21 Burst results for "Neil Gaiman"

"neil gaiman" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

02:08 min | 3 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on /Film Daily

"And the furious. And the feud between dwayne the rock johnson and vin diesel which I guess it enters a new chapter bent house it. Yeah so Chris and i think in a previous episode talked about some recent comments that vin diesel made around the time that if nine came out where menzies profiled in men's health magazine and he talked a little bit about how the beef behind the scenes between him and dwayne johnson was actually like a manipulation on the part of master-strategist vin diesel. Where he was talking about how he would do anything that he'd have to do in order to get performances From people that he worked with on projects that he was producing. So he's sort of like insinuated that all of the the tough love that he was giving was was in order to like coax out the performance that he wanted from johnson. Which at the time. Chris and i were just talking about how i mean. Just absurd on its face. That claim is an interest. How really ridiculous. And like you don't believe the vin diesel is a master chessmen. Were playing three moves ahead. Look i actually appreciate the way that vin diesel has leaned into an and been like very publicly publican open about the way that he loves fantasy storytelling in dungeons dungeons and dragons. And how he looks at the fast and furious franchise as like an extended the campaign basically. I actually think all of that kind of the the ridiculous thought that he puts into all of that stuff. I think is actually is paying off in has paid off very well in those movies but to claim basically to claim ownership over somebody else's performance in the way that he did especially when there's so much simmering tension. There is just a step too far and apparently doing johnson thought so as well. So in a a new profile of dwayne johnson. And emily blunt. That just went up in the hollywood reporter today. They asked dwayne johnson what he thought about those comments from he said. I laughed and i laughed hard. I think everyone had a laugh at that. And i'll leave it at that. And that i've wished them

Neil gaiman disney animation orlando jones amazon chem feigen david slade marvel disney nancy boys nancy pixar bryan fuller vanessa Michael green michael green Douglas mackinnon Nancy twitter africa alexander
"neil gaiman" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on /Film Daily

"From the podcast with jakup. And then there's some new contributors shutting the slash film lineup. You've been reading them on the site for the last month or so But actually vanessa's been with us for a while longer than that. But her role has been increased But this is our first time on the podcasts. so Welcome vanessa and Why don't you tell people what kind of what kind of movie person are you. Vanessa sure we'll get a sense of you it it some way so that people are like who is this woman. Yes yes movies. Good which. I guess is a good thing to feel if i'm writing for science film Yeah i guess. I'm a big genre fan so i pretty much seen everything in. Mci do everything star wars my first piece for slash on. Actually i think was back in two thousand eighteen when i chronicled my experience. Doing a thirty hour marvel marathon before the premiere of infinity war so those are definitely things. I always watch always enjoy. So what you're saying is you're nerd. Yeah yes fair to say my my mind gaijin earn my wedding ring. Actually is based off of rt too. So that's all you need to know. I spent some time with the desa comecon like going around the show floor where she just like goes and collects books. Like free books it. She has like bags and bags of free books that she brings home and reads a week which i find amazing. You still have a child now so but two weeks now okay. Let's get into. Let's get into the news. Let's start first with marvel which you know they have the what if animated series coming out but it turns out that they're actually creating a mini studio for animated titles. Ben tell us about it. Yes so victoria. Lonzo who is one of the highest ranking executives at studios Was speaking at a media summit earlier this week. And she revealed that mobile studios is a. I'll just read her quote here. She said we're going to have our animation branch and many studio and there will be more to come from that as well where super excited about animation. Which is mike. I love so yeah as you mentioned what. If is the first animated marvel studios show. That's coming up but it sounds like with this idea of an animation. Branch hold mini studio devoted specifically to intimation that. We're gonna see a lot. More animation stuff ramped up In specifically in the mt you and like one of my first thoughts. When i heard this was like Doesn't moral already. Have an animation branch. Because i remember you know a lot of those direct to video movies coming out over the past twelve years or so with like hulk verses and planet hulk and i'm sure a lot of people have a lot of our listeners. Have seen those even if they're not necessarily like full on like mainstream stuff but those were actually made by a completely separate company That that basically just sort of like it had somebody from marvel studios overseeing what was going on there but it's not necessarily. It certainly is not part of the moral studio. I'm sorry the marvel cinematic universe official canon or whatever so All of the stuff is going to be. I guess theoretically in-house at marvel. Maybe they're going to buy an animation company or something and and acquire them and bring them in house so Yeah i'm curious to see what the future of animation kennel click. What sounds like with what if they like with like a lot of things like hire out and have other like little mini studios. Do do whatever work like you know. There's multiple studios working on each episode. So i'm wondering you actually think that they're gonna actually have looking innovation. Campus like they'll actually buick disney ler. Erlich pixar where they actually have animators house. I mean if victoria want says that this innovation is i love. The company is a whole super excited about it. I would not be surprised. was has proven already that they have dominated the Live action movie landscape. They're already making pretty significant inroads into the live action television landscape with the disney plus shows and so animation. Seems like it's one of the few world that they have left to conquer right. Like i would not be surprised to see especially since the entire basis of marshall is based on comic books and there is certainly a line to be drawn there between animated stuff and the illustrations that appeared in the pages of comics that provide the inspiration for so many of these stories. I would not be surprised to see kevin fighting in the rest of the team. Just lean hard into this and yeah create their own campus and just start you. Know churning stuff out but To turn it back around to euro quick theater. You know we've seen previews for what if and that show has a certain visual style. I think one of the big complaints that people have about the marvel cinematic universe movies so far. Is that a lot of them. Quote unquote look the same but animation to me opens up so many possibilities of different visual. Looks that you can have for different types of stories that can be told. Do you think that marvel is going to use the look of one if as the sort of house style. Look for all of its animation. Going forward or do you think the lean into you know like On what were the the animatrix or something like a bunch of different styles. Depending on what kind of stories are gonna tell. Oh that's that's such an interesting question. I mean definitely judging by what they're going on the marble style of like what the characters look like in the movies and the technology and all that kind of stuff and even the action The the the guy directing these episodes is actually like the guy that was story boarding the actions of benjor's at marvel studios his big gig and I don't know that's a good question. Like could they have other things like were star..

jakup vanessa marvel studios Lonzo Mci Vanessa victoria buick disney Erlich pixar Ben mike disney marshall kevin benjor
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

01:35 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

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"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

03:35 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Tv too and they would rather something that makes them think can has the power and all the impact of of you know the long form narrative storytelling can pull off with brian and michael. The best thing about both of them is this script writers who were well together. They show runners who well together and they play well with others. You know on that for me is important. And it's weird for me. Sometimes you being moving from being neil neil. The the author of the book of whom the thing was based to kneel dadi and of the integrity of the thing and they are very good about letting me go Sometimes you know the the thing where they'll be like. Oh you know what do you think of this. You can't do that. I will throw myself in front of a bus and you know because it has to not be in there that karen would not do that and like but we love and they will bless them. They will let me do that. And i hear your working on a sequel to american gods. So you know right now. I'm working on the sequel to never wear. I have writing a new novel slightly. Be so much more sensible for me. Commercially take but iranian new. Never wear mostly. I think because of the work that i've been doing with refugees. Neverwhere was vehicle. That i built to be able to say political things about homelessness about being dispossessed about being Being cast out about not having a home and it seems to me like it's an incredibly good tool to go back right now in a world in which we have You know there are more people physically dispossessed now over sixty million people than there have been since the end of world war two. I'll i think we're actually getting to the point. Now whether more people were at the end of world war two who who are homeless refugees physically dispossessed physically displaced. You're seeing a hardening of political hearts and an unwillingness to help politically which is not doing anybody any good. So that's where my head is at right now and that's one of my team right now. When that's done. I will probably write a very silly funny children's books to clean and then maybe at that point dive into america to place. It's a it's a big important thing. It's not so much. thank you. American gods premiers on stars. On april thirtieth first episode is called the bone orchard where more introduced shadow moon. And also the mysterious mr wednesday. I also like to impart certain little things you can do to save some money like tink..

michael brian neil neil april thirtieth world war two both america first episode kneel dadi over sixty million people karen team tink wednesday one of american iranian American gods end
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"And if i get hit by a car they will be able to carry on. I think what's interesting is not. Everybody thinks this way or is doing this is that boosters will call you in contact say look we're stuck rather than just kind of put their own egos and will ourselves so reach out to you and there's more of a collaboration. It sounds like it's going on. It's just a recent trend. I've seen as being really. That's why the contents good. I think well. I've been contents got good. The biggest thing that's made contact get good. He's no longer have networks and standards and practices and people going people aren't going to understand that and even more than that what we've lost which is such a beautiful thing to have lost. Is the idea that every episode of every show must be not just that it's somebody's first and only episode but that it has to work for anybody for him. It's the first and only episode. We're now in a world in which continuity is wonderful which means things become chapters of a novel or even pages novel which means that depth and intelligence rather than becoming being bugs become features. And i watched it happen. We watched it happen with comics so for me. This is kind of strangely familiar in that. When i started writing comics we would just in the early. Days of salmon and watchmen would probably the first two comex web. Being a critical success was not also synonymous with being a commercial failure. Being intelligent was not the kiss of death. Actually there were people out there who thought that intelligent stuff was really good and wanted would come in for it and the fact that it was a serial medium meant that you could put more stuff in and right now we have that television Or the world in which being intelligent is not the kiss of death actually intelligent people watch..

first first two Days of salmon every comex
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"It's not even you know there are many many messages. Michaud the glorious thing right now about doing something in the golden age of television is it's not about just one thing it's about a lot of things it's about the immigrant experience it's about coming to america. It's about the what happens to cultures when they come here and what we leave behind. It's about the new goth's the things that pull our attention and our love and our belief and our interest and it's about all of those things but it's also about the people in the story and carrying about what happens to them and following them around. You know in the same way that you could say well. Breaking bad was about the nature of an economic climate. In which a you know. A teacher cannot actually cover the cost of cancer treatment. And you're sort of going off into that kind of world you know. Yeah but actually. It's about these two people and the fucked up lives and these other people around them and their fucked up lives and what's going to happen to them and so in terms of what people are going to take away from american gods. I will be perfectly happy if all take away. Is i really like shadow. I really like laura. I love but do not trust mr wednesday matt. Sweeney is fucking hilarious. I wonder what's going to happen. I would take the. Will we see crossover from san man. I mean the endless are gods. Aren't the endless are owned. By the time. I think i think if american goods is a huge success you may very well wind up seeing this. This is just said as a spectator. This isn't like knowledge that i now hinting. i think. give it a success. it might will push time-warner into going. Okay we have salmon. We really don't know what to do with it. We've had scripts with. Nobody is as movies but it is too big in to win to make into a movie. Much like gods. we've we've gone down around. Maybe doing it as tv but the things that make. Sandman sandman don't work on network tv on the other hand. You know i love the ticket. Tiny little spinoff from san like lucifer watch what become a huge hit for. So there's definitely that essentially you know a little bit of the san mateo. Simon university tiny bit of the sensibility. There and what you guys so hopefully You know i i would. I would definitely love to see this kind of treatment. Given the san man because salmon is a giant big story with lots of stuff and lots of moving parts and a huge cost would at the end of the day via rubbish movie but it could be an amazing teams. I think with the false starts for sandman on the big screen and the climate for cable. Tv being so much better. I think that's where it belongs. Do you see the books material being enough for two seasons. Maybe we end episode eight ends just before everybody goes off to the house on the rock. So i mean we we and the way that i've been talking with brian and michael about it we going. Okay well we can. Do you know season two. We're going to do this and we're going to do this season. Three with preliminary this Which means that season for is this and possibly season five. Is this to the end of season. Five is when. I would need to have any novel one of the nice things about having brian. Michael me all involved in all linked together his. I can do things even before the they started writing..

Michael michael brian america matt Sweeney laura two seasons two people Michaud san man Five Simon university Three episode eight season two season five one one thing Sandman
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

04:22 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Well we're going to boycott this. And i thought well i will. You're not going to boycott. It is technically what is called. Not watching which is a different thing slightly less impressive but but the fact that you would get people going. My entire identity is my world view is now being threatened by a show which is talking about things that seem fairly fucking. This is kind of astonishing to me and the fact that stuff. Which did not seem contentious. When i wrote it is now actually headlines saying american gods being the most political show twenty seventeen and as you know in terms of pop culture. Yes we probably will be. Did we set out to be that. No the whirlwind mad and we we were doing before the world went. There's more sci fi so stay tuned back on scifi talk. I'm tony tomato. When it star trek movie or star wars movie comes out there are scrutinized and now the buzz from some people is that shadow is not actually racially. Diverse will. Yeah but that's only because they will lazy. I mean i i. That's let said with an enormous amount of love and respect to my audience and said as somebody who has a little white boy managed to read novels with characters who were not white and completely miss that fact and later you know would reread and go. Oh my god. I completely missed the fact that this country's shadow. Yeah the what is important to us about shadow is that he is a mix of races. And that's how he is described in the book. That is how you know when his skin color is described. That is how people react to him. That is people wanna you know. Ask him about his racial makeup. We got incredible amount of support on that. It was very interesting because when we began talking with brian and michael. I said look one of the things that is sacrosanct. Is the racial mixture in this Many years ago. I with the novela. Nancy boys i got a phone call from A fancy hollywood director producer and they were like we love this book. It's times bestseller. We think the plot is amazing. We want to make it into a movie. And i'm like great like we're gonna off your ridiculous amount of money. And i'm like great and they're like we're gonna make everybody in white and i said what they're going to be white but you can't it's an nc. It's the it's black from africa. Yeah you don't get it. Black people don't go to fantasy movies and white people aren't going to see pending new fantasy movie with with black and i said okay. I'm i'm not selling you guys. It's been great talking to you. And and that was where everything ended so going into. American goats was like okay. This is the many things that are important to me but the most important thing is the racial makeup in the book is the racial makeup and actually became even became a thing that were you know. We probably saw or additions from four hundred potential shadows and there was some actors who were fantastic and who were unquestionably black and stars. Bless them with the ones going well mixed race and we wanna keep keep him mixed race and then with robey. Eventually ricky whittle got the part of shadow mood what message. You hope that people will take regarding immigration. I think one of the things that you're gonna wind up seeing..

michael brian africa star trek star wars one four hundred potential shadows American tomato american Many years ago twenty seventeen things Nancy hollywood
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

02:18 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"You okay you nobody. Seeing a performance like what she does in episode for as far as i'm concerned like so nominate comed- pablo is like the lovely wonderful surprise. Because i wrote a thing where you write the dialogue and you write a character and you'll very proud of what written but it's watching watching public doing the queen tricks watching him deliver the line. And how did you do that with patch this. I'm i'm laughing at a joke. That i worked twenty years later because of the way that you deliver. This is amazing. What kind of changes were made to adapt it to television. What what's fascinated me. Most is two things one of which is how little we've had to change. And how much of what we did. When i wrote it seventeen years ago which seemed fairly non-contentious and even when we were writing the scripts seemed very non-contentious. Seemed like nobody is going to argue with this stuff. Well obviously we are. You know you're in. America is a country of its. Everybody came here from somewhere else. And you know and then people who were you know yes. There were people who came here across land bridges and boats and twenty thousand years ago when separate everybody into an empty land and they filled it and some came under the arrest. And it's a racially diverse cast. Because it's a racially diverse country. That sort of these. These are the things that seemed as they say self evident. I'm at least things that you couldn't argue with. And then three weeks ago. I was being interviewed on the red carpet at the empire film awards and i just talked about this as a as a show that was fundamentally about immigrants and that being a good thing about people coming to america about the racial mixture of the thing and and i'm looking at the comments when the daily express puts it up on i've set up online and they begin with people going..

america America twenty thousand years ago twenty years later comed- pablo seventeen years ago three weeks ago two things one empire film awards carpet
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"And i was mostly sort of kibitzing doing the equivalent leaning over their shoulder. And say you don't do that and then And then a year later. I was like i got a phone call from the big bang. Theory's and would you like to be yourself in the big bang theory and i to say no. I can't. it's shooting of american goods and they'll be in toronto and they're like i went off to toronto and i watched ricky meeting each other on an airplane. I thought okay. This is in good hands. It seems like you're still writing it after doing a bio for mad sweeney. Well we see that in publication in some form. That's a great question because they're not actually written for they're not written for the public that is written for. It's a great relationship with with brian. Michael in the and it's a weird kind of two way relationship. You know they will phone me and say with stucco. Miss a your. Here's where we are in the plot. But you know i can say oh well you know this would happen or why. Don't you do this. Or whatever which is a lot of. Because i've known the characters for very long time and i can so that's good. Some of it is me to sing. You can't do that and whether it's seen that they wrote where somebody just goes out of character say no. You can't do that that that carry the would not do that. We think he wouldn't. I wouldn't and then later also sort of gaining credibility as they come back and gun. You will write anything you know that now because watch this thing. I knew it because they've been living in my head for so long. There was one point. You haven't seen it because it's the beginning of episode five but we have this beautiful animated sequence where the animation was fantastic but once the animation was done it became very obvious that the duration that had been written which was good direction didn't work with the animation..

Michael brian toronto one point a year later two way relationship ricky american episode five each
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

04:06 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Yeah good point. And i would never hear from them so that meant that. As far as i was concerned it was unfilmable. I would never be filmed and at that time. The idea of putting something like this on television wiz also ridiculous. So i didn't think about it and then the world began to change some of you know looking back on a lot of what made me interested in putting this on television with that. I've been i fall in love with dr who i wrote an episode of doctor who the doctor's wife i started going. Oh i like this. I like what you can do in television now. This is really this feels very alive. I won a load of awards for his wife. Which also where you do something people love it. that's nice. I found myself initially in a conversation with. Hbo an executive hbo loved it. They bought it was doing it in association with tom. Hanks's playtime company who were great guys and particularly working with an executive who was there. Stephanie burke the exact at hbo who had bought it went away and by the time we handed in a first draft script. It was to people who didn't get it and really didn't get it and it was like okay and did a couple of drops and polish for them and at the end of which they will like we. We really don't get this thing. We don't quite get it was. We don't understand it. Please have your book back which was great. And then we couldn't work with plato anymore because play tones deal was just with the hbo guys. Stephanie burke who had been that plato had moved over to fremantle and the first thing she did on moving. The fremantle was found me and say so american gods. I love it as much as i did a year ago. Two years ago. Can we do it. And i said yes. Let's do it. So stephanie. And i And craig sagansky from fremantle when around had a few conversations with Places it could go. It became very apparent that styles would be a really good home for it and that The guys that stars who. I actually met many many years earlier Back when they were. Hbo the original hbo. Chris comey they got it and they loved it and they were like. Yeah we this. This would be amazing. I flew out met with brian. On the first of april twenty fourteen met brian shangrila hotel lobby and in toronto. We sat in and it was like. Would you like to you know kind of sound him out about god's and what was great about that may not sound regular really was was he. It wasn't like we sat down. I'm brian okay. So american got. This is my plan. It was much more sitting down and brian. i'm. I'm a huge fan of american goats. I bought it when it came out. I love it. I don't know how you'd make it into a tv series. But i know that if you did we'd have to put that thing. That's in the book on the screen and i'm going okay. This seems good and michael came onboard. Stars said yes feels for A year later scripts were being written..

toronto brian michael Chris Two years ago hbo Hbo play tones Stephanie burke a year ago tom. Hanks first draft craig sagansky stephanie plato A year later first april twenty fourteen fremantle first thing
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

03:51 min | 8 months ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"I write kach. My name is calling salmon. i played shade. One resident evil. Is peter deluise from twenty one jump street and the director of many episodes of stargate. St one also from quick and the more recent sanctuary and blood ties. And you're listening to sifi dog. You get more sifi. Talk for your site by talk. This is tony talaat on. Welcome to a special edition of scifi. Talk as i have the roundtable with neil gaiman. God's his famous novel now coming to television on stars here is how we p describes american gods. It's a hugo and nebula award. Winning novel by english author neil gaiman. The novel is a blend of american fantasy in various strands of ancient and modern mythology. All centering on the mysterious shadow and we'll hear about shadow and some of the other characters. Just some notes before we begin this is uncensored so i have not cut any of the language what he says what he said that day. He does mention brian and michael. Which are the show runners bryan fuller and michael green. I also be asking all the questions even though this was a roundtable setting. Let's begin to to do this for television. To begin with. I wrote it in nine hundred ninety nine two thousand two thousand one finished. I mean finish the last revision on it in january. Two thousand and i spent the previous three years writing a lot of movies..

michael bryan fuller brian neil gaiman michael green january english peter deluise hugo and Two thousand three years one nine hundred nebula award tony talaat twenty one jump street ninety nine two thousand two thousand stargate One
A Birthday Lesson by Adi Redzic on How To Be Courageous & Be Your Authentic Self

Optimal Living Daily

05:18 min | 1 year ago

A Birthday Lesson by Adi Redzic on How To Be Courageous & Be Your Authentic Self

"A birthday lesson by ATI Zik of AUDIE REDZIC DOT COM? Apparently, age only matters if you're cheese. I am pretty cheesy. So every year at my birthday, do cheesy thing and reflect on the lessons from the year before last year I wrote thirty one lessons for thirty one years is my birthday last Monday but instead of writing another list this year, I ask myself what is one theme that I've thought a lot about inexperienced as essential to a life well lived. Courage. Of come to understand that courage is the greatest expression of love. My Angeles said quote courage is the most important of all virtues because without courage, you can't practice any other virtue. Consistently, he practice any virtue erratically but nothing consistently without courage and quote. We delight in the beauty of the butterfly but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty that change took courage. Make, no mistake. Courage is not the absence of fear. Courage is staring fear in the face and still doing what scares us the because is exactly what leads to the fulfillment of our greatest purpose in creation of a truly full life. I've experienced this firsthand. Scared a lot many nights I found myself afraid and overwhelmed eyes filled with tears fear can seem very real. This past year was especially hard and scary but facing my fears even when it was really hard has made all the difference. Shows Campbell called fears are dragons, and it is only when we get close to them that they disappear. Only when we have a drink with the proverbial demon's our greatest fears, parts of ourselves, our psyche we try to disown, do the fear seize to assist. said that we are all as sick as our secrets. It's not fear that keeps US trat. It's hiding fear. Courage therefore liberates us. It is hard to be courageous because much harder living life without courage. In the end we won't regret the things we did, but we regret not showing up in a big way and taking risks. You know why B's courage is the greatest expression of love. I've asked myself if I ever had children where I want their daddy to be a lion or a weasel. All my Kiddos to know that I had a heart of a lion. To quote, Teddy, Roosevelt's I WANNA be the man in the arena not the man on the sidelines being afraid of living of loving of daring greatly and quote. Only when we are brave to, we realize what we're made of and to quote Campbell again, it's a privilege of a lifetime to be who we are and quo. We to choose how he wants to use up our lives. Oh, you choose a lion or a weasel. At the base of every personal or organizational dysfunction, there is fear. So I choose to imagine a world where we all have a bit more courage to face down those fears. That's how we heal that. We leave a better world for those who come after us. Jim Warren Talks about liking quote messy people people who don't fit in a box stay between the lines but whose integrity is greater than any rule book and whose loyalty is stronger than blood and quote. We can't be that person without courage. I WANNA have the courage to be that person. Back urges in you too. We often encourages for some mythical euros dismissing true is reserved for us because of us has the heart of a lion inside. And here's why is really important to be courageous. When we are courageous, we inspire those around us. We help those we love have courage to live authentically fully deeply to. When we are courageous and living truthfully, we let others know that they too can do the same. When we are courageous, we face our deepest fears we heal. We understand life in an entirely different way we risk deep connection. Thrill, and joy where courageous we help those in need we stand up for what is right we leave this world better than we have found it only when we are courageous too. We get to reach our greatest potential only when we are courageous too. We follow our bliss only when we are courageous, our life align are being integrates into we make our children indeed everyone around us know only how deeply we love. Them. To be courageous hard. But if we aren't, how can we say we have lived tore loved well more really live at all. Sometimes the hardest thing in the right thing or the same in being courageous as always the rightist and the hardest thing. How do we get to be courageous? It's simple really if it scares you do it. Take the leap and the net will appear people give up on wonderful things in life because of familiarity is more important than bliss have courage not to do this. Trust that when we are courageous doors will open where there was only a wall before this is proven true many times and all of our lives. And if fears are a dragon's then Neil gaiman puts it quote fairy tales are more than true not because they tell us that dragons exist. But because they tell us that dragons can be beaten and quote. I hope he will slay your own dragons. The world needs you to do that.

Campbell United States Neil Gaiman Ati Zik Angeles Roosevelt Jim Warren B
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Lesbians Who Write Podcast

Lesbians Who Write Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Lesbians Who Write Podcast

"Make holiday starter line. You only have so much retiring. Corinthian not limitless. We'll check you later. By which shoe better luck player? Carl let me let me is all right. So appearance also committed on the website Here it is strictly defined a show to watch in his starting one and stopping by the second one because of a boredom and apparently period can only apparently books are only thing keeping periods of tension during these uh strange type so I wish pyramid happy reading in. I've kind of had the same problem with shows like started a few like literally within like two minutes. I'm like no I think is the worst or spoiled for choice these days will we're streaming shows. No Yeah I think that was a thing done like a study done back in the day when there was no kindle you just had a book. I think he gave a lot longer. I always think you have to sit with the book for an hour because if you might get into it within the first fifteen minutes but if you sit for an hour quite often you will. I've done that but I think you last night the kindle because you've got a whole world even tits and probably the same TV that because I started on recently was telling you yesterday I started t- show good omens because I'm a huge fan of Neil gaiman in after the first episode. I don't know if I was this all. I think we have covered the fact that I've been in a bad mood this week. So maybe that was influencing my Being in a bad mood watching television shocking news while if you've got let flex we did watch a documentary on that. This week could circus books and that was really good. It was about a straight couple. He Ran San Francisco's of a biggest Gay Porn bookshop for years and they stumbled into it and then they cut it became advocates for the gay community and everything say was weekend net flicks is like the one. I don't have like every other streaming possibility but not netflixing mother fucker. Top suggesting netflixing all.

Neil gaiman Carl San Francisco
"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

08:57 min | 1 year ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hi everybody welcome to season two episode twelve of the rookie writer show. I'm h-share Brown. And today we're GONNA be talking about. Neil gaiman teaches the art of storytelling. Which is his masterclass. So it's actually a rookie class rebuked this week. I have to say I am seriously loving this masterpass That makes it possible for you to take many classes as you want And I'm also loving this challenge that I've given myself to review a different book or class every week. Because it's actually holding my feet to the fire so I have a little bit of extra accountability to get me to taking. Get me taking these classes. Because what if it had taken me longer to get around and taking the class it would have been like putting off the ability to like see a new color or here in new kind of music. That's how he makes you feel like you're discovering things. It's the overall feeling I got from this course. The awakening of the Eyes Wide Open fully alive kid inside who too often has to sit quietly while I manage the logistics of being a grown up in a mom and away. Whatever so you know much the way his writing makes you feel. That's how classes so like I said about Joyce Carol oates masterclass and could have said about David Bell Dodge. He's for that matter. How can you pass up having Neil gaiman teach a class a masterclass in your living room or on your daily commute or while? You're chopping vegetables for the evening dinner. He just can't so in case you haven't ever heard of him. Here is a thumbnail sketch. You've heard the expression triple threat. Maybe well he would laugh at such a low bar if he wasn't such a nice person Pretty much if it can be written. He writes it Short FICTION NOVELS GRAPHIC NOVELS COMIC Books Film Television and just for kicks. Let's throw in some audio theater and some nonfiction and did I mention that. He does this for multiple audiences so you can find his work in both the adults and the children sections and he doesn't really well. He's taken home. The Hugo Nebula. The bram stoker the newbery and the Carnegie in fact he's the first author to ever win the newbery medal which is given in the US by librarians and the Carnegie Medal which is given in the UK for the same work The book that did that was the graveyard book. If you haven't read the ocean at the end of the lane which is one of my favorites. You really should in two thousand thirteen. The British national book gave it the top honor as their top book for the year. Or maybe check out his comic book series the Sandman which was awarded the Eisner Award and that's prize since the La Times described it as the greatest epoch. In the history of the form and Stephen King declared that the Sandman had turned graphic novel into art You can catch US work on. Tv If you're watching American gods or good omens or on film if you've seen core line so it will probably surprise. No one familiar with his work that his masterclass is a little more philosophical and laced with a fair amount of whimsy and humor He spends a lot of time on things. Like sources of infor- inspiration finding your voice and a writers responsibilities but he also does cover the nuts and bolts of storytelling sessions on things like world building descriptions dialogue character editing. Things like that and there is a nice section on the rules for writers that has some juicy stuff on both mindset in the business side of rating so like usual. I can only cover three things a hack and a quote. There's so much more than I'm GONNA be able to cover but here my three things number one be honest when you're lying while at one point game in says what you're doing is lying but you're using the truth in order to make your lives convincing and true. That was a quote what he means by this. Is that the underlying message. The heart of your story must be true so last week if you caught robbing cannibals review of consider this by Chuck Politic She mentioned that Chuck also pushes us to go there into the spaces that make us uncomfortable and how true they are so you have to write from a place of intense honesty Or again as Neil gaiman puts it quote. Be More honest than you're comfortable with because all fiction has to be as honest as you can make it. It's quote. It's what people connect to the most in your story. Is that kind of honesty that shows itself through the characters and how they come at the the story. Line that you put them in. He urges you to be willing. Here's another quote to be willing to do the equivalent of walking down a street naked and be able to show off too much yourself and cope. I told you humor in Ramsey okay. Number to be consisted be consisted B. E. All right. I'm not GONNA do it. Sorry you can't though it actually works out so for someone who is known for being exceptionally good at inventing. Entire world or adding an imaginative. Twist or lens to this one. It would seem to be counterintuitive that he would be such a stickler on this point but actually makes perfect sense. If you're asking the reader to come along with you on a fantastical journey get the details rate. Know the rules of your world and be loyal to them. Know the details of the of your world even if you don't use them all because and getting your real world facts straight Both build your credibility and angers the readers in the story so they can take on the more unfamiliar elements of your story. Because you've handled the ones that they might be familiar with. People will notice if you change the rules or get a fact wrong and it will diminish the experience. You're creating for them if it has to happen. One trick he had and they're like little bonus hack is make sure that your characters react to the fact that something that the rules are being broken in some fashion or something seems off. It should factor into the story itself number three rules for writers. I referred to this earlier so towards the end of the class. He says that he's always followed a version of and I might be mispronouncing. This but high lines business rules and he uses it when he's approaching publication so here are neal's adapted rules for writers and I think that they're pretty self explanatory without a whole lot of commentary from me so here they come number one. You have to write number two you have to finish. What right number three. You have to send it out to someone who could publish it number. Four refrain from rewriting except to editorial request. And then even then not always number five when it comes back which it will all lot send it out again and number six. Then start the next thing. One thing I wanNA make clear really quickly is that when he said refrained from rewriting he doesn't mean don't revise. In fact there is a great section on revising. He just means don't endlessly before laying around with one thing trying to get it so perfect that it never gets out the door so at the core of a publishing career are these rules and he says that they have served him very well as you can see okay. Today's hat comes in the form of a bonus quote in here comes. You always have to remember when people tell you that something doesn't work for them that they're right. It doesn't work for them and that is incredibly important information. You also have to remember that when people tell you what they think is wrong and how you should fix it. They're almost always wrong. So I'm GONNA leave that right there Here is the actual weekly quotation. I know of laid a lot of them on. You're ready but it's Neil Gaiman. What do you want I like this one in particular just because in the face of all the people like him accomplished. It can be very daunting and so here comes. This is his quote. You can fix dialogue. That isn't quite there. You can fix the beginning of something but you cannot fix nothingness so you have to be brave. You have to just start. You've probably heard a lot of versions of that is not something new but it's always nice be reminded that by someone like this class will take you about four hours during which time you will feel like you have somehow found a magic door. Back to your own uninhibited childhood. Creativity like usual what he has to tell us as far far beyond what? I could summarize here like I said I. With hundred percent recommend this class to any fiction. But if you're a speculative fiction writer sci fi fantasy horror things like that. I think you should strongly consider it. So there are two ways to access a masterclass individual classes cost ninety bucks and then you have access to them forever or the all access pass costs one hundred and eighty bucks a year works out to be about fifteen bucks a month and it gives you access to all the classes you just..

Neil gaiman writer US h-share Brown Joyce Carol oates Eisner Award Chuck Politic Hugo Nebula Stephen King La Times UK David Bell Dodge Ramsey neal
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
"neil gaiman" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"So we have a lot of people hang on for J. Michael Straczynski perhaps best known for Babylon five but if you ever want a a measure of just what an impact he made I think it's fair to point out that the introduction for the book was written by Neil Gaiman it's always cool when Neil Gaiman's writing your part your introduction of your book you know you've done something I think in your life and I know you all work together to which is even cooler in the week we had to do we leave anything off before the bottom of the hour another we did did we ever get okay good Anna in mesa Arizona on coast to coast for J. Michael Straczynski go ahead Anna J. Michael you know and and again to the shooting my heart goes out to the shootings in the you know families and stuff but and I tell you you know he said on on you never know who has the right idea and lots of people never know that they are the ones that have the right idea and just think thanks Ron on the on the stories and stuff but my question was for Babylon five I can't remember why does mini bar sleep diagonally in that and that was that I'm just the perfect time to give you a call well either Lori right got that from I was in England I was touring Stratford upon Avon and went to Shakespeare's old homes and what they did was of the woods stack up to build the beds are very short the reason for which was it was stuck up pillows at the headboard and people would sleep sitting up because it was considered bad luck to sleep lying flat because that would help you will put out when you were dead idea of of a a that that rose upward as part of like a good luck thing became part of what the Minbari believed in what I found in in the passive whatever you can take something that we do ourselves and her it is ten degrees to one side it becomes very alien surveillance so that's what I came from yeah cool but love that and Ryan is in Phoenix on coast to coast a fan of J. Michael Straczynski yeah I would what you thought of the common people but I also want to know if you have any upcoming projects like I would love to see another series like us and they but with like rising stars of the nation and I also wondered if you had any upcoming book tours are conditions by well comics gate is an hour and a half long conversation I think that currently in the works I just saw a novel to Simon Schuster will be coming out in the spring mainstream I'm running a pilot for the USA network I'm ready for a new kind of a company called artists writers artists and started by bill ham us an actual Lonzo who crew with the publisher and editor in chief of Marvel Comics for many years insular the right never stops and it it just it just keeps going on and end up together parents this coming this week coming up the starting this Thursday in Connecticut also be doing the politics of pro politics and prose bookstore in Washington DC the the the two days later also the cartoon art museum and you and your comic con and want to other Christians my flat waist of page has all the dates no that's totally cool all right but what was the other one then was sensei coming back was we barely talked about on Netflix but is a great series all you do that having else like something in the works right but not nothing like like that I alternative to walk in the same stream twice but the the short developing for USA network I think could be very cool in it's a modern contemporary fantasy thing which I'm working out with a very well known as a writer so that could be a lot of one very cool thank you right do you know my friend David Mack I know the name yeah kabuki and he works he also works with Neil Gaiman he did this is the same and stuff Sheila is in Springfield on coast to coast AM and she was an early fan of J. Michael Straczynski Sheila yes hi there I just wanna let you know Jameis Stravinsky by the way someone home you're supposed to call Joe someone else's only so if you call Mike all right there is little we have your book on my lap it's called the complete book of script writing you read this we were just what thirty years ago I think and it's still like one of the number one go to books in screenwriting courses it really helped me a lot in my screenwriting efforts and I've regrettably I had to get out of screen writing I had to take care of my mom when she got very sick but as far as how far actually got in that really long Klein to becoming a successful scriptwriter which I did not I got to the point where I was able to successfully query screenplays sentiments the studios and then they ask you got that it was always a past that they always said we have to pass on the screenplay but you have anything else which means they couldn't produce septic this screenplay but they liked my style they like like when I had to offer so that's only as far as I got this book is just a best reading even if you pick up this book just the first chapter I think he and the really really entertaining a lot and my one final gushing moment of a gushing fan is the one of the principals in screenwriting as far as how to make it well that you drove home what you have to write the first ten pages of your screenplay must be absolutely killer and in this book you give us a sample of your first hand of a screenplay called the strange case of Christine Collins which of course was turned into that magnificent film called changeling starring Angelina Jolie and that was a killer killer firsthand it would have left you hanging and wanted more with the death was the first ten of the screen but you need it anybody in the audience wants this think about becoming a screenwriter by this book so there that's a free ad for you yeah that that that was right there in time was right for your whole life changed when I couldn't make it work and other at the first ten pages he is writing a book no I did I I I sold a screenplay of sorts earlier I write pot guy right I've been writing for less your serve in writing up fiction podcast which has been very fun with somebody that sold any but they're great it's a great time but I did I wrote it I sold a sketch to Bozo's circus when I was like twenty years old I sold the sketch about golly the gorilla and it it if they they paid fifty Bucks for it he actually aired it I never saw it but somebody in the dorm right right when I was in college and somebody in the dorm Saad said Hey did your sketch of a gorilla with the net and I was like yes we like it just it just right as always Mister Kim is in Saint Louis a coast to coast AM for J. Michael Straczynski of Babylon five and more Tim yeah Joe are there any plans to do anything in the future with the Babylon five universe like with crusader legend of the Rangers or anything like that no Warner brothers is sitting on the the right seat so that you know they don't want to do that without one five the lady personal animus against the show really yeah they do yep which way they took a Sears is proud of the show and opted to put it on Amazon yeah they they don't like in the T. ten shows that were done and it is said that they this is one person per ticket aware but who simply will not let anything without with it so we're hoping that eventually he will retire if we can have a shot at it they're interesting I thank you west of the Rockies Andre is in Seattle on coast to coast Andre first time beyond hope the coast anniversary all J. huge fan of yours I just finished all of Babylon five but yeah I just I myself actually work in the film industry but mostly in the in the film side of things that's one I J. we're ahead of film produced a couple years ago called Bates has just you know anything bad up you can gain power in it okay here's where I should go from there I've never tried again either in or anything like that and I've written a lot five five over last couple years well I think you answered your own question if you have some that was produced earlier that you're calling card and you should definitely go out to your agent but the best way of doing that is your right the other couple specs hopefully different genres ticket make a series right now do a a spec script for that because you have to work your way up but yet at the stage where you are right now there's a lot to step is to go out and get major I wish I could be more creative and half of that's true yeah and it's that weird thing where you can't get an agent of the plus you've done something and you can't do something because you have an agent which is always you know again it speaks to the the way in which you did it was pretty genius you were able to break through without an agent and then you got an agent that specialized in into doing representing animation writers but then even there you they you sort of parlayed that into doing eventually doing that live action stuff that you were a part of it just like every you did everything right even if it didn't always work out right or at least so it seems do you have a lot of regrets do you have any yeah that's another three hour long conversation what I will say though to the agent thing here think hurting the good news is you know whatever it is an agent as a client eventually that client out there doing well we outgrow the agency and move up to somewhere else the agent has to go out and find someone new there is every year about you know two or three hundred your take new writers self for the first time enjoy the writers guild and every year new clients are picked up by agents that that they have to be at that they don't pick up the clients who have nobody so it does happen did they do make first sales agents to take on new clients it's a struggle to Hannah but but it does happen yes it does then the it all comes down to to being persistent and and ultimately for being talented which kind of I circle back to Norman Corwin who recognized early on and save you from I mean there's even like it's close to because of how you manipulated the system at San Diego state how you manipulated their computer system in order to get into his class it was kind of a choice between you being kicked out of the school for you getting into his class because he liked the material that you had to present him it you know to get permission from the instructor to be able to take the class and he read your material and he liked it enough that he over read the decision which was to throw you out I mean it just does it comes down to these make or break moments that you have all the time where you take a standard you roll the dice big and sort of reminds with people say about show me somebody who said they've never gotten a break in she somebody's never taken yeah well the only benefits I can think of to consular moving around when I was a kid and losing everything I've ever owned that's was toss up by the side of the road it's I realized I didn't have anything to lose after awhile and there's a point where you start to become you know relatively Fairless they realize there's nothing they can do for you you know they they can't tell you they can easily get put on TV jail why not take a chance live there pick what what's gotten the Harlan Ellison mostly run there's a saying that the more time you spend hang out with lions the less improbable becomes the idea of warring I've met a lot of people in my life reliance and from them I learned to war and to take chances because honestly what's.

J. Michael Straczynski Neil Gaiman thirty years twenty years ten degrees three hour two days
Emma Thompson talks new movie and

The Frame

09:45 min | 2 years ago

Emma Thompson talks new movie and

"Thomson she's in a movie called late night. It opens this weekend. She also took on a Hollywood titan who has fired for sexual harassment and then quickly got another job and late night. Thompson plays opposite Mindy Kaeling. She also wrote the movie Mindy Kaeling script was one of those strange things immediately, good upon first reading just great. She had a good idea. And she really knew how to bring in for you. That's a. Plus, she said, I wrote it for you. So of course, you haul things, anything God is going to be bad going to be bad, because it's not going away anytime soon being earnest and kind so luckily, I wasn't I was in a blazer with looked back here being incredibly mean most of the time journal, just had our second baby Taylor adorable. She takes to you. Thanks, so there's just a lot of expenses at home right now and I think it's time for a race. I see. This is actually very exciting to be really great because what you're describing is the most clear out example of the classic sexist argument for the advancement of men in the workplace you're asking for raise not because of any work related contribution. You've made but simply because you have a family, and that's why in the nineteen fifties family men were promoted over the women. They worked with never encountered is in such a clean teachable way. How would you describe Catharine Newbury? She is a late night host. She is successful. But maybe the future doesn't look as bright. Well, she's someone who was so driven right from a very early age. We did shoot a little bit of heart doing stand up in London. And when she was very young. And actually, we used my stand up from tally, the I did in nineteen forty five. I remember when forty six can't come on and. I remember so clearly that feeling of whenever I did stand up in my twenty s of being one of certainty. If not the only woman, then one of two amongst great load of men, who were often quite standoffish didn't clearly, expect anything view, so. Spoke to me on every level, we took that piece out because it just didn't help with the story actually in the end. But Mindy understands that, she understands what it's like to be the one who's different not only because of being a woman, but also being a person of color in a fuel the only one you're going to feel different, and that's not comfortable, a lot of the time, it just simply isn't comfortable, and we're not very honest about not. I don't think and she's only about it. She was a diversity higher. She's written about someone who was a diversity. I if that hadn't happened, maybe we wouldn't have this movie. So go, diversity reactively talked to the director of the film Nisha Ghana Tra and she talked about Catherine, as one of those women who came up in the entertainment business. When women were made to believe that other women were their adversaries, not their allies. They were sold this idea that there's only room at the table for one. And if you're here, then you better make sure nobody threatens your position here. And any other women coming up may have been seen as a threat to that position rather than adding to the workforce. And so I think what I love about this movie. Is it sort of breaks up myth? Yeah. I wonder if just women who had, I don't think of men is being enormously generous and warm, too young men, who coming up and might take their position. I think that it might be not only women but just the nature of the power structures that we have created. Do you know what I mean? Like I didn't think of, of blogs coming into writing room and everyone going. Hey, your great. You're a young thrusting blood, a guy like me. I can't wait to give you some extra airtime. I didn't think that happens with mine, iza. And I think that's a problem of power. Right. But I think there's something more to what Nisha sane. And that is that if you're a woman coming up that you are so aware of how limited the opportunities are obsolete that you start to see other women not as your peers. But as your. Arrivals, and that becomes an inch hawk sake. Talk sake. Absolutely. The, the conditions of power do not make it possible, especially for people who find it difficult to get into that position in the first place to be generous will be welcoming will be mentoring or want to help. Movie that you chose not to make. And this is the animated film luck that was at sky dance, which is David Ellison's company animation comedy, paramount and you decided not to make it because guy dance had hired John Lasseter has been fired from Pixar for the way that he treated women. And you wrote a letter that I have described on the air as the Magna Carta of the metoo movement, is one of the most beautiful eloquent, and well argued letters about this whole notion of the way women are treated the way men are forgiven that I found profound, and I hope you would share these two paragraphs with with us right now too. If a man has been touching women inappropriately for decades. Why would a woman want to work for him? If the only reason he's not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave professionally. If a man has made women his companies feel undivided and disrespected for decades. Why should the women at his new company think that any respect he shows them is anything other than an act that he's required to perform by his coach his therapist and his employment agreement. The message seems to be I am learning to feel respect for women. So please be patient, while I work on it. It's not easy. What motivated you to write it? What gave you the ability to write it. Very good questions. When I left the production, and then I wrote to Lindsey Durand about it, and in these one of the most brilliant, women, I know, said, Phil, can you talk to some women about this? I'd really be interested to know what's going on. And in fact, that letter is the work of many voices is not just my voice because those questions, very much came from those women. So the dots what's wonderful about it is that it is a collective voice, and I sent it to sky downs and didn't receive a reply, and because I showed it was quite a lot of people because of the issue, being very pressing, a lot of just as you go to publish it, and that was quite a big decision because it's just a public, but the. Vision turned out to be the right one because. Those with the questions that needed to be oft and to this date of not been onset in any way. I've had no response public or personal back from sky don's an dots very disappointing. Because they only way we're going to get anywhere with this own going issue is by talking to each other. It's not just a public thing to do its thing that potentially, and this is what has happened over the last couple of decades, that has kept women silent is they fear that they will be punished that they will be blackballed. They won't get parts that people will rise. They're absolutely really. Why were you able to I'm sixty on thought too old not to woke my own talk time is very much marching on. And because I had spoke to not before when the Weinstein thing blew up, and I've always spoken about this. I was young woman. I'm there was up -solutely, no choice really. And what was interesting to me in very touching was responses. I got from so many people male and female, who had done the same thing who would walk away and who don't have. Perhaps, don't feel as stoppage does I feel you know, I couldn't do other things. It's not going to kill my career even if sky don'ts, says, we're never going to work with you again, and we're going to tell every other animation, but I don't think that that would be possible now because the do feel that with the metoo time's up moving. There is a tipping point. But we do have to keep on, and on one of the ways in which I think we're going to have to do that. We got to talk to people before during, and after film shoots the thing, the clever thing about anybody who's going to bully. Is that they'll do it, not in front of someone who's going to say you can't do that? They'll do it in secret or in quiet or in private. And it's very difficult, for instance, for someone who's a runner, and who can be replaced in five minutes to say anything, bad about someone who will cost a lot of money to replace an all of these things. They have implications for everyone.

Mindy Kaeling Nisha Ghana Tra Thomson Harassment Taylor Hollywood Thompson Catharine Newbury Sky Downs Sky Dance Pixar London Director John Lasseter David Ellison Lindsey Durand Catherine Weinstein Phil
G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

Tell Them, I Am

11:54 min | 2 years ago

G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

"This episode g willow Wilson, she's a comic book author, and she wrote the first marvel comic with a young Muslim woman as the hero, Kamla, Han aka MS marvel. So when I was in high school, I was kind of a giant Goth. I was the kind of insufferable kid who, who would say that they were not actually cost the Gosper, too pretentious, and that I was above that of. But Nevertheless, I wore the really dark lipstick and like the fish nuts, and the pseudo Victorian jackets, that you could find like buffalo exchange. Yeah. I mean, if you looked up Goss in the dictionary, you would have found a photo of me somewhere. Fortunately, for me around the same time, sort of the late eighties early nineties, this British wave of very literary experimental comics started coming out. And I ran Pedley became obsessed, and one of my absolute favorite series, as was the case for a lot of people was Sandman by Neil Gaiman. Which took a World War, Two era, kind of be list, super hero and turned him into this mythological dream king who goes on adventures with all kinds of different, mythical creatures and kind of deconstructs, western mythology from a really interesting point of view. So, you know, for me as like a fourteen year old fifteen year old mega Goth this was huge and revelatory. Not just the story itself, but the medium of comics. Sandman told a kind of story in comic book form that I didn't really know was possible. It was kind of my first exposure to these more literary more adult kinds of comics, when I was a kid comics were still considered very much a kids, medium, and particularly a boys medium. There were not things that were marketed at girls. There were very few books out there that were adjacent to the superhero world that were marketed to adults so to see a comic book that was very clear and open in its love for that classics Hooper hero story. And yet, at the same time talked about Shakespeare and Chaucer and you know, brought in a very Joseph Cambell kind of U of mythology. Just expanded my understanding of what could be done within the pages of a comic book. I want to take a quick break to tell you about another podcast. I worked on it's called the big one your survival guide. We walk you through what it would be, like, if a major earthquake hit Los Angeles, and we help you understand what you need to know, to survive science and journalism, and immerses you and the experience of being in a huge earthquake. Don't be scared. We help you prepare. You can find it today wherever you listen to this show. Okay. Back to tell them. I am. So as I remember, the first time I found Neil, Gaiman Sandman, I was at the apartment of a friend. Who is I think about two years older than me and had graduated. And they were already living on their own. And so we're, we're very kind of cool and grown up in my eyes. You know, the, the people who live, there had also been giant Goths. So there were clove cigarettes, which were still legal at the time sitting around, and, ashtrays, and that's kind of always what it smelled, like, which I like the smell of. But it had that kind of late nineties, Goth aesthetic, every all the windows were kind of draped in, like, JoAnn fabric in sort of dark colors. It was it was just that kind of place. This apartment had a collective library of all kinds of great stuff, and they were all reading Sandman, and they had they'd just sort of made a rule, you can read whatever you want, but don't take anything out of the apartment. But because their library was so big. I was like, nobody will notice if I just kind of sneaked these back issues out and read them on my own, so I did. And. It was one of those reading experiences that, that kind of sticks out in your mind as being something for which there is a before. And an after he read this book. It made me feel a lot less grubby as a Goth it, oh, it was a very unabashedly Goth comic. And it was kind of cool to see something with such a huge cultural impact that was kind of headlined by this very Goth guy with white makeup, an extremely scruffy kind of Robert Smith, secure hair, and it was kind of a nice affirmation that you could do the stuff. And it you'd be kind of like a mopey teenager. And yet have cool stories that meant something, and that we're all to uplifting, and we're about hope. So, you know, it was in, in that sense. Nice to see Goths doing some kind of artistic service for, for the whiter were. The kind of storyteller that he was was very influential, and then as I got a little bit older. And I I saw him a couple of times back. This is back when he used to tour. I was also very impressed with the way that he approached writing and being a writer and it being a human being. There was one instance, in which I saw him along with a bunch of other really amazing comic book writers, including, I think Peter David, at MIT just a few days, not more than a week after nine eleven. Nine eleven happened just a couple of weeks after my nineteenth birthday at the beginning of my junior year of college. And he you know, I was I was very much a college student, I was kind of going through a late adolescent. What does it all mean phase, I become interested in, in religion and started to sort of rethink what I assumed about life, and purpose and are, are sort of our place in the universe. And like everybody, I think it was it was a tremendous shock. I think particularly people of my vintage kind of elderly millennials or Xeni, all's had never known a time when the US felt really threatened. The Cold War was kind of over, there was a sense that we were separate from the rest of the world or that nothing could ever interrupt. That period of prosperity into which we had been born and so nine eleven just massively shook the foundations of our generational experience and especially being in Boston at Boston University, the feeling of ongoing threat and vulnerability was quite high. Two of the planes had taken off from Logan airport. There are all kinds of rumors circulating that, there were still a terrorist cells in the city. And so it really did feel like a war zone in many ways, and it occurred to me, just sort of walking to class that this is the reality that so much of the rest of the world faces every single day. And somehow we have managed to avoid it for this long. And now here we are just like the rest of the world. as we did for a lot of things during those weeks after nine eleven we kind of hung around to see if this event was actually going to happen because a lot of them were cancelled. And it was clear that, yes, it was going to happen. It was still going on. So we, you know, we decided okay, well, we're not we're not going to give up this, this chance to see all of these amazing authors and artists on stage at the same time. And we decided yeah, we're going to go. We're going to we're going to do it, despite the sort of aura of anxiety and dread. That was kind of hanging over everything. What was interesting to me is the Neil Gaiman was the only one in his kind of opening words who never mentioned nine eleven once everybody on stage when they got up to talk that was what they talked about. It was it was about superheroes in nine eleven. You know, I think one of the people on stage envisioned this world in which wolverine was on the plane with the terrorists, and sort of got up and, and hit them with his finger spikes. And it kind of rubbed me the wrong way because I remember thinking, you know, this is not the time to pretend that are fictional heroes are gonna do us any kind of good. It's too real. It's a nice thought that yes. If we had these amazing heroes who were always in the right place at the right time that they would have saved us, but they didn't. And Neil Gaiman got up and never mentioned nine eleven once he just sort of told a story, I don't even remember what it was that he talked about. But by the end of it for about thirty seconds. We all forgot and in a weird way, I think that prepared us to have them were serious conversation versus the. Yeah. Wolverine would I've got him if you'd have been there, which, which just felt very tried to me. The reason that that stood out to me was because it illustrated, very neatly that for a storyteller in a time of great national tragedy upheaval. The way forward is not always the way through that sometimes we assume we're in a position to attack things head on. And yes, we're gonna fight, whatever it is or or get through whatever it is. And it's, it's very easy to blur the line at that point between storytelling and, and just sort of shallow saber rattling. But what he said at that time illustrated to me that it was possible to speak in a deeper key and not to pretend that you have the answers that you need all the answers. You know, everybody was was in an incredibly tense somber. Reflective mood, and it I think brought a lot of us especially who are about my age. I was eighteen at the time into the realization that we are all mortal that, that, that nothing that we think, is a turtle is eternal, and that the world may be didn't look the way that we had been taught growing up,

Neil Gaiman Sandman Wolverine Gosper Goss Willow Wilson Pedley Kamla Los Angeles Logan Airport Hooper United States Peter David Boston Writer MIT Robert Smith
"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Fandom Podcast

The Fandom Podcast

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Fandom Podcast

"But it's so clever, and so funny, you just have to keep reading it. So funny. Okay. So take Neil take Neil Gaiman. And then every time he every time he goes dark. Replace it with something out of left field. Is that what I'm hearing? Yes. Pretty much. In fact, the first I think ten or fifteen pages of good omens. All I could think of was this reads so much like hitchhikers guide. Okay. All right. So if we combine Neil Gaiman and Douglas Adams, get us Neil Adams, the legendary comic book artist. I think that it does I have two of have his signature onto drawings and lean also has one as well. I think that is world busting right there too. Don't you Taylor? Yes. I agree. Okay. All right. That's right. I was listening. Well, and if we go atoms we could also talk about Adam west, just I don't know. I don't know how right. He's Batman trying to find a way to talk about Batman consistently skull have a really funny story. So we went to Cosco me and Lena this weekend. That's it. That's the story. Great story. This is really funny. That's a really funny star associ-. So I go I go off. And then I come back, and she's like, hey, I found this really cool jacket for the Cobra and it had captain America. It was big captain America's shield, and I was like, oh, that's nice. They have any others. And she was like, yeah, they had Batman. And they had turtles ninja turtles and stuff. And I was like why did you get him the captain America one? Because then it's like, Jeff you should go get Batman. And then it's like that. Okay. We can go change it. And so I went back and switched jacket. So now, he has a Batman Jackie and instead of captain America. So if he grows up indoctrinated into the Batman instead of captain America, we know who's to blame. Well, right now, he doesn't know any better when he has the right to choose his own phantoms. You say that now until he's really into something like Mangga, I'm going to raise him to really love Gilmore girls. So. But that won't be because of you it'll be because of his mother Taylor until see disdain. No mother were child was caught watching Gilmore girls today. Not again. Until your father gets home. I think we just saw glimpse into the future. Honestly. The only reason I chose the captain America jacket over the Batman jacket to begin with is because I have a pin on my person is captain America's shield an Owen points to it. And makes me Nate label it for him repeatedly with a oh he'll recognize this. But Nick has also been working on the bat recognizing batmans sing him. The captain America song. Does you captured America song? Don't know. The captain America song. Is it dirty? Does go cap in America. He's the captain of America almost. It's from like sixties TV shows when kept in America throws his mighty shield all those who chose to oppose him must yield. Something about Bubba..

captain America America Neil Gaiman Adam west Neil Taylor Gilmore batmans Neil Adams Lena Bubba Douglas Adams Mangga Jeff Owen Nick
"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Filmcast

"He series like this actually gave me some kind of reminded me in ways of the BBC series Merlin, which kind of the more kitty approach to it. But was still, you know, driven by some sort of more authority and lower and some heavy mythology as well. But basically took on the premise of like young Merlin and everyone sexy in young sickly young Merlin. Yes. Yeah. The the bigger part of this movie too. I think it says similar to last night. I it says a lot about the legends we construct. I think right. Like, it may be all these things you've heard may not exactly be true. And through your actions in through good actions. And being a good decent person. You can maybe change that down the line. So the real legends are the friends we made along the way. In the round table. Yeah. Okay. HD you want to have less word on the kid who would be king. I do want to say that. I think that this film is is best encapsulated by that Neil Gaiman quote in which he talks about why a core line isn't scary for children because they see themselves in that adventure. Whereas for adults when they see Corre line. It's something that completely terrifies them. And I know that watching the kid who would be king. There are moments where I became very concerned in almost like paternal maternal way about these children. I'm like they're going to be like impaled by rebar. They're going to be like killed by these demonic Hel health warriors. And yet because these children have such a gleeful abandon to them in a fearlessness. It was something that like infected the entire movie and takes you along for the ride. And I think that's why it does feel a little bit low stakes at time because it really comes from that perspective. And I think that's why it was able to. Sweep me along. So well with it her aunt, well, I'm sorry that we disagree on this movie. But I'm glad you guys enjoyed it. And I do think a lot of people will enjoy it. I think a lot of kids will enjoy too in in the next generation. I think they'll grow up watching this movie instead of goonies and. Thing at all. All right. That's all review the kid who would.

Merlin Neil Gaiman BBC
"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"neil gaiman" Discussed on The Filmcast

"He series like this actually gave me some kind of reminded me in ways of the BBC series Merlin, which kind of the more kitty approach to it. But was still, you know, driven by some sort of like more authority and lore and some heavy mythology as well. But basically took on the premise of like young Merlin and everyone sexy in young sickly young Merlin. Yes. Yeah. The the bigger part of this movie too. I think it says similar to last night. I it says a lot about the legends we construct. I think right. Like, it may be all these things you've heard may not exactly be true. And through your actions in three good actions. And being a good decent person. You can maybe change that down the line. So member of the real legends are the friends we made along the way. In the round table. Okay. HD you want to have less word on the kid who would be king. I do want to say that. I think that this film is is best encapsulated by that Neil Gaiman quote in which he talks about why a core line isn't scary for children because they see themselves in that adventure. Whereas for adults when they see core line. It's something that completely terrifies them. And I know that watching the kid who would be king. There are moments where I became very concerned in almost like paternal maternal way about these children like they're going to be you like impaled by rebar. They're going to be like killed by these demonic Hel health warriors. And yet because these children have such a gleeful abandon to them and fearlessness. It was something that like infected the entire movie and takes you along for the ride. And I think that's why it does feel a little bit low stakes at time because it really comes from that perspective. And I think that's why it was able to. Sweet me along. So well with it, right? Well, I'm sorry that we disagree on this movie. But I'm glad you guys enjoyed it. And I do think a lot of people will enjoy it. A lot of kids will enjoy too in in the next generation. I think they'll grow up watching this movie instead of goonies and. I don't think that thing at all. All right. That's all review the kid who would be.

Merlin Neil Gaiman BBC