there's this whole sequence where zero filling cruelly are discovered through human history in various different versions of themselves. As a relationship develops over time. So it was yes, a bit budget busting. It was utterly budget busting and I also knew it would make everything else work yes and also it would make. The scene I knew that I was going to write an episode three it would. It would. Turn. That from a scene that was a bit sniffly into one that would break people's hearts because actually spent. Twenty eight minutes watching the ups and downs of these two on earth for six thousand years becoming the only important thing in each other's lives and here is this moment where they actually. They have to utterly disparate philosophies of existing and. Zero cannot go off with Crowley and croly cannot leave without him but he has to and you wind up with a Nice Doomsday line. Yeah. But the excitement the I had a writing that stuff and the joy I had in knowing that we can watch your relationship open like a flower US ending in the nineteen sixties with the handover of the holy water and that there wouldn't be dry eye. In the House and I knew that because it did that for me then watching what you? and Michael brought and it became. The most glorious tentative friendship over thousands of years then becomes. Sort, of peculiar and flirty and weird and. Prickly and funny and glorious, and it became you know was the one that won a Nebula award. Right. Michael. Is favourite sequences. Well, we've often said yeah, it's interesting. You talk about that because do I remember as that sequence was coming into being and we were we would sort of occasionally would shoot a scene from an amongst all the other scenes from show. And one that was always in the script was at Shakespeare's globe the first performance of hammer as Shakespeare's globe. But the wars are you did affect a change there wasn't that big initially it was. It was to be fool it was to a massive head. And so that we could make a happen. Necessity became the mother of invention and you re route it and it's better than it. Did it did actually it was one of those. What Steven Moffat had said something to me when I was grumbling to him at the beginning of Making good omens he said what he said what I do is whenever they make me cut a scene for budget reasons. I try and replace it with a better seen. I'm. I go the scene I just had to cut and rewrite. I'm now going to replace with a scene that they're going to. They will be youtube clips. Old People are just got to love. This is going to be the one that they point. And I was fabulous philosophy rather than going in and grumpy way. So When Douglas came to me and said, we can't do. Shakespeare and I said why not? Surely, we can afford the globe. And he said we can afford the globe, but we can only be in there for five hours. Five hundred extras bringing them in out to bat space getting possibles as Elizabeth. Yeah. Breaks the bunch and it breaks the time we can't do it. And I said HANG UP WEAPON IF I'm losing five hundred extras. Can I afford shows? And he said absolutely, and before you start shooting seen as you know. The heads of department and the people who are going to need. To see things and you know the camera people and the light of everybody. And the sound they come on, they watch a run through I've never before seen A..

Shakespeare Steven Moffat Michael Crowley Nebula award Elizabeth Douglas
"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

07:01 min | Last month

"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"But. Actually, you just have to do that infection. Now you have to make that up. Yes. Well, it's one of the one of your themes isn't it the supernatural world world theology I suppose in God's and mysticism and I it not where these ideas arose in your childhood a fuss nation with that. I think so but I never remember not being interested. In that stuff. I don't have I don't have an origin story isn't that point where you go here one one day I was normal and the next I was bitten by a radioactive and turned into this thing. Kiewit moments for me would be watching William Hartnell as doctor who right age for I guess watching. A little bit of a TV version of the Lion, the witch and the wardrobe I would have been six and then making sure i. Got All of the NARNIA books for my seventh birthday. and. The Roger Lance Lynn Green Book of Egyptian mythology. Tales of ancient. Egypt and his tales of the Norseman. Know those they were huge with things that I can put pins in now and go. Okay you you were important. You changed the way that I saw the world. 'cause your parents were allegis when the you grew up in a religious household too was that? Do you think that kindle the fascination with that otherworldliness? Now I think I was actually I mean I, think one of the things that might have helped. In a in a weird kind of way was the there was so many different religions floating around, right? Yes. You know. I'm I'm a Jewish kid at a High Church Church of England. School. Getting top marks in religious studies. On stuff that I don't entirely believe right and at the same time I have scientologist parents who are now sending me when I by the time. I. Ten Eleven or twelve and going up. To my incredibly Jewish north London relatives every weekend and for holidays to study for my budget's for and so you got all of those sorts of stuff going on and. That added to. DC COMICS Which had said theology market more cock when I was eleven or twelve, the entirety of Michael Mohawk was being. Brought back in the press and you get new book every three or four weeks, and they all hide in in these sorts of strange. Theological kind of way the eternal champion here you had him as Elrich. Can here he's Corum and he he's all these other things and then the Jerry Cornelius books fitting somehow. Being me I was desperate to put that into that also became. Part of this huge sort of mouldering sludge. Of just sort of loving loving ideas loving over things that people believed that is a cocktail of belief systems that you were rattling around in among th is fascinating but Y- that you can sort of trace that fascination through your writing career can I think? You really can and I. I mean, I love I, love belief. I love the things that people do believe I love the fact that. Humans. are believing machines were also patent finding machines we can find. Patterns and stories in anything and one of the things that you learn as a writer. Is All you need is a really good idea and then you can set out and the world will demonstrate that it's true for you. Yeah, you're fascinated by lifson almost as a scientist rather than someone who experiences them. You're kind of interested in highly. That the the web of them, the kind of the track of them. I guess I the lovely thing for me as A. Writer. is a really, really good. At Believing anything one, hundred percent while I'm writing it. And while I need to build it. So. You know the Good Omens Universe is. A completely different universe to the Sandman universe the Sandman Universe's billions of years. Old Good. Omens Universe is basically six thousand years old and then there's a bunch of time before that when they're building Nebula and stuff and they haven't actually pressed the the time has started button. And if I'm writing in one of them I, absolutely believe that because if I don't believe it, nobody else is going to. It's interesting. Because I remember. Russell. T Davis. Talking about writing to her and saying that he found that the the hardest ones to do with one set in the future because you were starting from, you had to clear the decks and go okay this in this world, this is the rule and that builds on that and you had whereas if it's an alien invasion twenty-first-century. London. So much of the the setup is done for you if you're doing stuff here and I mean Russell's genius was. Having this wonderful, warm embracing early twenty first century set of soap opera comedy going on and also having doctor who going on at the same time and having bringing aliens into it and so. There was genuine magic. To that that was. Utterly Brilliant I'm probably better at the other I'm I will use. A use the here and now as a jumping off point much more. I I. Love. To use as a springboard and I would head for that twenty fifth. Sentry. Writing or the Fiftieth When I did my Doctor, who's one of the things I immediately did was head out into these worlds. And start building because it's part of for me. It's just part the joy of doctor who, yeah because the truth is anything can do a really good story. Set now the only doctor who can. Take. You five minutes before the universe begins and and trap you. I'm always in awe of watching what Russell does and all of his variants on. The here in the now in the near future and using that as a build up. Georgia.

Russell William Hartnell Roger Lance Lynn Egypt DC COMICS High Church Church of England T Davis Corum Elrich Georgia writer Jerry Cornelius scientist Michael Mohawk London Writer.
"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

06:28 min | Last month

"neil gaiman" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"Try that one to one stays. There we go. There we go. To fall well wrangled well like grown-ups. Only skills that I wonder if they'll ever be used to us when this is all over I, think we'll be almost definitely be Cada to impress. By some of these things because will not impress me as magicians any longer. I will look at them and I am one of your brethren I know secret baking knowledge. Bread. I have learned bread. I read that I made was so bad that it was inevitable about thirty five minutes after it came out the oven and hardened into something concrete like and having done that and been a polling at an and I. was determined as might lockdown skill right to get it right and now I'm incredibly could become one of these insufferable people entirely self-sufficient i. David tennant does a podcast with Neil gaiman. To kneel in early creative writing classes at school. Most of told the you start by writing but what you know. And you apparently have sold a great many books by doing completely the opposite of that. Is that fair or is it always a bit of autobiography and everything? You're right Oh? There's always autobiography and there's always experience. You're always looking at what you're seeing. And then it's coming in and then it's composting down right and then it's coming out the other side and you're planting flowers in it but. There's also will have on witch when you write what you know. That includes interior landscapes to. and. That includes ways of telling story that nobody's thought about and I know. I know Dr who I know about how wonderful Graveyards, and how I count walk through a graveyard without turning it into a town or at least village. That's populated in my head. You know that stuff. So so then you tell those stories, do you feel like you have been? BLESSED GIFTED KARST WHATEVER YOU WANNA call it with a with a different way of seeing the world than most people. It's very hard to answer that having not looked out at anybody else's. I, you know I accept fiction, which is the magic of. Fiction it does lettuce lookout through other people's eyes. No I don't I. Think I was. An over imaginative kid who loved stories and I've grown up to become an over imaginative adult who still love stories you never imagined. You're going to do anything else. You never had aspirations to pursue another career. No. Well, actually when I was. About fourteen or fifteen. There was a thing that my school where they sent in an outside careers advisor. We'd spent a whole day during tests. And then The. Tests got evaluated and then we went in and had a meeting with the careers adviser who would tell us what? University courses or what we wanted to become what we wanted to do based on the answers you'd give in this test based on. A maths test and a special test in a literacy done all these tests. And I remember going in and. It was a long wait in a corridor. Cooled down, it was fifteen minutes E.. And then the door opens and. Enthusiastic school friend of mine came out I went in and. Guys. So young man, what do you want to do that and I said I want to write American? Comics. Right, and this would have been one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, five, seventy, six, and. He just looked at me for a bit and nobody said anything and then he's how would you go about doing that then and I said I have absolutely no idea. You're the outside careers advice. To tell me. and. We sat there in silence for a while and then he said, have you ever thought about accountancy. And I said I have never thought about Accountantcy, and then we set some more. And as I remember it was a long time ago I said Chalet show the next boy in and he said, yes, you might as well and that was the entirety of microbes advice but I definitely thought you couldn't get there from. It was. Did. He get to accountancy from American comic books because you're not because you're masters who good. I had no idea because my math says wasn't that good I doubt daydreaming maths and I got a B at our level only because that was the very first year they allowed calculators round I learned how to use the calculator even if my mass was lousy, my calculator schools were pretty good for more than just re typing out the number. So they wrote read out rude words when you turn them upside down, you could make those things say boobs guide yes. Went to you know the joy of being skill boy I seem to remember in a math class. Didn't get that's. Where you pretty good at school, I'm going to be in math is not bad. In English you are excelling. I was I was really good at. Anything. English anything. History. Religious Studies. There was definitely to me about being a theologian. Wasn't quite sure what feelings did I loved the idea of to sort of plan around with. I hoped what theologians did was they could build religions. Go South in. Some way. Just like the idea of. Being a freelance religion designer. Could phone me up and so I I, want to religion please and I'd say, well, okay. What what what is your stance on sin and makes well, broadly I think we're against it like okay. I can. I can go with that. You want a day off the week. How do you? What about holidays and food? Dietary restrictions. A, come up with something.

Cada David tennant Neil gaiman advisor Chalet Accountantcy
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast. Hello, and welcome this week we're bringing you conversations about myths and legends Gods and monsters. In the middle. Ages before Scandinavia was Christianized. The Vikings the north people of the frozen lands of Europe. Pulled a story of how the world was created. By said that there was once a realm of fire and realm of ice. The fire melted the frost and dripped down into the yawning void. And it formed the first frost giant called Imia. then. Odin and his brothers came along and they murdered he mia and they pull him apart and they made the earth and sky and oceans. From his skull, his bones and his blood. The town comes from norse mythology. The stories that the Vikings told each other of the birth of the universe. And of the Gods that dwell on it and the day known as Ragnarok when all the gods must die. Neil gaiman has retold these myths in a book called Norse mythology, which became a number one best-seller in the US and the UK. Neil gaiman is one of the world's most popular authors we spoke in two, thousand, seventeen, ten years after first conversation. Welcome back now. Thank you. Thank you for having me back Richard parents not supposed to have favorite children. New Games not supposed to have favorite. Thala. So why you stepping forward and claiming norse mythology is your favorite. Oh. Sometimes. You have to actually confess that you do have a favorite. I love so many mythologies and I've I've plundered exploited played with so many mythologies is a writer over the. Years I've been writing, but I keep coming back to the news I went to them in San man when I was writing comics I went back to them dinos dinos codes with American gods. About seventeen years ago, and then fifteen years ago I wrote a book called Autumn The frost giants, which was just going back and doing children's book with Odin and low key and thorn it transformed into animals and I think at that point I probably, if you'd asked me, I would have told you that I was dumb. I'm then I had a fateful lunch it was November tenth two, thousand eight. A. Remember because it happened to be my birthday. I met Amy Cherry from Norton publishes, and she said, we love what you do with myths. Have you ever thought about? Telling them straight. And it tells you how nervous I was all UNIN confident I was. That it was probably a couple of years before I actually said to her yes I will give this a bash. Why? Why were you nervous? Because I make things up for a living, I spent my life. Making things up I invent stories. That's what I do. And I am Ben to all sorts of stories, children's stories, adult stories, comics, movies, TV. Yeah. I'm that's not the problem. But..

Neil gaiman Vikings Odin Scandinavia ABC Amy Cherry Europe writer Ben US mia UK Norton Richard
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 9 months ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

15:08 min | 10 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Bobin Sally as if he took it there was. He didn't do in so bob since you. This gift of photo was that after he often walked around your Yup. It turned up mysteriously about a month later. That's how would you know how long he was there. Walking around she was there. I believe ten fifteen minutes. He turned up. And did a one of these. These BOB walking through do one of Neil Young. Bruce Springsteen Albert Grossman weirdly. Of course he knew the House or House intimacy and say this was. This was his house in this was where he had lived. Sixty three sixty four before he bought his house in Woodstock And there are a lot of photos that are label Bob in his house in Woodstock which actually in my house the ones of him wandering wondering around with Allen Ginsberg. There's him in the kitchen playing the harmonium this a bunch of these photos which actually the impression given was Bob's house but actually it was my place my place. It was the Grossman plant. We ever moved to see him live I I would have loved to have seen him live if if I'd ever been in the place and was never moved to going see him. I wasn't until I became interested. In Dillon I realized he basically been on tour. Solidly for years and it would have been easy to go and see. The and I'm a friend of Jesse's Jesse Dylan. His son and I became friends in about nine hundred. Ninety eight stayed friends so sure I could've called Jesse at any point. Can you get me into this Gig but I never did. You may be better off because you just never know. That's that's that's you know having having read about it but was very thrilled to see. There were books on Bob Dylan in my sitting room when he walked in. I was one of the things that I learned was. You never know what you're going to get and you may get one of gigs and you. May You get one of the other day you never know and it's okay. How did what is Jesse? Do How do Jesse's a film director Jesse Dylan is director and I met Jessie the time. I met Jesse. He was one of the top directors of commercials and he wanted to get in to directly movies movies and for a period of twenty five minutes in Nineteen Ninety eight nine hundred nine nine. The Jim Henson Company in association with Denise Di Novi who was Tim Burton's producer and and Just dealing we're going to do a movie of neverwhere my novel and And it never happened. And Jesse in in one of those sort of Hollywood maneuverings found himself cast out from the project and which always made me sad. Because I I'd love Jesse Esi and then since then we bump into each other to the point where we enjoyed bump into it knowing that we will with bunk into each other. It's like meeting you know you're sitting next to each plane and it's only just The last time I saw Jesse he invite him out for dinner with him. And Elvis Costello hello and I said no and I said no for the same reason that I'm very happy never to have met Billingham for the same reason. I actually worked relatively hard to avoid meeting David Bowie especially when he was still alive and living primarily in woodstock fairly close to me. which is I have very few heroes left that I have not met brief you larger than life iconic people that I haven't met a met and had dinner with Lou Reed in kind of wished afterwards that I hadn't because I think I would have preferred the Lou in my head to the one that I had dinner with? If he wasn't a bad person he didn't do anything bad. But having dinner with Lou there was a point where I had to come and sit next to him and he kind of interrogated me about comics because he was thinking about doing a graphic novel and he wanted my opinion on stuff and I had an I set of comics exam from Lou on subjects as diverse as e c comex and so on put and by the end of the exam. I was informed that I had passed and now I was allowed to have this conversation with him. And I'm going. Oh Ah but you know it was I so it was one of those things where I lost my so Jesse. Let's see it was like no I don't want to have this coastal even though I am sure I would love him. I've never heard anything anybody. So bad would about him. I'm like Dylan light blue. He is one of the lyricists who made me know. Please have a great speaking of projects and you. Various projects that have come to fruition so In American God's will in American gods the novel you mentioned hard rain. I do which I felt. It's interesting I fell in love with the Sung hard rain again in weird way that you come to Dylan Dylan is was more omnipresent than you believe. And you come to him in ways and even as as you know as an adult discovering that the mighty Quinn Zone I loved. When I saw on crackerjack as a kid turned out to be above and I'd fall in love with hard rain through Bryan Ferry's cover you know these foolish things was just one up my favorite albums when it came out continued to be one of my favorite albums? Dili's I think. Probably one of my favorite albums and there. It was something about hard rain that has worked itself into a lot of stuff I've written and I tried trying to make sure that. In American gods you would get a lot of the things that are referred to in hard rain just as the imagery that crops up all the way through it that I would have things things that would refer to that and in order to actually alert readers to the fact that that was might happen or at least if they spotted that happening they were not mad I actually they to watch the biggest to listen to hard rain while they're the driving and I was thrilled when actually made it into American gods the TV service. The last thing I expected because I was watching the TV series the other day just the just the first this episode and I I saw misty mountains crooked highways sad morris mother graveyard giant Bob Dylan saw. It is a because again. It's that thing of okay. I'm going to write a road trip and I'm going to write a road trip chapter three. The Pont. Three of American goods is called this moment of the storm. And it's a storm is coming Tom Is the the iconic phrase the way heading into. Because it's a hard rain's GonNa fall is another way of saying that. Do you go to these songs now. And from accents the world. I mean it's insane. You mentioned hard. Rain's GONNA fall because a couple of our podcast. Guests said that that's a song that seems to take Econo- renewed resonance every so often and politically little phrases will jump out. I think all you need is to be an armageddon state of mind and and it is sad. Leaders tend to put us in Magadan state of mind and it throws a a small number of pieces about work as they sort of bubbled back to the surface and feel more relevant and audrain is absolutely one of those and it sits for me like you know I. It sits like like the eight poem turning intending in the whitening giant point. Where you're going okay? You know the best. The best lack all conviction while the worst of filled with passionate intensity intensity. That's now that's the thing you know what that looks like. So I think we're in an apocalyptic state of mind I think anything that feels apocalyptic feels right. It's the same with You know the the original watchman's C'mon you civil along the watchtower. Yes Dorrie Linski was on this podcast. And he mentioned as well. Yeah and You know watchmen was. I was looking back on it. I think it was an awful lot of things and one of the biggest things that it was was was a giant Russia. Book for an Apocalyptic State of mine for all.

Jesse Bob Dylan Jesse Dylan Lou Reed Jesse Esi Dylan Dylan Woodstock House or House Dylan Albert Grossman Sally Jim Henson Company Russia Bruce Springsteen Elvis Costello Neil Young Allen Ginsberg David Bowie Dili Dorrie Linski
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Slate's Working

"I was finishing up the ocean of the end of the lane. All of these things i would go off after one of these things done and i would do a story and then a couple of months later i do another another one and it was a very slow way of doing it and and then when they were denied send them off to amy cherry at norton jordan editor noten whose editorial response normally consisted of saying. When do i get the next one which i think was the best possible one <hes> it. It's interesting that you describe the process in that way. Though because it's a silas sickly quite consistent book there are variances from paragraph to a paragraph as you shifted perspectives or or storytelling techniques but the overall feel of the book is is quite coherent to me that was much more it took me several years after agreeing to do the book to begin that was because i was festival readings nari career reading the editors <hes> the the pros and the poetica <hes> and then it was because i was trying to work out a voice that was wholly mine. I'd read some fantastic nor set up over the years roger lance. Lynn green did myths norseman which i love this a small boy <hes> kevin crossley holland defense testing writer and poet <hes> did the penguin noah noah smith's <hes> withdrawals norse gods and giants for what it's worth which yup not maybe not one of your greatest hits but it influenced my my knowledge knowlege of these stories today i i was. I was lucky because i found i read various versions but those two in particular had was just struck me as beautifully flee written beautifully retailer working from translations of.

silas amy cherry noah smith kevin crossley roger lance Lynn green editor writer
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Slate's Working

"I think of myself as a better editor than i am a writer <hes>. I'm pretty good at taking something that's good but not great and making it great <hes> even if it wasn't great to begin with i can consider polish it and go on okay. This is what it is about semantically go in and just buttress that an <hes> shave this off and then suddenly it will fly yeah. Are there <hes> other folks who are habitually involved in your writing in eh processing you worked for years with the great comic book editor karen berger <hes> at at vertigo dc comics on san man and i think some of the projects as well well <hes> such as well and books of magic and of course yeah yeah no i. I've been very fortunate. I had really good at it but even more important than could editors. I've had good friends. <hes> and i've had good friends who happen to be really good. Writers thinkers critics so that i know that when <music> i'm if finish novel in and it's there is a draft ready to go out to friends to be read and i have people whose opinions i'm interested in and will listen to <hes> the the the most tragic one for me. Though oh is my friend john m. ford who was an astonishingly good writer. Mike ford he won the world fantasy he would some years ago for novel called the dragon waiting which doesn't actually have any dragons in it. It is an alternate university of richard the third with vampires an astonishing writer and mike was my favorite be tarita. What does that mean it means is that he would read it and he would go. You know you should think that this moment where this character shows shows up is a bit cheap or this thing you can do it back to about doing this and he was always right <hes> and he was always then reliable and you know i've. I've missed him. He died about a decade ago a little bit more and not having my tarita has been hard for me. I would imagine well in writing your most recent book in norse mythology which we've been speaking about much <hes> you are as we've said here already doing certain work of rewriting in this case it just happens to be of <hes> ancient poets and prose writers <hes> relatively rather than than <hes> of your own work. <hes> was the process of bringing this. This book together is significantly different from the work of writing. We've done in the past completely. I've i've never done anything like this before. I don't ever do anything quite like this again. <hes> because essentially <hes> i've tried to explain it to say look it was my knitting. I have have aunts who knit and they tend to have capitus handbags. I'm whenever they're bored waiting for a bus or something the bag sloping angled come out and do a couple of rows of knitting a mental go away <hes> there are twenty stores stores in norse mythology and what i would tend to do is when i was finished with something i would write to nas mythology story so i whatever i was working on at the time <hes> whether it was writing script so whether it was writing comics i was working on san mateo your during that period i was writing television scripts scripts..

writer john m. ford editor Mike ford karen berger san mateo vertigo dc
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Slate's Working

"In a couple of days in south africa and i left a week early which has been in order to come on the road and tell people about most mythology. Were so happy to have you here to talk about that and this other work <hes>. How do you actually spend actively writing the <unk>. Is it something that you are able to commit to. Everyday wasn't ever something that you were committed to. It was definitely something that i was committed to every day. <hes> <hes> dealing with things like you know show running has has kind of up ended my <hes> but yeah i <hes> i used to be <hes> an and it also depends on what i was doing and for whom for example when i was writing sandman this monthly fleet comet three thousand page series. Almost i think thousand pages this too many thousand two and a half by the time it was done two thousand and then there's been atom yes the front another five hundred pages. I'm so when i was doing that i had to do and to write full pages a day mhm of comics every day and what actually would happen. Was i might day one. I would probably right one page. If i was lucky as i would work my way into something and then the loss day of salmon i would probably go from page eighteen to page twenty four michael six pages and <hes> because i would be inevitable by that point that already built a giant thing <hes> but with that i knew that if i didn't write it there was an artist waiting waiting colorist painting waiting and they wouldn't get paid <hes> with novels i try and write every day i try and set myself a target over thous woods <hes> because if you do thousand woods every day in one hundred days he would have one hundred thousand word novel yeah and of course i fail <hes> and that's okay and then they're a great days in which you do two thousand or three thousand words but mostly you fail. It's okay <hes> and with north mythology. It was a bit strange because nas mythology. I was invited to do it by amy cherry. Who's an editor at norton in end of two thousand eight to me about a year before i said yes because i was just thinking about how i would do it. How could make it relevant if i had the chops and if i did have the chops how how how what i wanted to do if i did it was right to book of mythology that would feel as important on a bookshelf off as i dunno edith hamilton's mythology or something and maybe it's worth saying something about the form of this book norse mythology because i think that that may be important to understanding what the process of writing it involved which is that it is a a close but creative adaptation of versions of these stories these nor stores stories eight hundred plus year old stories as told in the prose and poetic edda these this <hes> twelfth and thirteenth century trish texts.

amy cherry edith hamilton africa editor norton trish michael one hundred days
Emma Thompson talks new movie and

The Frame

09:45 min | 1 year ago

Emma Thompson talks new movie and

"Thomson she's in a movie called late night. It opens this weekend. She also took on a Hollywood titan who has fired for sexual harassment and then quickly got another job and late night. Thompson plays opposite Mindy Kaeling. She also wrote the movie Mindy Kaeling script was one of those strange things immediately, good upon first reading just great. She had a good idea. And she really knew how to bring in for you. That's a. Plus, she said, I wrote it for you. So of course, you haul things, anything God is going to be bad going to be bad, because it's not going away anytime soon being earnest and kind so luckily, I wasn't I was in a blazer with looked back here being incredibly mean most of the time journal, just had our second baby Taylor adorable. She takes to you. Thanks, so there's just a lot of expenses at home right now and I think it's time for a race. I see. This is actually very exciting to be really great because what you're describing is the most clear out example of the classic sexist argument for the advancement of men in the workplace you're asking for raise not because of any work related contribution. You've made but simply because you have a family, and that's why in the nineteen fifties family men were promoted over the women. They worked with never encountered is in such a clean teachable way. How would you describe Catharine Newbury? She is a late night host. She is successful. But maybe the future doesn't look as bright. Well, she's someone who was so driven right from a very early age. We did shoot a little bit of heart doing stand up in London. And when she was very young. And actually, we used my stand up from tally, the I did in nineteen forty five. I remember when forty six can't come on and. I remember so clearly that feeling of whenever I did stand up in my twenty s of being one of certainty. If not the only woman, then one of two amongst great load of men, who were often quite standoffish didn't clearly, expect anything view, so. Spoke to me on every level, we took that piece out because it just didn't help with the story actually in the end. But Mindy understands that, she understands what it's like to be the one who's different not only because of being a woman, but also being a person of color in a fuel the only one you're going to feel different, and that's not comfortable, a lot of the time, it just simply isn't comfortable, and we're not very honest about not. I don't think and she's only about it. She was a diversity higher. She's written about someone who was a diversity. I if that hadn't happened, maybe we wouldn't have this movie. So go, diversity reactively talked to the director of the film Nisha Ghana Tra and she talked about Catherine, as one of those women who came up in the entertainment business. When women were made to believe that other women were their adversaries, not their allies. They were sold this idea that there's only room at the table for one. And if you're here, then you better make sure nobody threatens your position here. And any other women coming up may have been seen as a threat to that position rather than adding to the workforce. And so I think what I love about this movie. Is it sort of breaks up myth? Yeah. I wonder if just women who had, I don't think of men is being enormously generous and warm, too young men, who coming up and might take their position. I think that it might be not only women but just the nature of the power structures that we have created. Do you know what I mean? Like I didn't think of, of blogs coming into writing room and everyone going. Hey, your great. You're a young thrusting blood, a guy like me. I can't wait to give you some extra airtime. I didn't think that happens with mine, iza. And I think that's a problem of power. Right. But I think there's something more to what Nisha sane. And that is that if you're a woman coming up that you are so aware of how limited the opportunities are obsolete that you start to see other women not as your peers. But as your. Arrivals, and that becomes an inch hawk sake. Talk sake. Absolutely. The, the conditions of power do not make it possible, especially for people who find it difficult to get into that position in the first place to be generous will be welcoming will be mentoring or want to help. Movie that you chose not to make. And this is the animated film luck that was at sky dance, which is David Ellison's company animation comedy, paramount and you decided not to make it because guy dance had hired John Lasseter has been fired from Pixar for the way that he treated women. And you wrote a letter that I have described on the air as the Magna Carta of the metoo movement, is one of the most beautiful eloquent, and well argued letters about this whole notion of the way women are treated the way men are forgiven that I found profound, and I hope you would share these two paragraphs with with us right now too. If a man has been touching women inappropriately for decades. Why would a woman want to work for him? If the only reason he's not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave professionally. If a man has made women his companies feel undivided and disrespected for decades. Why should the women at his new company think that any respect he shows them is anything other than an act that he's required to perform by his coach his therapist and his employment agreement. The message seems to be I am learning to feel respect for women. So please be patient, while I work on it. It's not easy. What motivated you to write it? What gave you the ability to write it. Very good questions. When I left the production, and then I wrote to Lindsey Durand about it, and in these one of the most brilliant, women, I know, said, Phil, can you talk to some women about this? I'd really be interested to know what's going on. And in fact, that letter is the work of many voices is not just my voice because those questions, very much came from those women. So the dots what's wonderful about it is that it is a collective voice, and I sent it to sky downs and didn't receive a reply, and because I showed it was quite a lot of people because of the issue, being very pressing, a lot of just as you go to publish it, and that was quite a big decision because it's just a public, but the. Vision turned out to be the right one because. Those with the questions that needed to be oft and to this date of not been onset in any way. I've had no response public or personal back from sky don's an dots very disappointing. Because they only way we're going to get anywhere with this own going issue is by talking to each other. It's not just a public thing to do its thing that potentially, and this is what has happened over the last couple of decades, that has kept women silent is they fear that they will be punished that they will be blackballed. They won't get parts that people will rise. They're absolutely really. Why were you able to I'm sixty on thought too old not to woke my own talk time is very much marching on. And because I had spoke to not before when the Weinstein thing blew up, and I've always spoken about this. I was young woman. I'm there was up -solutely, no choice really. And what was interesting to me in very touching was responses. I got from so many people male and female, who had done the same thing who would walk away and who don't have. Perhaps, don't feel as stoppage does I feel you know, I couldn't do other things. It's not going to kill my career even if sky don'ts, says, we're never going to work with you again, and we're going to tell every other animation, but I don't think that that would be possible now because the do feel that with the metoo time's up moving. There is a tipping point. But we do have to keep on, and on one of the ways in which I think we're going to have to do that. We got to talk to people before during, and after film shoots the thing, the clever thing about anybody who's going to bully. Is that they'll do it, not in front of someone who's going to say you can't do that? They'll do it in secret or in quiet or in private. And it's very difficult, for instance, for someone who's a runner, and who can be replaced in five minutes to say anything, bad about someone who will cost a lot of money to replace an all of these things. They have implications for everyone.

Mindy Kaeling Nisha Ghana Tra Thomson Harassment Taylor Hollywood Thompson Catharine Newbury Sky Downs Sky Dance Pixar London Director John Lasseter David Ellison Lindsey Durand Catherine Weinstein Phil
G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

Tell Them, I Am

11:54 min | 1 year ago

G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

"This episode g willow Wilson, she's a comic book author, and she wrote the first marvel comic with a young Muslim woman as the hero, Kamla, Han aka MS marvel. So when I was in high school, I was kind of a giant Goth. I was the kind of insufferable kid who, who would say that they were not actually cost the Gosper, too pretentious, and that I was above that of. But Nevertheless, I wore the really dark lipstick and like the fish nuts, and the pseudo Victorian jackets, that you could find like buffalo exchange. Yeah. I mean, if you looked up Goss in the dictionary, you would have found a photo of me somewhere. Fortunately, for me around the same time, sort of the late eighties early nineties, this British wave of very literary experimental comics started coming out. And I ran Pedley became obsessed, and one of my absolute favorite series, as was the case for a lot of people was Sandman by Neil Gaiman. Which took a World War, Two era, kind of be list, super hero and turned him into this mythological dream king who goes on adventures with all kinds of different, mythical creatures and kind of deconstructs, western mythology from a really interesting point of view. So, you know, for me as like a fourteen year old fifteen year old mega Goth this was huge and revelatory. Not just the story itself, but the medium of comics. Sandman told a kind of story in comic book form that I didn't really know was possible. It was kind of my first exposure to these more literary more adult kinds of comics, when I was a kid comics were still considered very much a kids, medium, and particularly a boys medium. There were not things that were marketed at girls. There were very few books out there that were adjacent to the superhero world that were marketed to adults so to see a comic book that was very clear and open in its love for that classics Hooper hero story. And yet, at the same time talked about Shakespeare and Chaucer and you know, brought in a very Joseph Cambell kind of U of mythology. Just expanded my understanding of what could be done within the pages of a comic book. I want to take a quick break to tell you about another podcast. I worked on it's called the big one your survival guide. We walk you through what it would be, like, if a major earthquake hit Los Angeles, and we help you understand what you need to know, to survive science and journalism, and immerses you and the experience of being in a huge earthquake. Don't be scared. We help you prepare. You can find it today wherever you listen to this show. Okay. Back to tell them. I am. So as I remember, the first time I found Neil, Gaiman Sandman, I was at the apartment of a friend. Who is I think about two years older than me and had graduated. And they were already living on their own. And so we're, we're very kind of cool and grown up in my eyes. You know, the, the people who live, there had also been giant Goths. So there were clove cigarettes, which were still legal at the time sitting around, and, ashtrays, and that's kind of always what it smelled, like, which I like the smell of. But it had that kind of late nineties, Goth aesthetic, every all the windows were kind of draped in, like, JoAnn fabric in sort of dark colors. It was it was just that kind of place. This apartment had a collective library of all kinds of great stuff, and they were all reading Sandman, and they had they'd just sort of made a rule, you can read whatever you want, but don't take anything out of the apartment. But because their library was so big. I was like, nobody will notice if I just kind of sneaked these back issues out and read them on my own, so I did. And. It was one of those reading experiences that, that kind of sticks out in your mind as being something for which there is a before. And an after he read this book. It made me feel a lot less grubby as a Goth it, oh, it was a very unabashedly Goth comic. And it was kind of cool to see something with such a huge cultural impact that was kind of headlined by this very Goth guy with white makeup, an extremely scruffy kind of Robert Smith, secure hair, and it was kind of a nice affirmation that you could do the stuff. And it you'd be kind of like a mopey teenager. And yet have cool stories that meant something, and that we're all to uplifting, and we're about hope. So, you know, it was in, in that sense. Nice to see Goths doing some kind of artistic service for, for the whiter were. The kind of storyteller that he was was very influential, and then as I got a little bit older. And I I saw him a couple of times back. This is back when he used to tour. I was also very impressed with the way that he approached writing and being a writer and it being a human being. There was one instance, in which I saw him along with a bunch of other really amazing comic book writers, including, I think Peter David, at MIT just a few days, not more than a week after nine eleven. Nine eleven happened just a couple of weeks after my nineteenth birthday at the beginning of my junior year of college. And he you know, I was I was very much a college student, I was kind of going through a late adolescent. What does it all mean phase, I become interested in, in religion and started to sort of rethink what I assumed about life, and purpose and are, are sort of our place in the universe. And like everybody, I think it was it was a tremendous shock. I think particularly people of my vintage kind of elderly millennials or Xeni, all's had never known a time when the US felt really threatened. The Cold War was kind of over, there was a sense that we were separate from the rest of the world or that nothing could ever interrupt. That period of prosperity into which we had been born and so nine eleven just massively shook the foundations of our generational experience and especially being in Boston at Boston University, the feeling of ongoing threat and vulnerability was quite high. Two of the planes had taken off from Logan airport. There are all kinds of rumors circulating that, there were still a terrorist cells in the city. And so it really did feel like a war zone in many ways, and it occurred to me, just sort of walking to class that this is the reality that so much of the rest of the world faces every single day. And somehow we have managed to avoid it for this long. And now here we are just like the rest of the world. as we did for a lot of things during those weeks after nine eleven we kind of hung around to see if this event was actually going to happen because a lot of them were cancelled. And it was clear that, yes, it was going to happen. It was still going on. So we, you know, we decided okay, well, we're not we're not going to give up this, this chance to see all of these amazing authors and artists on stage at the same time. And we decided yeah, we're going to go. We're going to we're going to do it, despite the sort of aura of anxiety and dread. That was kind of hanging over everything. What was interesting to me is the Neil Gaiman was the only one in his kind of opening words who never mentioned nine eleven once everybody on stage when they got up to talk that was what they talked about. It was it was about superheroes in nine eleven. You know, I think one of the people on stage envisioned this world in which wolverine was on the plane with the terrorists, and sort of got up and, and hit them with his finger spikes. And it kind of rubbed me the wrong way because I remember thinking, you know, this is not the time to pretend that are fictional heroes are gonna do us any kind of good. It's too real. It's a nice thought that yes. If we had these amazing heroes who were always in the right place at the right time that they would have saved us, but they didn't. And Neil Gaiman got up and never mentioned nine eleven once he just sort of told a story, I don't even remember what it was that he talked about. But by the end of it for about thirty seconds. We all forgot and in a weird way, I think that prepared us to have them were serious conversation versus the. Yeah. Wolverine would I've got him if you'd have been there, which, which just felt very tried to me. The reason that that stood out to me was because it illustrated, very neatly that for a storyteller in a time of great national tragedy upheaval. The way forward is not always the way through that sometimes we assume we're in a position to attack things head on. And yes, we're gonna fight, whatever it is or or get through whatever it is. And it's, it's very easy to blur the line at that point between storytelling and, and just sort of shallow saber rattling. But what he said at that time illustrated to me that it was possible to speak in a deeper key and not to pretend that you have the answers that you need all the answers. You know, everybody was was in an incredibly tense somber. Reflective mood, and it I think brought a lot of us especially who are about my age. I was eighteen at the time into the realization that we are all mortal that, that, that nothing that we think, is a turtle is eternal, and that the world may be didn't look the way that we had been taught growing up,

Neil Gaiman Sandman Wolverine Gosper Goss Willow Wilson Pedley Kamla Los Angeles Logan Airport Hooper United States Peter David Boston Writer MIT Robert Smith
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Kickass News

"Unable to think and during the course of that, just keep going and Unser everybody's questions and head off into some kind of little room at some point to rewrite this seem that needs to be rewritten because it needs to be a little bit cheaper. Whatever. So, so that was a set amount of that. Yeah. But I'm really looking forward to becoming somebody who gets up in the morning deals with urgent Email, maybe goes for a run, and then settles in to right now I've read that you're particularly disciplined about not letting yourself get too distracted when you're writing d have certain rules or things that you had here too. Well, I was used to be fabulous because I'd have a writing cabin which had no why fine. Oh perfect. Then that was great. And then my wife said, okay, I'm not actually you work in the house anymore. I was waking the house and in the cabin. So then I had to put my fine to the cabin. So I built a gazebo to right in a really not even more distant in the woods, we have all of these woods. So I now the distant wireless free gazebo. And when I need to right before we go. I just want to say how much. I enjoyed the show and also how much I enjoyed the opening credits. I love the animated sequence. There almost seems reminiscent of the old PBS mystery Edward Gorey titles. Nikko ffom said to me when he saw it he said it's like it's like it was made by the lovechild. They'd would go on her. Humous bosh. I can really see that. That's lovely these wonderful. People could Peter Anderson studios made it for us, if there is any Justice in the world, they will take all of the opening credits awards that are there to be taken. Definitely because it as the most glorious opening credits. It's the only opening credit sequence. Of anything where you want to keep watching it every episode. You don't go okay. We can zoom through the opening credits. You watch it again. Even though you've seen it before. Because you pick up new details. Notice new things. And now things that didn't mean anything the last time you saw it. It's like, oh, well that's, that's the flying saucer. Right. Will the six part series? Good omens is available on Amazon prime video starting Friday may thirty first Neil Gaiman. Thanks so much for talking with me is so welcome. Thanks again. To Neil Gaiman for coming on the podcast is wonderful series..

Neil Gaiman Nikko ffom Unser Edward Gorey Peter Anderson studios Amazon
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Kickass News

"I mentioned at the top that you work in a variety of mediums often, I think, at the same time from novels and comic books, two children's books movies defying that working in so many different mediums greats and environment for a lot of creative cross pollenisation to some extent. But what I really like better than that is just the fact that if I get Nigeria. I can probably go to the place. Where is most appropriate new, I winter, you know, it's, it's the equivalent of having an idea guy. Okay. You short story, a novel or a poem. But I can also go. He was show story novel a poem stage play television. What are you, what, are you going to be funding, and then occasionally, you get to write the short story or something? And go, you know, you're really good show story by love to see the people in you walking around. I'd love to see this thing happen, where. We'll things are going on. How do you make those decisions when you have idea for a story in your head, how do you decide this is a graphic novel? Comic book this is going to be a novel. Sometimes you do it because you go, okay. I think what's important to me is the tone of voice. Okay. If it's what's important to me is the tone of voice, and it's probably pros. And whereas if I'm going okay, what's really important is seeing these people doing this thing. What does it look like that? I'm go kill you probably a movie. Okay. That's very logical. Really makes sense. Yeah. It's and that really is sort of how it happened. And sometimes simple as that of really been wrong. What's an example of one that maybe should have been done something else, an NC boys, my novel, I thought for years was probably a movie, and I remember I had, like four or five different movie beginnings. For nuncios, and I'd start writing it would sort of Peter out, like really get it. And at some point in the I was talking to an editor of mine at Harper's about doing a book of three different novellas and said, one of them could be could be an NC boys. And she said, what's that I told the plot she shook her full me 'cause we were eating. And she said, that's a novel on I'm like, is it and she said, yes, it is. Okay. So I wrote it at some point recently, I think that I read that you're considering doing an original musical for the stage. Now core line had been adapted for the stage, but this would be an original, Neil Gaiman musical designed to be put on Broadway or something. What would be the tone of Neil Gaiman musical currently, I'm actually quietly who tring away in the background and again like everything else in my life, got put on hold for two years while I did good omens? Now, I'm sort of looking around going. If I've been in suspended animation. But what KENDALL project right now with with New York's public theater over. And with Stephen Merritt of the magnetic fields, span, and together where we're working to craft something of India's last something little for do what's a typical workday like for you. How do you go about writing? I haven't had a typical work day. Now really I, I would love, you You know. know, I'm in the process of retiring from show. Running full on your first show. Absolutely. But for the last two years, you know, it's tended to be things like set the alarm the quarter to six for the six fifteen pickup to take you to the location, seven fifteen where things are going to be beginning and stumble back in at ten o'clock at night..

Neil Gaiman Harper Nigeria NC Stephen Merritt New York editor Peter India two years
"neil gaiman" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on /Film Daily

"What's going on with us when Chris back in the eighties? And I think it was nine thousand nine hundred eighty seven there was this TV series and it only lasted one season. It was called the storyteller. And it was from Jim Henson's workshop, and it had, you know, the gym the Jim Henson creatures in it the puppets that he created from his workshop and the show had John hurt who has passed away now. But he played the titular storyteller. And every episode would start with him and is dog who was a puppet. Introducing a story based on fairytales or folk lore. And then the story would unfold with, you know, more aunts and creatures that show is now getting a reboot Kirk. Ac- of Neil Gaiman. Neil Gaiman is executive producing it. And he's going to write it and. You can read the full quote he gives but he makes it sound. Like, the show is going to be a lot more detailed than the hints on the Hanson one. You know, it had the storyteller basically as a framing device but from his quote and you'll game his record. It makes it sound. Like, the the story teller is actually going to be like a main character in the show, and they're gonna try and work the stories into his story. It sounds a lot more ambitious. I guess the word than the original. But it's still gonna have, you know, the hints at workshop involved, and they're gonna try, and you have that same sort of magical, Jim Henson vibe to it. And that's really all we know at the moment. There's no home for it yet. There's no clear integration of where it's going to air. Neil Gaiman did say it's going to be adapted for the binge-watching generations of that sort of applies. They're they're looking for streaming home for it. But that's really the bulk of what we know at the moment. And that sounds really cool to me. I never saw the original series. But my old roommate was. Is a big fan of it. And he just from him like explaining the concepts. I was sort of. I've always been intrigued by the show, but just never got around to checking out. I wonder if like the original series is available streaming anywhere right now. But I know that the Jim Henson companies working on a TV version of the dark, crystal at Netflix. So maybe because of that relationship that that might be a natural home for this version of the storyteller, but Christie, do you have any relationship with the original show? Did you see a lot of those episodes when you were growing up or anything? Yeah. I did watch it when it aired or maybe in reruns 'cause I was alive hundred eight seventy I don't know if I would remember something that happened. But I did watch it when it was on. I think maybe like rented VHS tapes of certain episodes. They had like, individual episodes and. But I'm a big fan of Neil game in work nail. So his involvement is is what really has me interested in in this new version. Yeah, I was going to ask about that. Because I've only read one Neil Gaiman book. I think which is I read American gods, and I was sort of mixed on it. I love the mythological parts of it like the parts where it got really wild and out there. The those were the elements that drew me to that book in the first place when I was a little disappointed to find that so much of it is like relatively straightforward. But I know he's like a huge fantasy guy. He has a massive following heavy read a lot of his other books. And I know you've watched like the American gods TV show, which I have not yet. But what do you think about him as a fit for this particular property?.

Neil Gaiman Jim Henson Chris John Hanson Netflix executive Christie
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"Welcome to the pick the brain podcast where we pick the brains of the brightest minds in the areas of health, self-improvement productivity and kicking ass at life. I am Jeremy Fisher always alongside my co host Aaron Falconer will Aaron today. We've got first of a two part Assode. We're going to hear from Neil Gaiman who is an author who is known from writing known for writing stardust American gods. Core lean which they turned into a movie and a bunch of other stuff. You looking forward to today show very much. So all right. Let's get started with part one from Neil Gaiman. I never really expected to find myself giving advice to people graduating from an establishment of higher education. I never graduated from any such establishment. I never even started at one I escaped from school as soon as I could when the prospect of four more years of enforced learning before I could become the right right wanted to be seemed stifling. I got out into the world. I wrote and I became a better writer the more. I wrote, and I wrote some more, and nobody seemed to mind that I was making it all up as I went too long. They just read what I wrote, and they paid me for it. Or they didn't. And often they commissioned me to write something else for them, which has left me with a healthy respect and fund nece for higher education that those that my friends and family who attended universities cured off long ago. Looking back. I've had a remarkable ride. I'm not sure I can call it a career because a career implies that I had some kind of career plan, and I never did the nearest thing. I had was a list I made when I was about fifteen of everything I wanted to do I wanted to write an adult novel children's book comic and movie record an audio book writing episode of doctor who and so on I didn't have a career. I just did the next thing on the list. So I thought I'd tell you everything I wish I'd known starting out and a few things that looking back on it. I suppose I did know and that also give you the best piece of advice I'd ever got which I completely fail to follow. First of all when you start out on a career in the arts. You have no idea what you're doing. This is great. People who know what they're doing know the rules. And they know what is possible. What is impossible? You do not. And you should not the rules on what is possible and impossible in the arts were made by people who had not tested, the bounds of the possible by going beyond them. And you can if you don't know it's impossible. It's easier to do because nobody's done it before. They haven't made up rules. Stop anyone doing that particular thing again..

Neil Gaiman Aaron Falconer Jeremy Fisher writer
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Upgrade

Upgrade

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Upgrade

"It is, I would say generally, well, regarded the most of the people I know read it for a while and then just got tired of it because it's so long. I will say our friend, Cathy Campbell MRs soup in the chat room. I think her favorite or one of her very favorite book series and she's read it all probably more than once. I don't know Kathy can tell me that, but anyway it is and at the serious there's a lot of material. There are a lot of characters, and so they've added. They've added that to their list. And they, you know, so. So they continue to build these these deals, they've gotta deal with Neil Gaiman that is called an overall TV deal, which is another thing that they announced at the same time, which basically just means anything. Well, he's doing so Neil Gaiman the for those who don't know a bestselling writer. He's actually doing a show with them. Now that's co produced by BBC, but it's going to premiere on Amazon prime worldwide, and that is good omens, which is a book that Neil Gaiman wrote with Terry Pracha and and apparently you know, Neil Gaiman even though he's a novelist, he knows I think with between this American gods, he knows that you know, there's a lot of money and TV too, and that he part of hang career. If you've written the book, the books written, one do something more like you totally see why this happens and why people do it. It's like he wrote the book. The book is done now. They can be adapted into a TV series. Great lake. Let's go for it. You see how this is playing out now is so interesting to see these companies. You know, these tech focused companies just picking going to the library and just like picking these things off the shelves. Is so fascinating. So there is that one, right? So like Amazon's doing its thing, but Netflix of announced, I think something equally huge, which is the de going to be developing adaptations of the corn Ecoles of noneya day have they're very proud of the fact that they of the first company to ever have the rights to all of the books. They're seven books in the chronicles of ninety series. You know, most people note the lion, the witch in the wardrobe is one of the boat, right? They have all of them, and this has never been. This never happened before. So all seven books, they have the rightful them like the prime deal with token estate. My understanding here is the idea is that they, they own the rights to narnia at this point and they can tell that story they don't have to do. I think this is really smart actually because there have been so many attestations of the lion, the witch and the wardrobe over the years that they have narnia. So they can tell that story or stories in that world and they can do it. However they want. And they've said new series and film projects. So I think the idea here is they might be able to produce films if they want to that would presumably debut on Netflix, but they also could drill down into series and they can cover this whole world instead of doing essentially rehashing the exact same story about the kids who find the the back of the wardrobe leads to a magical world. They can take a a kind of a bigger picture, especially because famously those books kind of released outflow to right. So they could go back to the stock, didn't they exactly they could. They could tell it in sort of any direction that they want to. And you know, I've, I've never been thrilled with any of the. I read this books when I was a kid. But I think it's interesting just again that basically these companies that have all this money and we talked about apple being in here, but Amazon and net flicks. And of course, Disney and Comcast, like these companies that are huge companies and they have a lot of money and they know that the world is going to streaming. One of the things that they're all looking for is blockbuster hits HBO and game of thrones really made everybody sit up and take notice that was a huge hit..

Neil Gaiman Amazon Netflix Cathy Campbell HBO Kathy BBC Disney writer apple Comcast Terry Pracha
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Think Again

"You know it's depressing if you're a slow thinker to to look at these fast thinkers racecar brains and realize they can get anywhere much more quickly than you but think about what hiker experiences as opposed to the race car driver the race car driver lose really fast fastest to the finish line everything's a blur the hiker can reach out they can touch the leaves on the trees they can see the little rabbit trails they can smell the air here the birds completely different experience and in some ways far richer and deeper so it can help you sometimes if you're a slow thinker you think oh there's nothing in it for me i'm not as fast as other people you can sometimes see things that those really really fast thinkers miss just because you're looking more deeply right are you a race car learner or a hike hiker i'm definitely imposter so let's let's put that conned down on the table right at the beginning i mean that's one of those things that absolutely never goes away i spent much of much of my career convinced that sooner or later there will be knock on the door and i go and open it maybe somebody with a clipboard and they'd say neil gaiman and i'd say yes i'd say oh well i'm afraid you have to get a real job and i would go okay and 'cause once they caught you have to go and get a real job and i would go into hotel administration or accountant seal something and just be sad because they would have caught me because i was an impostor.

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