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"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

02:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Concluding our four series on the space race with a look at the final leg as the Soviets and the US compete to put a man the moon. Throughout the late nineteen sixties, CIA analysts and photo interpreters like the man in this story had been monitoring Soviet rocket facilities through their surveillance. They discovered the existence of the and one rocket. The N one was a heavy lift launch vehicle designed to deliver large payloads far beyond lower orbit meaning in theory. The rocket could be used to send Soviet cosmonauts to the moon. When Richard Nixon took office. US officials were debating whether the Soviets could feasibly beat the US to the moon, some believed the Soviets didn't stand a chance. Others had their doubts. One thing was clear. The race was still on the home. Stretch was in sight, and in the final leg. The Soviets and the Americans were neck and neck this episode four. Photo finish. In one thousand, nine, hundred eighty one John F. Kennedy stood before Congress and declared that the US should commit itself to putting a man on the moon, eight years later Kennedy's dream would become a reality with the launch of Apollo Eleven. The man who would become the public face of that moment was Neil Armstrong. Armstrong had started his career as a naval aviator before becoming a test pilot at NASA's Flight Research Center in Edwards California in Nineteen, sixty six, he. He had served as command pilot of the Gemini Eight. On that mission Armstrong had performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space. His fellow crewmembers, astronauts Edwin Buzz, Aldrin and Michael. Collins had equally impressive careers. Alternate sat a record on the Jim. Knight Twelve Mission for the most our spent outside spacecraft Collins had set an altitude record for human flight on the Gemini Ten now, the three of them would lead the first mission to land on the moon. And a press conference in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine Armstrong. Told reporter. I think we're going to the moon, because it's in the nature of the human being to face challenges, it's by the nature of his deep inner soul. We're required to do these things just as salmon swim upstream. The astronauts were in good hands gene KRANZ. The flight director for Apollo Eleven had a reputation for being tough as nails sporting a crew cut in a stern expression. He was all business after the tragedy of the Apollo. One Fire Crohn's vowed it would never happen again telling his team from this day forward flight control would be known by two words, tough and competent tough means. We are forever accountable for what we do or what we? We failed to do competent means. We will never take anything for granted. When you leave this meeting today, you will go to your office and the first thing you will do..

US Neil Armstrong Apollo Eleven gene KRANZ Collins CIA Richard Nixon John F. Kennedy Crohn Gemini Ten Congress Edwin Buzz Flight Research Center Apollo Edwards California reporter Jim NASA director
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

02:25 min | 2 months ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Aerial America

"A a deal deal drafted drafted by by president. president. Thomas Thomas Jefferson Jefferson that that deal deal called called the the northwest. northwest. Ordinance Ordinance helped helped ensure ensure that that New New Territories Territories like like Ohio. Ohio. Set Set aside aside land land for for universities. universities. It's It's tempting tempting to to wonder wonder what what Jefferson Jefferson would would have have made made the the university's university's most most recent recent achievement achievement ranking ranking among among America's America's top top party party schools. schools. Well Well known known alumnus alumnus was was no no stranger stranger to to that that reputation reputation in in nineteen nineteen forty-three forty-three a a freshman freshman named named Paul. Paul. Newman Newman joined joined the the Phi Phi Kappa Kappa Tau Tau Fraternity. Fraternity. But But it it didn't didn't last last year year long. long. One One Ninety Ninety allegedly allegedly rolled rolled a a beer beer keg keg down down a a hill hill on on campus campus when when the the cake cake crashed crashed into into a a car car owned owned by by the the University University President President Newman Newman was was expelled expelled before before becoming becoming a a famous famous actor. actor. Paul Paul Newman Newman then then joined joined the the navy navy hoping hoping to to become become a a pilot pilot but but his his dream dream of of flight flight was was dashed dashed when when he he was was found found to to be be colorblind. colorblind. But But here here in in the the small small town town of of topic topic Annetta Annetta another another young young man man shared shared Newman's Newman's dream dream of of flight flight and and his his journey journey would would soon soon turn turn extraordinary extraordinary in in one one thousand thousand nine nine forty forty four four fourteen fourteen year year old old boy boy named named Neil Neil Armstrong Armstrong and and his his family family moved moved into into this this Corner Corner House House gazing gazing out out at at the the night night sky sky from from his his second second floor floor bedroom. bedroom. The The Armstrong Armstrong fell fell in in love love with with the the idea idea of of flight. flight. Got Got His His pilot's pilot's license license just just two two years years later later the the age age of of sixteen sixteen even even before before he he could. could. Dr Dr Armstrong Armstrong flew flew for for the the navy navy and and worked worked as as a a test test pilot pilot for for NASA NASA before before becoming becoming an an astronaut astronaut or or July July sixteenth sixteenth nineteen nineteen sixty sixty nine nine he he and and the the rest rest of of the the Apollo Apollo eleven eleven crew crew lifted lifted off off from from Cape Cape Canaveral. Canaveral. It It was was four four days days later later on on July July twentieth. twentieth. That That Armstrong Armstrong set set foot foot on on the the moon moon while while he he inspired inspired millions millions around around the the world. world. People People here here in. in. What What can can ETA ETA were were especially especially proud proud of of their their hometown. hometown. Hero Hero that that same same day. day. Ohio Ohio Governor Governor James James Rhodes Rhodes proposed proposed building building museum museum to to honor honor Armstrong Armstrong and and the the state's state's contribution contribution to to spaceflight spaceflight just just three three years years later. later. The The Armstrong Armstrong Air Air and and Space Space Museum Museum opened. opened. Its Its doors doors from from the the air. air. It It looks looks more more like like a a moon moon station station than than a a museum. museum. Inside Inside is is a a Gemini Gemini Capsule Capsule a a Moon Moon Rock Rock and and a a simulator simulator gives gives visitors visitors a a chance chance to to feel feel what what it's it's like like to to land land on on the the moon. moon.

Ohio Natives Who Went on to Make History - burst 2

Aerial America

02:28 min | 2 months ago

Ohio Natives Who Went on to Make History - burst 2

"A a deal deal drafted drafted by by president. president. Thomas Thomas Jefferson Jefferson that that deal deal called called the the northwest. northwest. Ordinance Ordinance helped helped ensure ensure that that New New Territories Territories like like Ohio. Ohio. Set Set aside aside land land for for universities. universities. It's It's tempting tempting to to wonder wonder what what Jefferson Jefferson would would have have made made the the university's university's most most recent recent achievement achievement ranking ranking among among America's America's top top party party schools. schools. Well Well known known alumnus alumnus was was no no stranger stranger to to that that reputation reputation in in nineteen nineteen forty-three forty-three a a freshman freshman named named Paul. Paul. Newman Newman joined joined the the Phi Phi Kappa Kappa Tau Tau Fraternity. Fraternity. But But it it didn't didn't last last year year long. long. One One Ninety Ninety allegedly allegedly rolled rolled a a beer beer keg keg down down a a hill hill on on campus campus when when the the cake cake crashed crashed into into a a car car owned owned by by the the University University President President Newman Newman was was expelled expelled before before becoming becoming a a famous famous actor. actor. Paul Paul Newman Newman then then joined joined the the navy navy hoping hoping to to become become a a pilot pilot but but his his dream dream of of flight flight was was dashed dashed when when he he was was found found to to be be colorblind. colorblind. But But here here in in the the small small town town of of topic topic Annetta Annetta another another young young man man shared shared Newman's Newman's dream dream of of flight flight and and his his journey journey would would soon soon turn turn extraordinary extraordinary in in one one thousand thousand nine nine forty forty four four fourteen fourteen year year old old boy boy named named Neil Neil Armstrong Armstrong and and his his family family moved moved into into this this Corner Corner House House gazing gazing out out at at the the night night sky sky from from his his second second floor floor bedroom. bedroom. The The Armstrong Armstrong fell fell in in love love with with the the idea idea of of flight. flight. Got Got His His pilot's pilot's license license just just two two years years later later the the age age of of sixteen sixteen even even before before he he could. could. Dr Dr Armstrong Armstrong flew flew for for the the navy navy and and worked worked as as a a test test pilot pilot for for NASA NASA before before becoming becoming an an astronaut astronaut or or July July sixteenth sixteenth nineteen nineteen sixty sixty nine nine he he and and the the rest rest of of the the Apollo Apollo eleven eleven crew crew lifted lifted off off from from Cape Cape Canaveral. Canaveral. It It was was four four days days later later on on July July twentieth. twentieth. That That Armstrong Armstrong set set foot foot on on the the moon moon while while he he inspired inspired millions millions around around the the world. world. People People here here in. in. What What can can ETA ETA were were especially especially proud proud of of their their hometown. hometown. Hero Hero that that same same day. day. Ohio Ohio Governor Governor James James Rhodes Rhodes proposed proposed building building museum museum to to honor honor Armstrong Armstrong and and the the state's state's contribution contribution to to spaceflight spaceflight just just three three years years later. later. The The Armstrong Armstrong Air Air and and Space Space Museum Museum opened. opened. Its Its doors doors from from the the air. air. It It looks looks more more like like a a moon moon station station than than a a museum. museum. Inside Inside is is a a Gemini Gemini Capsule Capsule a a Moon Moon Rock Rock and and a a simulator simulator gives gives visitors visitors a a chance chance to to feel feel what what it's it's like like to to land land on on the the moon. moon.

Neil Neil Armstrong Armstrong President Newman Newman The Armstrong Armstrong Air Ai Armstrong Armstrong Thomas Thomas Jefferson Jeffer Ohio Phi Phi Kappa Kappa Tau Tau Fr Navy Navy President Trump Ordinance Ordinance Jefferson Jefferson Space Space Museum Museum Paul Annetta Annetta Building Museum Museum Governor James James Rhodes Rh Cape Cape Canaveral Corner Corner House House America
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

09:45 min | 10 months ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"Him but as the movie goes on and he begins getting tied to an external conflict lead which in this case is father up you see that he starts change. He starts to become a little more anxious. He starts to get a little more irritated. He it makes it a point that it becomes really tough for him at least in his mind to deal what with everything that's going on in this mission that he has if you look at the character that's being played by Ethan Hawke. He's presented with a situation that he can't ignore. It's it's driving him crazy pretty much and that's what happens with Brad Pitt's to a lesser extent but I think thank those similarities between those two main characters. How at the beginning of the film they're both calm. They're both you know. They know what they are and they know what they do. Do they handle their situations day to day but when something changes them or something comes in conflict with them how they begin to that change change and they begin to become anxious characters they begin to you know. WanNa ask questions or they just get stressed out by what's going on around them. So that's what I found pretty fascinating with the two of them. I find it interesting that it's not so much the things that happened to them that are adding to their the stress and anxiety but it's the asking of questions. It's the not not going along with with the plan in and thinking for themselves about like you know is is this ray. What are we doing the right things and that's what really drives them. You know starts to drive them a little crazy and of course more so I reformed armed but I love that you brought to eight twenty four movies to this conversation so eh well okay so my next puzzle piece. I am going to go with a movie. That's probably a little too recent to truly truly have been an inspiration but I'm going to bring it up anyway and that is I man but I mean I think it's just such a clear. you know a clear parallel here between these two movies of to move to movies that deal with just the psychological effects of space east travel and the isolation of space travel and you know the disconnect that creates with family and with just you know a regular life on earth and I you know we did an episode on. I man when it first came out and I will say I did not really love. I man I. I guess I went into it wanting wanting a more traditional just big. You know like an Apollo third. Yeah yeah something like that and I I was like really so it's going to be this but I think that when you're dealing with something fictional like ad Astra and something that that you know take some interesting approaches to the I two that idea. I think works a lot better. I guess I'm still waiting for for the Real Neil Armstrong Armstrong movie but but I I know a lot of people disagree with me though Yeah we actually did an episode on I man and it was the three of us and two of the three did not like I man because of the way it goes. It's not a traditional going to to space in seeing how ROKA's person as or you know or you know a very triumphant score when they land on the moon you know not stuff like fat but I will say that this movie and I man do have in common like you were saying about the psychological effects of space space but also how these two characters are pretty similar in terms of how focused they are and how nothing else matters except for we need to go to space or I need to do this mission. I think there's some similarities between the two characters. You know. It's funny when you say that because I love Ryan Gosling as an actor. I love Brad pity actor but and you're absolutely right they have. They're very similar and they're driven. NECE in there you know they're kind of disconnect from other other people and yet for whatever reason I'd like Brad Pitt's character so much more like I could just watch him and root for him. I guess in in a way you know and I just I'm so much more so much more into watching watching him. Go about whatever it is. His story is is going to be that. I was watching Ryan Gosling. I just as I watched that version of this kind of a character. I'm like get it together man in Italy here you on that but yeah well. It's not it's not hard to basically look at Brad Pitt for for two hours. Yes that's actually pretty good looking guys no question there well. What do you got for your next one all right this the final one that I have and so it is interstellar I think the parallels I think are just a little too obvious not not to mention them. number one is the way space is portrayed in in both of these movies. I think both of them take a very interesting interesting and I would say cool approach to how they design their space exploration whether it's designer the ships are the the actual special effects of the movie and how they use them to design their vision of space. I think they're both interesting and very meanwhile done but more importantly I think the other main point you could pull from both movies is the parent child relationships between the main characters in interstellar yet. Matthew mcconaughey character with his daughter who eventually is played by Jessica chastain. There is that sense of abandonment went from the child towards their parent that the mission that they went on was more important than them on earth and that's exactly what Brad Pitt's character deals with Tommy Lee Jones Tommy Lee Jones was so caught up with the mission and going out that he abandoned in his family and his and his son just as Matthew mcconaughey abandoned his daughter and his also his son as well and I found that to be the strongest point between these two movies and how similar they are in that aspect. I like it. I like it and you know it's funny. I've seen people bull on twitter on film twitter which we all know film twitter's just the worst but I've seen people try to say that there is no comparison between in the two movies that they they're not alike in any way I think they absolutely are alike in quite a few ways like what you were just talking about right there. I mean using a space travel. You know adventure basically for the purpose of dealing with people's emotions rather than some kind of you've you know plot driven goal or something like that. I think there is definitely parallels between interstellar in this movie. Yeah I find it interesting. When people say there isn't some type of like relationship board? They're not similar because it's almost a little too obvious yes how similar the aspect. I completely agree completely agree well. I only have one more puzzle pieces well so ah I told you before we started recording this kind of silly so I don't really think of it as an inspiration just a observation but but I should I should preface by saying I didn't mind this scene at all in either movie but when Brad Pitt flies through space piece I was. I was reminded of Princess Leia in the last Jedi that Sean's hated so much and I was that was cool. I mean come on. I I love last. I don't care what anyone says so do. I that Oh my God I love that movie so much and don't we're both gonNA negate for them. I'm sure we will and I don't give a damn. Johnson rules all right well. I'm going to do the finished puzzle and then we'll get into any he closing thoughts that we had on this movie so we've got X. McKenna total recall goodfellas event Horizon Mad Ed Max Fury Road Lost City of Z. I reformed I man interstellar and the last Jedi so great list of movies here you know really a wide ranging list of movies but quite a few that deal with space and you know all that kind of stuff because I mean come on of course that's bound to happen but it definitely definitely goes into a lot of different other directions as well Do you have any any closing thoughts about Ad Astra Astra. I recommend anyone who enjoys space movies. Just give it a shot. I think that you will be better off off than the worse off unless you really hate space movies but I think there is.

Brad Pitt Ryan Gosling Ethan Hawke twitter Matthew mcconaughey ROKA Neil Armstrong Armstrong Astra Jessica chastain Tommy Lee Jones Apollo Italy Johnson X. McKenna Ed Max Princess Leia Sean two hours
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Science Friday

"Each listener supported W in Y.. C. Studios this is science Friday. I'm I replied Oh. You probably know that famous photograph that Neil Armstrong Armstrong snapped of Buzz Aldrin on the moon just after Apollo eleven landed in L. buzzes standing one arm bent and in the reflection of his helmet. You can see neil taking the photo but for centuries scientists artists filmmakers have been trying to see the Moon capture all of its craters and blemishes and imagine what could be up there while now a new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York called Apollo's Muse Explores those centuries of obsessive moon shots and how they've shaped scientific discovery and the Artistic Imagination Science Fridays Camille Peterson took a trip with the exhibit's curators Mir finding in order to tell the story we needed to include a lot of different kinds of objects. This is a book by Galileo Galilei. It is a record of his observations through a telescope in sixteen o nine Galileo's drawings and descriptions completely changed the human conception of what the moon was like before this people thought of the moon as a perfect unblemished orb this section of the exhibition deals with the Moon of the imagination. What we're hearing is actually a new soundtrack for an old film? It's shorts maleas trip to the moon which he created in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. That's the image of the man in the moon being hit in the eye by the astronomers rocketship get ship. These are some artists renderings from the seventeenth sixties. It shows the moon as a place with people on canoes and giant Pumpkins in which the moon people live why the Pumpkins yeah I guess they thought well where I mean. People live it was a new world vegetable so that was something that was strange and unfamiliar to Europeans so now we can move into the space race. Most people know these pictures or thrives shows does the Earth floating above the Horizon Line of the moon and the blue marble is a picture of just the planet earth with the blackness of space around it. The fact that these were in color was what really created this strong impact the earth earth. Is this living thing. Why do you think the moon has been so captivating for centuries? It's a bundle of contradictions can see it all the time with the naked eye and yet it's too far to get to. It's always kind dr mysterious. It's constant and yet it's always changing just a paradox. That's hanging out in the sky. That was me if I'm in from the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York talking to our Camille Peterson. My next guest is here to talk more about the moon's visual past present and future Michael Benson is a filmmaker artist and author of cosmic graphics picturing space through time. Welcome back to science Friday. Thanks are good to be with you yeah. It's nice to have you and I wanNA tell listeners that they can see all of these images. Were talking about up on our website at science Friday dot.

Neil Armstrong Armstrong Camille Peterson Metropolitan Museum of art New York Galileo Galilei C. Studios Buzz Aldrin blemishes Michael Benson Mir
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on 790 KABC

"It's five thirty I'm Liz Warner the president and First Lady Maloney a trump are commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven moon landing that was a any cheaper possibly one of the great considered one of the great and you were going a lot further now we're going to the moon but within going to Mars during a ceremony in the oval office today the president called it one of the greatest achievement ever and repeated the vow that the US is indeed going to Mars Apollo eleven astronauts Michael Collins and buzz Aldrin joined the ceremony along with the family of Neil Armstrong Armstrong was the first person to walk on the moon and died in two thousand twelve Iran seized a British flagged vessel in the Liberian flag vessel in the strait of Hormuz today stepping up actions in the Gulf region the Liberian ship was quickly released after Ron said it conducted an environmental check bart correspondent Barbara Starr reports the US is positioning the military to protect interests the British at this hour trying to decide how to respond to all of this but for the trump administration the immediate security concerns is there are you as ships commercial ships moving through that area tonight and we know from the US military they have patrol aircraft overhead keeping an eye on that you wish shipping plenty of fire power in the region if they run into trouble Google in the F. T. C. you're reaching a settlement over the company's violation of the privacy rights of children the reports say details have not been announced but the FTC charged Google's you too with failing to protect children when they improperly collected their data on the.

Liz Warner president Lady Maloney US Michael Collins buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Armstrong Iran Hormuz Ron Barbara Starr Google FTC Gulf
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Atlanta monster from season to this is a monster listening following I heart radio app the G. one Yankee with the forecast very warm and humid tonight partly cloudy lo seventy seven sunshine a few clouds of our very hot here behind IT six only dropping to seventy nine tomorrow night with a stray thunderstorm with your accu weather forecast hi Bob Larson bodies radio a tent in one of three one W. G. Y. right now sun and clouds an excessive heat advisories in effect for today and the National Weather Service at Albany has issued an excessive heat warning for most of eastern New York for tomorrow between noon and eight PM right now mix of sun and clouds temperature at ninety two degrees at news radio eight ten and one oh three one W. G. Y. an announcement at the server took a race course this afternoon Lou Whitney the socialite who embraced horse racing spend time and money helping backstretch workers adjust to life at Saratoga has died she was ninety three years old very low Whitney considered by many to be the grand Dame of Saratoga she promoted racing she also felt a great responsibility to horses as well her Whitney gala was an event that brought queens and princesses and movie stars to Saratoga again merry Lou Whitney dead reportedly after a long illness dead at the age of ninety three now that story from Middle East that's still developing US officials say Iran has seized at least one and perhaps a second oil tanker in the Persian Gulf the librarian flag tanker was captured for shortly after the Islamic revolutionary guard corps took over a British tanker the second tanker also operates for Great Britain a twenty five year old Glenville man is facing criminal charges after police say he threw pieces of broken concrete over a fence and damaged a city of Schenectady truck back in may doing more than nine thousand dollars in damage Joshua balls and was arrested last week charged with felony criminal mischief police track balls and down through surveillance cameras in the area incident described as random president trump First Lady melania trump are commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven moon landing that was a penny chamber possibly one of the great considered one of the great job and you were going a lot further now we're going to the moon but what I'm going to Mars during a ceremony oval office president trump called it one of the greatest achievements ever drop also repeating a vow that the United States is going to Mars bottle of an astronaut Michael Collins buzz Aldrin join the ceremony along with the family of Neil Armstrong Armstrong.

Persian Gulf Michael Collins president Joshua Schenectady Glenville Bob Larson Atlanta Neil Armstrong Armstrong Britain Islamic revolutionary guard co W. G. Y. Iran US Middle East Saratoga Lou Whitney New York Albany
United States, Neil Armstrong Armstrong And President discussed on Sean Hannity

Sean Hannity

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

United States, Neil Armstrong Armstrong And President discussed on Sean Hannity

"President trump First Lady melania trump are commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven moon landing that was a penny chamber possibly one of the great considered one of the great job and you were going a lot further now we're going to the moon but what I'm going to Mars during a ceremony oval office president trump called it one of the greatest achievements ever drop also repeating a vow that the United States is going to Mars bottle of an astronaut Michael Collins buzz Aldrin join the ceremony along with the family of Neil Armstrong Armstrong

United States Neil Armstrong Armstrong President Trump Michael Collins
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"And you can see it from different angles and it's not just that one on picture but that's just the iconic want people well the flag. It's not waving <hes> something we noticed walking the lunch yesterday. That is just a good example of how up its own ass. Hollywood is is Neil Armstrong Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin got their own Hollywood stars <hes> and it's in the category of TV <hes>. They're Real T._v.. Star Collins to four all four of them. Dan Let me put my L._A.. Tour Guy had on ornament have it and they put it in the T._v.. Category because I mean to well that's why but up until I think still to this day was is the most watched television program of all time that's <hes> so that that allowed the loophole for them. I mean that's great programming. That's great content and shoot them putting a fucking flag up there people don't Dan Netflix thing about that right now. It's like okay man. Can we get somebody in the Megan would they don't know is no Armstrong. L. Was the act was the person on earth but up there. It's really a young Morgan Freeman. Why isn't that astronaut suit Yep? That's a Hollywood end size says I move <hes> he was about sixty nine all right. We're GONNA take a quick break. We'll be right back. Have you ever asked yourself what happens. When an event built by young black kids deemed dangerous by the establishment shuts down the city will answer to that? Is You have the story of Freaknik okay <hes> and if you don't know a freak nick is you. You're not paying attention in the nineties and late eighties Freaknik was a spring break party like nothing you've ever seen before bring together many students from a historical black colleges and universities <hes> and it was basically D- Spring Break Festival of a lifetime now in a new podcast from mass appeal and endeavor audio. You can explore the annual event that brought Atlanta to its sneeze and it's told directly from the people.

Neil Armstrong Armstrong Morgan Freeman Hollywood Dan Netflix Star Collins Buzz Aldrin Freaknik Guy Megan Atlanta nick
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"This is what it sounded like fifty years years ago this week as Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon all staff for man by Neil Armstrong's Armstrong's famous steps would be followed by Buzz Aldrin's but although Michael Collins accompanied them on the mission he never set foot on the moon instead the command module pilot orbited around it today on the fiftieth anniversary of the launch of Apollo Paul Eleven Mr Collins returned to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and reflected on his mission. I was always asked wasn't I the loneliest person and the whole lonely history of the whole lonely solar system when I was by myself in that lonely orbit and the answer was no. I felt fine I <hes> I've been flying <hes> airplanes by myself <hes> that was being aloft in a vehicle. Goal was <hes> was no novelty I <hes> I trusted my surroundings. <hes> I was very happy <hes> to be where was and to see this complicated mission unfold <hes> but the time that I was was by myself I was perfectly enjoyable. I had hot coffee. I had music if I wanted it. <hes> good old command module <hes> Columbia had every facility that I needed and it was plenty big and I really enjoyed my time by myself. Instead of being terribly only I was not one iota lonely that's former astronaut Michael Collins reflecting on what it was like to orbit the moon well Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked below that orbit also included stretches of time when Mr Collins lost contact with mission control you know mission control is our friends are save your mentor but <hes> they could also be a terrible nuisance Yak Yak. They want this at the other little tidbit of information minute after minute our after our so to have a peaceful period of solitude was <hes> far from being terrifying was very pleasant nice easy and I enjoyed joy to Michael Collins right in the lead up to and throughout the Apollo Eleven mission there was a great deal of Yak Yak Yak eleven thousand hours worth to be exact and this week to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the launch and moon landing. You can relive the mission by listening to that audio in real time. That's thanks to bend feist. The Canadian man behind the website Apollo eleven in real time while his work began as a hobby. He's now a software engineer with NASA. We reached Mr Feist in Toronto. Ben Most of us will never get the chance to visit space but thanks to you. We can listen in while others do tell us where all the sound came from well most of the sound that's on Apollo in real time. Dot Org came from set of tapes that we're in the National Archives for the last fifty years these tapes have been in cold storage and there's only one machine in the world that can play them back and it's in Houston Texas and we spent a lot of time refurbishing washing machine so that we could get this audio out for the world to enjoy. We have some of the recordings handy so let's start with this one yes. Can I think excellent briefer though we had a real good morning is you may have heard where you're watching on the radio hotline okay meal these foods you know enough very talking so it was well by the quietest has overheard you know yet occasionally. We've had a call on just to make sure that radio contact with who are we hearing their bed. I believe we're hearing to controllers and somebody who works in the back room of Mission Control Humid. How things went on the day before launch? What do you think when you hear that well I dislike this window opening into the past where we can hear the men and women that worked so hard to make the more famous people on the mission like Neil Armstrong successful successful and they're landing and we get to actually here the operations or what it took to get them there? There's a little bit of a tendency to look at historical figures like that and with a sheen of history to it that they were all legendary awesome people that had the right stuff as it were and and <hes> they did obviously have the right stuff but they were also just normal people that would have conversations like that one and sometimes make jokes. Take a listen to this next piece of audio this afternoon Tammany right. Hey Dan Julie Okay Taber breakfast either. Is that what I think it is like basically colleagues pranking and other ones that he slept through the launch that's right so this is a somebody who's got on shift was supposed to be there for the launch. The Apollo Eleven and this is about two hours before launch on the rest of his team called him at home and pretended it was adver Nancy he had missed the launch. I think that's just great what is the historical significance of something like that. Well these are regular people and <hes> in that case. They're making mistakes just like we would today of sleep and pass your alarm. The more historical significant part of this audio of course there's a vast amount of it on the website is the operations in the hierarchy with emission control of Howard decisions made and who had to make choices along the way and you have to remember these were very young people. The average age and Mission Control During Apollo Eleven was twenty six years old. That's quite incredible able to think about. I'm wondering when you're listening to all of this audio. What would you dream about at night after spending a whole day listening to that honestly what I thought it was oh my goodness? I'm going to be finished in time for the anniversary nursery of Apollo eleven and that's kept me awake at night so there was no dreaming but <hes> to be clear. I haven't listened to all of the audio my contribution to this was a software solution that restored the audio without me having to listen to all all of it I could just process all the tapes so I've put it out there for the world to enjoy and in many cases nobody has heard any of it in fifty years and before you put together this Apollo Eleven website. You actually worked on Apollo seventeen woodwork. Did you do on that. Apollo seventeen was really the beginning of all of us. It was a side project. I had a day job in advertising evenings and weekends. I spent by time trying to clean the historical mission data apollo seventeen that resulted in apollo seventeen dot org which is similar website to Apollo in real time but it recreates the last mission to the moon which was apollo seventeen and it was really that mission that got NASA tension <hes> back in two thousand sixteen. Where did your interest in space come from? I think everybody's interested in space aren't they. I mean it. It's in a special category. I just love watching <hes> humanity at its best and I think these space missions were great examples of that. Everybody focused to it makes something amazing happen and the very fact of the matter that the this historical information is available in that you can see it and maybe even follow along and hear what they did to me is just super compelling so I just wanted to bring this to life for everyone. What wider implications ends will your work? Have I mean how will this be used in the future. Many space missions have instruments and activities on them that are all separated from other in these kind of silos. You can picture <hes> data instrument. That's on on the side of space craft the team that makes instrument and operates it might never meet the team that makes the instrument that's next to it and what I've done is tie everything together across those silos using mission time so when you go on the website at any given time name you can see all the photographs being taken all the film footage being shot. You can hear all the different stations in mission control who was saying what what would they doing that given time in the mission and this idea might be a solution to how do we make heads or tails sales of what we've done on a future mission for a given day so a software solution like this one might allow people to be more economists on those future missions and what are you going to be thinking about in the Fiftieth Anniversary Gee. I hope the website stays up. That's what I'll be thinking. No honestly really I. I hope that everybody in the world takes a moment out of their busy day to to reflect on what they did fifty years ago it is one of the greatest moments in human history and fifty years isn't really that long time I think in many cases people wonder why haven't we gone back and fifty years well. I looked up recently to see what the record was and it turns out that Christopher Columbus ambitious his first exploration of the Americas was fourteen ninety two. Everybody knows but it wasn't until one hundred fifteen years later the first permanent settlement arrived from Europe into the America's so we're we're ahead of schedule with the return to the Moon in two thousand twenty four excellent Ben just as a side note and I was not sure whether to bring this up because you were an accomplished man in your own right but listeners might be interested to know that you are the older brother of Leslie faced the singer and I wondered you both love audio clearly clearly. Might you ever collaborate using some of your audio and turning it into music. Oh my goodness. I hope not why wouldn't impose that upon my sister I think she has her own artistic ideas of what should be happening with her audio. It was great to talk to you. Thanks so much thank you very much for having me. Take Care Bye bye bye bye. Ben Feist is the creator of Apollo Eleven in real time and a software engineer with NASA. He was in Toronto this we can lead up to the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing. You can relive the Apollo eleven mission in real time on his website. That's Apollo in real time dot org. We'd love to hear your memories of the landing. Where were you fifty years ago? This week that that Saturn five rocket launched and when Neil Armstrong took that one small step call talk back and let us know for.

Neil Armstrong Apollo Michael Collins NASA Apollo Eleven Buzz Aldrin Ben Feist Toronto software engineer Mission Control Paul Eleven Kennedy Space Center feist Columbia Mr Collins Ben Most Florida Houston
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on KOMO

"Basil said we have discovered ways to do things cheaper and quicker than the federal government has and I think the federal government should say Hey you know I want to throw their money and into the Kitty wonderful I mean I don't know why would you possibly say no to it whether money is federally appropriated or comes out of their pocket books what I care about is a hardware that it produces and not necessarily the source of the funds and there are many other merrier I would say you're listening to first light hand here Apollo eleven astronaut Michael Collins response to a question about whether he agrees with the current NASA strategy of going first to the moon in preparation for a voyage to Mars later on Collins replies he talked with the late Apollo eleven commander Neil Armstrong about that I I say I say no now I did a lot of candy some I know the biggest one is Neil Armstrong Armstrong the conversations I had with him he did feel that perhaps there were so many unknowns about going from earth to direct you Mars that it made sense to fill in some of these gaps in our knowledge around the moon before you went I he kneels a lot better engineer than I am I guarantee you that so that's that's certainly a coke a credible approach and that seems to be the one that is most popular today I say no I go was John F. Kennedy and I would take the the John in the JFK direct not the S. way direct I think if you want to go to Mars you decide to put your chips in there and and developed a hardware and go and do it now it's not simple that's an understatement that's Michael Collins one of the Apollo eleven astronauts talking veteran journalist Marvin kalb on the caliber port at the national Press Club in and we think Marvin kalb for helping us out and talking with Mister Collins for us thirteen and a half past the hour on first letter going to come back and we'll.

Basil federal government Neil Armstrong engineer John F. Kennedy Michael Collins Marvin kalb national Press Club NASA commander Neil Armstrong Armstrong JFK
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Larry top half the stadium. The Yankees lead. The Orioles five three first of a double header homerun derby at this point labor, Taurus a couple of home runs. So the case Gary Sanchez Cameron may as well. Trae man, cine Renato Nunez of Homer for Baltimore that I tore is home run sailed into monument Park Day happened. David has are your starters. Meantime, metro back at the five hundred level after winning their third straight six two in Washington. Last night. Nationals are now nine hundred five hundred eleven fifteen mezzo pitch. Wilmer font against Patrick Corbin tonight in his initial outing font through sixty pitches in four innings against the Padres, the Mets on WCBS eight eighty at seven while this was a stunner as the word. Down shortly before noon via Twitter, and there have been thoughts and stories written about a power struggle within the jets front office in particular general manager, Mike maccagnan and the new head coach Adam as well McCarron was fired today cases, the interim GM NBA playoffs gave one eastern final tonight in Milwaukee. The buck Senda Toronto Raptors fifteen and forty five around the clock job Khotan ten when sports coming soon to a major league ballpark near you. America's favorite pastime as history's greatest adventure. The MLB announcing today, they're celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the first Mon landing by putting fifteen replica statues of Neil Armstrong's iconic space soup, putting it in the ballparks across the country that include Yankee Stadium here in the Bronx Apollo at the part will launch next month. It'll also continued through the fall Apollo eleven was the collective achievement of four hundred thousand people working together towards a common goal. Meantime. And as our national pastime baseball provides countless exciting moments for millions. Of americans. So they think this is the perfect pairing the two for new generations to come and learn and marvel about our history, you'll actually be check this out you actually able to scan the Neil Armstrong Armstrong's suit to experience different facets of the mission in that eight suits will start arriving at ballparks around the country on June. First wins news time, four seventy. Let's say you just bought a house bad.

Neil Armstrong Armstrong Senda Toronto Raptors Renato Nunez Yankees Gary Sanchez Cameron Yankee Stadium David Larry Orioles Twitter Washington Baltimore Patrick Corbin Wilmer MLB NBA Milwaukee America Mets Mike maccagnan
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

16:23 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Let's go back to space. Okay. Do you think that we are in a race with Russia for the control of space? I think rushing leadership Putin. We'll probably do what whatever you can do to make the Soviet Union whatever it's called Russia. More important. And if he includes some space trips in that, I think he will espouse them. I think that's his primary van I think the Chinese tend to be a little more space oriented today than does the does Russia or perhaps the United States. Not quite sure about that. But. So I if you're looking for competition, I worry a little bit more about the Chinese, and I would Russians explain to was recently the Chinese landed at the goal on the forest of the dog side of the moon. Yes. Could you explain to was why is that important? Well, the fact that they landed. On the backside of the Mon fifty years after we landed on the front side of the them. I don't think that's any big deal at all. It's a minor achievement. However. The future of that chievements may bear all kinds of fruit troops wrong term. But or there's the rare metals. On on some of those rocks. There's gold platinum there's things that we consider of a great economic value. And if they can expand their base there and get into the mining operation there and figure out how to not only get those or refined them a little bit on the moon and somehow ship them back to earth, and they're going to have something that will be very valuable how long that will take to ensue. I do not know. But are there all of these minerals only on the dark side and not on the side that we landed. I. You have to ask Jack Schmitt. Now, he's the guy the geologists PHD from from MIT or Harvard us from Harvard, and he knows about each rock. But from what I recall, my geology training, the Mario the flat areas on the front side of the moon. That's where they are predominantly or are pretty much sandy barons. Whereas on the back side of the moon. You have much much. Much rougher terrain and nooks and crannies and cracks and fissures and and the chemistry of that surface material on the back side of the moon is much greater interest financially and just intellectually then the Mario on the front side. Why didn't we get to the backside? Why didn't we I'm sorry? Why didn't we get to the back side of the moon before the Chinese? Oh, since we had been in the front side so much ahead of them. Well, I guess because our leadership for right or wrong. And it didn't think it was worth the money. And you know, if I were voting with them, I say so far our leadership. I'm a crash Republicans, whatever not balls, whatever. I don't think that's a bad decision. If if we knew maybe more about how to build a larger rockets and people like Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk or helping us a little bit in that way. It could be that we could get you the back side of the moon and have a soft landing with a big enough machinery that was gonna machine it was going to go around and excavate and bring back somehow all these wonderful ores, but. That's something. I think that is beyond the realm of possibility for another. I know not a decade or perhaps more double UCSB from west. Michael Collins on American history on C-SPAN span radio the command module pilot for Apollo eleven speaking with Marvin cowb- of the cowboy report. We sort of farming out the space craft industry to the private sector. Now is that what is happening with the American space program. Well, I think musk bazars discovered ways to do things cheaper and quicker than the federal government has. And I think the federal government should say, hey, they want to throw their money into the kitty wonderful. I mean, why would you possibly say no to it whether their money is Beverly appropriated or comes out of their pocket books. What I care about is the hardware produces and not necessarily the source of the funds and automatically marry her. I would say, but you're suggesting that that hard where from the private sector is better. Comes along more quickly than government hardware, in some cases. Yes. In some cases. No. I mean, for example. The bazo so has has pioneered the idea of shooting Iraq at off it gets rid of its payload and then instead of crashing into the ocean and returns to its launch pad and is reused. So that is a tremendous cost saving, and then maybe the feds could've done that as well. But they didn't they they were off doing something or other else. And he decided that was a very profitable avenue and something of value again, whether that rocket that reusable rocket whether it's watched by federal appropriation or out of Musk's pockets really doesn't matter we had I think the US government had a program according to which by twenty twenty eight we would be sending astronauts back to the moon. That according to the Trump administration has been dropped down to twenty twenty four. And that's it has said that that is an achievable date that we ought to be able to do that you agree. No. I mean, you agree with what you. We can go back to the moon know that we can do it at twenty twenty four or five years from now, I don't know. I don't know probably not. I mean, we're usually optimistic in our estimates. So I'd probably take longer than that. I think it depends on go back to the moon and do what go back to the moon and why go back to the moon as opposed to going to Mars, exactly. And I was going to say that part of the plan is that you. By twenty twenty four astronauts returned to the moon, they set up shop. So that it becomes a refueling. Stop for these sent then to Mars. Number one, just theoretically that makes sense, right? That's the way to do it. Or you have also talked about going directly from earth to Mars on a large elliptical loop, which which is better. Why don't you tell me about it? To change their vocabulary a little bit is the plan. Now, I think it's an asset official plan is to go to a back to the moon and you create a pathway, which is a very long aided elliptical sort of orbit pointed out toward Mars and that you use. You have a build up approach you have relayed of vessels working in and out of that pathway and their refueling here and they're being. Throne of. Refueling there in a lunar enter the pathway and resuscitated with more supplies from earth. And I I say I say no a lot of caveats semi. No. The biggest one is Neil Armstrong Armstrong. He died before. All these details were put together. But in the conversations I had with him. He did feel that perhaps there were so many unknowns about going from earth director Mars that it made sense to fill in some of these gaps in our knowledge around the Mon before you went. I he kneels a lot better engineer than I am. I guarantee you that. So that's that's certainly a credible approach. And that seems to be the one that is most popular today. I say, no, I go with the John F Kennedy, and I would take the John JFK direct, not the Hatheway direct. I think if you wanna. To go to Mars, and you decide to put your chips in there and developed a hardware and go and do it. Now, it's not simple. It makes you know. You know, it's it's about a two year voyage and two year. To do what to go from the surface of the earth? To Mars with a spacecraft and return that crew to earth would take two years about two years. Apollo eleven took eight days eight days. Yeah. Eight so follow is a child's play compared to go right Amar. And if you were to use Moore's as the launching pad in a way. Yeah. Refueling stop. The astronauts on Mars need oxygen. How do you provide that? And isn't there a constant threat of radiation poisoning? Now, they have all kinds of problems. So the people who are who go to Mars. I mean, if you count the planets out from the sun, mercury Venus earth Mars, there's earth Mars side by side or twins. If you will or the closest thing that we have to a sister planet, but nonetheless. Couple of hundred million miles separated. And and they are in. Different sorts of orbits around the around the sun. The the past that is cheapest in terms of fuel expenditures called a home and transfer a Hohmann transfer takes about nine months one way. Unfortunately, when you get there, you can't turn around and come home. Because in the meantime, the planets have rearranged their orientation, you may have to wait for a year or so on the surface before they're in proper alignment that you can come home on the surface of what I'll Mars you go. You land on Mars, you try to get home the round the total trip. I'm saying first time out is going to be void around. Excuse me. Is going to be a voice of around two years. And and two years is is an eternity when it comes to aircraft or spacecraft malfunctions you have to be independent of anybody like mission control. You can't have any crew compatibility problems. You can't have illnesses really or fatal illnesses. You. You're the subject to a great deal or of radiation, solar, radiation, extra planetary radiation. And so is a host of problems facing anybody who wants to go to Mars, so it's just going to be very very difficult. And what kind of timeframe are we talking about if even work perfectly the daisy chain was operated perfectly. Well, I don't know. I've thought about this JFK direct approach and say to land to land a crew of men and women on Mars by someone. So and return them safely to earth, and the so and so I put in there has to be about twenty forty something like that right here. I wonder years. Yeah. It'd be about what I'd guess. But you got a lot of people guessing a lot better stuff than I am. I do not know. But I'd be my guess is the moon habitable. The moon. Sure, the Mona's habitable, but you have to bring your own oxygen with you a few things like that depends on how you define habitable. I'm not sure sometimes my house, I think is not habitable. So I'm not sure about the Mon, but yeah, by and large can be made habitable. You touched on what I'm about to ask you before. But I don't want to kind of del it down. Vice president Pence has been put in charge essentially of the space program for this administration. And he used very dramatic gold language in a recent speech. You said the United States must remain I in space in this century as in the last he then went on the rules and values of space will be written by those who have the courage to get there. First and the commitment to stay you implied earlier in our conversation. That. We wear for a time. I last century the twentieth century, but not all the time. Would you say that in the twentieth century? We were first for most of that period of time for most. Yes, what do you think? Yeah. But that's part of the question. You were going to go on and finish that Quayle. But what I'm trying to get at is one is the vice president, right? When he said that we were I in the last century, and in this, and I asked the question because there's a space station out there. Now that is a Russian space station, we use it. We have people who go up there. So it doesn't seem as if we're number one. It seems as if we're renting out space from the guy who is number one. So the idea that we are. I doesn't make any sense am I right? I don't know. Dodged a question. I'm going to answer. One is I happened before. An answer. One is first cousin to it. I I was a military officer. We landed Apollo eleven on the moon. We had an American flag, we saluted. I was extremely proud of that extremely I thought that was just a wonderful manifestation, not only of president John F Kennedy, but of a check neurological base industrial basic who do that. I mean, Ed, I just have encyclopedia of things that I thought were wonderful about that. It made me more and more patriotic if I use a citizen of the United States of America. Michael Commons command module pilot for Apollo eleven American history on C span radio about a few months after that Neil Armstrong buzz, and I were very lucky..

United States Elon Musk John F Kennedy Russia twenty twenty federal government Apollo vice president Soviet Union Mario Putin Jack Schmitt Harvard Neil Armstrong Armstrong Iraq Michael Collins Jeff Bezos Neil Armstrong
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Soda granny say Eaton hawk his performance was amazing. He really did deserve nomination for that role. Totally agree, man. So good in that movie. Daniel for Lito says I man best movie I've seen in like fifteen years. I still haven't seen that this is the was it Buzz Aldrin now, it's Neil. Armstrong armstrong. I man knoll. Sorry, dude. You'll Armstrong was the first that buzz was right behind. Sorry. You need to get up on your NASA. I really do. I really do you go to space camp. Okay. Every all of my other colleagues space camp except me. So Nikolai says my boy Gosling, I man is quiet intensity at its best. I love I love Gosling. He's really good at light intensity to this thing. Yeah. It is. Yeah. Come to think of blade. Bladerunner quiet intensified into drive quite intensified intensity. Yeah. Yeah, he should be. He's a singer to you should start a band called quite intensive intensities. Joshua hall says Lookie Stanfield for best actor the guy elevates started. By the you to another level. It's true. He's a great. He's got this like energy. That's so like, it's comedy. But it's also like, very heartfelt. And like, you know, you're there with them. You know, I don't know. It's great. Yeah. Mary O'Donnell says Paddington to Wes Anderson wishes he could make a film with such whimsey and heart is it really. Adding to do. It's crazy. One. We'll be able to follow it. Yes. Doesn't matter. They're they're very self contained. No, it's it's it's got a lot of these great British comics in it like the dudes from like the mighty Bouche and like IT crowd. And right. So I think the guy that directed at directed the show the league of gentlemen, which is a really really great weird. Would would ruby? Like, it is it. Oh god. Yes. For for three and a half year old. That's the beauty of it. Is it Scott something for everybody? It's got like adventure. It's got this whimsey like they're saying, it's got a great story, and it's got real real heart. And like, it's it's really a beautiful movie. All right. It's on the list. Let me see here. Amanda, eight says Toni Collette for hereditary another nod for her t j Danny says if Beale street could talk for best picture, I've heard that criticism Sierra Sherry says Emily blunt for quiet place. She gave me all the fields. All right fair enough. DC? Hoover says Bradley Cooper for best director. All right. I've heard mixed reviews on that one. Stars born a big giant movie, though Hollywood loves a big self-referential. You know, also like a remake of a classic Hollywood remake of the classic which is remake of Hollywood loves the third or fourth one. I think it's the thirty third. AJ middle sets is eighth grade and hereditary in a quiet place..

Armstrong armstrong Hollywood Eaton Sierra Sherry Danny Wes Anderson NASA Joshua hall Lito Daniel DC Gosling Hoover Bouche Nikolai Bradley Cooper Lookie Stanfield director Mary O'Donnell Scott
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Hills right now. Seventy seven degrees. We have got seventy four on the coast in Santa Monica, currently seventy downtown Los Angeles at ten seventeen hundreds of Google employees walked off the job in New York Europe Asia as well in protest over the company's handling of sexual misconduct cases. Hundreds more preparing to walk out of the company's headquarters. In Silicon Valley later this morning KCBS radio. Reporter Tim Ryan is there tells KNX there is growing anger among workers for a long time had a sexual harassment problem. And they just kept getting hush us. In fact, some talk male executives were giving these normal packages to leave one of ninety million dollars. It's coming to light now, and the women are fed up walking out CEO of Google has said he supports those who want to walk out, but he wants to turn their ideas into action. There have already been walkouts by Google workers and offices in Europe and Asia, a political ad involving Californian congresswoman Nancy Pelosi is getting criticized in England. The TV ad was done by congressional candidate. In illinois. Who photo shopped image of Pelosi into the scene of a run down neighborhood need warns that you only you can stop this from becoming reality. Now, the issue here is that the neighborhood in question was from a small coastal village in eastern England not from town. In the United States ten eighteen on KNX as many as two hundred thousand people enjoyed the Halloween festivities in West Hollywood last night. Deputies say no arrests were reported that we hope sheriff station says there were a few arrest last year last night's crowd size fell short of the city's estimate of half-million revelers. Researchers are trying to figure out if your apple watch could help screen for a heart rhythm disorder. The study out of Stanford University looks at whether the watches light sensor and a phone app can analyze pulse. Data to detect atrial fibrillation. Some people are very symptomatic. Other people can have it for months or years and not even know it. So their possible be a regular, but they won't feel anything like competition shortness of breath chest pain, Dr Marco Peres with Stanford University. Researchers plan to release the results of the study in January atrial fibrillation is a potentially life-threatening condition that often goes unnoticed. The coast guard has a new tool drug intersection effort in and search and rescue off the California coast. It's a shiny new fast response cutter with the bright coat of white paint and a shiny new anchor. The one hundred fifty four foot long boat is the second of four cutters. That will be stationed the US coastguard, Los Angeles Long Beach base on the island. The Robert ward is named after a seaman who rescued two stranded boat crews during the Normandy invasion on d day in World War Two the crew of the thirty five million dollar Robert ward have already had an adventure the vessel encountered hurricane Michael. Is it made its way from Louisiana to California Rothbart shirt KNX, ten seventy NewsRadio. Ten nineteen on KNX. Extrordinary flight gear will be auctioned off today and tomorrow in gala should include a gold navy helmet worn by John Glenn the first American to orbit earth. They helmet was given to astronaut Matt carpenter, and he passed it on to his sons the collection. Also includes about two thousand artifacts and mementos owned by astronaut Neil Armstrong Armstrong of. Of course, the first person to walk on the moon..

KNX Google Nancy Pelosi Stanford University England United States Asia Los Angeles Santa Monica Neil Armstrong Armstrong Robert ward California Matt carpenter John Glenn Silicon Valley illinois Tim Ryan Los Angeles Long Beach apple
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on TechStuff

"Line which most of the world acknowledges as being the border line for earth's atmosphere and space is generally in the one hundred kilometer altitude range. So the x fifteen reached altitudes of sub orbital space. So you could argue the x fifteen qualifies as a space plane, but it's one that was meant purely to conduct research for future vehicle designs. Following the x fifteen was a project called the Dyna soar d. y. in a dash s. o. a. r. also knows the x twenty NASA contract Boeing to build the space plane. There was a related asset called asset. This was sort of the nose cone section of the dinosaur. It was used separately to test various designs to find out what sort of shielding would best withstand reentry and the rigors that any material with undergo as it does re enter the atmosphere. The dinosaur was in parallel development in some ways to the x fifteen, though it would take advantage of lessons. Learned from the x fifteen program. And it also had links back to the silver Vogel aircraft proposed in Germany. I was a man named Walter Dorn burger or vaulter Dorn burger. He was one of the key figures in developing the dinosaur project. He was in charge of Germany's rocketry program in World War Two. He was also the direct superior to the famous rocket scientist, Verna fawn Brown. He wasn't picked up by the United States during project paper clip. That was the secret project in which the United States brought over a whole bunch of German scientists to work on the same stuff they had been doing over in Germany, but now for the United States Dorn burger Winstead go into British custody for a few years before being released. And then immigrating to the United States where he found a job with bell aircraft. He advocated that the company tried to make real. The vision of the Silber vocal, dawn burger felt that rockets were the future of flight. Even for commercial flight though, probably just for the really wealthy. And it would become the propulsion systems for a new type of aircraft that he would call Oltra planes. These were essentially very similar to what we would think of space planes and Dorn burger imagined a world in which a hypersonic glider would ride piggyback on a larger rocket propelled aircraft at the appropriate altitude. The glider would launch off of rails that were mounted on this booster vehicle and ignited zone rocket propulsion system, which would push this smaller vehicle to great speed and higher altitudes at the peak of its journey. It would then switch off its engines and then glide quietly to its destination. The booster vehicle would return home for the next journey up. And this idea would coalesce into a program that was called dinosaur as one of several proposals that entered into debate during the round three conference which took place just eleven days after the Soviet Union had successfully launched Sputnik one into orbit dinosaur which originally was pitched as a dual ROY. Search and military platform that could potentially be weaponized was able to move into the next stage of development. The program was actually revised multiple times and this complicated the process of designing and prototyping, because whenever you change the requirements, it changes lots of other stuff down the line. One late edition was a feasibility study to make sure that the dinosaur could also serve as an orbital vehicle, sort of like what the space shuttle would eventually become then in September nineteen sixty one, the United States Air Force. General Bernard, a Shriver changed things up big time by stating the program would be split into two parallel arms. One of the versions of dinosaur would be developed as a military application of the technology. The other would be intended for spacefaring projects and a priority would be placed on no big surprise here the military one around this time pilots were joining the program including future astronaut, Neil Armstrong. Armstrong was also given the task to figure out how to keep an astronaut safe in the event of a launch failure. Such as a launch vehicle about to explode..

Dorn burger Winstead dawn burger United States Vogel aircraft Germany United States Air Force Neil Armstrong NASA Boeing Silber Verna fawn Brown Soviet Union scientist General Bernard Shriver one hundred kilometer eleven days
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on KTRH

"Many people remember that richard hoagland has discussed the face on mars and other anomalies at nasa said do not exist some of the things that have been uncovered due to curiosity other rovers have shown us especially i mean i remember just how intrigued i was but the face located sidonia for years the faces had many people watching it after years of study nasa released a new photo i think it was in two thousand and one from mars global surveyor that conveniently put a to any speculation showing the face completely obliterated looking only like a typical mesa on the planet service and as i said it earlier in the program i attended a speaking engagement in utah where richard and i discussed the face on mars and how the ancients would speak faces of cherub and that there were carved into rock and they were guardians of holy places well cherub them of course are spoken of in the bible and that most ben when you look at them they are the symbolism of of course ties to be ancient zodiac biblical passages there's actually a passage in easy kill the talks about the chair abeam there's actually you know i it said what does it say here it says and it was made with cherubs and palm trees he's talking about temple so the palm trees was between a chairman a cherub in every chairman had two faces so the face of a man was toward the palm tree on one side and the face of a young lion toward the palm tree on the other side it was made through all the house roundabout for the ground unto it above the door were chairman some palm trees bait and on the wall of the temple that's an easy kill chapter forty one the bible speaks of the face of the man in the face of the lion the feline and what's really interesting is that when mars traverses into the opposition it will be under the sign of leo and i just find it interesting that this is all coming together in some strange way as you say it's it's it's ritual ism it's nassar's ritual ism so what is exactly the plan now when will they find the right times dates and places in the sky to make the announcement solid do you think well again we're having to kind of back engineer this dramatic side because we haven't got their playbook no one has leaked to copy of the book that nasa and these ritualised us so we're trying to engineer it from the outside and the way we do that is we look at certain celestial alignments like the eclipse you know and do do you you understand understand when when putin putin and and trump trump are are meeting meeting did did you you get get the the incredible incredible significant significant number number there there meeting meeting alone alone why why are are they they meeting meeting why why do do they they have have to to be be all all all all by by themselves themselves in in a a room room just just the the two two guys guys and and nobody nobody else else and and they're they're supposed supposed to to meet meet in in helsinki helsinki on on monday monday the the sixteenth sixteenth clyde clyde you you remember remember what what july july sixteenth sixteenth is is no no it's it's the the date date we we left left for for the the moon moon haughty haughty nine nine years years ago ago i i oh oh my my god god yes yes that's that's right right at at the the nine nine thirty thirty two two in in the the morning morning which which is is part part of of the the tetrahedral tetrahedral code code this this is is the the forty forty nine nine year year the the forty forty ninth ninth anniversary anniversary of of the the neil neil armstrong armstrong buzz buzz aldrin aldrin landing landing on on the the moon moon apollo apollo eleven eleven right right right right next next year year is is the the fiftieth fiftieth the the the the biggest biggest inc inc most most incredible incredible important important sacred sacred number number in in the the ancient ancient sumerian sumerian calendar calendar was fifty remember and serious you know the the dog star it has a little ob obviously a smaller star orbiting called the pop sirius the dog star and then the the white dwarf that orbital period is forty nine fifty years as serious as a huge part of their mythology so i think the.

richard hoagland nasa forty forty nine nine year forty nine fifty years nine nine years
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on American History Tellers

"We're concluding our four episode series on the space race with a look at the final leg as the soviets and the us compete to put a man on the moon throughout the late nineteen sixties cia analysts and photo interpreters like the man in this story had been monitoring soviet rocket facilities through their surveillance they discovered the existence of the n one rocket the n one was a heavy lift launch vehicle designed to deliver large payloads far beyond lowearth orbit meaning in theory the rocket could be used to send soviet cosmonauts to the moon when richard nixon took office us officials were debating whether the soviets could feasibly beat the us to the moon some believed the soviets didn't stand a chance others had their doubts one thing was clear the race was still on but the home stretch was in sight and in the final leg the soviets and the americans were neck and neck this episode four photo finish in nineteen sixty one john f kennedy stood before congress and declared that the us should commit itself to putting a man on the moon eight years later kennedy's dream would become a reality with the launch of apollo eleven the man who would become the public face of that moment was neil armstrong armstrong had started his career as a naval aviator before becoming a test pilot at nasr's flight research center in edwards california in nineteen sixty six he had serves command pilot of gemini eight on that mission armstrong had performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space his fellow crewmembers astronauts edwin buzz aldrin and michael collins had equally impressive careers altern had sat a record on the jim knight twelve mission for the most our spent outside spacecraft collins had set an altitude record for human flight on the gemini ten now the three of them would lead the first mission to land on the moon.

us richard nixon john f kennedy congress nasr jim knight cia neil armstrong armstrong edwards california michael collins altern eight years
"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"neil armstrong armstrong" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"We we hold that against him what do you think would have happened a dale day lewis if he made three movies year riyad we all know you know what i mean like he made five movies anymore and years and he risks is a genius russell crowe's out here making the doughnuts every morning order the italian at the fair point that's how you get to be the greatest actor who generation 'naming good choices all right russell crowe could only be inserted types of movies like the proof of life part was like a classic russell crowe part and i'll glass macron sarulla islamic is like a guy who was mode most of his use with like if it's like a basketball player who is like all about speed and when he lost to step his game goes out the window grow once he lost the gladiator body and the looks yeah it kinda it's it's it's a it's a tough beat it turns out you just shouldn't drink every day free excessively i think it has some room for keisha sort of an allen iverson figure you go for it so it was i would say for russell crowe for in sports analogies it's like t back oh interesting like two thousand two thousand five you buy and all the team act stock and this is at rims gallons of the ira was his yaoming but for two thousand eighteen rhody off to a great start man well we had this january month of action move his whole the platter is here it's it's great i love january it's always buy favor movie month but i'd like to see ah is leo have something the share what i don't think he has a project on the i really worry about leo that he won that askar release aim is supposed to be in the cartel which will be shooting soon the ridley scott adaption of don winslow is novel your guide on ones yet i think he is i am not positive for by your guide damian chazelle he has agreement a very exciting we call me uncle first man she's about neil armstrong armstrong and stars clear foyer and who plays neil armstrong ryan gosling rang out so there you go i i'd like to see cruz follow up on what we talked about pta four crews worked with pti crews have it crouzols guide was six stopped making young guy movies crews it's time.

russell crowe ira leo don winslow damian chazelle neil armstrong armstrong cruz lewis basketball keisha allen iverson ridley scott neil armstrong ryan gosling