35 Burst results for "Neil And"

Pier 1 Import Transaction - What We Can learn From It

Marketing School

04:10 min | 2 d ago

Pier 1 Import Transaction - What We Can learn From It

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and Neil Patel, and today we are going to talk about something really interesting. That's happening right now while we're GonNa talk about the pure one import transaction and what we can learn from it but we. A little context here as to when recording this. This is July twenty, second twenty twenty where still in the midst of Covid, and so what's going on as a lot of these companies retailers are going bankrupt. They were already shaky, and this was basically nail in the coffin for them. So they've had to basically liquidate. Neil. I'm sure you've looked into this deal a little bit. What do you know about it? Can you kind of pay some white as to WHO's kind of spearheading this as well? Sure. So there's a guy named Alex, ooh Zeus Anti Lopez. Many guys know about the guy has a. Car. Garage union, it's at. Times really smart. So ty ended up techno was but a lot of people look at Thai Guy who's pushing Lamborghini, and there's not much more to. What ty analysis decided to do was leverage on leverage. Our audience gets a ton of investors in go out there in go leverage their audience and going by these struggling e-commerce. First one they did was dressed farm about her pennies on the dollar. Now, the buying pure one, and then from there, they turn around the company's make him grow at the fat. And you got a really solid business in part, audience built brand lowliest do the bat and off. Yeah I mean, if you think about it, it's it was initially, they agreed on a twenty one, million dollar deal in the pure one came back and said, we want thirty million. So I think it's a thirty million dollar deal now, but to Neal's point, it's pennies on the dollar, the work de Sweat equity that's been put in over the years and years. They don't necessarily need all the retail shops anywhere. You take the brand, make everything. Go Onto ECOMMERCE. You'RE GONNA go. So, you're going to print money what turns action. It's super simple. It's effective and I wish more people thought about things that way a lot of people want to build businesses from scratch. The hardest part is building easier. Part is growing muscle were marketers cutting back in grown company has already a billion dollars revenue. They're not fall role while. Is it okay by for pennies on the dollar, you cut the fat and made two billion anymore, but they slew one, hundred, million. So that really amazing business, right? I was listening to that yesterday. So Nike originally, they were slated for their online revenue to be about thirty percent for twenty, twenty three. I at the target now is fifty percent. So the already shot past that. So a lot of stuff is accelerated. Yes. We know that they're not getting a lot of offline transactions, but would this basically means if you look at shop advice stock a lot of stuff ECOMMERCE which is accelerating. Yet, and before this year roughly percent of online transact commerce transaction rebound online that. And sure after cheers Emmy going down a little bit, but it's still gonNA. Be Way higher than where started. Yeah I think at least one of the lessons from me here is you have to look at the Times what are people used to right now, and is it just a business model? tweak where you remove the retail component? The you know the in store component and you just switch it to online and boom. You're you're good to go. 'cause people are tied to the original kind of appear one management team might be tied to hey, we should keep the stores people stuck with doing things the old way by once you remove the emotion from it wants you just be used a objective and you think about it from a business perspective everything changes anything else. Let's it in the last thing you should take away from pure wants to Techn- idea something as donor to book by its cover. A lot of people a judge tyler. This guy is in smart steam

Neil Patel Emmy Marketing School Covid Eric Su Thai Guy TY Nike Garage Union Alex A. Car Techn Neal Tyler Lamborghini The Times
Amy Spowart, Head Of The National Aviation Hall Of Fame

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

04:37 min | 3 d ago

Amy Spowart, Head Of The National Aviation Hall Of Fame

"Many years especially when right field was more impactful when the foundations of today's age were taking off so much research with here at Afrl, and there's all kinds of research and aerospace research places that are here. It made a lot of sense Scott Crossfield even said to me once amy, you're not a pilot unless you through right field everybody who's anybody flies through right field, and of course, you know in the early days, there were Ayla celebrity who always came on China and it was John Wayne and Jimmy Stewart. Who's who I remember? My first enshrinement in nineteen ninety, nine Ted Williams came at Joe Foss. We've had John Travolta Dennis, quaid miles, O'Brien all been and sees it the hall of fame event but I would say following the economic downturn of two thousand nine and companies started to pull out of the Dayton area. It was harder to get that kind of support. So while the city of Dayton wholeheartedly loves having the hall of fame here we also Need people who can sponsor because we receive no federal state or local funding at all whatsoever. So we have to depend on aerospace aviation companies industry to support US and in Trimbe it was a big help us getting brand recognition. It's never been moneymaker. It's part of our mission to memorialize. So we need people to support our education and support are learning center through sponsorship. So what we decided to do in two thousand seventeen is actually take quote unquote. Show on the road, the Oscar night of aviation left Dayton and we went to Dallas first, and then we went to DC in twenty, eighteen and Denver and twenty nineteen than we were supposed to have a homecoming here in twenty twenty. But of course, the this year has been postponed until two thousand, twenty one we're working on getting is back to the National Aviation Hall of fame in Dayton use an abbreviation there a F- on the Air Force research. Lab. So. Here Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Employees. I think it's twenty to thirty thousand people in. Southwest Ohio, and only about less than half of those are active military. So there's a lot of research scientists here, and that's where the United States air force does all their most important research everything from what they're going to build aircraft out of to what their munitions do and Jet Propulsion. It's all located here in Dayton at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Still is very much a hub of aerospace activity. especially from the military and. Speaking of which there are signs that the or the appeal of aerospace is not resonating with the youngest generation do you sense that and if so is the hall responding in some way? It's hard because it's just like covert. The company's nonprofits that survive cove. It are the ones who are going to adapt and react to the situation with kids with this next generation they're not so much looking up lake weeded or the generation before me did Neil Armstrong stood in one place and what's fair to the sky and we all know the Wright brothers played with a little plastic helicopter type thing that inspired them. So we need to appeal to kids in. What interest them? So that might be if they're interested in the environment, they WANNA make less noise from aircraft. They want less jet fumes from cargo plane. That kind of thing we have to say, why not you? Why don't you figure that out? It makes me think of enshrining clap Myra who wanted a safer jet plane. So he thought about it and thought about it and he Allen Clapp mark came up with this idea of putting a parachute on the top of. A plane and everyone's like that's not gonNA work except the vision jet is pretty remarkable. So what we need to do is have kids interact or read about or they have to know who Bill Mayer is, and it isn't just Alan Shepherd. It isn't just the astronauts it isn't just the inventors it's all the Chinese and they can inspire kids more than just an aviation. It could be designed it to be dreamers that could be artists, but if we all have. Heroes. That's what gets kids going and if we give them a problem like make less noisy aircraft or might be a kid who's a Gamer and they sit on the computer all day, they're actually going to be fantastic drone pilots. We just have to recognize what they're doing and adapt to it.

Dayton Wright Patterson Air Force Bas Neil Armstrong United States National Aviation Hall Of Fame Air Force Scott Crossfield Jet Propulsion Afrl John Travolta Dennis Bill Mayer Joe Foss John Wayne Ted Williams China Jimmy Stewart Ayla Alan Shepherd Southwest Ohio
Why Twitter is a Severely Underrated Platform

Marketing School

04:33 min | 3 d ago

Why Twitter is a Severely Underrated Platform

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about why twitter is a severely rated platform that I tell you what happened with twitter recently. What I did recently, where did you do? So I started running ads for like ten dollars a day or fifteen dollars a day and what happened was one of our big clients I think everyone knows the name they saw it and that led to a upscale conversation and let too much deeper conversations and not only that I'm running this ad right now basically like a blog post and more and more people are seeing it and people with like. Blue checkmark that are reputable investors or VC's or vendors there following me they're liking this is really good for branding her ten dollars fifteen dollars a day it's done so much for me right now and not only not ballers day without regaining growth winds, ten bucks a day growth wise negligible getting impressions. The most important thing is getting impressions on these both the reach my goal with these is the reach, and so you shouldn't be aiming for like. At least for me, I'm not aiming for conversions or anything like that I think if you're running ten dollars a day or maybe fifteen hundred dollars, the reason I started doing this was because I started seeing other people running these ads extra Wilkins in for example, from tiny capital, he just keeps running the same over fifty dollars a day but I remember him and that we talk about the rule fourteen, the rule seven, whatever I just think twitter. From ads perspective is very underrated but from a learning perspective I've also talked about how to me. It's the most important social network because I learned so much more from than other social networks. So when you're using your impressions beginning Yeah I mean let me just open it right now. So while we do that, why do you think is underrated platform? So twitter has a lot of smart high net worth people on there. It's not the sex. It's not like instagram. It's not like based. Youtube it's a place where you find the likes of like the e-leong must of the world when the Bill Gates in the role constantly communicate and they liked doing it themselves, it's not like having someone who works for them postings they themselves like going on twitter and tweeting, and conversely with others or that reason I think it's powerful because although they may not have the reach you can get access to really wealthy influential people on twitter in a much more easier way than you can on instagram or case Lincoln rainy their social. Yup. I have the numbers the so I guess I'm spending a little more I. Guess we wrapped up the budget a little bit so in the last seven days so it looks like about ninety five dollars spent I think we've wrapped up from ten dollars a day so six, hundred, seventy dollars in spend one, hundred, twenty, two, thousand impressions not the greatest CPM cost per thousand impressions but to Neal's point he hit the nail on the head the people that you're reaching our high net worth smart individuals that like to pontificate they like to act they want to show their wisdom. So that's why twitter is really underrated depends on what you're selling to. Out of the impression, how many did you get your site? Let's see well, but in general like there's a lot of channels like twitter Radha contrast, the lot of people don't talk about snapchat doll during its audiences. These underrated pop why we underrated platforms for civically. But the others as Wallace is not a lot of competition for advertising Baseba can google or instagram. Google would also be youtube based also the instrument, but they're all SACCHARIN. You look from the other channels they're much more affordable Lincoln that is thriving social network from ad standpoint. It is quite expensive is a lot of companies, zipper sales and recruiting people spend a lot of money on jobless other than that I found that the other networks much more affordable. Yeah. So here's the thing. Hey, it shows how am I at cloud formed the the second thing is it's actually not showing me clicks just because I'm focused on impressions cost result is giving me a CPM. So I am not seeing clicks right now on it, but I didn't tell you. Thousand. Yeah. So something impressions, dozen impressions it's not the best CPM's around five bucks or so but I can tell you based on the up sell, and then also the people that are engaging with me and the people that are falling me as well. It's worth its weight in gold. So use it. You don't have to use it for the ads side of things but

Twitter Wilkins Marketing School Bill Gates Instagram Google Radha Contrast Lincoln Eric Su Youtube Wallace Neil Patel Neal Baseba
WNBA players urge people to vote against team owner, senator

The Erick Erickson Show

02:16 min | 4 d ago

WNBA players urge people to vote against team owner, senator

"W. NBA. Stars are openly endorsing Kelly Leffler opponent in her Georgia sit race despite her ownership stake in one of the teams, leagues. W Now? No No, no. No they're not supporting Ralph warnock Nah I'm sorry Doug Collins No. That's Boring College Board Ralph. WARNOCK WNBA. Stars are openly endorsing Reverend Raphael warnock for the US Senate seat currently held Atlanta Dream Cone or Kelly Leffler Leffler Georgia Republican previously used her position as a team owner as a political stance in her hotly contested special election players called on WNBA Commissioner. Cathy Engelbert to ban Leffler from the League after her comments against the black lives matters group. You know she. She's writing this. HELP INNER Players across the WNBA have long been vocal opponents of Senator Kelly Leffler Georgia. Republican who also happens to Cole the League's Atlanta Franchise. But as the special election for Leffler appointed senatorial seats up stars are using their platform to explicitly rebel against the controversial politician prior to Tuesday nights matchup between the Phoenix Mercury and the Atlanta Dream members of both teams express support. For Reverend Raphael. warnock. By wearing t shirts that read vote warnock according to representatives for the mercury players on the Chicago Sky also donned the black and white shirts prior to their game against the Dallas Wings players on the Seattle Storm in Connecticut also wore the shirts prior to the game which you know these people who were I guess they just eight Kelly leveler. Okay. Now, here's the thing. If they schrief walls in the forest and no one is around. Does it make a sound? If. They WNBA player takes political position does anyone know unless there's a reporter there to tell them and then does anyone care? No one watches the Wnba these are the people who off the court because of the national anthem they didn't even neil they walked off the court.

Kelly Leffler Leffler Georgia Leffler Wnba Reverend Raphael. Warnock Kelly Leffler Senator Kelly Leffler Ralph Warnock Georgia NBA Doug Collins Atlanta Atlanta Franchise Cathy Engelbert Senate United States Cole Reporter Commissioner Seattle Dallas Wings
Neil Young Sues Donald Trump Campaign Over Use of ‘Rockin’ in the Free World’

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

Neil Young Sues Donald Trump Campaign Over Use of ‘Rockin’ in the Free World’

"President Trump's reelection campaign for using his music without permission. Young's lawsuit says the campaign is used rocket in the Free World and Devils sidewalk several times and rallies and political events, including June 20th Rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Young says when he complained about the campaign using rocking in the free world in 2015 when Trump announce his run for the presidency, the campaign had said it had permission. Young says that the proof that the campaign knew it needed permission to use his music. He's Looking for up to $150,000 statutory damages for each infringement. We're going to

President Trump Young Tulsa Oklahoma
7 New Ways to Grow Your SEO Traffic

Marketing School

04:40 min | 4 d ago

7 New Ways to Grow Your SEO Traffic

"To another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. Hotel and today we're GonNa talk about seven new ways to grow your seo traffic. So I'll start first because they had a Webinar on new ways to do SEO. So the first way to grow your SEO traffic new way to grow your seo traffic would be to think about on surp- seo but does that mean exactly so Serb assertion that result page, and as you know Seo now is getting more difficult because the search result pages are so dynamic you have sometimes you might have apps you have knowledge box you might have featured snippets you might have site links there's a lot. Of changes happening. So what you gotTa do from your and we've talked about Faq Schema before in the past, we've talked about all these different tactics those all fall on the search engine result page. You GotTa think about how you can do on Seo part of what you can do using software or you can do it on your own, but you can use our software. If you want click flow, you can test your titles Meta description and that is basically one element of on as he'll. There's a lot more that goes into that but I just want to give you one piece. Number two is create new formats of content. So you don't have to just do text based content. You've already seen that Google ranks videos, but did you know Google also rains podcasts? So now crawling podcasts transcribing and indexing them and getting driving traffic to them as loss. So don't create text based content, considering creating all the different types of media formats that people really leveraging these days such as video audio off Cassie I should out there make she include keywords with whatever you're talking about your research on. What you'll find is some of that context also start ranking. For many listings are pushing up just classroom pushing up just video results. So it's a way to grab more search traffic bubbling people already. Number three kind of alluded to this a little earlier. But if you Google, Matthew Woodward Faq Schema. You'll find a way to get Faq. Schema. Set Up, and in some cases you click the rate actually might go higher. This is kind of continuing to follow the theme of on Surp- SEO number four by websites now for their back lanes buying for their brand and their existing traffic and there exists. You'll traffic merging into your site makes you deleted duplicate content merge than duplicate content together what it mean by duplicate is not word for word content. But if I have article on Seo someone else has an article on Seo and they both talk bout began as a test yo you don't have to pay design begins Guy Teissier you'd WanNa merge tackle only do that. What you'll find is Marshall Tropical to ring for Marquee Words All. Right. Number five. So even though we talk about it, I don't think a lot of people do this enough think about how you can build your own widget or how you could build your own software where those will basically because those to me, there are a little more defensible than making new book or a new Info Graphic, for example so An example, this Neil night I talked about this website when covert initially hid a lot of late in the United States a lot of layoffs started happening. So these layoff tracker started going up I was actually looking at one of the layoff trackers recently, sixteen hundred referring domains going that's a lot of lakes. So if you can build something, that's helpful. Genuinely helpful. The people that's very lincoln asset. This is evergreen SEO tactic but nobody has ever talked about talk about Lincoln assets, but don't talk too much about using a product to help with branding or product to build lakes. Another thing that you can end up doing is. Look at popular tools on the Internet that are Mir Space Adam to your website. You can find a lot like code canyons stuff like that will find his they tend to create a lot of brand queries more BRANCUSI's. You have the easier to rank on Google. So yes, eric talked about lingual acids but you can also get tools that create more brand queries will you'll find as you rankings for all Europeans go up even if you're not getting into links. All right number seven kind of similar. Building on the example I gave from number five where you build a where you lied with a product could be a widget as well. But let's use Neil Uber suggests as an example, he has a lot of data, a lot of click stream data. And basically, the great thing about that is that he can make really data loaded post that nobody else can do so I remember recently, I just read something from about how everything you know about click the rate has changed, but they were pulling proprietary data that they have. If you have your own product, you're able to glean zone insights and you can produce. Content that stands out on its own which you have liquid asset that's helping you produce more link cable assets with your content.

Google SEO Eric Su Adam Guy Teissier Marshall Tropical United States Neil Matthew Woodward Lincoln Brancusi
Columbia Sportswear's Gert Boyle Faced Down Sexism and Ageism

Business Wars Daily

04:29 min | 5 d ago

Columbia Sportswear's Gert Boyle Faced Down Sexism and Ageism

"Boyle. Grew. Columbia sportswear into a downfield powerhouse is the third Nar five-part series on the origin stories of iconic companies. We originally aired this episode about boils legacy after she died last. November, let's listen back. She was one tough mother and proud of it. Gert Boyle, the ninety five year old Chairman of Columbia Sportswear died earlier this month since then accolades poured in for boil, she was a formidable funny icon of the outdoor apparel world notorious for her resilience and her toughness qualities that empowered her to guide Columbia from near bankruptcy in the early seventies to what the New York. Times. Now calls the largest outerwear brand in the United States, a three billion dollar business. Gert Boyle was born gertrude lamb from in Germany in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, four, when she was thirteen, the family fled Nazi Germany moving to Portland Oregon there her father lamb from bought the Rosenfeld hat company worried about antisemitism. He changed the name to the Columbia hat company. Columbia evolved from hats to outdoor year including a fishing vest that Gert than a homemaker raising three kids designed. Gertz husband Neil Boyle eventually became CEO of the family business. But in nineteen seventy, the forty seven year, old leader suffered a fatal heart attack. Suddenly Gert found herself at the helm of an eight. Hundred Thousand Dollar Company. She had no idea how Neil had run it nor how she and her son twenty, one year old, Timothy would manage. As CEO of Columbia Gert frequently encountered sexism, but she always had an acerbic comeback as the new. York Times reported Gert recalled that a businessman upon learning. She was the president exclaimed, but you're a woman her answer. You know I noticed that when I got up this morning. Still, the combination of rampant sexism in her inexperience almost killed the company by Nineteen seventy-one. Gert. Agreed to entertain an offer to purchase it. But when the buyer a man offered, only fourteen hundred dollars she custom out and slammed the door in his face wrote Doug Schnitt span who profiled her for outside magazine. Gert said for fourteen hundred dollars. I would just as soon run this business into the ground myself that encounter galvanized Gruden Tim with a combination of unconventional strategies including being the first to use the waterproof fabric. GORTEX. They saved Colombia and set it on its growth path while all of their outdoor industry rivals including the north face in Patagonia. Marketed their wares to elite climbers and adventurers girding in Tim, we're happy to sell their products. Products at department stores at lower prices that strategy shocked the young industry and it worked so too did the Marketing Campaign Gert? Boyle is best known for the one that featured her as just what she was. One tough mother that campaign which ran from nineteen, eighty, four to two, thousand, five depicted gert down to earth mob oil. Now, take no nonsense mother who didn't suffer fools gladly, and who would allow nothing less than perfection A. A string of TV ads showed Gert using her son Tim as a product Tester to prove that they're outerwear was both warm and waterproof. In the first. She had tim dressed in Columbia's famous three layer system. Walk through a car wash. Her favorite one was one in which she drove a Zamboni on a hockey rink. Right over her long suffering son dressed in Columbia gear. Of course, he was lying the ice breathing through a straw. Straw apprentice out of the same era for the boundary peak parker quoted the Middle Aged Gert, saying I've got hot flashes to keep me warm. You'll need something that zips mob boils tough. Mother ads are credited with transforming a little known business into a household name inside the company. Her wit was also on display. She summed up her guidance for other leaders. This way early to bed early to rise work like hell and advertise. She might have added and work like hell. Until the day you die, she made it to the office on her ninety fifth birthday in March and was still having business discussions shortly before her death on November third according to outsides Schmidt's Pon. Gert Boyle will be remembered for many things among them, her belief which she shared often with younger women that a woman could do anything and also her conviction that older workers are assets in the workplace. Indeed, in her nineties, she wrote perhaps my presence in the office offers a message that managers liked to put older workers out to pasture. Out. To lunch.

Gert Boyle Columbia Columbia Gert Thousand Dollar Company Chairman Of Columbia Sportswea TIM CEO Boyle. United States Germany Neil York Times Doug Schnitt Portland Oregon Gertrude Lamb Gertz Hockey
Neil Young Sues Donald Trump Campaign Over Use of ‘Rockin’ in the Free World’

Sean Hannity

00:23 sec | 5 d ago

Neil Young Sues Donald Trump Campaign Over Use of ‘Rockin’ in the Free World’

"Campaign may not be able to rock in the free World Much longer. Neil Young filed a copyright infringement lawsuit in New York today against the campaign for playing his songs at campaign rallies. The lawsuit says the plaintiff cannot allow his music to be used as a theme song for a divisive on American campaign of ignorance and hate. It says the campaign has been playing rocket in the Free World and Devils sidewalk for years.

Neil Young New York
Neil Young Sues Trump Campaign for Playing Songs at Rallies

Terry Meiners and Company

00:33 sec | 5 d ago

Neil Young Sues Trump Campaign for Playing Songs at Rallies

"The Trump campaign may not be able to rock in the free World much longer deal. Young filed a copyright infringement lawsuit in New York today against the campaign for playing his songs at campaign rallies. The lawsuit says Young cannot allow his music to be used as a theme song for a divisive on American campaign of ignorance and hate. It says the campaign has been playing rocking in the Free World and Devils sidewalk for years, most recently at the June 20th rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Young Tulsa New York Oklahoma
COVID-19 reshapes and reduces back-to-school spending

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

COVID-19 reshapes and reduces back-to-school spending

"Covet nineteen has reshaped and reduced back to school spending back to school shopping is usually a gold mine for retailers but due to the corona virus sales will be down compared to last year grew predictions this year good spending will be down by around six point four percent retail expert Neil Saunders on why this back to school shopping season is so important retailers but watching it very closely the what happened and to see if there are any trends that they can discern as we go into really important occasions of Halloween and thanksgiving and Black Friday to back to school shopping season for retailers is second only to the Christmas holidays I surely after

Neil Saunders
How to Run An Amazing Virtual Event

Marketing School

04:08 min | 5 d ago

How to Run An Amazing Virtual Event

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric. Su. Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about how to run an amazing virtual event. But maybe we'll get some context everyone I as to what are amazing virtual event was I. It's a growth accelerator virtual events we had. Let's give some people some color what we have. We had to mazing speakers we had great networking one networking with speed networking. Group networking and we had chat to connect everyone afterwards we did this over the course of four weeks. Each week is about three hours or so we've ended hot seats where we help people with their business and people were helping each other. You know we aren't able to do live right now. So we decided to do are virtually event and we wanted to see how he would do with that. So it's a new challenge for US Neil you want to add some more color to that before we talk about how to be amazing. Sure and I know some you it seemed like is virtual events really worth day she ended up doing it if you do it right it's definitely fun eric and I had a blast doing it not just as the host but we learned a law. We've got to interact with a lot of people and there's ways to set it up where almost like a real conference when you're interacting in person as well and if you do that ends of the really fun experience, a couple key. Things I think just to let everyone know we didn't get it perfect I. Still think we're improving this Neil nihar driving to do the best we can with these live or virtually the verse to we made a lot more mistakes than the third and fourth one really gotten. Yeah. Our Ratings at seven on the first one that it improved like an eight one up to a nine state at nine for the final one. But yeah, let's talk about it. So a couple of things that. We maybe we should talk about the mistakes we made. I think some of the key mistakes we made was not vetting detect platform enough meaning. So we use a new platform called hopping. That's H. O. P. I. N. before we moved back to zoom but that's where I can talk about that later. But what we've learned is that you can't just say these people speak these events and they're experiencing you have to test every single person which I think meal night we've always been on. The other side where it's like Oh God we have to go to ten minute test again, and then it's like you do it every single time but there's a reason for it because you don't want to be a weird in our first two speakers the very first two they had tech issues we had echos people could enjoin didn't know how to share their screen. So we just had a lot of issues and if we had tested with every single speaker, we would have had much experience. We would have much much smoother experience. The big thing that. I ended up learning from this is you don't just want to use this that makes it seem like glorified Webinar. That was the biggest mistake that I think we made and we got that in be back as well. If you do it through things like zoom and the way it was set up in Eric, you should probably talk a little bit more about this. 'cause you did more than I did on that and especially we were able to make it seem like event where you're not working learning from others almost like in Nevada versus something that was glorified Webinar that would be done over the computer. Yeah we got really good feedback from one of our members Ricardo. He was making it a key point to just say, Hey, look, we use hop in initially because the week before I spoke at virtually bend had nine hundred people or so it had some interesting features which we can talk about. But we ended up switching back to zoom meetings not zoom Webinar like right now we're on zoo but our and you can see we have a couple of days in here we can't see their faces we can't really interact. So instead what we did is we did a zoom meeting. We did it Brady bunch style so we can. See Everyone's face and the presenter would speak and then people would amuse themselves and then they would basically asked her questions and then it would be an interactive thing instead of someone reading the text and entering the human connection the bonding there is more of that granted were not in person but that what much further and the final thing I'll add to zoom is we ended up using breakout rooms, breakout rooms, put us into separate groups of five where we talk about Seo or different books or different prompts that allowed for even closer bonding. So we're glad that we switched back to zoom for those

Eric Neil Patel Neil Nihar Mazing Nevada H. O. P. I. N.
How to Create Legendary Content When Youre Short on Time

Marketing School

05:07 min | Last week

How to Create Legendary Content When Youre Short on Time

"I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about how to create legendary content when you're short on time. So this is something I've been thinking about for a while if you're busy, let's say you're a busy founder you're just starting up right now everyone's talking about Oh, my God you know. We're talking got to create content. You have people like Gary Con content's but how do you have time for contents redoing all these different things? Right you have other operational things to worry about. So I can kind of go over my process first and then this is what I've been thinking about recently, and then we can kind of go back and forth so. For me recently, I just kind of had this epiphany man. There's some leverage that's built maybe I should take advantage of that leverage and then right more. So you see a lot of people for me I look at the people that follow on twitter. It's a lot of entrepreneurs. It's a lot of investors as well, and their twitter game is just really strong and I'm like men I haven't blog for awhile talk into neo about this. I've been blog for a while but when I wrote my first blog post in about three or four years last week I felt really energized by I. Miss that feeling but I don't always have time to do that. But what I can do capture my thoughts in a tweet so if you're short on time. Start with a tweet I, 'cause years writing these tweets and if you WANNA come back to later to write legendary content, the tweet is the foundational piece that is your little sprout content, and then you can decide where you want to take that piece. Later because I have a couple tweets that I saved up after this recording, the reason I have my hair done. The reason why I'm actually dressed up time is I feel so motivated because of those tweets and let go make some legendary content go on Youtube. So Neil, what are your thoughts? So I liked that I have a simple process to create good content and a short period of time and I've been using it for years. So, there's really two steps in the first is finding the idea i. just go to all my competitors websites and most of them have solar sharing buttons on there and comment counts and some have up votes in down votes and I looked to see what's hot in my space because that'll give me ideas. All right. Once you have idea you don't WanNa Copier Competition. But if you know topic like on Seo or link building as you can create your own version of it, that's better more thorough. That's on a different viewpoint than there right again, you don't WanNa copy them. You WanNa do something that's better and then I just get into writing and the way I write is very simple. Headline I tried to vote curiosity or use a how to or lists based title than outlined I. Write the introductory paragraph with a Hook, right state some questions in their Hook Gum, and then for example, if I'm writing an article on Yoga be like. What would it be cool to do yoga like a advance Yogi? You know of course, it would. Who really has a patient's practice yoga for ten years? Why can't I learned the moves and get them done right now? Well, you know what I figured out a way one hundred and one ways to advance yoga as a Newbie and keep in mind I don't do yoga. So I have no clue what a Yogi any of that is Linda yogis postal teaches yoga. So my context is probably off but that. Should give you idea of how I hope people than I outlined my body. I list the main subheadings of all the sections that I want to cover, and then I'll put a sentence or two underneath each one. Then all right to conclusion and the conclusions that summarizes everything and then I end the conclusion with question that encourages more comments and then I go back in I fill up the middle I'll reread it. But that stuff on where pressure put my content up on wordpress are uploaded to your cms have editor some review it make sure you had your pictures from your stock targeted decided schedule it and boom. You're good to go like that. Literally is my process sometimes on writing and unsure some things all Google for the answer and then all linked to it within my article I'm deciding my sources but that really is my process. Cool. That's great process. I think by the way just because you know we're talking about tech space content on this podcast it doesn't necessarily mean you have to do text based right when we talk about legendary content, it could be at it could be a facebook ad it could be a youtube video it could be a podcast, right but neil touch on something it is. If you guys have in Glengarry Glen Ross, you have to watch that. Ad Section where he talks a idea just go find that one but this silly? Tent Patel So. A idea right. A is awareness interest D is decision as action right? The Hook that Neil is talking about you want to get them immediately. Right you want to dress Oh, while that's awareness right there right and then you want to get them interested right. Then in some cases when you're any educational content, you might not try to get them to make a decision maybe you wanted to opt into a your e book or get onto your mailing lists and then they can you know given decision there maybe to take an action, right but. Point here is human beings are still the same. You gotTa Hook, them, somehow, keep them interested because people's attention is so all over the place right and then the framework that Neil gave you or the one. I gave you a little earlier on how to start creating legendary content. Everyone has different processes but I think the foundational piece again is thinking about, okay. How do I get their attention first and how do I bring them all the way taking

Neil Patel Twitter Hook Gum Gary Con Founder Eric Su Glengarry Glen Ross Google Facebook Youtube Linda Editor
Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

The Morgan Show

01:10 min | Last week

Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

"Pouring in from all sides after a federal appeals court overturns the death sentence of the Boston Marathon bomber, George Tsarnaev thie argument from Tsarnaev's lawyers centered around two jurors who lied when asked if they had posted on social media about the bombing. PBZ Suzanne Saws. Ville spoke with Dr Neil Livingston, author, TV commentator and an expert on security and terrorism. Tsarnaev's death penalty was overturned because of issues with jury selection. The appeals court ruled that the trial judge didn't do enough to prevent biased jurors from being selected. Terrorism expert Neil Livingston says that's a weak argument and think Tsarnaev deserves the death penalty. I believe that might have given some of the victims families. More closure is indeed the death sentence carried out. But the parents of Martin Richard, the youngest victim to die from the bombings, didn't want Tsarnaev to be sentenced to death. And despite Friday's ruling, it's clear Tsarnaev will not be walking out of prison. A free man. He's in Florence, Colorado, right now, which is one of our Super Max presents and you know Life is not going to be a bowl of Cherries Money. Any measure in

George Tsarnaev Dr Neil Livingston Suzanne Saws Boston Ville Colorado Martin Richard Florence
NASA keeping close eye on Hurricane Isaias ahead of bringing astronauts back to Earth

Kim Komando

00:45 sec | Last week

NASA keeping close eye on Hurricane Isaias ahead of bringing astronauts back to Earth

"The threatening weather, NASA says the weather looks good for a Sunday afternoon splash down in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida It'll be the first water landing for Astronauts in 45 years. Doug Hurley and Bob Benton took part in a farewell ceremony today at the International Space Station hours ahead of their plans. Departure on a space X Dragon capsule. NASA Administrator Jim Brian Steen making an appearance on Fox's Neil Cavuto live discussing what would happen if the crew can't undock from the international space station tonight. We're not gonna undock and unless we're very sure that they're going to be able to return as planned, that's number one number two. If something happens if there's Anomaly or something. We have about 36 hours of life support so they could continue orbiting for a period of time.

Nasa International Space Station Administrator Jim Brian Steen Doug Hurley Panama City Bob Benton Neil Cavuto Mexico Florida
Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

Family Financial Focus

00:25 sec | Last week

Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

"Massachusetts over the federal Court ruling to overturn the death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Terrorism expert Neil Livingston doesn't agree with the appeals court decision. The appeals court, of course, decided that the judge made errors and exploring the biases of the jury, and I think that's a weak reason to overturn the case. Livingston says. Putting Tsarnaev to death will give some of the victims closure Governor

Neil Livingston Federal Court Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Boston Marathon Massachusetts
The Step by Step Checklist to Spying on Your Competitions Marketing

Marketing School

04:01 min | Last week

The Step by Step Checklist to Spying on Your Competitions Marketing

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to give you a step by step checklist to spying on your competitions marketing. So first and foremost kneel before we talk about it when it comes to spying on competitions marketing, why do you find it? Helpful I find it helpful because typically what works peer competition, it doesn't always work for you but in many cases, it will and you can see the direction that they're. going. So when you're competition's doing a lot of experiments and things like that, it'll give you ideas on what direction you should end up doing what you should end up trying. If you want to grow your business while and sometimes it doesn't need to be a direct competitor it could be an indirect competitor but let's say for example, I'm a direct competitor to click funnels, which is Russell Brunson Company. So I might just pull up facebook Ad Library, which is completely free and I'm going to take a look at the ads that he has going on. I'm going to look at how frequently he's throwing up new ads because facebook was show when ads are published I'm GonNa look at the ads that he frequently has running and I can just tell by looking at his facebook Adler he last time I checked it was six hundred thirty results. He just cranking out new creative all the time because he knows that he needs to stay interesting to. Stay top of mind you have to come up with new concepts and you have to constantly show up over and over you can't just show the same ad and let your ads. Basically, you can't drive ad fatigue right I like looking at this using that as an example when I like people's ads facebook. Ad Library. I use at beach take a look at Google, display ads and Youtube ads. Those are what I start with I when I want to look up people's advertising campaigns. Other thing that I recommend doing is checkout goat with Donald, what technology people are using, and you wanNA combine that with the way back machine. So if you're seeing that people are doing things like running ABC's tests using Bwi or optimizing crazy egg, what you WanNa do is you want to go to the way back machine to see all the variations that they're running in. See what they end up with annual you keep going back and back and back and seeing all the different variations. 'cause it will give you a direction of what consumers in your space prefer if you WANNA maximize your conversion rate. All right. The other one I like using is social blade social blade allows me to see the growth rates of different. Let's say youtube twitch channels. I can see twitter as well. We can also see the top channels for different categories. So from a social perspective, I, find social blade to be helpful. and. There's a lot of tools out there like eight sem rush uber suggests by sumo that will show you what people are producing on a contract basis social shares. What's going? Well, how many shares new. Back, link. But Will give data on both content marketing as well as SEO as well as paid advertising. Again, this will give you trends to see what's working overtime on what's fair competition. Yup, and then similar web is great too because it shows websites that you know referring websites that go to one to the site that you're looking at the also show you the breakdown of traffic in terms of different sources and I've talked about this in the past but I used to find that their traffic trends were accurate but the traffic numbers were not as accurate. That's actually incorrect now the. Traffic trends are accurate and then the traffic numbers. There are a lot more accurate than they were before. So I do find myself looking at that from time to Time Neil anything else on your side yet the last thing I have for my side is Google alerts put in your company competitor names and Google alerts. If the more than one word, you'd WANNA put him in quotes and get alert emails on that because it'll show you every time your competition releases something they're trying to make some noise. This will get inclination of where they're moving on what you needed to. Yup last one from my sight is crunch base. Especially, if you're in the tech world, you can just take a look, just follow your competitor and see what's going on what new announcements are happening. Crunch Base Hook up with a lot of different other news sources. You can see funding rounds. You can see if they hired a specific executive, you can see what direction they're going in. From a marketing perspective, but also from a business perspective as well. So

Facebook Google Ad Library Youtube Neil Patel Donald Trump Russell Brunson Company Eric Su Twitter Executive ABC BWI
Books Ive Loved  Neil Strauss

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:48 min | Last week

Books Ive Loved Neil Strauss

"Hello Boys and girls ladies and Germs Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic, athletes you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests close. Friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I. Hope You pick up one or two mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please enjoy. Thanks for having me back to talk about some of my favorite books and I wanted to do something different today, which is I wanted to recommend some books that I've never recommended before on this podcast and that I haven't heard other people recommending things that people may not know about I wanNA turn people onto some new staff. That's like so central to me. So My Criteria were, what are the books where I've underlined the most amount of things some of these books that I'm going to recommend I literally have underlining or marks on every single page. A have kind of involved system. I use to mark books depending on the residents of the idea and different things going on in the book. The second thing is brought together these books sort of. Encompass like. The body of. What I think right now, the kinds of things that I write about and posted on instagram and teach in coach and have had so much value in my life and change them, and I'm going to walk you into them from. Let's say the simplest book to the most complex from one that's just so easy to read to one. It's almost like a textbook safer into these the beginning and see how far along you get I. Love All of these. They're really great on the path to understand yourself and who you are and the obstacles again, your way and where he's self sabotage in your relationships and. Real. Freedom. The first author is Sherry Huber and I wanted to tell you about her past but I looked it up online and I can't find anything there. So I don't know if it's public but as a child Sherry, probably faced one of the worst traumas a young person can ever. Go through and only survived it. She became a Buddhist monk. Ever met in my life I. Think She's one of the most. Centered. Wise. Powerful presences I've ever been around there's just something about her that. I can my I would like to get to one day. I really would she writes tons of books I'd love to read every one. And her books very simply written just still to pure wisdom almost like a wise mentor is giving you the advice. There aren't like supporting arguments and footnotes in research studies is just like the wisdom from high on the mountain. It's also unique font where part of the story and the power and the impact of the words is done through the font and style of writing changing as well. The illustrations by June shaver or could be shiver. The illustrator in the book so really. Looked through all her books read anything but I'll share with you the two that have had the biggest impact on me. Actually to read but I would want to read the rest. But I started with fear Book and fear book is so powerful because so many of us. Have a certain area where fear and doubt and uncertainty get in our way, and the book walks you through the of of of how to embrace them and move beyond them, and often it's very counterintuitive. But so true I highly recommend this for dealing with it and want to read you one quote from it. I WANNA read a couple of quotes from it. And her basic idea is that moving toward your fears and getting past them is the path to freedom and I love this part. And her books by the way very short hundred, fifty pages at most. She writes if you no longer believe what fear tells you you will live and it will not. That is a point on a spiritual journey that almost nobody gets past when the terror arises. When it gets backed into a corner and a matter of its survival years almost nobody has the required combination of courage desperation willingness to stand up to it.

Sherry Huber Tim Ferriss
BREAKING: Herman Cain Dies Of Coronavirus At Age 74 in Atlanta

The Erick Erickson Show

03:35 min | Last week

BREAKING: Herman Cain Dies Of Coronavirus At Age 74 in Atlanta

"A political consultant who worked for Herman? Cain on his twenty twelve presidential campaign is announcing that he has passed away. from. covid nineteen. That's breaking news here in Y'all I'm not confide. This is not. Confirmed other than through Ellen. And I'm Yup. nope. It's IT's confirmed folks. Herman Cain has died of the corona virus. age seventy four. In Republican presidential candidate in two thousand twelve. Herman Cain ran his platform very famously was the nine nine, nine tax reform plan. He had been Fox. News contributor and a newsmax contributor newsmax is confirming his death He was admitted to the hospital on July first two days after being. DIAGNOSED WITH COVA night teen. Ten Days Prior, he had been at the Rally for the President they they don't know where he got the virus. And Herman Cain has now. Passed away He was the President of Godfather's pizza. He. Rose through the ranks He joined coca. Cola. He worked for Pillsbury. He was regional vice president for Burger, King, which at the time Pillsbury owned and then he took over. Godfather's pizza turned around made it a profitable company. And his big issue is marketing. He became the chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in Nineteen ninety-five He was in the position for twenty months in nineteen in two, thousand nine you'll recall the president renominated him for the Federal Reserve. Board? He ultimately withdrew his nomination. He dabbled in politics in one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty was an adviser to the Bob Dole Jack Kemp Campaign for President He ran for the Senate in two thousand four. He was defeated in the primary by Johnny Isaacson actually campaigned for him in two thousand four. Now he beat colon cancer it was stage four and two, thousand six he was diagnosed with it the and then from two, thousand, eight, two, thousand, seven, of course, he had the Herman Cain Show in Atlanta? On WSB, I was actually hired in two thousand eleven to replace Herman on WSB Because Herman had decided, he was going to run for president and he had been in the line to replace Neil Bortz they needed somebody to replace Herman as a result. So they hired me Herman off and ran for president. He at one point was the front runner for the Republican presidential nomination, and then he the ultimately lost the nomination and came back to radio has has wound down his career over time and. Herman Cain now dead he was a good man. Seventy four years old affected by coronavirus virus. Prayers for his family. And for for those who knew and loved and worked with Herman Cain God. Bless him.

Herman Cain Regional Vice President Herman President Trump Pillsbury Consultant Newsmax Federal Reserve WSB Ellen Bob Dole Jack Kemp Federal Reserve Bank Johnny Isaacson Neil Bortz Senate Kansas City Burger Atlanta
"neil and" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

01:58 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"There, you go and we're going to We're going to give you some. Some music that hopefully Soothes the soul a little bit and. If you don't know, the sole stirs the inspiration for. Neil, Simon and Art Garfunkel. You might have picked up a. you might have picked up a line in there that. Alternately Got Into Bridge over troubled waters and. Neil pessene standing by and neil the bell ringer with bells. The one on Saturday got her back at. Churchill and back on the dirt. And that's the way to. To get going early in a meet Neil congratulations? Thank you very much. I'm around big race. You know she she's funny. I didn't think I didn't think the pace was like a giant setup. Solid and it's gotTa pace you would. You would like to see if you've got a closer, but you know talk about the winter. She really you know. After the libra, she only had a little break after keeneland the LA. Brea than you were down in New Orleans. You gave her that turf try. Talk about the three to four transition. Well. The La brea she kinda got moved a little too early moved on backside. Coming around the turn wide, which is the move? I hate the absolute most wide around the turn. So you lose momentum and distance with all that. And she moved, she went from next last two third, and then just kinda flattened out in the Lebron, plus with the ship and everything. and. Then there really wasn't a lot of spots to runner I could've taken to hot springs. which I really didn't want to do or just stay the fairgrounds and try around the turf. She'd one on the turf down there the year before, but was going mile. And not, against. You know the sex race, but it wasn't a really top stake race..

Neil pessene La brea Brea Art Garfunkel Lebron libra Churchill New Orleans LA Simon
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:03 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"At Neil any I L True S. H You a writing another now now. I was actually going to be in a book for this and that got cancelled so yeah time to think of a new actually neal's in the National Academy of Sciences. He's a festive researcher. Kogyo would he teaching primarily now so I teach undergraduate anatomy not using this quarter but I next quarter? I will teach a course or two courses. Actually I inner fish course which is basically tracing the evolutionary history of the body into deep time now fish and worms and flies and then the other course I teach I work with an cosmologists. And it's of course origins from the Big Bang human consciousness so basically thirteen point seven billion years of of the evolution of the world. And you know that look. That's your next. Yeah no kidding right as I became a fan of Sean Carroll because I I've actually listened to but he's awesome. Yeah extremely good explaining the fundamentals of physics you know and as as a biologist I would. I've always been fascinated. That these these molecules that form because there are these physical forces that at at a comic force has golly nosy influence of those but I mean thermodynamics and energies and entropy and empathy working itself out so these proteins fold and then they behave in a certain way because of the laws of physics as now. They don't behave that way because they know how to behave in the mathematics around of around the probabilities of them behaving certain ways. That's right that's life that's it. That's and so you know to try to make sense of those things. You did. The math on the complexity and the probabilities will let me. Let me let me finish with this philosophical questions. I'm sure given you have a similar view. Biology to my own You have thought about free will and are you a deterministic compatible list or a free will denier Kinda Kinda have much choice and things I think. Biology is Let me bill push you back and say what? Biology is a giant equation. That's an infinitely probabilistic system. There's room for what something where there's something I think. Knowing a feeling that have free will the more of a compatible list in some ways but feeling that we have free will definitely impacts our the way we choose things but you know the more you study biology the more you realize that boy so much hardwired in our system now that doesn't mean you know that doesn't mean walking through my day that everything I do is determined but boy. Those outcomes are so Malcolm's are going to be much more likely than others probabilistic based on the structure of our brain. The our nervous system works in you know and the history that our brain you know encountered as we grew up but but categorically humans live in a better world. If they're at least compatible list at least yeah no I like exactly exactly and I think you know crime and punishment and all these important things only work if you think about it that way. Yeah Yeah and and and again even though we may be determined some of those external forces help with those determined to behave almost definitely. Oh yeah most definitely no if I thought it was completely determined and everything but right yeah as wait a minute. So listenable is a delight to to again of. I can't wait to read the book any website or anyplace else. You want to refer people. Yeah you can just go to our tectonic website to collect that you Chicago Dot. Edu Lot on the fossil itself. My twitter feed. I'm always posting stuff on Neil Shubin on twitter posting pictures of Antarctica and the Arctic and crazy story about genetics have often with Telugu spelled. Ti K. T. A. L. K. to Zia. Yeah menuet word awesome. We'll deal fingers paid time appreciate so excited. Talk to you again. And congratulations and all this all your success. In scientific success in world literary success things fantastic so like I can't wait.

researcher twitter Kogyo National Academy of Sciences Sean Carroll neal Neil Shubin Ti K. T. A. L. K. Zia Malcolm Chicago Arctic
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:20 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"How did that have the head because my next question make sense until they're like wait a minute? We got something totally different going on. Well I actually. I began my career. Not On fish. Like Mamik reaction mammals. I went to graduate school to work on fossil mammals. I got bored of mammals but I Love Them. But it's research wise found more problems and fish so mammals arose about two hundred two hundred ten million years ago and there. They are their closest relatives. Are these creature. We call mammal like reptiles. They are reptiles that look very doglike so one of the dog like yeah doglike yet their house and so the diversity of but the ones that are that are closely related to mammal. Look really dog like they don't have anything like that. But if you think about mammals you know there are lots of traits that that are distinct distinctive in mammals. You know one is having a ear with Three bones inside at middle ear bones. Three middle airboats. That's Kinda unique to mammals. There's out we can trace those middle ear bones all the way back to reptiles to the jaw box using the fossil record and we can do that with the DNA record as well But it's a very beautiful series. We can show how mammals gradually arose at the end of the triassic from one group of reptiles probably nocturnal. You know so. That's probably behind the metabolism the high metabolism that we have maybe that 'cause novels have warm blooded nece Probably once. They became warm-blooded. They need intelligent. They need skin structures like hair to to pull it in. You have wonderful series to show how these dog like reptiles got got smaller and smaller and smaller their ear bones. I'm sorry their jawbones transformed into ear. Bones we can follow that in the fossil record. Write beautifully their limbs changed. Its The fossils that show this from around the world from Russia United States China so forth. It's a really fabulous story. Amazing amazing it really is now now. You wrote another book. I am not aware about. I have not read called the universe within and that was in two thousand thirteen that's inter- fish was two thousand eight so I didn't know you'd written a book in between Yep that one so that really touches on some I was always. I was a child of the two things when I was one reason. Why I'm a scientist is the Apollo space program. When I was growing up seeing humans. Walk on the moon just blew my mind. And the other was Carl Sagan and the you know Cosmos and all that and so this was sort of An Ode to Carl Sagan. Because he always talked about stardust. You know how we are stardust were related to the stars. The the the matter that makes us was born in the you know the fusion reactions to start will in writing fish. I was impressed by even more than that. That is you can trace the history of the formation of the cosmos the Solar System the formation of the planet. Those great events inside our own bodies you know so we our own our own presence on earth our own structures are related to the formation of the solar system. You go back to the. I love their dynamics or where we know. Actually go back to the Big Bang but one of the But I trace it even further and further more recently. So let me give you an example so much of human evolution it relates to the ice ages that are there have been ice ages the Isis. You Know Isis gone to the polls towards the equator and back and that dance of the ice has really changed climate at a particular time in our own evolution. So we wouldn't be here in the same way. If it wasn't for ice ages it turns out that the one of the main factors driving the ice ages in the distant past is changes in the orbit of the Earth and our relationship to the gravitational relationship to the planet Jupiter. So it's an amazing story. You Leon yes. Yeah so basically. If you think about the solar system planets orbiting around the sun have these huge massive planets the gas giants Saturn Jupiter they affect the orbit of the Earth. So what happens is the orbit of the Earth is a can go from being more of an ellipse to a circle go from the tilt of the Earth can change a bit and that does it on regular cycles of one hundred thousand years of forty thousand years as a regular cycle that are based on our orbital relationship to Jupiter Somare close to Jupiter exerts a gravitational pull on US changes the orbit of the Earth. Will those changes in the orbit of the Earth? It's been shown we've known this about fifty. Sixty years changes the climate of the earth in very predictable ways so you can map the changes in the ice levels at the polls most recently a changes in the Earth's orbit regular cycles in the changes of the Earth's orbit so I'd like to show how you know our relationship with Jupiter and are in the solar system has affected our own narrow. And we can see that. Record in mapping the skies but also in mapping the ice and also a mapping human evolution. So it's and and by the way it's so cool. I mean how deeply connected everything that is heard about and I again. My head always goes back to the cataclysms we've had in the sun the Earth and in the whole shift at one point in Paul's shift and all the time too. Yeah I mean. In fact cataclysm asteroids hit the earth. Wipe out life. We've had the oceans. Get get poisoned. Get get hyper acidified. That causes lots of extinctions. You know the Earth has witnessed some incredible revolutions and changes through its time and and and species track does change and MLA. They tracked it th they. This is the big evolutionary challenge. Right now the race comes in like Buchen who can justin surviving. Whatever the new environment is in the new world so you get you get these events which Kinda reshuffle the deck change everything and then species. That were formerly super successful. No longer can cut it. They're they're remove for whatever reason and then new players come on you know to new things and so you see. These events are reset everything resets like an asteroid wipes out bunch of species for whatever reason then for whatever reason those ones that survived now have inherited a whole new world. They can do things. And so those resets have been a very important thing so so fascinating. Well I appreciate you right in the by guy. I can't wait to read it when Heard you talk about four and I was like okay. That's that's my next book assembly required decoding four billion years of life from ancient fossils. Dna You can phone the L. At Neil Shubin dot com also twitter and instagram..

Carl Sagan Jupiter Somare L. At Neil Shubin Buchen scientist Russia United States China twitter US Paul justin
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:19 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And in the box. Basically whatever conditions in the box triggered metamorphosis triggered a hormonal shift so now he had two kinds of salamanders not one now. What does that discovery show us? It's discovery shows us that subtle changes in levels of Harman's in development could cause changes throughout the body. So you don't need all kinds of different genes at to change at once. You can have just a one gene to genes. That are behind the you know the timing of the you know secretion of this one hormone thyroid hormone and you'll get widespread changes across the body so it was a great example to show how tinkering with small changes in the process of embryo. Logical development can produce huge changes in evolution. It's a it's a form of puberty. Exactly I mean Alexander. Puberty metamorphosis a fourteen year old humans. Right I mean it's what happens to humans. They turned into different creatures at a certain phase. When it's normal and match all that Sturman drunk and you put it just into like one week. One Week last man. There's experience talking here. That definitely give me more on gills and lungs because that that goes at that issue and I see you I heard you talking about. I couldn't quite get my head around it. Yes so this is what's amazing okay. We always associate so if you think about when creatures evolved to walk on land. What did it take while they had to have arm bones inside and risks but they also have lungs? Fingers is not impressed me nearly as much as long and this is where the story gets super surprising if you look at the distribution of lungs in the Animal Kingdom who has them well creatures that live on land reptiles mammals birds and Vivians but also fish and in fact. The most primitive condition of fish is to have lungs. Get my head around. It's amazing most and say what what are their. Lv the Alveoli surfactant lobes. They are the in lung fish identical species to Irish. And then if you look at some fish like Rafin fishes so when clippers. They have lungs as well. They'RE PAIRED THEY HAVE. I expect is a little different but they are lungs. And in fact when you look at the genes that form our own lungs. We can identify those genes. Dna same thing. These genes are active in these fishes. While if you look at the and do these fish. Lungs transmit auction with as opposed to all or now. These fish are Arab readers. And so what happens? Air-breathing and fish is a very common strategy. Most people don't know this is what This is a big in the book. Is that the so. The oxygen content of water can vary a lot. Okay sometimes some sometimes. It's high sometimes as low. These fish have both lungs and gills. So they used their gills when the oxygen content along of the water is pretty high but when it drops they use their lungs go to the surface take cups of air. Come back down so think about the longest accessory Oregon. It serve you know. It's IT'S A. It's a secondary Oregon for when the the auction level in the streams won't cut it and a lot of fish have that strategy or the most primitive fish have that strategy and most primitive fish. Let's think about that for a second. Is that be? Why would that be? I'll tell you so. Basically the every fish has some sort of air SAC in. Its most fish ninety percent other than so basically you have A. They have a sack that lies next to this office. Okay and in some fish that air sack is a swim bladder? They use it for neutral buoyancy. So there you go there you go now other fish. It's a lung so they have one or both and it's basically you. There have a long or a swim bladder. Every fish has some sort of air SAC. So there's a lot of stuff and I've Lucien word something. They had one function ozone subsumes another function. That's exactly it so this is the idea here. So the origin of air-breathing did not involve the origin of new Oregon. It all changed in the function of Oregon. That already exists when we think about that. Is that incredible? And most people don't know that that's actually one of the big things in the book. I wanted to point things that things to feathers you think. Well feathers help Birds Fly. That's a rose for bird now. They Rosen dinosaurs eons before you know and so feathers rose not her flight but was regulation Courtship displays the fossil record clearly shows that some of these the dinosaurs related to birds have full downy feather feathers and and they're very common in the fossil record. That was a huge surprise. And by the way I would I look at the false record now looking you know archaeopteryx and stuff and you look at some of the giant detours to head duck bills may white exactly this morning in some of the some dots. Well you know. Duck need the duck bill thing. We see that mammals to like a platypus editor from from Australia. Duck Duck Bill. Is that that kind of bill. Is we see it again and again and again there's some things in evolution we see again and again. It doesn't it from a human perspective. It doesn't seem very adaptive but it had major utility at some. Yeah if you live in water it's a good you know it's a good way to catch stuff you know. It's a big big net but the you know this long and Gil stories amazing because if it's not a one off that is the way. Evolution happens most often happens not by new structures coming about but repurposing finding new functions for structures that evolved eons. Before yes so if you look at the fish that we're living in these ancient streams three hundred seventy five million years ago. They already had fins with limb bones inside they already had lungs and Gills. They already had next and they were used to fish to live in the water bottom to live in the showers so they already had the toolkit necessary to walk. Land and when the impetus came to walk on land they had it. They were ready to go really funny that you know having you know thinking of this story right Lord Away you've been striving it to me and helping me fill in some of the pieces in my own knowledge. Now Amy Lee start thinking well. How do we get mammals?.

Oregon Harman Alexander Sturman clippers Animal Kingdom Gil Amy Lee Australia editor
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:55 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Because you know having multiple lines of evidence show something that was like incredibly surprising to most people they you know it's really most people in your ear bone jawbone of a reptile or a a gill bone of shark. But that's the case so when you look it up the creature that we found in the Canadian. Arctic it shows a transitional stage and all that sort of stuff in third approves the theory out most definitely. Yeah now now. Explain something to me that. Maybe I'm I'm not quite thinking clearly about is that I've noticed that particular neurological mechanisms through evolution. We tend to layer things on top. We don't move into different unsure. There's some movement but there's a lot of Larum you know we have. We have an ancient para sympathetic in a more recent parasol. Pathetic system that we eliminate the old ancient system we piled on top of that system and is is that another way of all the sort of piling on as opposed to migrating am. I know you're making total sense. So yes one way of evolving. That's this is one way there's others is to pile on the avenue stuff so you have something that works keep it. Just add to you. Yeah Yeah and so. We see that. A lot in embryo logical development willoughby's stages of amber logical development marina go from egg to adult creatures my evolve by adding new stages at the end. Keep what works. Keep all the other stages and just add stuff at the end and that's actually a very common way evolving likewise when you look at neural evolution some of that does come to adding new systems on what works you know so that way. You're not like monkeying with something. That's actually working. You can or you might really works if you let something go. I mean you better be sure. It was a good thing to let go. You know what I mean. You're getting it back. Yeah you gotta like gotTa redesigned the motor cars moving. And so that's what's happening here and that's why that when you're talking about layering on that's another good way to do. It is to duplicate things and then change them. We see that in the genome a lot. A lot of new genes appear in evolution. Not just to Novo. Although some do you know just Adan? Seeing a lot of them are duplicates that is you have a gene some process. Some error happened during you know the the division of cells. Or what have you and you instead of? Having one copy of that gene you end up. The two copies are four copies or copies. That happens a lot and then what happens when you do that. You now have lots of copies of that ancient gene and now things are free to vary in in other ways rights. Now you've layered on top if you will by by by copying the if you you know one of the things. When I was studying genetics we did. We couldn't figure out how packed six foot of DNA could unwind and read it. You know how. How do you unpack wiser? Spread all over the place in. How how does that happen? But some of that unwinding unfolding is set up to make those kinds of errors. That's exactly right and if we didn't have errors have evolution and so that's and so a lot of errors happened in terms of the house so basically what happens is as genes are being turned on and off that six foot long package of DNA inside the Opens and closes in certain ways. It changes its shape and those changes can you know can affect how genes are turned on and off the accidents. Crossover duplicate something. That's right and then when you end up when you do that you'll end up with not one copy of gene. You might end up. Four five six seven eight whatever and and that is actually fuel for evolution as well because those new copies you can keep the original copy doing. It's old function. And then the new copies can change in certain ways that way you can change the motor of the car as it's being as cars going forward. That's that's that's a lot of it happens and I heard your interview is John Carroll. Who's a friend of our show and amazing guy and he was very impressed with your salamander stories. So perhaps we ought to share that with my listeners sellers. I Love Salmon. Is this the other thing I mean. I've Kinda crazy. I Love Salamanders. There's lots of amazing stories. Were Salamander so there's too but the one I really love. Is it traces back to like Dr or winning times right so this is like eighteen fifty nine eighteen sixty the sky agust? Duma real sitting in In the Museum of Natural History in Paris right and he was the keeper of Reptiles Amphibians. And so when expeditions would go around the world and they find cool stuff they bring it back to doom rail in Paris. He was the expert he would you know he was he. Ripley's mainly an expedition from Mexico. Came back with a special kind of Salomon. It was a salamander that was big. You know about four inches long. Best big for Salamander And it had fully aquatic features. It was an adult. And it'd be it'd had full Gills Gills. It had like a tale. That was that was like a thin. It had limbs or thin like very aquatic and the researchers and Jim Real. We're really interested in this because maybe Darwin just published his theory of evolution. Maybe this salamander town. How creatures evolved to walk on land so anyway ahead. About six of these salamanders and they're all big with external gills and he's excited to work on another project so he he put them in a box eh sound easy to keep and throw them into Menagerie forgotten for awhile came back to the the enclosure months later. And what did he say he saw? Two different kinds of salamanders in that box he saw his original kind. The one that was aquatic with the external gills the fins and stuff then he saw another one full grown adults with no external gills with full-on lungs with total and terrestrial land living habits not remotely watered while it was like hit to something magical happened in his box. And he's like you know it's like he put chimpanzees and his cage. You know one month and then came back half year later and found chimpanzees gorillas on the same case right and so what happens do real scientists. He's pretty good. She figured something had to happen here. So he started to like to look at the development of these things and that's where he found what the magic was. The what happens in Salamanders is typically. They hatch from an egg. They swim around his larvae. In the water external gills thin like limbs a tale that's aquatic and all kinds of other stuff and then at some point they get bigger and bigger and bigger you know and then at some point they undergo metamorphosis imple- shift change in the level of hormone. This case thyroid hormone causes a change across the entire body they lose the gills defense turned more into limbs the tail becomes more terrestrial and boom. They're fully terrestrial adults. What he discovered was in his box he started with the population of Salamanders. These were ones. That didn't metamorphose.

Gills Gills Paris Larum willoughby Adan John Carroll Jim Real Duma Museum of Natural History Ripley Mexico
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:39 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Plants tropical fish yet hold it and we found some early sharks freshwater sharks. We don't know this whole transition this out like that. Yeah we can follow what you can do is using the notion of the theory of plate tectonics continental drift but we can also look at signals in the rocks themselves to show us the latitude that the rock formed in overtime. So we can actually map over one hundred over tens of millions of years. How in article went from the equipment towards the equator shifted to the South Pole? And as it did it it went from a tropical rainforest environment to this frozen wasteland like where I worked I always I always wondered if any of those asteroid strikes a accelerated any of that over the no one. No one seems to. I never find that talked about anywhere. No I don't know something like that is much more related to the The Astros strikes have a huge effect on the earth. Don't get me wrong giant but this is much more due to the internal convection inside the earth itself. We think you know there's a Lotta theory about that This thing motor down and then the climate change so we found some the early sharks. We sat found some of the earliest bony fish. We found a relative of the creature Up North on lower in the tree. It's just as a field day for us. We're GONNA have to spend it on my lab shutdown right now so we can't really work on the stuff but When we resume. We'll be back in business looking at the fossils. The the technology's changed a lot since I worked on my Arctic fish. We now you know we used to like when we worked on a fossil you sit with a needle and pin vice and remove the rock grain by grain man. Now we don't do that now. We throw it in big high-powered. Cat scanner not a medical one. This is like for industrial use. It would like wow Ri- you like two hundred and forty kilovolts throw the Rock in there and you can see right inside the rock and see the fossils and we can serve prepare it digitally and get a digital capture of the thing so we have one downstairs here And Yeah that's what we were just going to mass produce it you know. Just scan every rock we brought back from. We brought tons of stuff back from a river environment right. Yeah Yeah Ancient Rivers. Think heard you say that it was a pretty Hard to last long those rivers. Now you wouldn't like it so basically it's a position fish were on. We win last night because basically you have fifteen foot long. Predator fish teeth size of railroads spikes okay like giant crocodile. Things you had even the small Fisher Nasty. Big Wide heads like monkfish with step. Just teeth that energy tate. Like just so you know basically everything's a carnivore in these ancient streams and so I like to say it's a fish eat fish world three strategies. Get big big fish little fish. Yeah get armor get body armor like external like bony skeletons or get out of the way you know. Get on land back. Yeah yeah that's that's kind of what happened back in the Devonian so talk about the specific fish and what you found even back to your inner fish part is that was interesting to be Cincinnati. We talked about that. I've gotten involved a lot of theory about The development of the bronchial pouches which is sort of what you were looking at in the fish and its connection to our social functioning. It turns out that There's a lot of information we get and use comes developmentally from those same regions that you were looking at well there's a lot of glandular tissue in there there's all kinds of stuff so the so basically. We designed an expedition to find one of the first fish to walk on land and we looked at rocks for particular agent a particular type and we found after six years of fish that has arms and inside it spins has lungs gills and lungs and Gills. When you have a chance definitely so we spent a fish had all that stuff and then we found twenty more of them we found small ones found big ones. We found the front end. The back end. We now know the rocks. Were you know we're looking at so now? We extended the search to Antarctica It's just been a gold mine and and when you look at a fish like what we found in the Arctic it has an ear bone a single ear bone one bone in its middle ear right and that bone is really once was a Gilbert and Gil Patches. You talk about that you know that. The Gill pouches that form so basically and early development. We have them a little fi logically recapitulates don. Yes so what we get is when if you look at human embryo a few weeks after conception what you see is like the head developing right and you see paired. Sir Paired Primordial for the is but just below it in the area. We call the barracks Kinda the throat area in the back area. What you find our series about four swellings varies by species subspecies of five swelling. But we have four. And those swellings contain a bunch of cells and those cells if we look at them in fish. Okay those swellings. They've become portions of the Gill apparatus the muscles the nerves the bones the arteries that formed the gills right. Were they doing in us? The first arch that firms are that first swelling becomes portions of the lower jaw and two bones inside area. The next one forms one bone inside our middle ear as well as a little throat bone that lies at the base of the tongue called the highway and then the other to become portions of the the voice box as well as all the muscles and nerves bonds and the thyroid and semantic environments thyroid. All that stuff and they all correspond to this fundamental organization that we see in the early embryo and I remember when I saw that for the first time in the anatomy class in medical school. Yeah it blew me away. I could not believe that I could not believe that I got I got hooked on now The the pope called the bagel theory by St porridges where he's doing a hooking Bagel and author nommik information flow through that Frankel couch development whereby there's this social emotional system that allows us to literally like tune our ear to the property of Mom's voice and at our vote and our voice box to communicate social information again through prosperity and tone. And it's all it's all hoping to the system. Well I love the pair of sympathetic. My need it now. It's the relaxation system trying to you. Know we have the two systems too sympathetic. In the and pathetic one is the fight or flight response sympathetic synthetic rest and calm relaxation response in the age. A covert I like my Paris this the heart is also the heart and yeah right in an eighty percent of it is is is effort. So you're getting information from your checks from in the local systems. Yeah well that's why you know when you think about meditation practice. The first thing they teach you is to control the breath right. And that's because the getting back to your effort thing getting back to sensing that when the minute you control your breath you're you know you are that the Para sympathetic sympathetic kicking in and it does affect your mental and cognitive state. And that's been known for Millennia. You know And that's why breathing is so fundamental to a meditation practice as well as everything we do. You control the breath you control. Your concentration is a lot of it So I ended up to again. You're trying to tell about that as you interrupt in a good way. That's awesome the your awesome. So you have an entire so basically into topic ear of tectonic this creature this critter. We found up in the Canadian. Arctic angle bone in its middle ear. We have three when you trace the history of that bone in Tollackson or the actually better trace the history of the bones inside our middle. We have three of them. You find an entire tree of life. Two of those bones corresponded jawbones and reptiles one of those bones car spots to a gill bone in sharks and fish crazy. How do I know that I could trace the fossils that show those bones getting smaller and smaller moving into the year? In the false. I could trace it from embryology. I can trace those for pouches that we see in early development. I could trace the cells and Aaron compare sharks and people and reptiles and show you that I can look at the DNA that drives all that stuff. It'll show me the same thing. Three Lot. Evidence borough are ear was once gill bones of bones inner ear ones gill bones of sharks to those bones bones or once jawbones reptiles it incredible story and you see it written in the nervous system and the skeleton in the muscles all the stuff we can trace back like that and to tell you the first time. I learned all this stuff. It blew me away. It's and that's sort of those sorts of things that are led to Inter fish the book beyond it..

Astros Gill Arctic Cincinnati Aaron Frankel Tollackson Paris Gilbert Gil Patches
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The hardware right the proteins the software is there the instructional tool kit that tells those jeans when and where to be. Active as bodies are built from egg adult and evolution so that's become enormously powerful in evolution this regulatory genome as you say. Because it's showing us. How the computational software the toolkit that builds bodies how that came about how that evolves how that changes and again. It's just so powerful because we're finding that many of the differences say between fishing people fins and limbs not necessarily the genes inside it's when and where those genes are active in now. And it's that computational you know the software if you rightly there turned on during development of such as to cause more elongation of certain bones and muscles and The raise of the fingers probably will separate mechanism right exotic in somehow. These things happened because of something happens somewhere along the way and and your search with divine one of those legs and we did and so it was really so we did it in two ways one is looking at the the genetics of living creatures and finding we can ask the question I can. I can look at the genome of a mouse the entire genome and I could look at the entire species of fish and can ask the question. What's different between the two? You know we can now ask that at the genetic level and that's kind of one of the things we do and by the way it doesn't even the wizardry that happens in the lab is really amazing. We can take mouse gene and put them at fish and other doing and we with the fish genes in mice. And that's what they're doing put peop- human genes and fish. We do it all the time. Furthermore we can at the genome now using a technique called crisper cast genome editing. We actually added this gene people. We do at such and we can remove genes. We can move around and so we can really serve monkey with this Ad. Ask evolutionary questions very powerful but then the other approach is just the classical on which I do now. Work in. Antarctica are used to work in the Arctic. Now for yourself. A way south You know looking at great transition so I can predict likely places to find fossils. Simple took you know you look for places in the world that have rocked so the right type and age to answer. Whatever question issue in my case interested in how fish evolved walk on land takes me to rocks three hundred and seventy five million years old rocks that were formed in ancient rivers and streams? Okay I go in the literature. We let us to the Arctic. That's how we found that creature with arms and legs The the fish with arms and legs and it's lettuce now to Antarctica for a similar to find. But whenever you talk about it. Yeah so we've been working in an article for three years. It is just a challenge working there. But it's remarkable. We're working rocks. That are a little bit older than the Canadian. Arctic stuff there about three hundred and eighty million three hundred eighty five billion years old..

Arctic Antarctica
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:46 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"He's into medical school. Utah so he calls the folks next door and virologists next door and come on over on the show. They come over and he put in the slide puts on this. Slide doesn't tell them what's on it. And these guys who are experts in viral genetics. Oh that's HIV Zaid's remember gene. So then they looked at the clancy of the genetic structure of ARC. Turns OUT IT'S A virus? It's been re purposed. This gene was once a virus that was re purposed to now function memories and they when they looked at it. Think the idea is that maybe there was an infection. You know Hundreds of millions of years ago that in our distant ancestors because it's president a lot of different species And then that Jean that I'm sorry that virus was then domesticated was was neutered and then put to work For a new purpose that fascinates me those sorts of genetic shifts. That you know might make a fan into an arm just a changing a regulatory gene. That's to me. These things seem like they should be either radiation or viruses. Those and I don't think people really build those models often do their no they don't and you know and in fact but we're increasingly doing that because now that we have the genetic tools to look at the structure of these things. We're finding some of the proteins that are active in the placenta right really important for reproduction. Those two are re purposed viruses that invaded our species years ago. And then we're repurpose and what happens is viruses. You know they go from cell to south and when they go from cell to cell they They make a little capsule that protects the genetic material as it goes around right Well it turns out. That's what these things are doing. So it's been repurpose. Gene works because it goes from cell to cell right and makes a capsule says basically taking a viral innovation of Ireland invention and repurposing it for us. Something that's useful. But that's not always the case coronas. It's kind of like Eric Kandel stuff. Some of the stuff he was looking at. In the periphery of the nerves. He was looking at these kinds of Informational transmission systems through the Amarnath system. And using that as a way of learning a model for learning. So it's all it's all kind of kings together as Ryan and it's and it's yes and it's full of surprises. That's what's wonderful about science the more we you know I mean. I love being surprised as a scientist but sometimes we see theories come together and that's what makes up. Aleutian so beautiful. You know it's molecular biologist fossils it's embryos it's all this other stuff you know and and in its unified as a perspective and that was one of the areas that she gets assaulted in. Spec- Asian. How do you talk about the process of species? I always wonder viruses have something to do with it. Yeah I don't not I'm not so sure about viruses but I know we have a greater understanding of like when you and I took introductory biology and evolution. We're taught species as this process where one species becomes two. There's like a geographic barrier. Learned all this stuff in our class is very doing very very very very while. We're learning now that there are certain genes that are involved in. They can identify particular genes. That are involved when animal species. And what happens is these genes actually When they function around one byproduct of their function is they cause to populations not to be able to reproduce with one another so genes behind creating the whole idea of species their whole also has sort of genetic barrier rather than geographic barrier. Yeah you can have what you can have geographic barriers. That's certainly part. You're going to behavioral barriers but ultimately has to translate into the jeans. And that's one thing we've gotten very good at with the molecular biology genetics of everything including species patient. And honestly. That's what motivated the book. But that's what's motivating my own research really I've been paleontologist for forty years but you know now I do DNA work. Why because it's so incredibly powerful. I didn't want to miss that party. You know. That's just so powerfully explanatory for what I do like my team and I showed that many of the genes that build our hands and feet That are necessary to build our hands and feet. Those genes are present and fish. And what are they doing? They're building the fence a fish. But what are they doing in the fence? Officially building the terminal end of the fence just like the terminal ends of our hands and aren packages our hands and feet. So what you're finding. Is that a lot of evolution at the genetic level is repurposing not always inventing new stuff new genes new things like that. It's using old things in new ways so the way a came about one of the process behind it genetically is using genes. There were already president. Fish fins making the terminal end of a fish and repurpose to make digits and fingers wrists and so forth. Look and stuff like that right. I think those regulatory genes regulatory genes are aware a lot of the action is so to step back so when we talk about regulatory genes there are two things to think about. You can think of our jeans and those are the those are the part parts of the genome that contain the code for a protein. But then there's a whole nother stuff which referring to the regulatory genome which tells the gene when and where to be active right so when you think about this we have trillions of cells in our body pretty much each one of the cells has the same DNA inside of it. So what makes a muscle in my hand? Different from the cells inside the retina of my i. It's not the different. Dna that's in the cells. It's which genes are turned on and off the Regulatory James. What we call the regulatory part. That's incredibly powerful. Because that's the kind of the computational machinery that tells jeans when and where to be active and that's sort of the software if you think of the genes is.

president Regulatory James Zaid Utah Eric Kandel Ireland scientist Ryan Jean
"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:05 min | 2 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The people that support us. Check those streams. I put out there every day and do support the charities that are helping out In the setting of the covert outbreak. There's a lot of great charity being done and we should be doing this all the time and so it reminds us that it's time sport. Does that support those? That are most vulnerable today. I'm delighted to bring my friend. And what's the word I want to look for the old Neil Shubin is somebody? I admire like phenomenally. He's written his first book. Was I was a big fan of called. Your inner fish is new book is called some Assembly required decoding four billion years of life from ancient fossils to DNA India. Welcome let's great to be here. Thank you and the reason. I'm such a fan of your's is I was reared as a biologist. That's what my original training and Circa one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred eighty if you were reared as biologist. You were reared as a evolutionary biologist. Strictly speaking a and so. I've always whenever I've assessed anything in. I'm always in these situations like we've been in with Kobe. Trying to understand the biology and why things happened. My default my default method is. What did this do evolutionary? What what purpose would function this. Or How did this happen? Pollution perspective. That has been your life. It has been they say you know the great quote from Theodosius Zamsky. One of the leading lights in airfield is nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Y- and that's been the guiding light for for me in my entire career and sounds like few as well. Yeah and it's weird. When people will take issue with evolution to me is like none another's no evolution has no biology. The dissed that's right and you know what's remarkable to it and one of the things actually motivated me in writing this book But motivated me throughout my career. Let me done I just push something I write up front for those of you. That are creationist or believe that guy did this off. I would urge you to look at how evolution really works and the the Awesomeness of it. You will be struck with awe at at at the glory of what? God has created you. Get a look at the reality of biology and not be struck with awe and if. God whatever did I I. It's awesome whatever it is but please don't minimize this biological thing and how it works and the beauty of the theory that the day of the beauty of the experiments in the discoveries. I mean there's an aesthetic to it as well. It's it's beautiful. I mean it really is the way it can explain our world. You know I interrupted you know I was just GonNa Wax Rx under the same point generating from a different side. I was just thinking about Charles Darwin in eighteen fifty nine. When he published the arginine species he had no theory of genetics let alone any understanding of DNA yet everything we've learned about DNA in the past. Fifty years has basically filled in the blanks of evolution. He had no way of knowing about any of that stuff yet. It it fits so beautifully and to me. That's the sign of it. Incredibly successful idea that you know that unifies observations that makes predictions about things that people didn't even know about at the time. Just really wonderful. A lot of people aren't aware that Mendel followed Darwin even though there was there is a lamarque in evolution. All ideas Valerie back to the Greeks had the mechanism of national flood. And Darn had no idea of the gene. No idea of genetics and it was actually at the time people criticize him for that. You Know How. Can you have a theory without understanding heredity? And in a way they were right but he was only he was only vindicated. You know years later. So Yeah so the book Ted Talk. To us about the book and what we can learn from it it. Does it go back to your studies in the Arctic. It does it sort of basically what I'm looking at. What really inspired this the question? How did the Great Transformations Evolution Happen? And how did fish up to walk on land? How BIRDS OF OUT TO FLY. You know when you step back and just look at the end points of these changes. They look so impossible right. You think about you know what has to happen for creditor walk on land yet. Everything we've learned in the last century and a half has showed us how that happens and it's often very surprising and part of the observations that I brought into this which have really blow my own mind be quite honest is just the power of understanding. Dna. I'm a paleontologist. I work on fossils. Dick my team and I discovered a fish with arms legs lungs and Gills in the fossil record. You know one of the first critter to walk on land up in Ellesmere island up in the Canadian Arctic predicted. You find that that's right and we weren't right for five years. We had to keep looking the six year. We finally found that it was like people ask. How did you feel like as much relieved as I was joyful? There's an interesting piece that I heard you speak about. Which is that. You didn't find an organism. That was the missing link. There was a widespread specie. That's right was was the made the connection. That's right there like twenty these things and it turns out they're creatures like this no now from elsewhere in the world so it's not a one off. It's a then actually not. They're not rare the pretty calm but what blew my mind and actually what motivated me for? This book was just the power of DNA and what we've learned. Since the genome projects we had the human genome project was published. Two thousand to great fanfare cost billions of dollars. You know over a decade to do now. We do genome projects in the afternoon for less than a thousand dollars and we have all these genomes genomes for Korn and everything. What would you look at that? Just loaded with surprises. You know And it tells us a lot about evolution so what I liked to tell students in folks is when you think about DNA. It is a six foot long string of molecules six feet long wrapped in packed and all folded in on itself into fit inside a cell and we've trillions of cells in our body the cell nucleus. Sal I mean think about how. Have your six foot. It's popping to that so if you take all the DNA. Albert trillion cells lay sickness the end to end the DNA. If you stretched out in our bodies and put an end to end in every cell it would go from here almost pluto. That's how much genetic information we have inside our bodies and that's mind blowing but even gets better because as we look at the The genome what we find are just enormous surprises. You know. We're living in an age of corona virus right so everybody thinks about viruses it turns out we have about four times more viral genetic material inside our genome than our own genes our own genes compromised compose about what to percents. You know the the part that actually codes for a protein. That's call Jean. That other ninety eight percents always been a mystery in many ways. We're now figuring IT OUT BUT TURNS OUT. A lot of that is ancient viruses that Attacked they've been. They invaded the DNA than the cut. Neutered knocked out but they sit there like fossils you know in a graveyard through the DNA. They'd be thinking of them as fossil record now. Not Right now no no the the the you know people talk about trouble wrapped in a protein right. These tiny little these tiny little pieces of genetic machines genetic machines wrapped in a protein that can change the world rancho a lot more benign but some of them can look at what's happening now but they're even more surprising relationship with viruses incredibly complicated and the story. I like to tell about that is. There's a lab a researcher studying memory jeans at the University of UTAH. And he's not interested viruses. He was interested in memory and it was working on a gene called ARC air sea and it's famous for being involved in memories mice that lack arc. Don't remember puzzles that. They saw the day before people that have mutations in our Kabul kinds of cognitive disorders right. So you've met so he studying and like any good geneticists and protein biochemist. Both he was he looked at you. Know The arc gene and he looked at the protein that that gene may standard fare for for academic he pops it under a microscope looks at it and had some medical training and he looked at it and he thought for all the world he was looking at clumps of the virus that causes AIDS.

Neil Shubin Charles Darwin Theodosius Zamsky Ellesmere island University of UTAH AIDS Kabul Ted Talk Arctic researcher Valerie Mendel Korn cognitive disorders Jean
"neil and" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

10:48 min | 5 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"DOT com. Today that's GEICO DOT com. Hey Libya's gear. Are you a Metallica Fan? Because you're younger than me. Metallica's been around for a long time. Kristen has probably been at least twenty of their concerts and complete metalhead. And she's seen a lot of a lot of bands in METALLICA's up there. Are you a fan or you have an appreciation musically Forbes since you pick the guitar and you love to sing yes I do have appreciation for Metallica It started probably freshman year like last year in college. Now I be doing calculus and I need something to just block out everything else in. I'd turn it all the way up and I just listened to my headphones and do my calculus and work and it was very weird but I started listening to them more and more through that and I like to listen to him when I'm working out and being active and stuff like that you know it's not I think he's really music that you just kind of sit around two or you just drive to. I think be a certain mood to do that type of stuff but I mean it's it's really good if you're trying to study in my opinion which is really weird but yeah. I like him a lot downloaded on itunes or whatever. Hardwired to self destruct deluxe and I guess it's release. It was later released in two thousand sixteen and Shit. They're twenty twenty six psalms on air two hours thirty seven minutes of music and I really enjoyed the hell out of that and because it kind of it sounded kind of new and kind of old at the same time. I don't know if that makes sense My wife would be better critic of what the album is because he was so into into them but man when when you look at that that guy the body of work that they put in from way back in the day and we were watching them in concert from nineteen eighty three and hatfields on the stage and they were singing seeking destroy. Had long hair crazy young he was like eighteen or nineteen years old. It hasn't really grown into his voice yet and he's got to put together style rhythm guitar and you can see. Hey Man. These guys could be some trailblazers. They they got talent but who would have known would've stayed around for as long as they did. Who'd have known the gigantic footprint that they would end up leasing leaving on the musical world and still daily to this day. You hear this homes every single day and go down there and find out that you know when you make a living on the road like they did our due and like I used to like. Oh Man Okay these these these guys do kind of what we do not entertain people entertainment business. They're making music. We're telling stories twenty two thousand square circle but here's due to send an entertainment business. He's got an appreciation for cars. Let me go see what kind of cars. He's into and man like most thirties. Based mob mob. Like you know like long elegant boat like boats. Yeah and dude. He spent some money on this stuff. It was in half ass anything. No it was a nineteen six Auburn speedster. Go look at this. Oh such a pretty car. It's such a pretty car you know when when I see that gotta root beer like metallic Brown what it is but just kind of reminds me of like a guitar. Yeah you know and I think I would have painted that things something loud like red or blue or whatever but this thing is so classy and beautiful and it's almost like maybe you should have painted something brighter and make it stand out but when you look at it. It's so so spectacular and it. Subtleties is just elegant. Yeah that's that's you hit that right on the head. I agree with that. Let me see if I can find some. My pictures of those guys Also liked that long asked silver car. I don't know what that car was thirty. Six Ford Five Window Coupe Whilst Aquarius Oh God. Yeah that won't read about right here. It was a inspiration was forgoing. At law she. I don't know what that means but it's called Aquarius special concert special construction. If I if I botched up at pronunciation I think pronounce correctly. I think I got some Italian in me but that Rick Door do help some of these cars. They got a pretty good communication system. Because man obviously he'll get to brain's working together. Put these these rides together near absolutely beautiful. They're gorgeous. What did you think about the fifty three Buick? Skylark this one. That was Kinda like light. Oh yeah that one was cool. I didn't pay much attention to it as much as I should have. Because it was very loud and I it was kind of in the center But I I paid paid more attention to the ESP guitar and amp out front. The amp was Like pattern with some like very nice leather all the way around it and then the face plate on. Pearl what I liked about. That was fifty three. Buick and I got fifty five Buick special so just two years later. These this is a long car. Mine's gas boat too. But it in quite this is and so you know that's first Buick I've had you've seen my debut when did when did you get the Buick? You Ain't seen that on instagram go. Oh man is bad at look see. I don't I don't get on instagram. It's not that I don't see it like down to talk to mark Henry and Austin. I've seen this car. Yeah that's it see. I liked it. Oh yeah you just liked it? I saw what you did there. Well but man but check. That's clean car. That isn't Redcar car. It has forty five thousand miles on it. It's got one partial respraying the guys that did it did a phenomenal job on the hood and the middle of the hood. There's a little crease where there's an perfection. But you know it needs to be buffed out. Yeah that's original interior original motor original Trans Third Gear. I think it needs to synchronize or something and we'll grind Olympic going into third and it needs a little break work but other than that. I mean it runs and drives down the road absolutely perfect and when you get in that big son of a bitch got vintage air conditioning. When you roll the windows up man. That thing is quiet as brand new luxury car really. Yeah but managed to boat speed on the column. Yeah three twenty two nail head. But it's just such a cool car as the fifty five Buick. Look the automotive world on fire. You 'cause like Chevy kind of really had to fifty five fifty six seventy five and so they were really crushing it but when I saw this car at my buddy's garage. He told me he's trying to sell. It was originally that. Mustang for Christmas. Yeah six bought. Yeah I said Hey man. What does that blue car? And that's how I ended up getting so you got you got. I think we talked about this. Definitely did I got the thing you know. I was looking for one just having to get it just happened just happened to get it back this collection here man. The other one I liked the thirty seven Lincoln Zephyr which is called Sherry. Read One. No Yeah Voodoo priest. Yeah that one was really cool. Had a great color to dude. I you know. Like I want to repaint that. Twenty eight that I got from Scotty. My seventy four and it's already started off medium read. Now it's Kinda Maroon but what do you think about that paint? Please do it on my Camaro. You should do it anyway. Yeah I look at. I'm looking at it. I mean this is a good picture show but Kristin Kristin Says No. It's too loud. And he goes. That's the flakes for like. Yeah that's the point. It's a flaky paint job. And she goes just a little flight just like a few flakes here and there news looks at her. I mean it's just like nope paint. You need to paint this car that I y doesn't understand with the cars you've been here with us for five days and of course she loves you to death and vice versa. But it's like I have a white corvette a two thousand seventeen zero zero six your six and she won't get in. I mean we've been to the restaurant there in town but she don't really like Rodney car because she thinks it's a little too flashy it's a white corvette white corvette. It's not a purple Lamborghini. Yeah with some some seats never cover. It's a white corvette. I don't understand so now. Can I told her I said you know what? What if I didn't pay that Camaro and I put a camouflage rapid? That's even worse in her opinion will. Oh yes worse. She hates Cammo by on cars. But also that would be extremely more loud because no one has a cameo wrapped Camaro but you can see a bright red car look. That's a nice car that's all that's all happens. But Z like I've been wearing camouflage for shit delong. Oh yeah too long. I can remember my wrestling days. I've been wearing camel Monday night. Round smack nat forever and so when I saw some of the patterns that they had well so's you six just like mine wrapped in it on a pitcher look bad ass. Yeah Yeah it looks cool so if I if I wanted to cheat my way out of it and not spend all the money I'd go nine. Donald Duck tape duct tape and let I'm hill together by duct tape and lecture tape. Baling Wire Somewhere. Use that but we're going to see what what we ended up doing with that car. Because I'M WE'RE GONNA suspension right now. Yeah make it handle better and dude. You'RE GONNA love driving a car so the Halen I'm putting a hotchkiss suspension on their. It'll make it like a brand new car and at three three. That's croker motorist hot and you lied in that sound bad. She will let you know it. I had to go down the road today. I won't say the speed on the air but it was. It was a little bit north of fifty five. Sammy Hager Kate traffic to five neither can I? Ring is a challenge. But there's one place you can go where hiring a simple fast and smart.

Buick Metallica instagram GEICO Libya Kristen Forbes Buick special Donald Duck Auburn speedster Chevy Sammy Hager Kristin Kristin Rick Door Ford croker
"neil and" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

05:18 min | 8 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Bad ooh Yeah back yeah and Yeah come on everybody at Christmas time restoring for single word that I'll say. Turn the money on the presence where we needed to get us. When we saw Serbian Serbian the saints come and driving? Rain new indicate L.. Who took me Sir? Batman in Batman in red sue gene It took man in a red suit Batman in a red suit.

"neil and" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

11:21 min | 9 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"We actually need to be happy first and then we do great work and then the big success follows I believe that the opposite of depression it's not happiness its purpose ever leave that every single person has something you meet meets contribute to the world and that's why I wanted to create a show called don't keep your day job don't keep your day job about figuring out what it is that you you do in this world that only you can do to make the world more whole more beautiful and to stop selling yourself short stop sitting it out and to figure out how to take this thing love whether art or music for screen writing or dance or faking how you this thing Nikki Rub into a life that you get contribute that you get to do what you love fulltime it's not just about business it's about contribution it's about meaning that is what we see that is what we truly want and you absolutely are here to serve the world old I want to help you figure out just how much value you have inside of you and every single week we're going to be talking to people who have something to add to help you get out of the way to help you be more successful to help you be the truest expression of you my name is Cathy Heller. I'm so glad that you're here let's dive in thanks to net sweet the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform giving you the visibility and control you need to grow net suite is offering valuable insights with free guide seven he's strategies to grow your profits at nets dot com slash dream job also thanks giving holiday gifts is great overspending is definitely not why spend more than you have to honey makes finding lowest price easy honey find the best deals online it's free and easy to use shop with confidence at join honey dot com slash dream job hey guys it's Cathy Heller Welcome back to episode of don't Keep Your Day job I hope you had such a good weekend it's been so good so fun we did a retreat we're actually actually still doing a retreat it finishes up tonight. You're listening to this Monday it started Saturday night the women flew in from all over Austin in Vegas and San Francisco Tisco in Saint Louis and it's just so cool to meet some of you in person and suspended two and a half days doing this really deep beautiful work and I just feel so l. grateful to get to connect with you guys it's just awesome In fact I WANNA do what other retreat I said to Emma my producer like before it even van began but then like in the first minutes in the second hour in the fourth hour I just kept turning to are saying this is the funniest thing I do this is so enriching and it's so good good and I love it so much we had dinner Saturday night you guys are falling on instagram you probably saw some of those photos who went to catch in West La took all the women out might treat beautiful dinner such a beautiful restaurant and so nice to get to know each other and then on Sunday everyone came to my home and we spent all day here yesterday really just doing the work work you know every single thing in our life all of it everything our relationship with ourselves their relationship we have with our spouse with our kids what we're doing for work what we chose to wear today and everything is a result of the things we believe what we believe dictates the habits and dictates the things that we choose to do the actions we take and so Sunday yesterday was day one like the full first day of the retreat and we spend the whole time doing these exercises to to get us in touch with what we really want what we really desire and what's holding us back what narrative are we still telling ourself off and where does it come from and we have to have so much compassion for ourselves because we were all kids at one point who went through a lot and so we sort of do this is Marie condo where we open the door to some of that and we take some of it out of the closet and look at it and it takes a lot of courage and I was just so impressed with how these these women come together and create such a safe beautiful space to Jus- each other give each other so much support and then today is the second day of the retreat where we you're going to do a full deep dive on what are the building blocks now to take this thing that you were born to give to the world and how do you make it and how do you put got it out there and who are you serving and how you best serve them and how do you price it and how to really make it so it works effortlessly I think that oftentimes we we make things harder than they need to be I think that what we realize is that the more that we're around successful people in the more that we see what works we don't have to you make it as hard as complicated as we think it is I think so much of it is like giving ourselves permission right to just take the seat at the table and then there are certain strategies that actually allow us to show up have empathy for other people so I'm really excited to do that business dive today with everybody at the retreat and if you're following along on instagram you'll probably see more photos you can find me at Kathy Dot Heller you WanNa see more of what's going on at the retreat all right you guys well my book is coming out the next week I can't believe I can say those words my book is coming out next week comes out next Tuesday the twelfth so this week is the biggest seacrest it means so much for us it means so much for me it means so much for this work that I'm doing if you believe in me if you believe in this work if you WANNA get a book that is really early going to speak to your soul if you WanNa give that book to somebody who you believe in who you want to encourage pleased by the book this week if you already bought one copy by a second copy if there's anyone you can think of who you want to give this message to to share this with to give them more of a sense of what's possible police by the book this week because is it matters so much you know a lot of people are saying why does it matter if you hit the New York Times bestsellers list what isn't that some arbitrary ego trip what does it matter and it's just really interesting interesting everything today is an algorithm and if the book hits the near Times Bestseller lists it means the bookstores will actually carry more than one copy which means that people will know about the book and then it sort of becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy were more people will buy the book because it is just featured and so I would love for these stories to be told I would love her Greg Franklin to be somebody that everybody's talking about I would love for them to know that he had the courage to open his cheesecake shop which is written about in the book I would love for people to hear about Beckie Scott what and how she wrote this movie even after she had this injury got fired I would love to hear about branding more pogo who builds her mobile bookshop on wheels and also to hear all of the lesson listen this book is so helpful in bringing home to ourselves and showing us what we actually can do how do we do something about how we feel so that we can become whatever is not serving serving us and really come back home to ourselves so please go ahead and get the book and what I'm GonNa do is because I've been loving this retreat so much we are going to do another retreat in mid December and first of all if you want more details about how you can come we are just asking that people buy a chunk of books and we can tell you the pricing all of that so you can message passage mean to find out more but I'm also I'm going to do a raffle for a retreat so that you can actually come on the street because it's so great and it's so worth it and and I did one in May and people usually spend a couple of grand to be here and they think it's such a cool prize so if you do by the two books if you've bought the two books then go ahead over to my instagram today I'm going to be posting a raffles so that you can enter to win and I will give that away to somebody but if you want to be on the next retreat it's really actually not such a big leap instead of paying the usual all you have to do is buy a chunk of books books if you want to find out more come over to my instagram and d. m. me and we will get you in okay and now let's talk about today's episode because it's so good this week we we have the incredible Neil joining us he is a multi bestselling author to Time Tedtalk Speaker Blogger podcast entrepreneur in just all around incredible human in being he's the creator of the Webby Award winning blog one thousand awesome things which led him to write the book of awesome a number one international bestseller for one hundred forty two weeks straight which he then went on to write other amazing books like the book of even more awesome awesome is everywhere the happiness equation and his newest book is coming out tomorrow Morrow and that is called you are awesome how to navigate change wrestle with failure and live in intentional life it's such a beautiful book I can't recommend it enough it's not just going inspire are you but it's packed with research based strategies tools and lessons to move from thin-skinned thick-skinned failure prone to failure proof and anxious to awesome and it is episode we're going to dive into all of the great stuff in his book so make sure you pick up a copy of Neal's book and you can also check out his great podcast three books with Neil Patricia which was included rooted in Apple's list of best twenty eighteen podcasts in his show he talks to the amazing human beings like Judy Bloom David sedaris Emily McDowell and Malcolm glad well any any asked them about their three most formative books and it leads to some really juicy conversations we recorded the episode with Mia Neil on video as well so if you wanna see the full full unedited version of the interview you can watch it on youtube you can find a link to that in the show notes neal is such a generous talented suite smart inspiring person then I love talking to him it was a blast and I know you guys are GonNa love all of the wisdom he is about to share so without further ado please welcome the Brilliant Neil Patricia Neil I'm so happy that you're here and thank you for joining US Kathy I'm so happy to be here thanks for having me so my audience I just want you to know Neil is so so delicious he's just one of those people you like him immediately and just to add a little sauce to that I want you know because my audience knows Emily Emily McDowell has I've been on the show you guys know she's a good friend of mine she loves him and Emily you get the credit wanted to make sure that you get a gold star because she introduced us so you we already all love you like if you could leave now and we're all like Neil okay you have books you have things to say I WANNA get into all of that so tell us a little bit about out your journey and what even got you to begin the blog let's say let's go up to their sure absolutely well I am the son of Immigrants Mom from Kenya Dad from India grew up just outside of Toronto Canada. You know it's like it's like study really hard hit good grades than if you're east India like I'm like go be a doctor go go to a good school buy a house have kids and so I'm in my late twenty s I'm kind of following the life plan I'm not a doctor but the rest of this stuff is coming true I'm tears into the marriage and everything everything falls apart from the span of a couple of weeks my wife tells me she doesn't want to be married anymore which was a total shock and I didn't see it coming and then my best friend Chris at the same time he'd been battling mental illness for a long time and and he didn't he took his own life just a few days after kind of this this news on the divorce and so I was Iraq obviously I'm trying to read a eulogy for Christmas Funeral I ended up putting in my house up for sale I go to the courthouse to try to start process this divorce I actually lose.

"neil and" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

10:54 min | 10 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"It hadn't occurred to me until just now when I when I went to look because I knew that that Neil Hasn't won plenty of races in recent years but I knew it'd been awhile since he had won a great at stake and keeneland congratulations thank you very much we like winning at King Fun well yeah but it's okay to win a steak Churchill too Lord fairgrounds well we've been a nose greatest thanks to Churchill and well the lighted for not just for you Ah Obviously Mr Loath back and this is a terrific win with a Philly that you you just never you never are gave up thinking that you know she had these these kinds of performances in her talk about the year and getting a big win for bells the one well you know after the acorn she didn't run her best race in the ACORN and we turned out for about three weeks. and brought her back and just came back slow with her and we prevented the Dogwood virtual and if she doesn't cozy then she won by two and a quarter and set the stakes record by full second should should have gone into the end of the range and runs you'd have been probably third or fourth choice seven to one since phoebe was in there and she beat his eight links and but she almost she came within one hundred seven seconds of the track record that Groupie doll set you know not one they kinda discounted phillies she's never really gotten a lot of respect the whole year and she's done nothing but runner eyeballs out and then of the me were a great philly it's funny because I mentioned you were going to join us and I I was clanking around in my head when which of the stakes this year that I watched with you at it was the Acorn and even at thirty two one you didn't necessarily expect to win but you did expect a a better effort and it it just you know really never really came together but regrouped and took a portion of the summer off at that point and then went onto the Dogwood I mean the the fact is she's run into virtually every three year old filly all year long including break even back in you know on Derby Day yeah big rights to be second there yeah exactly exactly she is interesting because she was she was purchased as a as a affiliated with real potential because one hundred fifty five thousand for majestic perfection at that point you know that's a that that was real money talk about her development to get to this point well I think drought and the fact that Tipton summer sale last two years ago and she just very athletic so she's not the most correct philly in the world but she's good enough but she's very she's very very athletic looking in fact her sister I'm going out to look at right now the Tober sale at has probably up so we we got her she goes they go to chesapeake formed start and they go down to Chat Stuart Florida it'd be broke and then I get them up but Well two years ago last year was at Arlington would be Churchill but she she developed Arlington far I gotta you know probably around June last year and we made our first started Arlington and she she went out there she'd been working antastic I mean the worst run the form to five eight hundred fifty nine bullet work and she goes off I think it's thirty two to one first time out which made no sense to me is a nice field but it was you know she had really Nice Works and done nothing wrong and when drove off and wins by four then we come to Qinglin and she wins easy of an allowance rates and they other than they will go down the fairgrounds and I was Kinda hoping we ran into lightly which was a sprint in December and she went that pretty handily and then trying to get her in the same she'd go grab because three year old fillies these egg Naroda ground and she kept getting sick on me we had entered a couple of times getting ready to enter the preps for the oaks and she just kept getting little stuff that we had just give her two weeks off for a week off header on antibiotics a couple of times so I ended up instead of running we scratched out of all the prep races so just going straight to the OAKS I decide to run a mile on the turf and set up for Qinglin and she really wasn't even ready for the mile turf race and she just doug inner self at the quarter pole kicked in and won impressively I probably is proud of her that day as any he's ever run and then we here and running the state going wrong here and she gets off bad which was okay with me because she kind of wants to sit behind but we ended up being rushed up and going wide and head for the lead around the turn and just wasn't her type of races way it's set up for about a half mile pole she kind of said the hell with it and flow just kind of wrapped up her so then we go to Churchill for that race and she she redeems yourself runs behind break even and we go to the ACORN and I don't know if it was the practice shipping or what it was she didn't seem to ship and didn't seem to bother me maybe she just didn't like Belmont he's tractor and I had no delusions about being one two I was hoping to be third and thought I would be third you know 'cause Gerona during the empress I didn't know if we could beat them if we ran our race so that she wound up like six in there and I was disappointed so I turned out for three weeks back ready for the Dogwood and then the right and run was our main goal and that it worked out well and you know she she's obviously so you know the the the seven eighths she's got the two good seconds and now this win so she really feels like that specialty hype and that's a nice commodity frankly I mean because that's a you know it's obviously the the fillion mayor sprint distance and Gosh I think they're gonNa wait a minute when what is that what is the next keeneland Philly Mayor Breeder's Cup sprint is next the year after next year so she'll be four year old and might be three-quarters then instead of seventy eight so I'm not sure what they'll do it Qinglin they do what they do they they used to be three quarters always been seven eight always been seven eighths to differentiate from the from the sprint and go never wanna see her again it can who who could who could Mr loathsome back motive courses run so maybe she will be back you know you bring up a great point you think about it neal between this philly and and Kaffee and Arana and break even and Dunbar road and and even like gelatin this this has been a good Rupa Sprint and phillies this year Oh yeah it's a very tough group I mean it's the toughest division there is as far as you know being in the a non graded stakes at Churchill. Yeah that's right well because they did some unusual they actually did some unusual Sir with her and you know look at it that black cat win you actually probably could could take some some paths less traveled yourself with her going going forward I should mention of course with Jessica Perfection Brett Jones a bread the philly out of a street cry bear street mate and they actually had two horses in it's Airdrie did and they were sitting in the box right next to me we're watching the race they they gotta be happy over there it's good majestic perfection and they were they were very happy I'm sure they would rather one with their own but they were very happy man break Israel and very polite thank congratulated me and same same generally pleased that at one listening that that's one thing everybody gene and we all root for the other one to do well for it there's no animosity between any of us we all want it's all about initial offenbach doing well hello everybody raves everybody as now that he's retired and is really you know he always was active but now it seems like yeah he's he really wants to enjoy himself and and you know be fully involved and he's been he's been busy at the sales accordingly yes we've been the last probably three years but quite a few.

Neil Jessica Perfection Airdrie Brett Jones Israel three weeks three year two years one hundred seven seconds three quarters three-quarters eight links three years four year two weeks
"neil and" Discussed on Talking Machines

Talking Machines

12:57 min | 11 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Talking Machines

"You are listening to talking machines. I'm Katherine Born and an and I'm Neil Lawrence and Neil. You have some big news. What is happening what is going on? I have big news because I have taken a new position at the University of Cambridge where I will be the inaugural deep mind professor of machine Russian learning and so I'm starting on first of October which I'm extremely excited about congratulations neil that is super exciting so that's like amazing and this this professorship. This chair has not existed before you will be the first one ever in the history of this fancy old university three. That's right so I'm seeing it up there. With the location professor of mathematics which of course Isaac Newton was the inaugural holder off all the Bertrand Russell Professorship philosophy. I think Hugh Prices The obviously it's entirely the same as all of those it is. It's the best one last one and it's the best one so this case deep mind have very kindly they funded a chair at the University of Cambridge and and they've also I think being adverts out for chat at University College London which are the places where did his undergraduate graduates and his. Phd Work Will Post Work Postal workers. They've been very kind in giving the money so these are what's called Benefactor victorio gifts they endow Chaz so it's called an endowed chair which is that they giving a certain amount of money the interest from which sufficient to support the professorship and POPs a little bit of money on top AD infinitum in theory so that that's that's the nature of the chess. It's a great privilege to receive Landau Chat and it re was was one of those opportunities. It's a dream go. I think for me this thing you just content out that's awesome well. I couldn't an offer you can't refuse so. Are you starting a lab. Are you just going to Lake Swan around and tell people they're doing things wrong. What's going to happen? What did you do well? I'm really good at the swanning around bit. It's in some sense. The more announcements is to come. I think in early October which will clarify a little bit about what I'm going to do because this. I've been very lucky that few different different does does this announcement now but there is there is sort of watch. This space is a little bit of it but I can give the broad thrust of what I'm very interested in. I feel an and maybe people may be regular. Listeners to the PODCAST. have got a sense of where that interest for me has been going so I sort of feel for the I I. I don't know fifteen years of my career. I was running around wondering why people apple one using machine learning enough these techniques seen really cool and useful and trying to fix the lack of use teaching the open date science initiative. We did gassing process summer school just trying to make people understand how where these techniques could be useful across a number of areas is. I don't really need to be doing anymore. It's it's swung the other way and the decision to go to Amazon which I think is an amazing place to I've learnt so much that that company is so focused on you know they have this. I sort of now say this without sounding like you know I've drunk. The KOOL aid on Omeday. I drink the cool eight when I was there and still lingering off to taste but I was absolutely convinced there anymore. So I can say you know I wasn't willing to say these sort of things on talking machines when it's like well nils is paid by them division of Customer Obsession of delivering innovation nation on behalf of customers so the thing about Amazon is they they liked portray themselves as a tech company because it brings people in and it makes it of engineers engineers want to what the and they do have some amazing technology and this is certainly not an Amazon line you would hear but in my head they know that company their customer company. They don't care what the innovation is long as it's helping customers they are entirely focused on customers and in that sense almost like the purest version of like what what the corporate system says you should have is something delivering customers and in that respect machine learning and fishing intern is super important their agenda because it's important for their customers. It's not machine learning for the sake of machine learning a and of of course a part of me that believes in machine learning for the sake of it. That's more like the academic sites in my mind but being invalid te in that world of breath. How is this going to drive things forward for people and you know we use the what customers but fundamentally it's about people and you can translate the same aim idea to whether working in health government wherever we do have this obsession with technology and we get carried away with the Technology Eulogy we're building and don't talk about the end effect and whether it's always being done in that way Amazon that is the idea that you're constantly doing that and I learned so much from that I it just an extraordinary experience and it was I was very purposeful about choosing to go there to learn that stuff because once once you are deploying that you have to see what are the effects of that being deployed in the real world but by the same token I think businesses unnecessarily early and rightly much more short term focused than you can be in academia because the sort of financial life cycle of a company is driven by quarters and years and if you're not not delivering results on timescale I know there's lots of wonderful research indeed mind being an example of it that it should have not held by these earthly bonds of quarterly reports but that was that is not the world of most people in business and you know I think that you have to understand and that worlds to understand how machine learning is going to be deployed and that experience of threes of doing that at Amazon across things like primer Lima directly or indirectly with Alexa and then finally sort of going all in with the supply chain team which is just the most extraordinary I would say it's the world's largest largest? Ai and this is the most extraordinary automated decision making system the volume of predictions and automated purchasing going to systems just amazing but brought by the same token. I've always wanted to bring back those ideas and sort of stare where we go academically in order to address that need because because things have flipped the challenges is not no longer sort of explain to people why they need these techniques did challenges. They know they need these techniques. They they are deploying those techniques and deploying those techniques at scale across the world did he kind of unimaginable to his academics and the raw downstream effects I'm from doing that and those downstream effects best addressed by think partnerships between academia and industry and that's very I want to lead on I want to lead on on looking at that and and dealing with those implications with a good understanding the technical side with a good understanding of the deployment side and bringing in some of the welcome that I've been doing on the ethical side data trusts and using example applications uh-huh from date science Africa which has always been my biggest motivator of ideas in my head about what needs because when you have to end to end where you I have to go I mean and it's not always not always doing this but I'm talking to people who have been in the field with the Pharma grow in the cassava crops and designing being the mobile phone application and then go into the Ministry of Agriculture and say this is the distribution of cassava crop disease and we need to take action and by distributing these breeds in these districts which are resistant to this disease otherwise this reserve crop that is their witness drought will not be there when there's an extra out that is the full end to end pipeline of what we're trying to do and data science Africa is just most amazing way of seeing that pipeline so my aim is to ice. What do I see this? As in general I see this is a paradigm shift for computer science and I feel a little bit. You know. I'm very enthused about this. I hope it doesn't sound arrogant probably does if I said in a very British accent it was signed even more organ- but I genuinely think that if machining is to be successful if the promise of Ai is to be fulfilled. It needs to be pervasive and that pervasiveness fitness should be achieved through revolution in the way that traditional computer sciences perceive and in particular you can see this from the fracturing of what are sort of canonical standard laws of computer science in what we're doing. I mean just the core principle of a computer system posted of cheering thing and Norman von Neumann architectures which integrated data and code within the sort of turing machine is like I can read and write from tape and I can write instructions that I'm going to read at a later time right that that's the cheering machine idea but in all modern computer architectures we deploy floyd we separate code and data and we do that for security reasons all the sort of the viruses and everything that we have subjected to coming around by sort of variants maybe not all but a large number of them are injecting code in through things that should be data so sql overruns are saying they're managing to write data Tara's which should be code and the computer reads them as code and carries out the instructions of the virus so that separation all data and code is it a fundamental security security of the system but what we're doing at the top level. There's many layers on top of that many layers where that's being implemented and now coming along and machine learning algorithms and miss saying okay now the data is going to write the code or at least even if we're not learning online we're going to have an evolving ecosystem around the code and we've only tested this empirically in the lab and we don't know necessarily those conditions particularly deploying its scale scale. We may even be changing the system around us so those those challenges a very real like if you think about the challenges we just having with security what you staying on top of this separate data and code when you're deploying in the real world and there's a potentially malicious environment imagine those challenges when in your deploy machine learning systems that are attempting to either learn from their environment or they're using subsystems are more difficult to verify or more difficult to comprehend but I I wanNA take systems point of view on it. I just don't believe you know having seen this inaction that you're gonNA be able to go into every single group and say to every single software engineer. You must now take all of this into account every time you write a line of code. It's impossible for them. I mean I it seems impossible for me. This agenda is way bigger than anything I can imagine doing myself so my agenda is to rally computer science around this and build architectures could Texas such that when people are deploying that deploying in such a way that is safe and reliable so they can ship machine learning model in the full knowledge that this is being worried about on their behalf by the system into which they're shipping and that vision for that really comes out of being data science Africa and just seeing those folks bright. They have no problem with the creation of machine learning model they have a better understanding of the application itself they have no problem with doing an analysis. After a little bit of teaching they have no problem with writing APPs or deploying sort of Internet. Things devices is in fields. This is all stuff you can learn and do on your own what they don't have access to is an ecosystem within which to deploy the models which they understand is handling the movement of the data and ensuring.

Amazon University of Cambridge Africa Ai Neil Lawrence Katherine Born Bertrand Russell Professorship Lake Swan professor Isaac Newton Landau Chat Chaz professor of mathematics Texas University College London Omeday apple intern
"neil and" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

08:49 min | 11 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on The Strategerist

"The United States Supreme Court tackles. The most polarizing cases that come through the legal system Supreme Court Justice Neal Gorsuch. I explains how though he might disagree with his fellow justices on any given case respect is at the core of every session disagreeing strongly over important issue but you know they love the country every bit as much as you do that makes it a little easier doesn't it and you know they've given over their life to this country for its service and a lot of them could have made a lot more money and even been more famous and in the chosen the career path that they've chosen a public service for reason. I can respect that every day that week. Every hour of the day the good people people they're kind people and they care about this country. Justice gorsuch takes us behind the scenes of the Supreme Court as he discusses His New York Times bestselling selling book a republic if you can keep it I'm Andrew Kaufman and this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush Institute what happens when you cross the forty third president late night sketch comedy and compelling conversation this strategic a podcast from the word strategic which was appointed by SNL and embrace the George W Bush administration we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations and we're reminded reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who left that'd be lying if I said I wasn't nervous right now because there have been one hundred hundred fourteen Supreme Court justices in the history of the United States and we are joined by one of them today. Our guest is just as Neil Gorsuch also author of public if you can keep a bit which is now a New York Times bestselling Book Justice Gorsuch. Thank you so much for joining us today. It's a delight to be here. The last time I was at the Bush library was during the ground breaking ceremony good morning moving some dirt. You've made some progress. We've got we are really proud of that progress to and we have a special co host today. Toby young was with the Bush Center from the start until she left recently spent a year as a clerk at the Supreme Court for Justice Gorsuch. Her title here was legal counsel but really she was a lead voice of Wisdom. Toby really glad you're back today. Thank you Andrew. It's wonderful to be back and see so many great friends and to get to bring justice gorsuch to see the library. Toby just finished her year with me and you realize according to our librarians. She's apparently the first enrolled tribal member to ever serve. There's a law clerk at the Supreme Court reading that it's which which is it chickasaw chickasaw which what side of your family's not from it's my father's side. That is amazing that we've had that as many people that have come through working there. You're the first and it also goes to show that the that you bring in multiple voices and I think that's a huge part of being a part of our government a few western Voice Colorado as like yourself and in Oklahoma Toby's very proud western voices so justice. This is gorsuch. I've started reading your book a republic if you can keep it and there's some great civics lessons in there but before we really get to civics and history. I wanted to talk a little bit about what it's like like being on the Supreme Court. I think there's a bit of a mystery there for a lot of us and the way you described it. Almost sounds like just any other office in the United States in any other workplace. What what is fly fly on the Supreme Court It's both very different than any of the workplace and very much the same. It's obviously an honor and humbling privileged. Come come to work in a place where only one hundred fourteen men and women have ever served in the work we do important. There's no question about it at the same time. It's nine people to small office. Only a couple of hundred people in the whole building people get to know one another care for one another. I clerked. They're twenty five three years ago and there are even employees. They're remember me or claim to from my days a law clerk about that and we do have fun together. I mean I think that's one thing we don't hear enough about in our fractious click. Ah World is that people are still people. An even justices are people we shake hands every time and we get together no matter how difficult to moment or tends to the issue and that traditions gone on for fifty years or so we eat lunch together the most days that we have argument or conference which is most dates and of course the government so it's bring your own lunch. we sing happy birthday to one another. We have holiday parties where we also sing very very badly but enthusiastically toby brought her daughter in participated in one of our annual events. Won't you tell them about that toby. Well a little known secret is the justices offices put on a trick or treat party for the children of the employees at the Supreme Court but even better my justice justice gorsuch escorted the kids to every every office and I can tell you who maybe had a little more fun than anyone and it was just a wonderful event to have pictures with Romley meeting justices pisses and other children and just you know she was because Justice gorsuch loves families and has two girls of his own. He really allowed her to be sort of the mascot of chambers this year she wrote her tricycle down the hall and got to know everybody and little things you would never guess happen behind the doors of the Supreme Court. If we all saw your in your instagram posts in Rodman a year ago toby was here hanging out with us and here's her picture with her daughter with a couple of Supreme Court justices and she's. She's doing all right yeah yeah. She's young. She has a pretty good life but you know it's not just that it's some of the fun jokes that Y'all play on each other. I know there's one on you've told me before about Justice Ohio right before y'all went into the courtroom. There's some practical jokes. I won't share with you but here's what I will so every time we go in the bench. We all put on our robes and we lined up. It's like grade school or something. There's even a bill that calls you. There's there's a it's a buzzer. That really is really does that reminds me of middle school. Five minute buzzer means time to put on your robe and then you line up just just like dislike in school like you're going to the bathroom or something you know and we lineup and we line up in order of seniority that has really it's all. It is totally like school so one morning I guess New York Yankees had had a particularly good season again again. I'm a rockies fan so rangers yeah now. My heart goes out to two and justice sort of my order comes in wearing a robe with pinstripes and the New York Yankees logo. Oh on the chest and I think my colleagues a couple of might. Have you know they were quite taken aback. I mean we have some Yankees fans but they were still oh quite surprised and we're lining up and we're back to go in the courtroom and finally one of them asks Sonya. Are you really going aware that on the bench she pauses and replies no but I was just waiting to ask and apparently justice breyer loves knock knock jokes. He has an endless reservoir of really bad knock knock jokes and I think he's grandkids share with him and and yet when we have lunch together we don't talk shop we talk life right and we talk about grandkids among other things and I just as prior increases us with his jokes well a big part of the job description as I understand it is that you will have disagreements with your colleagues on a regular basis and they might be really really intense disagreement. But how do you keep things civil when you're when you're in a state of having to disagree professionally with your colleagues so often well it's easy these are people who love this country and when you're looking someone in the eye and you're disagreeing strongly over an important issue but you know they love the country every bit as much as you do do that makes it easier doesn't it it does yeah and you know they've given over their life to this country for its.

Supreme Court United States Supreme Court Justice Gorsuch Toby young United States Neil Gorsuch Andrew Kaufman law clerk Neal Gorsuch Yankees New York Times bestselling Bush library George W Bush Institute New York Yankees His New York Times George W Bush administration legal counsel instagram president Oklahoma
"neil and" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

13:55 min | 11 months ago

"neil and" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Hey Guys Willie geist here with another episode of The Sunday. Sit Down podcasts my thanks as always for clicking and listening along got a great one four again this week. I think thank my guest is Neil Patrick Harris. I'm joined as always by Maggie law the producer of this podcast but also double duty this week producing the interview with Neil Patrick Harris Same Nagy. Where do you find the time hard working woman. I'm yes you are yes. You are indeed so Neil Patrick Harris. There's so much ground to cover with that man. I mean he's got the best selling book series where we're talking to. In the magic misfits. It's the third book and a series. That's been a New York Times bestseller for young adults. That incorporates cooperates magic so we went to a bar here in New York City. A rooftop bar called the magic hour the magic hour ding locations where he walked in. He was very impressed with your choice of location location. Maggie card tricks. He is super intimate very intimate. GIC President of the Magic Association has hosted Magic Award shows considers himself south an amateur magician this not just like a PR invention to support the books Alex Real Hobby and always has been guy from New Mexico went to theater camp when he was thirteen where he was discovered and put into a movie with Whoopi Goldberg at Old Great Trivia Question. What's the name the movie Clara's heart Bam profile audience now they can say they know his first Gig Clair's and he was nominated for a Golden Globe award at thirteen years old old that obviously leads to Doogie howser and he's off to the races. What was interesting to me? Though is how do he actually was only four seasons right think of it is this enduring iconic show which it is iconic but it was only four seasons it's over he's twenty years old when it's over right and has a little trouble out there because Kosugi said everyone knows him as Doogie and he was sort of typecast as that child star so he had a hard time kind of breaking out of that which is interesting and he did made for TV movies he did guest spots then he went back to theatre back to help the the shows were saying if we have Doogie Howser in the show. It helped him sell tickets. Yes so let him explain. All the left turns that got him back to where he was including one big. Stop which I didn't realize was such a big stop in Harold and Kumar go to white cat that's correct thousand four movie where he played himself but a very edgy profane version of yourself get and that got him to how I met your mother almost a decade so he's inbetween that WanNa Tony Award for Hedwig and the angry inch he's hosted every award show on the face of the planet I think and got good reviews for the memorial girl yeah. He's gone girl and he's just a good guy. You know people hear his name they smile part of that was built in from Doogie but he's lived up to that through his whole career yeah so here now our Sunday sit down conversation with Neil Patrick Harris Neil. Thanks for doing this man my great pleasure. This is fun. This is great. I'm very excited excited for this book. I told you I gave it to my ten year old son last night cracking on it today the age. That is the age right right in that window twelve nine. Ten is a sweet sweet spot but I think it's good for fifteen sixteen year olds as well. I don't know I tried to write. I try to write towards people that have interesting interesting just survey kind of sense of humor like puzzles and codes and things so as much as I like it being a middle grade book. I made sure to pepper it with some other levels so it didn't just feel I didn't want to feel simplistic at all so this is the third in a series of the misfits. Where do we find our characters and now little focus on Theo this time yeah well. I'll probably answer that structurally so it's it's a series of four books and each book represents suit of the deck of cards so the first book was diamonds and that was the introduction of everyone you met. Carter who is this kid who knew magic from a grafting and three card monty and magic use to steal people's money so he's he was good with cards but always assumed that everyone had an agenda with magic he takes a train train into this town called mineral wells and he meets other sort of like minded people who also like magic and he's suspicious them and he needs a magician named. Mr Mr Vernon who runs his magic shop and they form a group called the magic misfits he finds a place within a larger community and simultaneously hence the diamonds symonds. They're trying to keep a carnival boss from stealing a large diamond. That's on display up at the at the at the hotel up the way as it could snapshot Gotcha Second Book Follows Not Carter but Leyla Leyla is into escape. She always walks around with a straight jacket. This was clubs suit of of of of attack and so we delve more into the magic misfits as a club. We find that there's another club a darker older nefarious. This club called the Emerald Ring who are trying to keep people from using magic for good. They want to be able to magic for bad and this magic in this book is not wands and Wizar- and transportation teleportation transportation. This is more practical magic so oh this is magic that you could see today or back in the turn of century stage magic mental escape so Leyla Learning about clubs you find out she's adopted. She's living with Mr Vernon the magic shop owner and his husband and the other Mr Vernon who's a chef and they a have to figure out that this woman who is a psychic also part of the Emerald Ring and that's sort of the second book the Third Book now the minor third is hearts so now we follow. Theo steinmeyer violent prodigy who also can use violent boat to make things levitating and he's very classy and formal and his family's the musicians and so he's having to follow his heart and figure out what is passion is does he choose magic or does he choose music and so. I think a lot of kids who are around ten eleven twelve are having to sort of choose between all of these after school activities and which one do they want to focus on and and why do you play soccer 'cause you look soccer or you playing soccer because your friends are playing soccer and you're really good friends with them you know and so that's kind of where this book travels travels into. Oh and there's also a scary ventriloquists and his scary ventriloquist's dummy he his name is wendell whispers and the dummies name is uh Darling Daniel and all of a sudden multiple little freaky looking Darlene Darlene Daniel dolls start appearing all over town. Just 'cause I WANNA give nightmares. I say that the sick twist drop that in there well every book has looks like a playing card kind of right so that's the heart there and then like a like a King King or queen in the in the other side as a another part of it so that's the freaky looking darling Daniel doll I should I should have merch now that what I'm thinking about this. We should've made darling doll shocked you. Don't I give still time Guinean House. A fourth book fourth book will release it all at once so how. How did this idea come to you three books ago. Did somebody come to you and say hey. It's time for you to write a book. You already done a memoir type book. Where did this concept even develop for you. It was post autobiography. I had written an autobiography but I liked interesting structure so I did sort of a choose your own adventure version autobiography so that instead of just reading life lessons from all of my years in the business you were instead able to not be sure or if it was a serious story or a joke story or you could read about my family or you could read about. Barney Stinson and I thought that was kind of fun anti structure sure so then when I was done with that I was asked if there was anything else that would be fun to right now that I'm sort of in the book world a little bit and I like magic a lot. It's sort of been my hobbies since I was a kid and I've I've spent a lot of time promoting it whether studying on my own or encouraging encouraging friends to go to magic shows or telling people to see magic shows president produced I'm just a big fan of that style of variety and so this book series came up as an option and I thought oh that's cool. Let's do a book series. I don't want to be open ended about it. Let's do four like the suits deck. This is clever okay. This is good and what if there were four main misfits who felt uncomfortable about the fact that they do this kind of nerdy thing of magic but when they join forces they can actually accomplish things and sort of save the town. I wonder if it was kind of like goonies. You you know whether it's Madison Codes to solve and skeleton keys that you have to figure out how which door opens this is my brain and so oh I just I started going at it and and sold the book in the series of four with the with the hope that they sold well. I did well the second had really well. topped the New York Times bestseller list and that was a sequel which is cool and then a third book makes a series so it's actually happening. It's funny when you do you something especially when you do something new but when you do anything have no idea how it's going to be received if people don't expect it from you from. Neil Patrick Harris it must be so gratifying do have made the New York Times bestseller list to get the kind of response you get to these books when you kind of took a chance and said I'm going to write this series unlike anything you've ever done before. I've made a career out of doing random diverse things but hopefully with the level of quality the sort of a a gleam in my eye did I. It's GonNa go okay so whether it's I don't know how I met your mother or whether it's hosting the tonys or whether it's HEDWIG or gone girl. At least I wanna I wanNA keep having things where you kind of go. Oh let's could be interesting and so with books I think if you can immu if one person reads this book and and delve into it and starts realizing wait a second this is this code like. Are you speaking to me in a different way. I don't know I'm really speaking to that kid. I was as a reader an avid reader. When I grew up when I was a little kid it was my first job ever at ten years old and a book shop in a small town in New Mexico and I just loved the book I always have. I think I think it transports you to a place of your choosing right in your mind and I incur incur our kids are just now reading there in the third grade and they're just they learned to read in the second grade but it was just write books that were these small little books and now they can actually go and read and now that autonomy I just love it. They get to be independent and go to a bookstore or library or just shelf in our our house and pick what they want to read and when it's a book that's of substance that has a lot of pages you know that's a commitment and then they get to you imagine what this town looks like them and they get to learn magic tricks. I duNNo. It just seems it seems so it seems so exciting and and I'm I'm proud it's out there. They're new ability to read raises the question have they read this book and what were the reviews of so they've read the I had. The first book read a tooth okay by my husband. David when I was in Vancouver filming a series of unfortunate events so as sort of their way to stay in touch with me kind of if the second book they're still reading and it's a real point of contention because they've read a lot of books in between and the second book has been out for a while the second story has been on their coffee table for months as what it down and went to some other stuff yeah yeah read other chapter books and I would kept saying hang you know just so that you know I wrote this book here. I wrote it and you've already read the first one so. I don't know what that says. They're reading it now and they tell you about it. They like it. You know we're actually legitimately reading it last night and I was carrying a harper upstairs and she said you know when we're reading the book. I feel warm in my heart because I can. I can see that you wrote it and it makes me smile. I know I know I didn't even pair here to say that you're going to get the paperback incredible I love. I love watching kids. Grow up you know I I have such respect for kids and I've gotten to do some things in my career of late I hosted a game show for NBC that was following was called genius junior and it was focusing missing a spotlight on kids who are real real smart and and in an achievable way and I I was on series of fortunate events which was based on lemony lemony snickered books and it and it respects kids and I think I respect my kids and I feel like with magic misfits. I want to write something. I want to honor them in in a way to appreciate that they're smart. Kids are savvy. They might read Dr seuss books but they're very aware of tensions that are aw going on in your neighborhood. They're very aware of of subtlety and they're in a world where sometimes they're talked down to as if as if if what they do is is is not worthy or that they're not aware and I'm really aware of kids..

Neil Patrick Harris Doogie howser New York Times soccer Mr Mr Vernon Theo steinmeyer Darlene Darlene Daniel Neil Patrick Harris Same Nagy Magic Association New Mexico Carter Neil Patrick Harris Neil Willie geist New York City Emerald Ring producer Tony Award Dr seuss Maggie Whoopi Goldberg
"neil and" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"neil and" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Neil young be the eddie mom woman dan and langer the in never and.

Neil young langer