37 Burst results for "Neil"

"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:11 min | 7 hrs ago

"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

"Was working on, so I replaced it for a new super duper sound system. Never sounded as good. It really never sounded. You got to get that other one back. Yeah. That's what the world ought to do. It's a cool idea. It is a cool idea. Yeah. Radio could be the future. We can do that. I mean, we can do it at very least for ourselves. Yes. Easy. Yeah. So maybe we start there. And then maybe it grows. Yeah, Malibu radio. You know, it's possible. Yeah. And you just play analog sources through this thing. And it sounds great. And people are going, why is my radio sounding so good? It's like I got a record player in here. That's pretty wild. And all the time I spent talking to people about this record and I've done a few interviews and some of them I did one with some Gaius supposed to be this big thing and everything and he starts talking about love earth like it's the melody of love earth is actually did you know it's sha boom by the crew cuts and he said it's the same changes in the same thing and the whole idea of the song and everything and that's all he said about the music. And this is a guy that the big magazine that we do every year that my management told me oh yeah, they've heard this. They heard the record they love it and everything. I'm talking to this guy. He has no idea what the record is. After that, that's when I figured I'm really doing some heavy screening on these people on they're going to have to then I spoke to Edna Gunderson who was great. And she's from AARP. That's who she's interviewing for. Okay? So she's great. She's listened to every song. And she says to me, Neil, what happened to music? I remember about 1985. I stopped listening. I just didn't want to listen anymore.

Gaius Edna Gunderson AARP Neil
Fresh update on "neil" discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

02:55 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "neil" discussed on Broken Record

"I discovered because I always listen loud and long. And that's when I realized something was wrong. When did you switch back to recording analog? Probably in the 90s again. Yeah, I started going back because I wanted to have the analog source, and then vinyl started making a comeback. Here's an idea. I got an idea. Let's go. Check this out. Vinyl very popular because people, when they hear a good vinyl they love it, right? So there's only one other way to get that. It's radio. Remember those old analog transmitters on top of the buildings in New York and Chicago and Cincinnati and Boston. And they went far. Long way, yeah. Analog. So you could play a vinyl record on an analog radio station, and you never went digital. And it would go to everywhere everywhere that they had a radio that wasn't a digital radio. So you'd have to have an analog radio that can play can pick up a digital station, but it's not a digital radio, picking up a digital station. But that's could be the future of great sound. It's radio. A.m. radio. Or FM, whatever, as long as it's analog, because it can be broadcast. Imagine vinyl quality, you say, how hard it is to get vinyl, but a radio station could send it to millions of people. And it's one step away. It's one step away from being possible. Yeah. That'd be cool. It would be cool. It would be cool. The difference between playing what they play, what is it? MP3 is most of the time on the radio. Yeah. At the best, it'd be a CD. Which is not very good compared to analog. It's like really not good. And if that was coming through people's radios, but you know, people are now they're in this thing about, well, they dig the cars, digital. This is digital ad stitching. And you still realize how much gets lost. Digital loses at all. I'm really a great amount. Like I'm looking out this window on what can either beautiful green lawn and a blue sky and beautiful trees and all the detail of every little part of everything is all there and if this was a digital picture, it would be like there was a screen up. And I was looking through each little hole in the screen, but that's been averaged out to the dominant color in that hole. So instead of seeing a universe of cobbler, when I move up and look through it, I get up to that thing and it's all like one shade of blue or one shade of green.

Cincinnati Boston Chicago New York
"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:15 min | 8 hrs ago

"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

"Back with more from Rick Rubin and Neil Young. Is it different writing a song on guitar versus piano for you? You know, they're all the same, it's just wherever I am and whatever it is, I don't have much method. I just, I'm just there doing it. And I never try. I only do it if it happens. If I hear a melody and I start seeing a keyboard or a guitar or listening, then I'll pick it up and try it. And then I'll stay with it until I don't hear it anymore. Usually I saw a song arrives. But in the last 6 months since we finished this I've heard anything. But over the course of your life, there's been no rule of how and when it comes. It just comes when it comes. At first it was all guitar because I could hardly play piano. At any point, did you practice piano, like did you decide I want to be able to play piano more? Yeah, when I was in high school, there was a piano downstairs in the we lived in a triplex, and my mom and I were on the top floor. And then in the basement, there were some college guys. Outside of their room was a piano, so the piano wasn't really in their room. It was at the bottom of the stairs. I understood. And then you went into their room. It felt like their space or kind of. But that's how I learned to play what's the name of that song by the Marquis. Not last dance. Something. Let me check. Marquise. Yeah, Mark. Maybe I can even play it. Let's see. Anyway, I learned how to play that on the piano, and kind of a very vanilla fashion. Because they were pretty funky. What the heck's a name in that song. I think they might have been from New Orleans. Last night. Last night, that's it. Let's see.

Rick Rubin Neil Young Marquise Marquis Mark New Orleans
"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:20 min | 8 hrs ago

"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

"Even if you've only listened to broken record a few times, you've likely heard Rick Rubin absolutely gush about Neil Young. Neil's been on the show three times now and his legendary body of work has been brought up by more musicians interviewed on this show than likely anyone else except for maybe Joni Mitchell. That's because Neil is a true artist. He's been writing and singing songs since the early 60s and his creative output has been near constant and in my opinion, virtually flawless for the last 6 decades. Neil recently stopped by shangri la following the release of crazy horses latest album world record. That one was produced by our own Rick Rubin, and on today's episode, Neil talks to Rick about the remarkable way the new songs were conceived. Neil also reminisces about recording after the gold rush in harvest, and he explains how THC changes his relationship to music.

Neil Rick Rubin Neil Young Joni Mitchell shangri la Rick
Fresh update on "neil" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

03:23 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "neil" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

"Yeah, but this the figures for this one were during the mini budget. And so everybody just before we got started rushing as well. And then everybody was worried it was going to go worse. It always another rushing guide. And so I think that this is part of a longer term trend of negativity towards the housing market. How much you're pretty bleeding already bleak on the outlook for the UK housing market. How much of a downturn in prices are you thinking about as we look into 2023? Most people are saying 5 to 10% for next year. I think that's possible. Well, what happened unless the Central Bank changes its policy around interest rates, it's eventually second half this year. It will get worse and into 2024, we'll start to go, could you see a 20% full? Yes, that sounds terrible on the surface, but actually it just takes you back to pre-pandemic levels. It's not a huge deal for a lot of people, obviously those people who are bought during the pandemic are going to be affected, especially those people who bought in times that I'd loved and where there is no demander to then the people who came down from London to who are you going to set your house to, you're certainly not going to sell it at the price that you paid as a London person moving down there. So part of the market will see very negative effects other parts will be okay. If you've got a house in London, it's going to be a lower increase if you've got a one bed flat in London with no outside space, you're going to see probably a bigger fall. But Neil, something you and I have talked about a lot over the years is one of the big differences between the UK and the U.S. is that here you don't tend to see repossessions because the banks will accommodate people when they get into times of difficulty. I wonder how much does the bleakness in the housing market next year depend on the degree to which people are unemployed? I mean, does it really need to be that bad of the recession or does it change the dial that much? So I don't see there being large scale repossessions in the UK again, banks will extend the loan terms to avoid that or reduce people's rates in other ways. So I completely agree with you there, but that you can't hide from the fact that the interest rate increases mean that people can not afford to pay what they were paying. And then you have to wait for the point where sellers get to the stage where they're willing to cut the prices in order to move on with their lives as well. And that takes some time. So I still take second half of next year is when you're going to start to see what we call seller capitulation. Because many of them will be moving to new houses as well. And they're going to wait for their person there buying from to capitulate. So it tends to be a cascading effect. So nobody's saying that this market is going to fall apart. As I said, 20% increase is really only thinking or decreases really only taking you back to where you are two years ago. For those people who bought your time, it's more difficult, particularly by higher rates. But for most other people, they will have a built up a lot of equity in their house. So even though their mortgage rate will have an increase, their LTV will have gone down and in a way, they may not pay as much as they are worried they may have to pay. But other people, like real life stuff, are going to have to sell their house because I know somebody who's mortgage payments are going to triple. She doesn't have the income to be able to afford that. And she's going to have to sell her house. Wow. Really important context from Neil callanan, of course, of Bloomberg, for in that line, UK, October, mortgage approvals are coming in below the estimates 58,977

London UK Central Bank Neil U.S. LTV Neil Callanan Bloomberg
A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:19 min | 4 d ago

A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

"Michael viner was the owner of dove publishing. He had a number of decent books that came out in the 90s, the most famous one was you'll never make love in this town again. And when I was dating Jermaine Jackson's ex-wife, Margaret Maldonado. She was working for him at the time, but for Michael viner. And one day she sneaked me in early copy of this salacious book, and no one had seen it yet, Margaret got the proofs and begged me not to show or tell anyone about it. I said, no, no, I won't. I'm not going to write about it. I just want to read it myself, okay? So I go back to the hotel or wherever I was and start reading this book and the proofs and maybe two years ago, I read a couple of the more filthy chapters on this show. The book contains a bunch of stories written by three prostitutes and one actress about this sexual encounters with a bunch of different Hollywood celebrities. There was a Robin and Liza grier, Linda Hammond, and Alexandra daddy. And inside are all these lurid tales of what these girls discovered while having sex with the likes of Nicholson Warren Beatty, Don Henley, Bruce Willis, Robert Evans, John Claude Van Damme, Mickey Rourke, on and on. And a very, very detailed stories. Whether they're all true or not, I don't know. It's just the horrors point of view. So my jaw was on the floor when I started reading this. A couple of days later, I'm at Evans house for one of his great get togethers. Robert Shapiro, Geraldo Rivera, Jacqueline bessette, Beverly Johnson, Neil sedaka, a lot of luminaries in addition to the dynamic to all of Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty, who are always at Evans house back in the 90s, and now I have all this information inside me bursting out and I don't know that Jack Warren and bob know about this. And then my eyes couldn't believe what I was seeing. The publisher Michael Weiner walks into the party. And he lived a few doors down from heaven, so it kind of made sense, but I know all this information from the book he published and I grabbed Margaret and I go, what the fuck is he doing here? She's like, what's the big deal? I go, he's publishing a book about what a few hookers have to say about a few of the men at this party. But balls on this guy,

Michael Viner Margaret Maldonado Evans House Jermaine Jackson Liza Grier Linda Hammond Alexandra Daddy Nicholson Warren Beatty John Claude Van Damme Margaret Jacqueline Bessette Robert Evans Don Henley Mickey Rourke Bruce Willis Robert Shapiro Robin Beverly Johnson Geraldo Rivera Jack Warren
Home for the holidays: Rockefeller tree arrives in NYC

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Home for the holidays: Rockefeller tree arrives in NYC

"The Rockefeller center Christmas tree is up in New York City ushering in the holiday season but not yet lit up Spectators oh and all on the Plaza at Rockefeller center as the 82 foot tall 50 foot wide tree went up Saturday It comes from Neil liber wits queensbury New York property From what I can see it certainly made it down here very intact And I think it's going to look great once it's tough The Norway spruce was there for about 90 years The family donated it after the Rockefeller center Gardner scouted it The thought never crossed our mind that there was any interest in this tree I mean it was just there And now it's here and we'll be decorated with 50,000 multi colored lights and lit up on November 30th Julie Walker New York

Rockefeller Center Neil Liber New York City Norway Spruce New York Gardner Julie Walker
Duran Duran guitarist Andy Taylor absent from Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony with stage 4 cancer diagnosis

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Duran Duran guitarist Andy Taylor absent from Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony with stage 4 cancer diagnosis

"That Rock and Roll Hall of Fame welcomed a new class of inductees in Los Angeles on Saturday And Margie's are a letter with the latest Olivia Rodrigo performed on behalf of inductee Carly Simon who did not attend after the deaths of two sisters Lionel Richie eurythmics pep benatar and Neil Geraldo also were inducted Andy Taylor was unable to attend because of stage four prostate cancer Eminem says his induction was about more than just him I'm a high school dropout man with a hip hop education And these are my teachers And

Roll Hall Of Fame Olivia Rodrigo Lionel Richie Eurythmics Neil Geraldo Margie Carly Simon Benatar Los Angeles Andy Taylor Eminem Cancer
Caller: Paul Ryan Has Lost Touch With the People

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:47 min | Last month

Caller: Paul Ryan Has Lost Touch With the People

"To have red tsunami. I believe God's hand is placed in this state in this country too, especially Oregon. We can imagine if we get three congressional seats, but I want you to look backwards for a second year. Remember the Tea Party movement in 2010 and then the establishment Ryan Ryan and Willard Romney. I am not calling the mittens. They did not push the vote. They came out fundraised, but they never talked to the people. What Trump did and like Reagan, he came and told the people what he's planning to do. Propose and keep in mind Reagan had to deal with the Democrats of Neil and Richard gerhardt and yet he pushed to become a great president just like Trump. The biggest problem with Paul Ryan is just besides him getting a VA check cash and senator and James will Wisconsin that he'd done for his city. He had just lost touch with the people. He had gone away from the man I used to respect they used to go rafting down the rivers of Wisconsin and they were fishing and everything else to a man has become like a Rockefeller Republican establishment trash like Murkowski and would go on down the line even in various parts of my state's representation. But I believe we're going to my governor is going to get elected. And then get three congressional seats out west and you're going to see God stands move like the great awakening has gone about right now from Tennessee all the way to the Oregon coast. We should not live in fear. We should not let them intimidate us. And as I'm going to do as an alternate chairman, I encourage all my oregonians to come out and vote and vote if you need to, come on the last day and take it directly to the county clerks office and vote do not live in fear because fear is tool of the devil.

Ryan Ryan Willard Romney Richard Gerhardt Reagan Oregon Tea Party Wisconsin Paul Ryan Donald Trump Neil Murkowski James Tennessee
Pionk scores 2nd goal of game in OT, Jets beat Avalanche 4-3

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

Pionk scores 2nd goal of game in OT, Jets beat Avalanche 4-3

"The jets had to go overtime but they prevailed over Colorado four three Mason Appleton had two assists on the night including a pass that set up the game winning goal It's huge You know a Stanley Cup winners right there We're one on one team and everyone you never want to look at this Standings earlier whatever it is but you don't want to be 500 Appleton gained the puck in the neutral zone and fed Neil pioch who lit the lamp 31 seconds into the extra session Piano finished with two goals for the jets who twice blue two gold leads Bruce Martin Denver

Mason Appleton Jets Colorado Neil Pioch Appleton Bruce Martin Denver
Your Market Recap for the Week

The Breakdown

02:10 min | Last month

Your Market Recap for the Week

"Let's actually recap this week, shall we? When it comes to markets the beginning of the week saw some serious excitement. We even had the nerve to ask if we were in store for another October. Bitcoin hit 20,000 for the first time in three weeks. Stocks had two back to back bonkers rally days in a row, but many out there had the feeling that it might not really be based on, well, much of anything. Instead, it seemed like it was part of a narrative mini cycle that we've seen over and over for the last few months. That cycle is step one. Markets get excited about the idea of a fed pivot. The reason could be anything. It could be rumors of decreasing inflation, it could be dovish interpretations of fed statements. It could also be sheer utter boredom. Whatever the case the result is the same. First, a teeny tiny little bear market rally, and then step two, the fed says, hey guys, stop getting ahead of yourselves and dispatches a slew of officials to slap markets into line. Usually after that, there's some new piece of data that surfaces that totally reinforces the point the fed was making, which leads us to step four, market depression sets in again and the cycle starts anew. That is basically exactly what we saw this week after all of that optimism and excitement at the beginning, a set of fed speakers were trotted out to disavow us of our hopeful spirits. Joe wiesenthal, the host at odd lots on Bloomberg, shared the headline, kashkari, we are quite a ways away from a pause in rate hikes and added, this is what you get for piling back into stocks this week. So on Thursday, Minneapolis fed president Neil kashkari spoke directly to the prospect of a fed pivot anytime soon. He said, we have more work to do. Until I see some evidence that underlying inflation has solidly peaked and is hopefully headed back down, I'm not ready to declare a pause. I think we're quite a ways away from a pause. At one time viewed among the most dovish members of the FOMC, kashkari has turned decidedly hawkish in recent months. When addressing the downturn in financial markets, he reiterated the lack of concern at the fed. Quote, I fully expect that there are going to be some losses and there are going to be some failures around the global economy as we transition to a higher interest rate environment, and that's the nature of capitalism.

FED Bitcoin Kashkari Joe Wiesenthal Neil Kashkari Depression Bloomberg Minneapolis Fomc
Kamala Harris Attacks Justice Clarence Thomas for Roe Remarks

Mark Levin

01:58 min | Last month

Kamala Harris Attacks Justice Clarence Thomas for Roe Remarks

"Told you about a hershel walker Now we have clarence Thomas He's an historic justice He even knows how to define a man and a woman I suppose Is a man with enormous integrity and intelligence And he's an originalist He even understands what the Fourteenth Amendment says unlike Justice Jackson Who believes that the Fourteenth Amendment compels discrimination Imagine that Equal protection Compels discrimination But Kamala Harris who can barely put a sentence together unless it's written for us and even then there's some questions Of course she has to attack clarence Thomas why Why attack clarence Thomas Why not attack Neil Gorsuch Because clarence Thomas is black And she feels she can say whatever she wants about her And clarence Thomas is a male and she feels she can say anything about him Cut 8 go Clarence Thomas said the quiet part out loud Because for those of us who have read the decision and the concurring opinions we know that it is very much in the trajectory of those who have taken away this right of privacy that they are looking at same sex marriage and the right to contraception Oh really Now I read what he wrote He didn't say we should take away same sex marriage or the right to contraception See she's a danger She's a moron Which tells you almost anybody can get a law degree But that said It's not what he said

Clarence Thomas Hershel Walker Neil Gorsuch Justice Jackson Kamala Harris
Investor Neil Grossman Reacts to Larry Summers' Latest Comments

The Trish Regan Show

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Investor Neil Grossman Reacts to Larry Summers' Latest Comments

"Interestingly enough, speaking of economists that tend to have political views, you've got Larry summers out there, and now I'm going to play for you some sound he's at it, Aspen, just a few days ago at the festival there. Basically saying, what the heck happened? We had it going well. And then this. Here he is. We basically had inflation under control for 40 years, despite the fact that the price of oil fluctuated despite the fact that there were all kinds of supply shocks. We lost the thread along with many other countries about a year and a half ago with massively expansionary policies. Okay, so there you go. It's what you're saying, right? They just spent too much money. They lost the friend in my view a lot longer ago than 18 months. This is interesting, explain, explain. Look, the Central Bank of the United States is not a Central Bank, or it wasn't, and it's coming back to maybe to home. But it became a central asset manager. The basic premise became making sure asset markets were supported and bailed out more than anything else. This fed and will even misses Yellen. If you went through a normal risk return analysis, you cut off half of the probability distribution that's wrong. You're always going to be right. You think. They didn't want to consider the consequences. And when you overlay reality in the probability distribution and have to acknowledge that there's a risk, you take policy action earlier to address those potential risks. You've got, you know what? I call it ostrich economics. They stuck their head in the ground. Prayed it would go away. And all it did was get worse and they kept, you know, they came up with acronym or added J after our transitory was just a bad answer. I know, but it was a big word, though. It sounded good.

Larry Summers Central Bank Aspen Yellen United States
Investor Neil Grossman Predicts a MASSIVE PLUNGE

The Trish Regan Show

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Investor Neil Grossman Predicts a MASSIVE PLUNGE

"Always good to see you. Thanks, drew. I wanted to get your feel for where we are right now, where this market is right now. And where we're heading, what do you think? Well, let's go. We've talked about this. I think there's a short, probably medium and long term. Short term, I'm still quite negative. The extraordinary appreciation of the dollar combined with weaknesses and many of the economies around the world are telling you that the major American multinationals have some real significant risks and still left on their earnings, which you can put significant downward pressure. So what does that mean for this month? And we're going into October here. Early October, what is me? Well, I think in the next month, because earnings are just about to start. I think it's very important to understand before we get to some of the technical issues. I don't think the mindset of investors has changed enough. With the change in what the basic structure of policy is, and I think part of the problem is that there's going to be an awful lot of pain that's going to force people out over the shore room and they begin to realize that earnings projections are way too high, combined with higher yields, no matter what. So it's going to be an ugly October. That's my guess. And so where we go, I've been looking probably to test 3000 to 32 50. It depends on the S&P if you think about it, if earnings come down from where they are by about 15%, which would put them, I think, about $200 a share. I think current earnings projections are 15 times. That gets you to 3000 type of target. Our equity markets are still tremendously concentrated, right? The big companies represent so much of the market cap. And they're the ones who have been much more resistant. The significant price deterioration you've seen elsewhere. So

Drew S
Trish Examines the Risk to Our Markets in the Coming Months

The Trish Regan Show

01:39 min | 2 months ago

Trish Examines the Risk to Our Markets in the Coming Months

"Anyway, I want to get to what Stan was saying there with my friend Joe kernan at CNBC at a conference that they had recently take a listen to this because this is a guy who's seen it all a brilliant investor. Here's what he thinks. I will be stunned if we don't have a recession in 23. Don't know the timing, but certainly by the end of 23, I will not be surprised if it's not larger than the so called average garden variety. And I don't rule out, not my forecast, but I don't rule out something really bad. Why? Because if you look at the liquidity situation that has driven this, we're going to go from all this QE to QT, we're following an asset bubble, we've been doing all this running down on the SPR, which is now that's the strategic patrol in reserve. He's talking about the strategic petroleum reserve, and he's pointing out the Q T, which is the quantitative tiny. In other words, the fed is sucking all this money out of the system and he goes on to explain how many mistakes Janet Yellen made in all of this, but you've been spending so much money for so long and now you're doing the reverse. How do you not have a recession? But I think my friend Neil, we'll talk to him a little bit. In a little bit, I think he would argue this has been a long time come a long time coming because even before 2020, you had an extraordinarily aggressive fed. And it makes it so that we're facing a more catastrophic type of environment.

Joe Kernan Cnbc Stan Janet Yellen SPR FED Neil
What Friends and Family Do for Their Famous Friends

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:23 min | 2 months ago

What Friends and Family Do for Their Famous Friends

"So when driving through Colorado and the cocaine, we had a little bit less at that point as you can imagine. And it was in a baggie. And there we are on route 80. And a state trooper pulls behind us, and he's following us now. Now, like I said, we had God bless America taped to the back of the windshield. But still, a couple of dark skinned guys with Baldi's and a yorkie, driving through Colorado, that would be enough for a cop to at least follow us for a while. And he's been behind us for a good several miles now. He's not moving off our ants. That'll make you shit a brick when you're carrying a lot of dirty stuff. So suddenly Neil says to me, you know what, I think that I know there's a gas station and a car wash up here very soon. I've passed it and I've stopped here a number of times because gumballs made that drive before. That was my first trip. I said, wherever it is, bro, find it and let's go there. So he says, you know what? I'm going to point to the car wash. Hand me the code. I said, no, no, no, I got it. Just do what you got. He was hand me the Coke asshole. You're famous. You have a TV show. You can't hold this or you'll lose everything. You know what? He had a point. So I handed it to him. And he drives into the car wash, but before he stops the car, he says, go into the store and get us some sodas and get us some shit to eat some candy and meet me when I'm done with the car wash. This is sure. And wouldn't you know the cop pulls into the fucking car wash as well? And he stops right behind gumbo. But he isn't going to car wash. He stops and goes in the store. Now he's looking at me up and down and I got the dog in my hand. So after the wash, I hop back in the car and the cop is following us again. And I say, Jesus Christ deal it's curtains. I said, where is it? He says, don't worry. Just look straight ahead. I see where's the bad rose? Just don't fucking move. Just look straight ahead. Stay calm. A few minutes later, the cop puts his siren on. I'm thinking, we're fucking dead. We're going to jail in 9 11. And he speeds past us. Even gave us a little nod. Like, got to go, boys. I mean, I breathed a sigh of relief like you can't imagine. I go holy shit. All right, where's this stuff? Give it to me. He says, hold the wheel. And when I do, Neil leads to his left and fish is in the back of his pants and pulls the bag of Coke out of his crack. Now that's what Friends and family do for famous people. Okay? Sometimes fame isn't a bitch.

Baldi Colorado Neil America
Neil Parrott: We Have to Close the Border

The Dan Bongino Show

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Neil Parrott: We Have to Close the Border

"Where's your opponent stand on illegal immigration Neil you have been a devout advocate for legal Law & Order based immigration for years Where's your opponent on it Oh you're right It's huge I've been fighting that for years now and this is not just something new For me fentanyl opioids we have to close the border It's just coming right across Human trafficking illegally and gangster terraces all happen because we have an open border And it doesn't make any sense Unfortunately my opponent is for opening the board He likes what we have right now I totally support the Biden Pelosi agenda when it comes to open borders And it's crazy He says that his main issue is to fight opioids and to fight drug use and yet he won't even talk about close in the border Which is what skit sitting the fentanyl right over here Also there was actually an amendment that a Republican put forward just a couple of years ago It was the trade Bill and the amendment said if China or any other country in the world is sending us fentanyl it gave the president powers to clamp down on them and say no you're not going to have free trade with us until you get rid of that fundamental coming here That vote only failed by three and David trone I believe he betrayed his constituency when he says that this major issue he voted to go along with Nancy Pelosi and the majority of the Democrats to shut that amendment down And there were other amendments that passed that were Democrat introduced It just didn't make sense We have to close this border It's inexcusable If we're going to have a nation that we have to have borders

Biden Pelosi Neil David Trone Bill China Nancy Pelosi
Neil Parrott Provides an Update on His Campaign

The Dan Bongino Show

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Neil Parrott Provides an Update on His Campaign

"Telling the audience before you know I ran there Maryland district 6 I almost won Almost doesn't count Horseshoes and hand grenades but I've watched that district for a long time It's western Maryland It's a portion of Montgomery county It was a district before redistricting that was in the hands of a Republican Roscoe Bartlett for a really long time You're running there now you won your primary How do your polls look How are you feeling about it And your opponent David trone is super weak This guy's one of these wealthy dudes It doesn't think he needs to do anything to campaign How are you feeling about the race overall Hey thanks for asking First of all you were in a 2014 a great race A lot of us went to bed that night thinking you had won You're just we're all out I loved your campaign Matter of fact I love it so much I've hired your campaign manager and we are really excited We've got a great ground game We're getting our message out I do encourage anybody who's listening to go to Neil Perry dot org Neil OTT dot org where they can help us My opponent owns total wines and more He's spending about $15 million in this race which is more than our governor's race both candidates combined But you are right He is very weak because he hasn't done much for this district at all People hardly know who he is Our polls show that he's ahead 47% to 44% right now but when we give them just a few pieces of information just general information his support goes down to around 34% mine goes up to 55% in a bunch more become undecided I mean this race we can win and this will help change the direction our country is going It will help get rid of Nancy Pelosi We just need 5 seats to flip from Democrat to Republican This is one of those seats right here

Roscoe Bartlett David Trone Maryland Montgomery County Neil Ott Neil Perry Nancy Pelosi
The Weaponization of IRS: Is It Safe to Donate to Conservative Orgs?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 2 months ago

The Weaponization of IRS: Is It Safe to Donate to Conservative Orgs?

"Neil from Colorado has a question. Charlie, can you expand more on how the intelligence agency is declaring war on maga? I'm very worried I donated $200 to the Trump campaign. I donate to turning point USA. Thank you. And I'm very worried that I'm going to be targeted by these new 87,000 agents. IRS agents. What is the criteria? What do we do? Now this is what's so important about this topic, which is when you create a monstrosity in your government, you have to feed the beast, and by feeding the beast, I mean that you got to go find more people to label as extremists and domestic terrorists. So how does your government, how does our government categorize Trump supporters? What do they consider to be an extremist? Now, if you go back and our team is working on this, it's going to be an episode that will do at some point. We're going back, back, back, back in the 90s, and the early 2000s. And we're finding interviews, congressional committees. Of uni party politicians, people in both the Republican and Democrat establishment, who said, we need this massive Patriot Act, we need fisa courts. We need all this stuff built to spy on American citizens. We need the ability to infiltrate groups to protect us from radical Islamic terrorism. And that was a very compelling argument. I was sympathetic with that argument. Many of you are sympathetic with that argument. Almost the entire Republican Party was sympathetic with that argument. And the libertarians to their great credit, Ron Paul in particular, warned that that very monstrosity of a government will be used against conservatives.

Uni Party Neil Charlie Colorado IRS USA Republican Party Ron Paul
Cruz home run short of cycle, Pirates beat Cardinals 8-2

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Cruz home run short of cycle, Pirates beat Cardinals 8-2

"O'Neil Cruz finished a home run short of the cycle as the pirates pounded out 15 hits and mashed the Cardinals a two Cruz raked in three runs and fellow rookie Rwanda Contreras allowed just one run over 5 and a third for Derek Shelton's young team You know especially those two guys who we feel are going to be a big part of what we're doing not only throughout the last 25 games but into the multiple years coming forward It's a really important sign and I think it's really it's a thing our fans can jump on board and really kind of embrace Tommy Edmond drove in a run and had two hits for the NL central leading Cardinals Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh

Neil Cruz Rwanda Contreras Derek Shelton Cardinals Pirates Cruz Tommy Edmond NL Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh
Doug Welcomes Matt McPherson, Founder of Mathews Archery

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:48 min | 2 months ago

Doug Welcomes Matt McPherson, Founder of Mathews Archery

"For being with us. Hey, great Doug. I appreciate you asking me. Oh, it's going to be good. Well, let's start off because I've read a lot about you, the company as far as what's out there. You won't have one of those minds. God, you know, there's this old saying. And sometimes it's misused, but chaining up a child in the way they will go and they'll never depart from it. And that actual wording there from my pastoral days was bent. It's just trying to child in their bent. What they're naturally occurring to. It seems like you had a bent for the things that God put around us in life for mechanical and innovation. Probably coming a lot through your dad. Tell us about your growing up and how you got this mindset of making things. You know, it's interesting my uncle Ed on my mom's site. So my mom had a brother uncle ad, he had probably a dozen patents. And he had worked for a company. And I always loved my uncle Ed because he was creative and he was always making things. And my dad was also an inventor and had, you know, it seems to me right around maybe ten to 12 patents also. And we just were always working on things. Well, group in a very economically challenged family. And if you really wanted something, you kind of had to try to figure out how to make it. And so early on, there was a lot of things that I got involved with through my father, my father loved to just kind of be in the outdoors. He grew up in a log home, basically, you know, speaking with a small family in northern Wisconsin. And he loved being outside. And so my mom and dad, they got married in 1955 and I was born in 1957. My brother Randy was born in 56, so it just started coming right away, but my dad was a pastor. He was a minister in a little town called Nielsen, Wisconsin. And he didn't really he wasn't a position where he was making her any money. And so he was having to do work on the side. He was working at a creamery, I believe it was, and Neil's ville area at the time. Yeah. And so he did whatever he could to try it off. You know, supplement the income in that. And my mom, I found out that she had even sold clothing. They had catalogs and they would have these parties. I suppose something like the Tupperware part is except for it was clothing back in the 50s. And so she would sell clothing, try to make it a little extra money. But my dad said to my mom one day, she says, you know what, I need to go dear hunting. I need to go out and get some meat for the table, you know? And my mom says, oh, no, I'm afraid of guns. Please, I don't want you to have a gun. So my mom being an anti gun person, right? Is what, you know, kind of move my dad into, well, I'll go get a bowl. You know what I mean? Of course. Obvious thing, no gun. Okay, use a bow.

ED Doug Wisconsin Nielsen Randy Neil
Mets falter again in 8-2 loss to lowly Pirates

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Mets falter again in 8-2 loss to lowly Pirates

"O'Neil Cruz had his first three hit game of his career including a monster home run into the Allegheny river As the Pittsburgh pirates beat the mets 8 to two Four pirates players had multi hit games and Mitch Keller tossed 6 scoreless innings Such as the sinker slider now it's just like I'm always one pitch away from getting out of it so that's just help my mentality out there and confidence wise of God traffic on basin in a okay situation Taiwan walker allowed four runs in 5 innings and Brandon nimmo homered for the mets losers of three straight Josh rowntree Pittsburgh

Neil Cruz Mitch Keller Allegheny River Pittsburgh Pirates Mets Brandon Nimmo Taiwan Walker Josh Rowntree Pittsburgh
Liberal Pundits React to the Redacted Mar-a-Lago Affidavit

Mark Levin

01:30 min | 3 months ago

Liberal Pundits React to the Redacted Mar-a-Lago Affidavit

"Neil Catalog Former acting U.S. lister general Under Obama of course on MS LSD of course The affidavit shows Trump didn't declassify any documents No it doesn't show that at all Affidavit shows that FBI DoJ think that Donald Trump is a liar Maybe but who cares Jeff pegues if that is his name CBS News correspondent On redacted affidavit the government saying there is evidence of obstruction Hey what do you have like a 15 watt lightbulb up there brother That was in the documents they released two and a half weeks ago or whatever it was Frank fig luzi if that is his name former FBI assistant director also an MS LSD We won't be able to recruit our allies to work for us because Trump was storing their documents What else What else Sure there's more Trump should be charged with treason Corinne Jean Pierre on the constipated news when that work Well The White House didn't know about the search warrant White House knowing awful lot you've been working with the archives To get rid of executive privilege We're not going to get involved on that but if they are cars does that okay Wink wink wink wink

Neil Catalog Jeff Pegues FBI Frank Fig Luzi Donald Trump Cbs News Barack Obama Corinne Jean Pierre U.S. White House
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:48 min | 11 months ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Thomas. His book is taking leave of Darwin. He laughed a big fight back upon his back and lots of goodies for you and for me so leave a peppermint stick for all saint Nick. Oh, the weather outside is frightful but the folks I'm talking to Neil Thomas author of taking leave of Darwin and recently at evolution news, he reviewed a number of books that deal with the various theses involved in the idea of whether there is a creator, I guess I want to ask you Neil, if you would, this is a shorter segment. But can you talk about the difference between intelligent design as laid out by folks like Steven Meyer and Michael bihi. And what is called theistic evolution. Where do you come out in that conversation? Well, I think that the two links maybe not at the hip. I would prefer to use word like primal intelligence being involved in being involved in this intricacies of the earth. I'm not sure what you can entirely detach them. As I think, what is my himself? But what is the problem that people there are people in the theistic evolution universe? People like Francis Collins, whom I've questioned about this. Who seem uncomfortable? They seem as uncomfortable with the term intelligent design as. Fred hoyle was with the universe having a beginning. They seem to blanche, they seem to want to distance themselves from the ID folks, as though they got the plague or something like that. And they say, no, no, no, I am a realistic evolutionist. What do they mean? Well, in my own case, I think that I have do not have that say that problem because I think that the basic problem is how do you how do you explain a series of interlocking miracles? And having given Darwin is due on this, I feel that he is explanations were so childlike and rudimentary that they are not really worth thinking about too seriously, in which case you have to go back to the drawing board. Well, what does the drawing board say that how do you explain a miracle? You have to explain a miracle by resort to some kind of preacher natural operators. I'm not in the position to say what this is and I'm not I'm not sure anybody else is either. But sometimes of primary intelligence. I mean, in the Middle Ages, they use this term upper theology, you know, that you can't actually name the precise modalities of whatever this God it might be, but you can still presuppose that there was something equivalent to that actuating all that we have. Well, let's I think this is my theory and I want to get your feedback on it. We've just got a minute here, but and I'd love to keep you over into the next hour if you can hang on. But what I'm fascinated by is that it seems to me that the theistic evolutionists, people who say, I am a Christian, but I believe in Darwin's idea of natural selection through random mutations. It seems to me that the reason they say that has to do with fear of the secular establishment, in other words, they know that if they are to say that God somehow intervened in the way that only God could, that if he didn't set things in motion, if he set things in motion and the world was created through Darwin's theory of natural selection, that's safe. They can handle that. But the idea that there was some other mechanism at work to account, which seems obvious that there had to be you say it, I say it. We both see it. They say, well, that can't be, that can't be, we have to.

Neil Thomas Steven Meyer Michael bihi Darwin saint Nick Francis Collins Fred hoyle Neil Thomas blanche
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

09:04 min | 11 months ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"We'll talk more about this folks I'm talking to Neil Thomas, his book is taking leave of Darwin. I don't think Santa Claus will remind you he won't after you I dirty Jimmy poo just bring him through the front door that's the easy thing to do. I can see me now. Hey folks, I've got to tell you a secret about relief factor that the father son owners Pete and Seth. Talbott have never made a big deal about, but I think it is a big deal. I really do. They sell the three week quick start pack for just 1995 to anyone struggling from pain like neck shoulder back, hip or knee pain, 1995, about a dollar a day. But what they haven't broadcasted much is that every time they sell a three week quick start, they lose money. In fact, they don't even break even until about four to 5 months after if you keep ordering it. Friends, that's huge. People don't keep ordering relief factor month after month if it doesn't work. So yes, Pete and Seth are literally on a mission to help as many people as possible deal with their pain. They really do put their money where their mouths are. So if you're in pain from exercise or even just getting older or the three week quick start for 1995, let's see if we can get you out of pain, too, go to relief factor dot com relief factor dot com or call 805 108 three 8 four 805 108 three 8 four relief factor dot com. I use it, it works. That of all the rings, you know folks the book is taking leave of Darwin. University professor Neil Thomas is the author. He's also recently written three essays reviewing a number of books that deal with the issue of God and science and Darwin and the God hypothesis and whether atheism is still tenable, they're published at evolution news. So I would recommend that very highly so we're just talking Neil about Darwin and what ends up being the Big Bang hypothesis, this idea that the universe began, which most scientists today say, yes, this is established. But we forget. And the reason in my book I devote so much time to it is I myself forgot how this thing that we now take for granted, which is this idea that the universe began here and it expanded and here we are. That idea was scandalous. It was absolutely scandalous to people until rather recently. Yes, I think it was because the very term Big Bang came from the Fred hoyle, and it was a term of irreverence and almost abuse. Because he would prefer to refer to how the steady state universe, which would then not have needed a creator figure. I think this was it. And when the merchant others came out with the idea of the Big Bang, then the theistic implications could not be ignored. And I think that was a kind of embarrassment to some of the scientific community. Huge embarrassment. I mean, this is the thing. I mean, the reason I devote so much time to it in my book is I thought to myself, we don't talk about this anymore. That's kind of it's been digested, so to speak, and we've moved on to other things. But you know, you want to say to someone who purports to believe that there is no God. There can be no creator. We reject this hypothesis. We forget what a compelling argument just that is. The idea that no, the universe did not exist forever, science has now shown us clearly that it has a starting point. That was an outrage to people. It was an outrage to Einstein and he knew it would outrage his colleagues. And through the decades, people were afraid of saying yes, the universe has a beginning because to them the implication was clear. But we seem no longer to be talking about that anymore. Now we talk about other things and somehow I don't know what I don't know what agnostic or atheistic scientists say to that do they say anything? Do they care? I guess they have well I think that the view is that the world created itself like some kind of preternatural automatism. This is certainly what Peter Atkins, the Oxford scientist of a few decades ago said. And when he brought out his book on the creation, that must be the most immodest title for any book ever, the creation back in 1981 and in his revamping of that in 1992, he goes back to this idea that, in a sense, universe created itself. And now he cures it an agent does act. How on earth you can have an agentless act. Either in logic or in terms of the etymology of those terms is somewhat lost on me, but that's what he says. And that's what in Allen sandage. He figures prominently in the chapter in my own book when you're talking about the 20th century and you're talking about the evolution of this idea of whether the universe had a beginning. And later in life, sandage who was Jewish by birth and eventually became serious about faith in the God of the Bible. What I find interesting is his honesty as a top top top scientist calling out the nonsense of many of his colleagues who were saying things that were meaningless, things like the universe created itself. We all know that unless you are in a certain world where you don't question those things, most people would say, excuse me, that sounds like nonsense. What do you mean the universe? Another you're talking about an intelligent universe. What are you saying? They never say what they're saying. They use these terms as a kind of a camouflage as fig leafs. But there are many other things like that. That Alan sandage refers to yes. I mean, let alone I know the detail islands, and I know something about him and I think that he, I think he later became of such as in such a secure professional position that he could afford to call out the nonsense of colleagues. Younger Cali's can't do that. You've got to be properly tenured. You've got to have a momentum of prestige behind you before you feel confident enough to be able to say such things. In my own case, of course, as a retiree, then I can say what I like. But I think other people are far more inhibited, especially if they've got a sort of scientific career to make. Yeah, well, I think that's the point. That's really the underlying narrative of this conversation is that people are afraid to speak the truth and they have certain strictures that they don't they don't even question whether those strictures are appropriate. They just say, I want to succeed. I don't care so much about truth. I must succeed, and maybe, you know, at some point, I can worry about truth. But it's getting I guess the evidence has piled up against the theme my thesis in the book to such a preposterous level that they're doing backflips almost literally to make their cases talking about things like the universe creating itself talking about things like a multiverse theory. I mean, did you do, can you talk a little bit about the multiverse theory? I find it's so hilarious. Yes. The multiverse theory is a theory and without any empirical support at all. I mean, it's been instrumentalized as a theory in order to negate the effects of the earth being a Goldilocks zone, an area of sort of cosmically ring fenced for human life and so on. And the multiverse theory is essentially creating a kind of alternative narrative, which says that the earth just happens to be the winner of the cosmic lottery, you know, that there are all sorts of other places which could have been, but we just are. This is chance again coming into it. Yes. But the idea, of course, is that they simply say, it can't be this, therefore it must be this. There's no evidence for the second this, but we don't care. It must be that. And we declare that we're going to look into that. We'll be right back talking to Neil.

Neil Thomas Darwin Jimmy poo Seth Pete Talbott Peter Atkins Santa Claus Fred hoyle Allen sandage sandage Neil Alan sandage Younger Cali Einstein Oxford
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Up right there. I want to hear that story. Folks talking to Neil Thomas, the book is taking leave of Darwin. In case you haven't been paying attention, the Biden administration has caused a financial crisis and they have no clue how to fix it. Oil prices have skyrocketed and when oil prices go up the cost of transportation and shipping spikes, leaving the prices of goods to rise. And when we're already seeing record inflation that's the last thing we need, our economy is in trouble and you need to take steps to protect yourself. If all your money is tied up in stocks, bonds and traditional markets, you are vulnerable. Gold is one of the best ways to protect your retirement. No matter what happens, you own your gold, it is real, it is physical, it's always been valuable since the dawn of time, legacy precious metals is the company I trust for investing in gold. They can help you roll your retirement account into a gold backed IRA where you still own the physical gold. They can also ship gold and precious metals safely and securely to your house called legacy at 8 6 6 5 two 8 1903 or visit them online at legacy p.m. investments dot com. All right, you two months ready to sing your song? Yeah. Are the folks I'm talking to Neil Thomas, his book is taking leave of Darwin a longtime agnostic discovers the case for design. Neil, you were just about to tell us, because I think this is at the heart of all of this stuff. The way people respond to logic to evidence, when you did this investigation, you as someone who had been known as a longtime agnostic, naturalist, darwinist, you showed some colleagues, what you found. And did you say they were dismissive were they were they embarrassed? Were they, did they feel they had to back away because you'd obviously gone crazy? How did it play out? Well, they were never less than polite, of course. Of course, you're in England. What could we expect? But they were, they were not responsive to what I was having to say. Let us put it that way. And I remember the one lady who's retired Professor of French in London, who I asked her to do a review for Amazon. And I expected to drop off a few lines. And not think anything of it. But she. Instead transferred the manuscript, the electronic form of. To biology professor, who, of course, did not think did not agree with me. And so she framed her interpretation in lying with what a biologist colleague had said. Instead of actually looking at it with an unbiased mind. Let's put it that way. That is my interpretation of what happened. And ditto for the other gentleman who was a former hiking colleague at mine and Lake district and so.

Neil Thomas Biden administration Darwin Neil England Amazon London Lake district
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:11 min | 11 months ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Uh oh. It's time folks it's time I warned you we would have some substantive conversations today. No more joking around. That's it. Albin, don't make me get substantive. We have had this guest on before. His name is Neil Thomas university professor Neil Thomas. He has a new book I call taking leave of Darwin, a longtime agnostic discovers the case for design. I want to read what this says. So you understand what we're talking about. University professor Neil Thomas was a committed darwinist and committed agnostic until an investigation of evolutionary theory led him to a startling conclusion. I had been conned. As he studied the work of Darwin's defenders, he found himself encountering tactics eerily similar to the methods of political brainwashing. He had studied as a scholar. Not that there's anything wrong with brainwashing. We just want to be clear, we're not judging communist brainwashes or the democratic establishment. I want to be very clear. We're not political. In any case, Neil Thomas felt compelled. He says impelled to write a book as a sort of warning call to humanity beware. You've been fooled. Really thrilled to have him back with us. Neil Thomas welcome. Nice to be with you again. The book is taking leave of Darwin. You I just want to get this clear. So most of your life, you were indeed a committed agnostic or atheist and certainly a committed darwinist. When and how did you decide that you wanted to look into this, so to speak? Well, it was when I had the leisure to do so, I think when after retirement, did you say leisure reading a few well leisure you said leisure? We say leisure, but I want you to know that we don't mind if you say leisure. In fact, we prefer it. We should be clear with the audience. You don't just sound English. You are in fact in England as we speak. I am indeed, yes. Best of London. I want to be, I want to be clear, you're in England. So thanks for tuning in. I know the time change complicates things. But so for the first time in your life, you had the opportunity, the time the leisure as you put it to do it. And were you, I always say, when people are surprised by something. I mean, obviously, you were surprised by what you encountered. But this is a strange question. Were you surprised to be surprised? Yes, I think so. Because after a long life, you would have thought that I would have twigged this already. And I think I was culpable to the extent that I hadn't actually investigated this as I should have. But isn't that the point you didn't think you needed to investigate it? You thought it was settled. There are so many things that many of us think are settled. And we do not investigate because I think that's preposterous. Do I need to investigate whether the earth is flat? I don't think so. I don't think I need to bother with that. Most people feel that way about Darwinian evolution. The idea that it's a hoax or it's confused or their intellectual issues with it, that seems to be the precinct of loonies like Eric metaxas. We don't want to go there. So I asked that question very earnestly, you were surprised, but were you surprised to be surprised? And you said yes, okay. Yes, I think so. Because all the more so since it came out of a clear blue sky in the sense that after retiring, I had another I've had another career sort of very small business career, but a career nevertheless. And there was no continuity between investigating Darwin and any of my business affairs. So it really was something novel to me. And I.

Neil Thomas Darwin Neil Thomas university Albin England Eric metaxas London
"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on Broken Record

"Acoustic guitar. And he had some reads. So I've tried it, I've never tried it before. Sitting around with 6 or 7 people. When's the first time you noticed how it affected music? Whose time I smoked some blood with a band? Then it became real obvious. At the time that that happened, that wave of people discovering marijuana and music was everybody doing it. Was it like a known piece of the puzzle or doorway? It was kind of the underground of music. There was that underground. Not everybody did it. A lot of people in the underground group. Yeah, some clubs. I was just trying to it wasn't like so prevalent that you could walk in the club and smell it. It was not like that yet. It smelled on the street. But not somewhere where you're in a closed space with people. Early you mentioned the rust, how the guitar rig changed right before rust. How did it work out for you to film the rust tour? Well, Larry Johnson and did grow. And then David Meyers was director of photography in diamond spread on the hills of producer. You know, we just started thinking about filming it because it was a concept as a concert, it had a story as a concert that was an ambience place. And so we wanted we decided to try to make a film on it. I was hanging out with Larry all the time and just made what we had made already a few years back before that maybe in 7 one 7 two, we made Germany through the past, which was my first film. I really not a filmmaker, you know, on the path. I make movies, mostly for fun. I like to do it for fun. It's fun to do. It's great to create this and then create these scenes in a room. You know, I can't really, I'm not a game compete with all of the movie makers because that's not what this is. I'm not doing that. It's about music and film fantasy. That's what I like to do. Cool. I'm excited to see all of the 8 films that you talked about finding through the archive project. That would be great to see. Yeah, they're going to be fun. That's a good, that's a good ride. I think there's a maybe 9 minute. This is why this set is a film start in the set in the volume three. There's a lot of evolution of ideas. Plus some audio documentary audio, which had done one disk Linda monster nicolet Larson Lee sitting around the table with David Briggs. And I'm playing every song that I've just written for them and they're starting to sing the parts law and playing for the first time. So there's like ten or 12 songs along the one and those kind of songs from that era. And they're all singing, they're doing more often. It's more like it's a doctor musical. Yeah, sounds great. Yeah, it's interesting. I mean, I think people need more of the real thing behind the music. Yeah. And I can put out all my records, but I've already put all of my records out. I'll put the backstory of the records out a little bit or things you might have missed. Or if things have gotten left behind on the search for perfection. Organisms. It's quite often the original things that happened. When you look back and you go, wow, why did we go by that? Why didn't we just stay right there and go home? So I've discovered a lot of things like that in the archives. It's like 900,000. Whatever it is, I can't wait to hear the whole thing. Sit back and sit back and relax. The whole thing and probably take a day to listen to this. Beautiful. Yeah, three. Cool man. Well, it's a pleasure speaking to you as always. You too. I miss you and I love you. Likewise, my friend. And I look forward to seeing you in person, giving you big hugs sooner than later. Yeah, me too. Maybe we can get together and listen to our hard luck stories. Oh my God. I haven't heard it since then. So I'm gonna wait to listen until we listen together. I wanna do it with you. Okay, I'll be great. It's gonna be fun. Stories, modern world. We live in a modern world. Oh, yeah. Meet song. Yeah. Of course too, man. They were great. If Edmond from cutting my finger or whatever they want, it's probably older had a record right there and now what you would know now. It's all good. All good, whatever we trust the universe is order of events. It's all good. Exactly. Exactly. We do. Cool, man. All right, speak to you soon. Love to Daryl. Thanks, man. Be well. Thanks to Neil Young for spending so much time with us talking about his creative process, and about the new material he's getting ready to release in a new year. You can hear all of our favorite Neil Young songs at broken record podcast dot com. You can follow us on Twitter, at broken record. Broken record is produced help from Leah rose, Jason umbrella, Martin Gonzalez, Eric Sandler, and Jennifer Sanchez. With engineering help from Nick chaffee, our executive producer is Mia Labelle. Broken record is a production of pushkin industries. If you love this show and others from pushkin, consider subscribing to pushkin plus. Pushkin plus is a podcast subscription that offers bonus content and uninterrupted ad free listening for four 9 9. Look for pushkin plus on Apple podcast subscriptions. And please remember to share rate review us in your podcast app. A theme musics by Kenny beats, I'm just gonna try it..

David Meyers Linda monster nicolet Larson L Larry Johnson David Briggs Larry Germany Neil Young Edmond Leah rose Jason umbrella Martin Gonzalez Eric Sandler Jennifer Sanchez Nick chaffee Daryl Mia Labelle Twitter pushkin Apple Kenny
"neil" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"That is you have people who you have. People who have access to technology and people don't so you'll start to see divisions among our species based on access to technology you'll start to see more of a human induced conscious evolution and try to influence our genome in certain ways and the problem with that is not very smart. You know whenever we try to manipulate a system. There's always the unintended consequences which we didn't expect and you can just see this an example after example so that would be my my one of my largest concerns. Obviously as we simply don't know enough about systems too complex systems to mess around with them to send the wilt could be able to make predictions about what will happen But no i mean if you think about it this story writing itself over one hundred two thousand years. Our ability to manipulate our genome is going to be a big part of the human story and the question is how are we is a species going to handle that will it be. Just people do the experiment and then you know And then market forces will take over or will there be more collective decisions about what the appropriate kinds of behavior and maybe have taboo for certain kinds of Behaviors ghost in humans. Taboo works very well. There are certain things that are classically taboo and lines. We don't cross the is can we will. We have those first certain certain types of technologies. Yeah the first thing that comes to mind for me is one of the things that you mentioned which is a type of economical. Eugenics almost where you have near the wealth class getting access to those type of technologies sooner in having certain health and then just visual of opportunities that people who couldn't afford to have that budding technology wouldn't have and it would create just an epoch separation between the wealth and the struggling classes on earth. Oh that's right. I mean you can imagine they could be in terms of their capabilities in terms of their performance their lifespans that could be considered different species right. Yeah and that's that's scary to me you know and because we've been talking about the human fat i've been talking about connections right about the human family is being connected to the rest life on our planet. Now we're talking about how technology could separate us and i find that particularly an unappealing Future wall. neil man. Thank you so much for coming on the show. This is really fine and super fascinating. You're an incredible guy and thank you for all the work demands. It's really great. My pleasure thanks for.

neil
"neil" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"And one of the things that clearly shows. Is that when we do. The chimp comparison that genes that are involved in making our brains much bigger. Some of them actually did have a relatively rapid period of evolution. Starting a few million years ago and we can document that pretty carefully. We'd also document that in the fossil record we can look and see the fossils and we can measure their their cranial capacities and we can begin to see well. Okay does cranial capacity. You know how big your brain is relative to your body size. How does that fit with the kinds of tools. These creatures are these. these are descended. our ancestors are making Do as larger brain you know is associate with more complicated tools and and then some general. It is So we can map that all out you know and we can say human brain size both genetically as well as we look at it. Anatomically was increasing very rapidly over the past few million years. Then the question comes why. What are the what are the advantages. Well you can think a lot of advantages in terms of using technologies to hunter..

"neil" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"Friends going welcome to the house. I am coy on you. Are you and i hope. Dixie doing well. You should do all right today. And that your inner fish sean. Fine and i bring up the interference because my guest today. Neil shubin A book called your fish which is hilarious. May i love it. And speaking of neil. Neil is a evolutionary biologist and paleontologist and an author who is new book called some assembly required decoding four billion years of life from ancient fossils to dna. And this is a really fascinating podcasts. I feel like evolution is one of those ideas that a lot of people who they quote unquote believe or trust the science about and they would easily say yes. I believe in evolution. But then don't know so much about the actual details of how we came from. You know so little soupy stuff to what we are today to less soupy stuff to a big bag filled with soupy stuff. We've really changed a lot over the last few billion years. We've gone from being Less more liquidity to taller more vertical and more complicated versions of something liquidity with a nice container to keep all that stuff together but anyway we really go through a lot of interesting and just kind of fascinating Stages and approaches entry points to evolution in this podcast and neil does a great job breaking it down. They'll give you an understanding of how we came to be. So i know they're really enjoy this podcast and find it as fascinating as i did. If you're like me and you have a body and if you're listening to this. I assume that you do have a body. It is really really important to keep that body healthy and give it what it needs. So that has the proper energy the proper protein ability to relax inn regenerate and all of those body type of things now. Organic fi is a line of superfood. Blends offer plant based nutrition made from high quality ingredients. Now i have to be completely dead honest with you here..

Neil shubin neil Dixie sean Neil assembly
"neil" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"But But it was absolutely a thrill of a lifetime And and and add to the fact that you know when you have more kind of make delete a little bit at the quarter pole. And he's still running you know when and finishing is well as he gave to be second in the derby and also. I also had the pleasure of kind of going through a few of those races like even a couple of the bluegrass you know with with somebody like call master. Who's always been held in the highest regard in the industry And then and then going on to the preakness and things kind of being reversed It was just I i knew about it now. I'm not sure if. I knew how big was to be honest with you. At the time i knew. Was you have to train. You have to do things the same but it just so hard to describe when you're running into the classics it. It's a different ball game altogether. And i think any trainer. That's been in. It would tell you that you really can't put your finger on it but there's something about it but of course when the s. and it i would honestly say probably resonated with me Fully resonated with me kinda well after. I left that room. If you know what. I mean yeah you know that win in the preakness came eleven years after your first career winter. Knock knock bird and i mentioned that horses. We were going to the commercial break. I also mentioned the fact that he paid forty three sixty to win at river downs on that day. In one thousand nine hundred seventy nine and neil howard's career was often running but neil i joked you during the commercial break i said. How on earth did we get. Forty three sixty on knock knock bird that day and you said well. It's a new trainer just starting out. Nobody knew who we were. Tell me about the early days of of neil howard in that win and having your wife by your side. Yeah it was fun and us. Own nerve racking. I remember got started. And i'll never forget it because we we got our. We bought the equipment we needed and rented apartment. Cincinnati got their. Got off feet of water buckets in got all stuff and and then we we were got a bond set up down. Start out with seven horses. I remember we'd like. I think it was either two hundred and sixteen or three hundred sixteen dollars left in the bank when we got started and and but we couldn't have been enjoying it more and You know it was just a we. Were nervous to start out with and then you know. It was funding coming down. Meet meeting some new people. But you know it to this day. I always felt like this. Is it it. that's another thing that resonated with me. I remember that going somewhere. Didn't really know that. Partly anybody there but you just starting out on your own. What if you says and people everybody. The first day we thought training. Who got the bond immediately. I doing way from you. Know what what kinda got their you know talking to you like they knew all your life did know him five minutes. Yup and that's that's one. I said you know what this is. No cooler place in the world and the race track of it. Didn't you tell me that. Your wife susan was galloping at that time but she was pregnant when she was doing it. Yes yes yes he will she. She got pregnant while while she was working. My said look honey. You you gotta keep ryden too. So i know. I know but Yes so that. Was you know that was all of like the every. Starting family at river downs and But it was. It was a it was fun. 'cause you know having that built in top exercise rider re really really helped had what three hundred dollars in the bank. Neil you couldn't afford to pay an exercise rider. She had to keep going and paying one. She'll be forced to tell you that. That's another conversation but Yeah it was. It was fun. You always a little nervous. Obviously because no matter how much you trained to do anything as soon as you start on your own you know. You're you're going to be a little bit on edge about it but but it all worked out good but but the way people you know race jack people. They're all about. We might be running against each other in the afternoon but for the most part is not anything that another another outfit or another trainer. Wouldn't do for you. You know that saying that says behind every good man is a great woman or something along those lines. And it's so true for you and for susan what you've been to accomplish. Oh not even a win on halftime that conversation. Believe me your children. Are they interested or involved in racing in any way other than loving what i did and come into the races Daughter rode show horses. While because that's sues background and she kinda lost interested in but she. It's a shame because he was a good writer. She took after mother quite But more just just liking the races but none of them really data involved in it. What do you think. Neil is you now do get a little time to look back and reflect upon these forty two years that you've been training horses. What would you say is going to be the one thing or maybe the couple of things that you're most proud of i tell you the truth. It just became apparent to me over the last few days by actually by virtue of just like this conversation. You're having right now. You know you you you i i mean first of all were you know the camaraderie on the racetrack. To me is is is unlike is unprecedented. It's unlike any other any other industry But.

neil howard neil Cincinnati susan Neil
"neil" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Neil Sperry, Texas Gardening is presented by your North Texas hardware dealers, and that's not just one hour but both hours, so stop in and tell them. Thanks. Aces the place with the helpful hardware folks. And now here's Neil. All right. Thank you very much to be welcome to our second hour for this Saturday afternoon. Lovely Saturday. Lovely week we've had I hope that you will get in the habit of Tuning us in every Every assert. I never got my text sent to my pastor with my suggestion for a topic for the Anyway thinking out loud there. I will get that done. Um, Hope will be a regular part of your Saturday afternoons as we talk gardening, and I hope you'll stop in at the Ace Hardware store down the street from and let me know that you're listening. They all participate in this and I thank them for that, Um The I don't have a question of the week right now really don't have anything that is just a burning question. A lot of lawns are turning Brown and not looking too great right now. Part of that is because they have dried up. It's gotten drive he hadn't noticed. Some lawns. Some areas have had good rain. Farther south, you go the more rain they've had, but But other areas are very, very dry. And there has been quite an influx of armyworms a week or two ago, and they will strip the The blades off Bermuda grass, and so if you have Bermuda grass, and you find that you just have wiry stems left out there that maybe what happened? It's a good idea to fertilize your lawn with an all nitrogen, high quality fertilizer with 30 35% of that nitrogen is slow release form and then water it in well and and the grass will rebound pretty quickly. So that would be, I guess. Maybe a fairly common question for this time of year and responsible will just give that attribution to whiskey Stone since 1983 the experts at whose you stone have been fulfilling dreams of people like Neil Right and left. All the time. I love this place, and it's so much fun to tell you about it. I met my cuisine and when I was doing my all Texas All Gardens show at the Arlington Convention Center. It's been 30 years ago, I guess, and he and his young son, Derek, came in to bring stone to the exhibitors. They were using his stone in their in their booths to landscape. And I said, Well, who is that guy and I went over to see what is you stone right after that, and have been a very faithful customer, and also a very proud advertiser for them. Ever since you love this place 22 acres inside, you'll be greeted when you go in there in their sales building and you'll be helped. They have really hopeful sales staff will take you around. Show you the different stone stone for every purpose in your landscape, whether you're putting in a petty or drive or whether you're putting in a walkway whether you need a retaining wall whether you just want decorative stone. Maybe the river rock like I mentioned to Chris for For a retaining area of a bed. Maybe you need decorative gravel. Uh, you could also get boulders. Maybe you're building a, for example, a fountain all of that available to you at whose Q stone. Now they're open Monday through Saturday. Not open on Sundays. So make note of the address and head on out right now, if you if you're out and about they are a destination place to go. They deliver anywhere You can hear me. So if you can't go today go another day. 45 Oh, one east Loop 8 20 South 4501 East. Lupe 20 south in South East Fort Worth, 81742908 22 8174290822. Whiz. I thank you dot com. That's where skew Stone Hi. I'm Mandy from human Ace Hardware and Fort Worth. Come see us in the garden Center for all your plants, pottery and decor. Count on us for friendly service you can trust Ace.

Neil Sperry Neil Monday Saturday today Derek one hour Ace Chris 22 acres Ace Hardware Sundays second hour 1983 30 years ago both hours Neil Right Arlington Convention Center Saturday afternoons Aces
"neil" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"So happy and proud of their story store happy to be there, and it's uh, glad to help you and to serve you. It's going to Bryant in Dallas Bryant, this is Neil. Good afternoon. How you doing, Neil? Doing Well, Thank you, sir. What can I do to help you? I'm having trouble getting my rosemary's tough to stay. You know, they started dying on me. I don't know whether I'm putting them in a bad place. The last one I got Back in the spring. I got it in a big pot and it was doing good and all I want It looks started dying. Looks like from the side and now the whole plants nearly dead. So some people say that these two Bs and desert plan needs to be dry and other people. So I don't know whether I'm trying not to over water for a while and Get any better, So I'm not for sure What exactly? I'm doing. What size What size part? Do you have it in the one before was I got it in the ground. They got bought one in the part about a gallon size or Bigger. Maybe it was pretty good size of pop was about 80 inches. In diameter. And about you know, is a good size, but the one that Okay, I got mixed up. I'm sorry. I thought you were going in container. You have it in the ground done both. But this one is in the ground, and I thought it was doing good. Okay. Got all I got all that. So you're losing them both in a container. And then once that you were planted in the ground? Yes, sir. All right. Rosemary plants need, um They need a fair amount of moisture, but they need to be well drained and another words. Uh, you don't want to plant them on flat ground in a low area. Where where During which periods are going to soak up a lot of moisture. Our soils tend to get wet and stay wet. Unless unless we have a plant growing on a on a berm or in a raised bed, Rosemary would be a great plan to use in a raised bed where it's up four or five inches above the surrounding grade, either by retaining Well retaining wall or a edging strip or a slight berm or something where incident water from rainfall would drain away and go out into the yard and down the street or whatever. You don't want to plant it in a low spot. In a pot I find people tend to buy a plant put it in a pot where it looks just right at home in the in the pot, and then the plane gets bigger than the pot and it gets root bound and And they let them get too dry. Rosemary doesn't wilt And so you don't really realize that the plant has gotten too dry. And so in one case when they're in the ground, often people have them in places where they could get waterlogged and when they're in pots often they're in positive too small and they get to dry. So it's It's both extremes. It Yeah, in a place. It shouldn't be getting waterlogged. You know what I mean? So I was kind of, you know, happy with it for about a couple of months and then all at once. I don't know, because it's been a lot hotter or something, or no. They can handle the heat. What months did die outside the ground? What month It's been dying for about the last month. All right, well, it may have gotten dry. Also, A new plant doesn't have roots going far and wide, usually with rosemary, unless you have a really cold winter, and if you have chosen a more upright variety that the taller varieties tend to be much more winter hardy. In my experience and my observations. The taller varieties tend to go through our winters better than the trailing types. Uh, And if you're in a protected spotter, If you have it tucked up against the house, it will have a better chance of making it through a cold spell. Anyway to my point. If you can get it established and it's been growing for a year, then the roots are out for and wide and it's not at risk to dry up, but a new plant that's only been in the ground for a month or two. It's pretty easy to let them get too dry. Brian, I can't I can't figure out. I can't figure out without seeing the plant watching. You operate what might have killed it. They don't have a common problem that I can Point my finger at and say, Hey, it's got to be such and such because there isn't any such and such with Rosemary. They're pretty durable plants. It's usually related to moisture. Okay, all right. I'll try to maybe maybe getting right rather than I'm thinking in the ground. So I only Yeah, it only takes one time. You need to check them every day or two and just feel the soil and when it begins to feel a little bit dry to the touch, soak it deeply and then wait for that cycle to happen again and soak it again. All right. Thank you very much for your welcome very much appreciate the call. Let's go to Brian in Dallas now, Brian, this is Neil. Good afternoon. Let me get you off my Speaker there Good to speak to you again after all these years. Thank you Sit in the last several weeks. You were speaking to somebody about elephant ears, and I only caught the conversation on and off. In part I remember was you were discussing the difference in tubers and bulbs. And how to winter them. And I've got some of the giant ones, one of the bulbs, winning the ground about the size of a football. Or £1 coffee can and there's tall as I am or close to it. And I lost a few of the newer ones when it hit four degrees close to the other ones have come back. Just fine. Is there any tip? Or primaries in on how to winter. Those best. Well, the whole group of caladiums and cold locations, uh, are handled You can dig them if you want to. And store them. Caladiums are different, uh, different situation. I guess I shouldn't lump them together. I prefer to leave my elephant ears out in the ground. And put mulch over them. If I'm all do anything, usually in my case, they come back, and we're in a colder area than you are. We're in McKinney and you'll notice that Denton and McKinney are usually colder than the Dallas area, if you because the urban heat pocket if you have, um Have them in a fairly protected spot. I would take sure to tree leaves that you get off your lawn in the fall and just pile them up over them, shredded through the lawnmower and pile them over the elephant ears after the first freeze. Or even as they're wilting down, Uh, before the first freeze and Just leave that in places a thermal blanket for them, and they should make it through Almost all winters. Last year was an aberration. People who were growing banana plants and elephant ears and Other things that were marginally winter. Hardy, uh,.

Brian Neil £1 Dallas Last year four first freeze McKinney both one case a month five inches two about 80 inches last month one time one Denton Dallas Bryant a year
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"To. Neil thomas the author of a terrific new book Not a big book. it's called taking leave of darwin. neil. I didn't mean to get you off on the subject of schliemann and his but i i'm interested in the invention his idea the trojan horse his idea and i literally read yesterday that somebody thinks they've found it seems preposterous to me would be made of wood and so on and so forth so i didn't mean to get you off on that i wanna talk more about your book unless you have something to say about the trojan horse cold with this is reputation as being a trixie kind of fellow that he would. You'd have that idea what doesn't seem to me. Totally perspicuous is that i understood that went schliemann excavated troy. He went down to deep. You didn't actually hit his proper. So where this whole says. I don't know. I haven't seen what you've seen but i will keep an eye out for that. It whole thing's crazy. We'll follow up on that just as a what an interesting. Yeah hoping to sell a few copies of your book because it was such a fun. Read for me. It's why i wanted to get you on here The book is taking leave of darwin. What made you think of writing an entire book on the subject. In other words this it's one thing to have some thoughts. It's another yes your neck out yes i understand. Wh what you mean. I think what what happened. I originally wrote an article which i submitted to journal new humanist in mumbai them and they were interested in but in the end they decided not to not to publish it because they said we'll take 'em we've taken advice from scientific colleagues and they say don't publish when i can imagine if if you're the guild of biologists who on homework yesterday they wouldn't take very timely to the to this kind of argument so what happened was that i kept on being interested in the subject still interested in an coming to to write a second book which we can talk about some of the time. Perhaps the so i i kept on working on it and they sort of ballooned so it came from an article. It became became a chop dozen two chapters and so on the rest is history. It it it it came from that point you think that there is an openness out there in the academy to rethinking darwin fundamentally because you go back in the book and you talk about with some of his earlier critics yes satellite. That was just dispensed with eventually. And then we've gotten onto the darwinist juggernaut do is an opening in these days to to rethink this or to be more critical of it. I would very much doubt it to be candid with you. I don't think that Somebody in my position without biological credentials would would be able to hack it where people far more a higher up in the biological hierarchy have written some of the things before under not been able to penetrate is Armagh this darwinian on the biologists way otherwise so it strikes me that anytime. One is not in a discipline. They seem to have a freedom that those in the discipline don't have in other words. Those in the discipline say no one who is not a tenured. Biologists in the academy can write down the subject and so in a way people outside the field can can sync within the freedom can think across disciplines and so they bring perspective to it that people deep in the field often. Don't have david berlin ski in someone else who's written brilliantly. He's also an agnostic. And you use have as you put it any skin in the game. You can look at it more freely without fear of triggering your colleagues in the department so to speak so one other thing i think is i mean i'm to some extent duplicating the point remai- but there's a great kind of disjunction between the biological of the docs on watch philosophers who Who who of a on analyzed this this subject how have come up with philosophers have tended to suggest that the there is no basis. I've more or less suggested i have suggested. I mean the peop- business on legendary british philosopher. Mary mitchly who was so was so. Dismissive of richard dawkins is calms conception about about memes and so on and much else. Besides that legend has it that richard conducive impelled to turn down a an invitation to appear with. Mary midgely on the same platform because he feared feed facing her over the breakfast table in in that conference. I mean the out sounds a bit. I mean it only a humorous point but all the point is this that there is a very radical disjunction between people like myself who look at it dispassionately. I'm like philosophers of a loss. I wouldn't philosopher a story anything and under biological contrary who else stick together and maintain the wnba party. Nine well again. I mentioned the david. Berlin ski also professor of law. Yes i often think that people outside a discipline can see things more clearly and can simply think without fear. And that's what. I think he's done in the book. It really is a terrific book. You're writing a is what recommends it most highly. I think that the u You right wonderfully you almost right in an english accent but not quote by us. We have thirty seconds. Tell us about the new book your writing in in just a few seconds. Well it's i tended to try drill down on some of the arguments is some of the themes that i've looked and and i'm playing with the title of darwin's theory theory evolution of a cosmic genetic myth. Which is kind of all march to my stanton's imagine yes nine. I just look. We'll have to have you back soon. If you don't mind taking leave of darwin. A terrific read by. Neil thomas neil.

schliemann darwin Neil thomas david berlin neil troy mumbai Mary mitchly Mary midgely richard dawkins wnba richard Berlin david stanton Neil thomas neil
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Author of a new book terrific book. it's called taking leave of darwin. The author is my guest. Neil thomas neil thomas. You said earlier that you started out your an academic writing subject of german languages literature and other european literature. Now you found yourself a leaping into the world of darwin and you said that you remember the british rationalist association. Is that what it's called. Yes yes so. I sent you and your colleagues. There are mostly either agnostics or atheists and and not. Yes dave yes. I've i've described myself as an nonstick waving. What does the result of my findings but yes okay so true enough so you don't come to the subject from the point of your faith you just come to it as a free thinker as it were d- do you find as you as you get into the subject that darwin is so generally accepted in the world In the academy that anybody who questions him immediately becomes You know looked at In in a strange way or were did. Didn't you care about that. It doesn't affect me. Some since i am no a retiree of independent means. You know it. It really is irrelevant to me. But i do understand the people in the biological world of acadamy our threatened by all sorts of things including dismissal I've heard on the grapevine. I if they if they fall out of line with with with with with darwin's thinking yes yes half the about that but more. So i i think that no. I'm not a person of faith but my my wife is. I'm many friends who are peop- people faith and i do feel bad for them because i feel it in the way. This hold adult wenden bandwagon as has tempted to Ask robbed them of this virtual earth ri- to imply that their own instincts wrong that they should they should foresake any i. Any theistic interpretation. The idea of god. And mike nichols wrong. Wrong am i do. And i was rather discount allies to real to realize that the anglican church back in two thousand eight had made a public apology to darwin. Well i think that's because i don't know what is approved in syria toll by any is in particular the anglican church. They're not exactly known for their cultural bravery. But i guess curious about your process in other words as you begin to look into this. What were some of the arguments against darwinism or what was it. That was occurring to you. As you looked into this one of the things. I i looked at the origin of space. As am i looked at Descent of man which is sort of pendant companion volume two to it and the way that darwin argues and uses. Language is a very amateurish. An impressionistic unbeaten. It's very wiggling and tries to get in the way that advertising off political propaganda he he gives everything a spin or gloss. And i i interpret that as being very suspicious because he flies that he doesn't he's not really sure of his facts. These talk to whole pullover is and push one over on us. And so i did. I did use my sort of training if you like of for many decades tucson to try and unmask what i thought with some of the false pretensions of his writing. It's fascinating here. You say because that's the one thing Typically that you don't hear another people looking at him. Not just as a scientist but as a writer peter and you you did I don't use the term in england but we say you know the that he. He's putting english on the ball in billiards. Said he's basically trying rather than simply presenting the facts he he's making an argument That at the lay reader. Maybe wouldn't notice that that he's doing that. Yes i think so. I mean in many ways. He was a very decent individual but he had his faults. And i think that he wasn't sometimes he wasn't straight with his audience or readership mice. I'm also he was quite rather equivocating in his own mind. He didn't sometimes knows his own. Mind i mean. You've got to remember the darwin despite his being fated by posterity was rather average school by to say to say the least of conceptual clarity was not one of his great strengths. It seems to me. unpeopled people tend to praise him to the rooftops as if he was some sort of einstein. Thank that was not the case to be to be fair to him. In his autobiography he admits as much he says. I'm not as bright as my system. For instance and before of him as rather than you know which is which is tremendous. I like that kind of refreshing. Under what are some of the arguments and you go through a If somebody goes through the book taking leave of darwin which i enjoyed immensely a i think because of your own writing style. It's very engaging. So so what are some of the arguments against darwinism. Or what are some of the things that you notice that people will finding the book. Well on the evidence i suppose is that there is no empirical backup for. What his planes. There is. No empirical backup of hybridization of animals modulating from one animal into another dominance theory is not just a few biological tacoma's he suggesting that you and i developed ultimately from bacterial beings and it took to accept that you would need a little bit more proof. I think worms are not in in evidence in the fossil record. Is that what you mean. Not an evidence undone and to his credit says in the origin of species nature. Should if i if i were right in the state of uproar we we should have you know dogs and cats and cats power powerfull horses but nothing of the sort exists on the also nothing. The salt exists in the fossil record. Either i mean dobbin piously hope. The fossil record would redeem his reputation in the in the sense that we've had since since he he wrote the book and saw but that is not the case. The the fossil record is most under winning. If it might put it lot animals come come to be as a result of they seem to be fully formed creation had created them individually. I have to site not. I'm surprising myself. But i have to say that. Because that is where. The scientific evidence points to from the so-called cambrian explosion of animal lives five hundred forty million years ago. There are no transitional forms. So what do you think. What do the proponents of blind darwinism so so-called did they say about this for my audience to say. Tell us because isn't this thing. Most of us are led to believe in school that this is settled That they're a when i talk to certain scientific friends. They they're aghast that. I wouldn't have accept this. You're saying that that at the record is increasingly clear that there are not transitional forms and we mean between species than others. We can find a finches would with different beaks. We can find what's called micro evolution but man volusia and all the decades now a century and a half. There's nothing so when do proponents of this say in answer to that to the candidate there is no convincing straight answer to this..

darwin Neil thomas neil thomas british rationalist associatio anglican church mike nichols dave syria billiards tucson peter england tacoma dobbin volusia
"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"neil" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Talking to the author of a new book terrific book. it's called taking leave of darwin. The author is my guest. Neil thomas neil thomas. You said earlier that you started out your an academic writing subject of german languages literature and other european literature. Now you found yourself a leaping into the world of darwin and you said that you remember the british rationalist association. Is that what it's called. Yes yes so. I sent you and your colleagues. There are mostly either agnostics or atheists and and not. Yes dave yes. I've i've described myself as an nonstick waving. What does the result of my findings but yes okay so true enough so you don't come to the subject from the point of your faith you just come to it as a free thinker as it were d- do you find as you as you get into the subject that darwin is so generally accepted in the world In the academy that anybody who questions him immediately becomes You know looked at In in a strange way or were did. Didn't you care about that. It doesn't affect me. Some since i am no a retiree of independent means. You know it. It really is irrelevant to me. But i do understand the people in the biological world of acadamy our threatened by all sorts of things including dismissal I've heard on the grapevine. I if they if they fall out of line with with with with with darwin's thinking yes yes half the about that but more. So i i think that no. I'm not a person of faith but my my wife is. I'm many friends who are peop- people faith and i do feel bad for them because i feel it in the way. This hold adult wenden bandwagon as has tempted to Ask robbed them of this virtual earth ri- to imply that their own instincts wrong that they should they should foresake any i. Any theistic interpretation. The idea of god. And mike nichols wrong. Wrong am i do. And i was rather discount allies to real to realize that the anglican church back in two thousand eight had made a public apology to darwin. Well i think that's because i don't know what is approved in syria

darwin Neil thomas neil thomas british rationalist associatio anglican church mike nichols dave syria billiards tucson peter england tacoma dobbin volusia