20 Burst results for "Neighborhood School"

"neighborhood school" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:49 min | 9 months ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"America Bones Dry. Can't agreeing to my 400 affiliates across the United States and Europe. It is great to have you on the U U It shows special hour ahead. I guess I've never had before my 20 years of this show, Dr. Michael Eric Dyson is one of the country's most influential public intellectuals, prolific author and lecture. He is now a professor at Vanderbilt University. Where is the distinguished University professor of African and the aspirins studies at the College of Arts and Science? He's also got an appointment over divinity school. He's also the centennial professor at the university. I don't think he's doing anything but teaching. He was I like to point out educated Princeton for his PhD, and before that he had begun preaching at age 13 ordained at age 18 did his undergraduate Carson Newman. And when we went together on meet the press this year, I prepared for that by reading the book that he wrote last year. Cheers. We cannot stop, And then he came out with a brand new book. Long time coming reckoning with race in America, and I just finish reading that. And so I am deeply versed in Michael. Eric Dyson writing, but I've never met him before. Dr Dyson. Welcome to the U. U H Oh, Mr here, but it's always great to hear you and listen to you. And it's honor to be on your show, my friend. Well, Professor, I'm glad you're here and I really am glad you're here. We're gonna spend an hour talking about these two books and about where we are at the end of 2020 and 2021. And I don't expect we're going to agree much, but I want to begin with a quote that made me stop in my tracks from tears. We cannot stop on page one of seven you wrote. When I used to appear on Fox News pretty regularly with Bill O'Reilly. I begged him to say on air to a sizable audience. But even though he disagreed with me, they shouldn't send me hate mail and call me the n word. He never made that plea. His silence reinforced the racial social contract forge by angry whiteness. I'm making that play right now, people if you get mad at Dr Dyson, and you want to write him a letter, by all means do but call him Dr Dyson and pay him the respect he is due. He's a serious man and doctor Dyson. I'm surprised Bill never did that actually. Yeah, I was surprised and disappointed. You know, when I asked him, I said, Look, I know we're going to battle. We're gonna disagree. You're gonna state your position. I'm going to state mind. We're reasonable men, but my lord Uh, the outcry from your audience, the downpour of venom and vitriol and racially charged rhetoric. Epithets hurled against me. Can can we just stop? He would just say to the people. Look, you're my audience. I respect you, But don't do that. So I appreciate you saying those things, my friend. Well, let me let me begin with you. I want to get into both books, especially long time coming because it's so timely and I am very serious, and I want people to read them. I had any glad on to talk about Begin again. These two books and Eddie Glad is a beginner. Dr Dyson asks White America to read deeply in the outpouring of books about race in America this year, and I think that's timely and appropriate and I have, but I want to begin to make sure people know who you are. It's an interview, not a debate at the beginning. And so I learned a lot about I did not know you started Cranbrook. That's Mitt Romney school. That may be the most elite school in America. Why did you start there? Why did you leave? Well, I was kicked out. Actually, I got a scholarship out there. When I was I had to repeat the 11th grade. I was in public school and took an accurate test scored well. Got our entry into their judge Damon Keith, a prominent jurist. Who was a member of my church and a man who I respected greatly and revered as so many others did. I was dating his daughter as well at the time, and he took a great interest in me, and one thing led to another and I got out there. But that was the first time I'd ever go on the school. Outside of my black neighborhood outside of my segregated black neighborhood, which meant I had never gone to school with white kids at all, and then not have gone to school with white kids. It all too suddenly. Being the number of as you've already indicated Mitt Romney. Sorts of white brothers and sisters, which meant that they were very rich, very well heeled, very elite. It was a different situation. There was a great deal of racial animus. During that time as well. I remember it was during the first showing the original debut of Roots, the epic television show inspired by Alex Haley's book, which, ironically enough, I ended up writing a forward for Many years later, and during the playing of that there were cartoons and characters put into the newspaper and one of them was attacked in my door. With the words inward. Go home. There's been a local tape made by one of the students there. White students were going cigar fishing. No one that we're going. Inward fishing. What's the bait? Hominy grits. It had been circulated around. So it was a time of tremendous racial tension. That was in that kind of what I've described as a kind of vertigo as a result of it. Racial burden, though, because I've been thrown off. Knocked off my square. So to speak, Um And then did poorly enough in school that I was disinvited to that particular sub. That particular school. I got caught up. It was a young man and young couple young white guys. We're missing our girlfriends, so we figured out how to call out. On the on the dorm phone to our girlfriends. My girlfriend happened to be at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. You know, a prank that you know all of us received. Admonition for their parents into paying. Whatever the phone bill was. I couldn't afford it. So I had to take a third job working on the weekends, so all of that led to my feeling alienated. And feeling a bit overwhelmed and eventually got kicked out and went back to the Of the ghetto neighborhood school and took a diploma in night school and ended up graduating and then worked for four years until I went to college at 21. By that time, as you've already indicated, accepted my call to the ministry at about 18 began to be or license in ordain that 2021. I've been out there preaching and talking ever since. Here. When you look backwards it a career. It's easy to predict success. Because here you are with your doctor and you've taught in every major university in the United States have lectured everywhere. You've written 20 books and best sellers. All that stuff. But it's easy at the end of a career or at.

Dr. Michael Eric Dyson America professor United States Bill O'Reilly College of Arts and Science doctor Dyson Mitt Romney school University professor of Africa ghetto neighborhood school Vanderbilt University Mitt Romney Princeton Europe Eddie Glad Fox News White America Carson Newman Damon Keith Alex Haley
West Side Chicago residents concerned over plan that would close 3 schools in North Lawndale

Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

00:23 sec | 11 months ago

West Side Chicago residents concerned over plan that would close 3 schools in North Lawndale

"Plans to close schools on the West. By the proposal would consolidate three existing neighborhood schools into a new school specializing in science, technology and engineering. Critics, including the Chicago Teachers union, want money invested in existing schools. CPS says it would only move forward if the proposal has enough support. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson,

Chicago Teachers Union Boris Johnson Prime Minister CPS
"neighborhood school" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"A decent life. All of this changed dramatically in 2015. When a billionaire named Donald Trump put his own life of luxury on the line. From that moment he came down that famous escalator, He started a movement to reclaim our government from the rotten cartel of insiders that had been destroying our country. We may not have realized it at the time, but Trump Is the bodyguard of Western civilization. Trump was elected to protect our families from the vengeful mob that seeks to destroy our way of life, our neighborhoods, schools, churches and values. President Trump was elected to defend the American way of life. The American way of life means you follow the law. You work hard, You honor God, he raise your kids with strong values and you work to create a civil society. The American way of life means you speak your mind without retribution without being kicked off social media by a self righteous sensor in Silicon Valley. That means you can freely practice your religion and that church is more essential than a casino. And it means that we judge people on their actions not on their immutable characteristics. The American way of life is being dismantled by a group of bitter, deceitful, vengeful activists who have never built anything in their lives. I have. It's locking up pastors while releasing violent criminals from prison wear kicking doctor's office. Social media promoting Chinese state funded propaganda on major tech platforms. This election is the most critical since 18 60 When a man named Lincoln was elected to preserve the union from disintegration. Thiss election is not just the most important of our lifetime. It is the most important since the preservation of the republic in 18 65. By re electing Trump. We'll ensure that our kids are raised to love our country and respect its founding fathers not taught to hate or be ashamed of them. We will build monuments to heroes not burned down our cities. Will be a country that rises the higher heights that dreams big thinks big and achieves the impossible. A country that values are remarkable journey the complexities of our past. But clearly communicates to the next generation. That we have to be grateful, not angry that we live in the United States. We will be a country that makes it easier to have many Children. Live quiet and peaceable lives and worship your God without a tyrant getting in.

President Trump United States Silicon Valley Lincoln
How to Live Single - Single Moms in Brooklyn

Unladylike

03:48 min | 1 year ago

How to Live Single - Single Moms in Brooklyn

"Kristen last episode we talked about how expensive single hood can be and rent is one of the worst money pits for example like me, having to move back in with my parents after my last breakup before having to find a roommate, but if you're single and a mom like our guest Ashley, simple figuring out whether and where to live single gets way more complicated I couldn't just get up and leave, even even though eventually, that was like my bottom of the line. Last resort, just go back to California and live with my mom, but that wasn't really a viable option. I had to figure something out and I think unfortunately I think for a lot of women that option would have been to stay in an undesirable situation and impossibly abusive one and it happens a lot. When Ashley in her ex boyfriend ended things a few years ago, she had to find a place for herself and her then five year old son to live in Brooklyn where the median rent is three thousand dollars. It was like me after work, going to look at apartments and you know being told sometimes by landlords, and not a very direct way that they don't want to rent to a mom because you know. I've heard comments like well. It's a really quiet building, and we have a lot of single people who live year lots of couples, no kids, you know a lot of discouraging language, and it was really kind of gross so yeah, unfunny to say the least it was. Ashley's friend of ten years named Tia was going through a similar shit storm. Tia had just gotten divorced, and her two sons were three and thirteen at the time. Both women were commiserating about how hard it is to find affordable living situation as single moms like Ashley could have moved to a cheaper side of town, but her son was already enrolled in the neighborhood school. She felt invested in the community around her at the same time though she knew there is no way she could afford a place there on her own Tia meanwhile was still living in her pre-divorce apartment, but no longer had two incomes to cover the rent, so the ladies got to talking. And so literally to. Newly single moms with children all boys by the way talking about the same problem, so it was a very like it was like a light bulb moment where we were like well, what about because she had an extra room in her apartment three bedroom apartment, so it was also just it made sense like space, wise to and I will say honestly I mean. Both of us were kind of in desperate situation so even if that wasn't like. The first thing that we would do normally it seemed like the obvious. It seemed like the obvious to do. They decided that Ashley and her son would move into tears apartment they would divvy up the rent and expenses in childcare duties, and it seemed like a no brainer, even though Ashley said she'd never seen similar setups if you could have a roommate. Then why you have a roommate as a parent, if you're a single parent, especially like I, said an expensive city. It's Kinda weird like I. Don't know why that's not more common, but I do know that women and mothers have always been prone to Sharon resources and being communal when it comes to raising their kids I think maybe our generation has distanced from that a little bit, but you know I saw my mom and my grandmother and my aunts, sharing resources and helping each other out which is of the same vein, really so there was a loud checking in and letting each other know what was going on. There were times where you know. If she had a meeting that ran long, I went and got her youngest from daycare, or if I need groceries and she was going to the grocery store, I would give her my list and she would get the things that I needed. Although we shared a lot of groceries, you know different diets? There's different things on the list.

Ashley TIA Kristen California Brooklyn Sharon
"neighborhood school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:06 min | 2 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're going to talk about mothers every year homework. Mixer cleaned for the day. But we hear stories about mothers and the active mothering all year long at them off. And in this hour, we're gonna play you some of our favorites. I story is from the actress and writer, Molly ringwald, she told in a show. He did at the Carolina theatre in Durham, North Carolina. Here's Molly ringwald. Fi. So a couple years ago. My family. My husband Ponti, oh, and my seven year old daughter Matilda and our one year old twins move into a new house in Los Angeles. Which is in the best school district in Los Angeles. My daughter Matilda up until that point was was going to school in a very progressive Montessori kind of school. It was very far away. She quite liked it. But everybody kept saying why don't you have your daughter go to this school? It's it's an amazing school. Everybody moves into this this area just to go to the school. So we thought about it and about after year we said to Matilda Matilda. What do you think about going to the neighborhood school? It's supposed to be really good. And she said, no. And so we thought about it and about a week later. We asked her again, she said, no we kept asking her. She kept saying, no, no, no, no. But her father, and I decided we're parents and we're going to make an executive decision. And we said, yes. Mathilde kept saying no all the way up until she actually entered the second grade. But we figured you know, what she's young. She's seven years old. She's going to get over it. She'll adjust. We all did right? The first week. We knew that something was wrong. When her teacher said to us at the first week conference, you know in all my years of teaching. Which was sixteen years. I've never had a child like Matilda. You know, sometimes somebody can say this about your kid, and you think, wow, that's amazing. But in our case, we knew it wasn't very good. She said, she amended it and said, maybe boys, but not girls. And we said, oh, all right. Okay. What's up gender bias? But we had to listen to what she had to say she presented us with an index card that was clearly matilda's handwriting. That said you're pretty short and little for a second grader. Which I thought was sort of alarming until I realized that it was actually written to a little boy. And I thought she's flirting. I did that until I was well into my thirties, you know. But then there were other things that we really couldn't ignore. She told one girl that she had a pretty awful name. But that she could change it when she turned eighteen. And then and then there were other incidences, you know, when when she would get mad if you thought somebody was laughing at her she would throw sharp pencil at them or sometimes she would go up to their desk and just tear up their their work. So it was it was clearly a problem, and then they would give in schools and public schools at least in Los Angeles. They do this thing called a reflection chart, and what it is. They tell the child to explain what they did. And why they did it and how they felt and then and then the next part is how the other child might have felt and that's to instill some kind of empathy, and what Mathilde would write in the space was, blah, blah, blah. And translated that's the eight year old version of q. So Pontiac by my husband started to talk to her an verged on pleading where we said Matilda this. This is your first year at the school. If you keep doing this. You won't have any friends and Matilda looked at a straight in the eye. And she said, I don't need any friends. I don't want any friends. And this was very alarming to both of us. About a would say maybe a week went by it was probably about a week before Mathilde and Pontiac, and I both got hauled into the principal's office. And I can tell you that I never in my life had been inside of a principal's office only in a movie, in fact, there was a scene in in pretty in pink where I got called into the principal's office. And that was my only experience and the same with my husband. We were both such goody two shoes as kids, you know, and matilda's there with her feet up on the desk. And that the principal excuses her from the office, and she talks with my husband and me, and she says, you know, matilda's a very bright child. She's very observant in my opinion. She's highly gifted she's very funny. But if she continues this mode of behavior, I'm afraid that people are going to see her as a bully. And I can't tell you what that word meant me because I basically made a career out of being the girl who stood up to bullies in movies. You know, all those movies. I think they really spoke to people because because everybody's been bullied in one way in their life. But I was the girl who who stood up to them. And it really meant a lot to me and not only that, but I was actually bullied in my own life in seventh grade. I had this this bullied this eighth grader named Shirley Panini. That's not a real name. But it's really close. And I didn't even know who she was. She just showed up I would walk down the hall, and there should be in her little Dutch boy haircut, and she would say ringwald, I'm gonna kick your ass after school after school. I'm gonna kick your ass. And I had no idea who this girl was I just knew that she didn't like me for some reason. And she really scared me. And she scared me the point where I told my parents that I wasn't going to go back to that school. They could drop me off at school, and I would wait until they left, and then I would leave. And I think my parents knew that I was serious because I left that school. So when I heard that we're bully connected to my daughter. I thought this is impossible. I know my daughter, and I know what a huge and sensitive and compassionate heart. She has. I mean, this is the girl that when I put my father's teddy bear. I don't have very many things that belonged to my father. So this was very precious to me, I put my father's teddy bear in the washing machine and all the stuffing came out. But I didn't realize it. I opened the machine and all I saw was stuffing. And I thought that I'd killed my father's bear. And I was devastated, and I burst into tears and Matilda Zalmay came running out and offered to empty her. Piggy Bank to get me another teddy bear because you could see how much it meant to me. I knew that I knew Matilda, and I knew that the school could not see into the heart of Mathilde, but I could and I needed to figure out what was wrong. So I went into this frenzy of self help books, I stayed up all night on Amazon. You know, getting getting books like, you know, your defiant child, your Edison trait child, your of the gifted child, and what to do when you're trial doesn't have all the answers. And I just I did everything I could we went down this rabbit hole of child, therapists and child psychiatrists and educational therapist. I even considered biofeedback anything to bring my lovely child. Back to us. One of the things that I decided to try was social skills class because it was recommended to me this class at at a college. And it seemed like a good idea, and I presented it to Matilda. And she said, no. And I said too bad you're going. So we were in traffic for a long time took us a long time to get there and Matilda, and I have this this deal where she gets to listen to one catch asong song. And I get to listen to one Ella Fitzgerald song. And then we have to listen to something that we both like and in this case, it was a show called radio lab. I don't know if many of you know, radio lab, but show I like to call it this American life for science, and it's a show that really speaks to both of us. And this particular episode was about zoos and Matilda is a big animal lover, you know, she she really feels very comfortable in the company of animals and really cares about them. So I thought it would be a really good thing to listen to and this particular part of the show had to do with guerrillas and before the seventies guerrillas didn't have. They were just in these concrete boxes in zoos, and they were slowly going out of their minds and this one man took it upon himself to change all that. And to really give guerrillas the habitats that they needed in zoos and Matilda you're listening to this. And they're describing this guerilla the first time, he sees sky in his life and everybody, you know, the zookeepers and the specialists in the architects, everybody is standing on the other side of the glass watching this guerilla, not knowing if the guerrillas just going to absolutely lose his mind, but he looks up at the sky, and then he touches his hands to the grass, which is never felt in his life. And he's closing his eyes. And he's feeling the wind on his for for the first time. And while I'm listening to this. I'm looking at my daughter in the back seat, and she's Mirroring everything that this guerrillas doing. She's looking up she's closing her eyes. She's feeling her face. She's touching the seat as though it's grass. And I realize that my daughter is not in her habitat. And asked her mother, I vowed that day. That no matter what I would find her habitat. I would find a way for her to thrive. And I can't tell you all the ways that I did it, but I pretty much made it my full time job this year. And a few weeks ago. I was on the playground watching Mathilde hang upside down on the apparatus they used to call it the jungle gym. But now, they call it the apparatus. And she's hanging upside down with her legs locked with a girl. And this mother comes running up to me. And she says, Molly, Molly, you don't know me. But I need to talk to you about Mathilde. Oh my God. You have to ruin this moment. I'm watching really you have to talk to me about Mathilde. I said what what about Mathilde, and she said, I just want to tell you that my daughter Hannah loves your daughter, and I said, oh, really. Why? I love her. But you know, why does she loved her? And she said Hannah loves her because she said that she stood up for her on the playground. And she wants to know if Matilda can come over for a play date. And so I told her that we would be happy to and we would be there with bells on. Thank you..

Matilda Matilda Mathilde Molly ringwald Matilda Zalmay Los Angeles Carolina theatre neighborhood school North Carolina Durham principal Ponti writer Ella Fitzgerald executive Hannah Pontiac Shirley Panini Piggy Bank educational therapist Amazon
"neighborhood school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:04 min | 2 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This time. The mob is all about true stories told live and this week. We're going to talk about mothers every year homework mixer Queen for the day. But we hear stories about mothers, the active mothering all year long at them off. And in this hour, we're gonna play you some of our favorites. I story is from the actress and writer, Molly ringwald, she told in a show. He did at the Carolina theatre in Durham, North Carolina. Here's Molly ringwald. Hi. So a couple years ago. My family. My husband Ponti, oh, and my seven year old daughter Matilda and our one year old twins move into a new house in Los Angeles. Which is in the best school district in Los Angeles. My daughter Matilda up into that point was was going to school in a very progressive. Montessori ish kind of school. It was very far away. She quite liked it. But everybody kept saying why don't you have your daughter go to this school? It's it's an amazing school. Everybody moves into this this area just to go to the school. So we thought about it and about after year we said to Matilda Matilda. What do you think about going to the neighborhood school? It's supposed to be really good. And she said, no. And we thought about it. And you know about a week later. We asked her again, she said, no we kept asking her. She kept saying, no, no, no, no. But her father, and I decided we're parents and we're going to make an executive decision. And we said, yes. Mathilde kept saying no all the way up until she actually entered the second grade. But we figured you know, what she's young. She's seven years old. She's going to get over it. She'll adjust. We all did right? The first week. We knew that something was wrong. When her teacher said to us at the first week conference. You know in all my years of teaching. Which was sixteen years. I've never had a child like Matilda. You know, sometimes somebody can say this about your kid, and you think, wow, that's amazing. But in our case, we knew it wasn't very good. She said, you know, she mended. It and said, maybe boys, but not girls. And we said, oh, all right. Okay. What's up gender bias? But we had to listen to what she had to say she presented us with an index card that was clearly matilda's handwriting. That said you're pretty short little for a second grader. Which I thought was sort of alarming until I realized that it was actually written to a little boy. And I thought she's flirting. I did that until I was well into my thirties. You know? But then there were other things that we really couldn't ignore. She told one girl that she had a pretty awful name. But that she could change it when she turned eighteen. And then and then there were other incidences, you know, when when she would get mad if he thought somebody was laughing at her she would throw sharp pencil at them or sometimes she would go up to their desk and just tear up their their work. So it was it was clearly a problem, and they would give in schools and public schools at least in Los Angeles. They do this thing called a reflection chart, and what it is. They tell the child to explain what they did. And why they did it and how they felt and then and then the next part is how the other child might have felt and that's to instill some kind of empathy, and what Mathilde would write in the space was, blah, blah, blah. And translated that's the eight year old version of q. So pontiac. My husband started to talk to her verged on pleading where we said Matilda this. This is your first year at the school. If you keep doing this, you won't have any friends and Matilda look that a straight in the eye, and she said, I don't need any friends. I don't want any friends. And this was very alarming to both of us. About a would say maybe a week went by it was probably about a week before Mathilde and Pontiac, and I both got hauled into the principal's office. And I can tell you that I never in my life had been inside of a principal's office only in a movie, in fact, there was a scene in in pretty in pink where I got called into the principal's office. And that was my only experience and the same with my husband. We were both such goody two shoes as kids and matilda's there with her feet up on the desk. And the principal excuses her from the office, and she talks with my husband and me, and she says matilda's a very bright child. She's very observant in my opinion. She's highly gifted she's very funny. But if she continues this mode of behavior, I'm afraid that people are going to see her as a bully. And I can't tell you what that word meant to me because you know, I basically made a career out of being the girl who stood up to bullies in movies, all those movies. I think they really spoke to people because because everybody's been bullied in one way in their life. But I was the girl who who stood up to them. And it really meant a lot to me and not only that, but I was actually bullied in my own life in seventh grade. I had this this bullied this eighth grader named Shirley Panini. That's not a real name. But it's really close. And I didn't even know who she was. She just showed up I would walk down the hall, and there should be in her little Dutch boy haircut, and she would say ringwald, I'm gonna kick your ass after school after school. I'm gonna kick your ass. And I had no idea who this girl was I just knew that she didn't like me for some reason. And she really scared me. And she scared me to the point where I told my parents that I wasn't going to go back to that school. They could drop me off at school, and I would wait until they left, and then I would leave. And I think my parents knew that I was serious because I left that school. So when I heard that we're bully connected to my daughter. I thought this is impossible. I know my daughter, and I know what a huge and sensitive and compassionate heart. She has I mean, this is a girl that when I put my father's teddy bear. I don't have very many things that belonged to my father. So this was very precious to me, I put my father's teddy bear in the washing machine and all the stuffing came out. But I didn't realize it. I opened the machine and all I saw was stuffing. And I thought that I'd killed my father's bear. And I was devastated, and I burst into tears and Matilda came running out and offered to empty her. Piggy Bank to get me another teddy bear because she could see how much it meant to me. I knew that I knew Matilda, and I knew that the school could not see into the heart of Mathilde, but I could and I needed to figure out what was wrong. So I went into this frenzy of self help books, I stayed up all night on Amazon. You know, getting getting books like your defiant child. Your Edison trait child, you're from the gifted child, and what to do when your child isn't have all the answers. And I just I did everything I could I went down this rabbit hole of child, therapists and child psychiatrist and educational therapist, even considered bio feedback anything to bring my lovely child. Back to us. One of the things that I decided to try was social skills class because it was recommended to me this class at at a college. And it seemed like a good idea, and I presented it to Matilda. And she said, no. And I said too bad you're going. So we were in traffic for a long time took us a long time to get there and Matilda, and I have this this deal where she gets to listen to one catch asong, and I get to listen to Ella Fitzgerald song. And then we have to listen to something that we both like and in this case, it was a show called radio lab. I don't know if many of you know, radio lab, but I like to call it this American life for science, and it's the show that really speaks to both of us. And this particular episode was about zoos and Matilda is a big animal lover, you know, she she really feels very comfortable in the company of animals and really cares about them. So I thought it would be a really good thing to listen to and this particular part of the show had to do with guerrillas and before the seventies guerrillas didn't have they were just in these concrete boxes in zoos, and they were slowly going out of their minds, and this one man took it upon himself to change all that and to to really give guerrillas the habitats that they needed ensues, and some I are listening to this. And they're describing this guerilla the first time, he sees sky in his life and everybody, you know, the zookeepers and the specialists in the architects, everybody is standing on the other side of the glass watching this guerilla, not knowing if the guerrillas just going to -absolutely lose his mind, but he looks up at the sky, and then he touches his hands to the grass, which is never felt in his life. And is closing his eyes. And he's feeling the wind on his for for the first time. And while I'm listening to this. I'm looking at my daughter in the back seat, and she's Mirroring everything that this guerrillas doing. She's looking up she's closing her eyes. She's feeling her face. She's touching the seat as though it's grass. And I realize then my daughter is not in her habitat. And asks her mother, I vowed that day. That no matter what I would find her habitat. I would find a way for her to thrive. And I can't tell you all the ways that I did it, but I pretty much made it my full time job this year. And a few weeks ago. I was on the playground watching Mathilde hang upside down on the apparatus used to call the jungle gym. But now, they call it the apparatus. She's hanging upside down with her legs locked girl. And this mother comes running up to me. And she says, Molly, Molly, you don't know me. But I need to talk to you about Mathilde. Oh my God. You have to ruin this moment. I'm watching really you have to talk to me about Mathilde. I said what what about Mathilde, and she said, I just want to tell you that my daughter Hannah loves your daughter, and I said, oh, really. Why? I love her. Why is she loved her? And she said Hannah loves her because she said that she stood up for her on the playground. And she wants to know if Matilda can come over for a play date. And so I told her that we would be happy to and we would be there with bells on. Thank you..

Matilda Matilda Mathilde Molly ringwald Los Angeles Carolina theatre neighborhood school pontiac North Carolina Durham principal Ponti writer executive Hannah Shirley Panini Ella Fitzgerald Piggy Bank Amazon educational therapist sixteen years
"neighborhood school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:00 min | 2 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're going to talk about mothers every year homework. Mixer clean for the day. So we hear stories about mothers, the active mothering all year, long them off. And in this hour. We're gonna play you some of our favorites. I story is from the actress and writer, Molly ringwald, she told in a show Carolina theatre in Durham, North Carolina. Here's Molly ringwald. Hi. So a couple years ago. My family. My husband Ponti, oh, and my seven year old daughter Matilda and our one year old twins move into a new house in Los Angeles. Which is in the best school district in Los Angeles. My daughter Matilda up into that point was was going to school in a very progressive. Montessori ish kind of school. It was very far away. She quite liked it. But everybody kept saying why don't you have your daughter go to this school? It's it's an amazing school. Everybody moves into this this area just to go to the school. So we thought about it and about after year we said to Matilda Matilda. What do you think about going to the neighborhood school? It's supposed to be really good. And she said, no. And so we thought about it. And you know about a week later. We asked her again, she said, no we kept asking her. She kept saying, no, no, no, no. But her father, and I decided we're parents and we're going to make an executive decision. And we said, yes. Mathilde kept saying no all the way up until she actually entered the second grade. But we figured you know, what she's young. She seven years old. She's going to get over it. She'll adjust. We all did right? The first week. We knew that something was wrong. When her teacher said to us at the first week conference. You know in all my years of teaching. Which was sixteen years. I've never had a child like Matilda. You know, sometimes somebody can say this about your kid, and you think, wow, that's amazing. But in our case, we knew it wasn't very good. She said, she amended it instead, maybe boys, but not girls. And we said, oh, all right. Okay. What's up gender bias? But we had to listen to what she had to say she presented us with an index card that was clearly matilda's handwriting. That said you're pretty short little for a second grader. Which I thought was sort of alarming until I realized that it was actually written to a little boy. And I thought she's flirting. I did that until I was well into my thirties. But then there were other things that we really couldn't ignore. She told one girl that she had a pretty awful name. But that she could change it when she turned eighteen. And then and then there were other incidences, you know, when when she would get mad thought somebody was laughing at her. She would throw sharp pencil at them or sometimes she would go up to their desk and just tear up their their work. So it was it was clearly a problem, and they would give in schools and public schools at least in Los Angeles. They do this thing called a reflection chart, and what it is. They tell the child to explain what they did. And why they did it and how they felt and then and then the next part is how the other child might have felt and that's to instill some kind of empathy, and what Mathilde would write in the space was, blah, blah, blah. And translated that's the eight year old version of q. So ponti. My husband started to talk to her and verged on pleading where we said Matilda. This is your first year at the school. If you keep doing this, you won't have any friends and Matilda look a straight in the eye. And she said, I don't need any friends. I don't want any friends. And this was very alarming to both of us. About a would say maybe a week went by it was probably about a week before Mathilde and Pontiac, and I both got hauled into the principal's office. And I can tell you that I never in my life had been inside of a principal's office only in a movie, in fact, there was a scene in in pretty in pink where I got called into the principal's office. And that was my only experience and the same with my husband. We were both such goody two shoes as kids and matilda's there with her feet up on the desk. And the principal excuses her from the office, and she talks with my husband and me, and she says matilda's a very bright child. She's very observant in my opinion. She's highly gifted she's very funny. But if she continues this mode of behavior, I'm afraid that people are going to see her as a bully. And I can't tell you what that word meant to me because I basically made a career out of being the girl who stood up to bullies in movies, all those movies. I think they really spoke to people because because everybody's been bullied in one way in their life. But I was the girl who who stood up to them. And it really meant a lot to me and not only that, but I was actually bullied in my own life in seventh grade, I had this. This bully eighth grader named Shirley Panini. That's not a real name. But it's really close. And I didn't even know who she was. She just showed up I would walk down the hall, and there should be in her little Dutch boy haircut, and she would say ringwald, I'm going to kick your ass after school after school. I'm gonna kick your ass. And I had no idea who this girl was I just knew that she didn't like me for some reason. And she really scared me. And she scared me to the point where I told my parents that I wasn't going to go back to that school. They could drop me off at school, and I would wait until they left, and then I would leave. And I think my parents knew that I was serious because I left that school. So when I heard that we're bully connected to my daughter. I thought this is impossible. I know my daughter, and I know what a huge and sensitive and compassionate heart. She has I mean, this is a girl that when I put my father's teddy bear. I don't have very many things that belonged to my father. So this was very precious to me, I put my father's teddy bear in the washing machine and all the stuffing came out. But I didn't realize I opened the machine and all I saw was stuffing. And I thought that I'd killed my father's bear. And I was devastated, and I burst into tears and Matilda me came running out and offered to empty her. Piggy Bank to get me another teddy bear because she could see how much it meant to me. I knew that I knew Matilda, and I knew that the school could not see into the heart of Mathilde, but I could and I needed to figure out what was wrong. So I went into this frenzy of self help books, I stayed up all night on Amazon. You know, getting getting books like your defiant child. Your Edison trait child, you're from the gifted child, and what to do when your child doesn't have all the answers. And I just I did everything I could I went down this rabbit hole of child, therapists and child psychiatrists and educational therapist, even considered biofeedback anything to bring my lovely child. Back to us. One of the things that I decided to try to show social skills class because it was recommended to me this class at at a college. And it seemed like a good idea, and I presented it to Matilda. And she said, no. And I said too bad you're going. So we were in traffic for a long time took us a long time to get there and Matilda, and I have this this deal where she gets to listen to one cash asong, and I get to listen to one Ella Fitzgerald song. And then we have to listen to something that we both like and in this case, it was a show called radio lab. I don't know if many of you know, radio lab, but it depends Hasek show. I like to call it this American life for science, and it's the show that really speaks to both of us. And this particular episode was about zoos and Matilda is a big animal lover, she she really feels very comfortable in the company of animals and really cares about them. So I thought it would be a really good thing to listen to and this this particular part of the show had to do with guerrillas and before the seventies guerrillas didn't have they were just in these concrete boxes in zoos, and they were slowly going out of their minds, and this one man took it upon himself to change all that and to to really give guerrillas the habitats that they needed ensues and some are listening to this. And they're describing this guerilla the first time he sees sky in his life and everybody zookeepers and the specialists in the architects, everybody is standing on the other side of the glass watching this guerilla, not knowing if the guerrillas just going to absolutely lose his mind, but he looks up at the sky, and then he touches his hands to the grass, which is never felt in his life. And he's closing his eyes. And he's feeling the wind on his for for the first time. And while I'm listening to this. I'm looking at my daughter in the back seat, and she's Mirroring everything that this guerrillas doing. She's looking up she's closing her eyes. She's feeling her face. She's touching the seat as though it's grass. And I realize then my daughter is not in her habitat. And asks her mother, I vowed that day. That no matter what I would find her habitat. I would find a way for her to thrive. And I can't tell you all the ways that I did it, but I pretty much made it my full time job this year. And a few weeks ago. I was on the playground watching Mathilde hang upside down on the apparatus used to call it the jungle gym. But now, they call it the apparatus. She's hanging upside down with her legs locked girl. And this mother comes running up to me. And she says, Molly, Molly, you don't know me. But I need to talk to you about Mathilde. Oh my God. You have to ruin this moment. I'm watching really you have to talk to me about Mathilde. I said what what about Mathilde, and she said, I just want to tell you that my daughter Hannah loves your daughter, and I said, oh, really. Why? I love her. Why is she love her? And she said. Hannah loves her because she said that she stood up for her on the playground. And she wants to know if Matilda can come over for a play date. And so I told her that we would be happy to and we would be there with bells on. Thank you..

Matilda Matilda Mathilde Molly ringwald Los Angeles principal neighborhood school North Carolina Ponti Durham writer executive Hannah Shirley Panini Ella Fitzgerald Piggy Bank Hasek educational therapist Amazon Pontiac sixteen years
"neighborhood school" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"We're also on Twitter at Leland show. Let's see Email here from mismatch from the West End. She signs her emails. She says if the children were going to a neighborhood school, and the mother doesn't have a car wouldn't they have to walk or catch a bus in their neighborhood school. Although I don't like busing, I'm sure they would have to cross the street at some time or another whether or not they were being bussed. This whole lawsuit is confusing. I don't disagree as I said lawsuit. I whether the lawsuit justified or not remains to be seen. I'm not sure it is the the point I was making in the monologue in the first app. I segment was that the lawsuit highlight certain facts in the story highlight the problem of busing what I'm catching onto here. And what I am focusing on. Is these kids have an hour commute every day? That takes an enormous amount of toll on kids over the course of a school year. And it takes a lot of time away, and it and it shows that when you're bussing your kid across town. It's not so much about kids having to walk to school in the morning. I'm not sure the lawsuit is justified kids act to walk to school. If you had a neighborhood school miss Mary brings up a good point. You're walking to school when I was a kid. I walked the school. For when I was in high school. Our school was across the street when I was in elementary school. It was a mile away, and I had to walk most of it. But I cut through neighborhoods and do one ladies yard. She didn't like it very much when that happened. But anyway, beside the point it's that they're commuting for an entire hour. And it also means the parents can't get two parent teacher meetings and things like that very easily. And it just shows that there's a disadvantaged when kids are having to go through that. So whether the lawsuit is justified eight, I don't know. But it points out some of the facts that are coming to light points out the problem. And as I said, how can you make the argument that somehow putting a kid on an hour bus when they could be at school and five minutes is a better advantage a better opportunity for them. You know, I think if you have a school that so bad that it's at it's more advantages for the child to travel for an hour, then you need to fix that school. That's so bad. And there's no excuse for not fixing that school. That's so bad. But. Dave, you asked a question who profits from us continuing to do this asinine thing. There has to be a reason why it's still here. It's a failed social experiment. People still live, unfortunately, largely segregated it hasn't fixed that well. And I think I think who profits our politicians because they keep people divided in mad and say we have to do this. We have to do this policy because XYZ and it prophets them to keep people in the positions that they're in as opposed to getting out of the way. So that people can achieve their full potential that to prophets in my opinion. All right. This father is gonna profit bigly. I think that a word that's a Trump. It is now ugly big huge, huge huge. It forces children to answer their parents texts. Thank you. Yeah. So have you had this problem? Yeah. Here's what happens whatever the kid now. My wife's kids are twenty seven and thirty three. So they're not kid kids. Right. But they're still are correct. Okay. So if they want something, and you don't answer within thirty seconds. Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma right, right? And when they're around even when you're in the room with them their phone is two inches from their face at all times. Right. So you can ask an important question. What type of coming over Saturday cricket's really trying to plan dinner? What time you coming over Saturday? The next day. Crickets, answer your damn mom. I hear you own is right here. I'm not sure. At the time though. I'm not sure this app helps you though because you have adult kids who are not adulting. Yeah. So you can't control their foul. That's the problem. This father has young kids that aren't ready to adult yet. And he controls their phone. See he pays their phone Bill, and he's tired of his kids ignoring his tax messages. So. So now there's an app for that. The app is called reply ASAP is built by a guy named Nick Herbert, and it allows parents to send a message that locks kits phones they replied to the message. This is brilliantly evil. So your kids, you know, you picture at your kids sitting at Starbucks or someplace with all their friends. And of course, they're not talking to each other their heads are buried in their phone apps, and they're talking to somebody on social media that they're not actually physically wet. So you have a table full of kids and they're all sitting around in their heads buried in. And they're playing their video games that are doing their things in dammit here comes dad's tax in it. It takes over the phone, and it will let go of the phone until until your kid actually responds to your tax. He said, I just found that my messages and calls to get missed quite a lot because he got my son got a lot of social media notifications that in your solve it. Well, he's trying to be all nice about it. Because he's. His son helped him develop it or whatever. But I'm like, no your kid was ignoring your tax. That's what was happening. Mom and dad are not important. Gotta get this social media post up. He didn't miss any text from the girl that he likes his best, buddy. But missed yours coincidence. I think not. With games abs-. According to see TV games apps videos, serving his constant distractions. Mr. Herbert wanted to find a new way to make sure that whenever he had an important message would actually not fall by the wayside. So through the app users can send a message that will be displayed over top of anything the recipient may be doing on their phone. And it sounds an alarm on the phone even if it's set to silence. I loved it. That's awesome. Your kids your kids sitting at a party making out with his girlfriend got the phone on silent. Man. Twenty. Now, if you're coming home for dinner on time, that's right? I almost had the hook figured out. Yeah. She's all who's that. Yeah. Mood kale mood through the app. Users can send a message will be displayed over top of anything the recipient can then choose to reply or snooze it for like a couple of minutes. But it comes back and reenact the phone, and then sends the message back and lets the sender. No, the recipients locate mess with them if I had this. Oh, I would too there. Always somebody don't like what's your favorite color. That's why. Seriously. That's why it's so brilliantly evil. What's your favorite movie? I don't want her guy. So like, you could send her you could you could send her pictures of other guys that you would rather her be dating, and it would keep coming your phone while she's with him. I mean, that would be awesome. There's so many ways you could be evil with this. As soon as the message is viewed the app also notifies the center their message has been saying, and it tells the center where the phone is that you've just sent a message to so now, you know, where your kids that when they don't reply to your tax. You don't like it by own phone pay for your job and pay for your own phone? I love this app is the greatest thing ever. All right. You can Email me Leland W H, AS dot com. Coming up also a guy fell asleep or excuse me. He well, he kind kinda was he took Ambien and then accidents proposed his girlfriend. He didn't remember thing. He wakes up. She's got an engagement ring on what NewsRadio eight four. W H ASU citizens Union Bank. Bloomberg money update right now. You in Stokes around. But some of the early gains due to ongoing political and economic uncertainties the Dow is up one hundred five point cents and P five hundred up fine, the.

Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma Nick Herbert Twitter West End Starbucks W H ASU citizens Union Bank Stokes Mary Dave Bloomberg thirty seconds five minutes two inches
"neighborhood school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:11 min | 2 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To meet teachers demands, and they want more time to talk negotiations went on for two years before this strike joining us to discuss it here at KPCC is education reporter, Kyle Stokes. Kyle welcome too good to be with you. Kyle. Could we start with that protest? They were chanting UT LA United teachers, Los Angeles. They can borrow the UCLA chant. Although there are USC grads among them. So that would be of of of issue for them. I'm sure UCLA's the teacher's union the teacher's union. They represent more than thirty thousand teachers as well as other at kind of teacher, educator tight positions like librarians, which have their own special certification, nurses, as well as counselors and psychiatric social workers and a lot more than just teachers are encompassed by this union. What exactly is the union asking for? Well. So the the big issue right now is class size. They want class size reduction, which is a very complicated issue in the context of these negotiations because there is this language in the contract that has proven very toxic to this whole process. And it says that L A USDA can basically raise class sizes whenever it wants more or less in order to save money. If. The school district LA USD can raise classes to save money. The reason that this exists is because the district has gone through it and still is going through a lot of financial challenges enrollment is declining. That means funding is declining pension costs are growing and other squeezes. That are making it difficult to balance the budget. And so there is contract language that says if we need to will raise class sizes. So the district has promised to at least for one year spend one hundred and thirty million dollars on targeted reductions to class sizes in certain grades in schools. But the union says this doesn't really mean much so long as there is this language in the contract that says we can raise class sizes whenever we want. How do we take this money that you're willing to spend on class sizes if a that money could go away and be you could just decide to ignore it? Anyway, so they want more of structural fix for class sizes something that's not like a stopgap. I mean, it's both. I mean, it is both structural in terms of like this. This regulatory piece in the contract. They it's kind of like a safety valve. And they want the safety valve closed off basically for good. The other thing is that they do want to spend more. They want to lower class sizes from the current say twenty seven students in kindergarten through third grade and a lot of schools they want that that number reduced. And there are some classes that are as high as forty students plus forty plus students in certain classes, and they want those reduced to how much support Kyle does this strike have overall in the union does it seem like the majority of teachers were ready for this was a little more split. I do think that there's a lot of support in the union for this strike. There's been a lot of I think that this union feels very much be set and beleaguered by different waves of education reform that have come through Los Angeles in recent years. This is a district that has seen charter schools proliferate everywhere charter schools being public schools that also receive public money, but they also basically compete with district students for funding. And for for enrollment. And so that's been a big pressure. There have been different succeeding waves of superintendents. A lot of turn a turnover at the top of the district with each of each their sort of own idea of how to manage. What's the vision? What's the purpose of the Los Angeles unified school district in this community? That's been changing so much. And I think that there's there was a lot of readiness when it came down to it, you know, for this strike because now they distrust the current superintendent, and what he intends to do when you say what the purpose of the district is is in the purpose of a school district to educate children. I also I guess in that sense in Los Angeles. Parents have a lot of choice about where they send their kids to school. And that's just a reality. There's a large percentage of parents who their children into the private school system because it's becoming much more difficult to afford to live here. But if you can't afford to live here, you probably have the resources to to consider private school. Now, I'm talking about a specific subset. You know, the the upper end. End of the demographic scale, of course, now for everybody else. They're they're including a wide swath of the middle and even upper middle class. You know, there is this choice about where do you send your kids to school charter schools have been this growing option, and each sort of has their own specific, programmatic, focus, you have charter schools that are focused on the arts and science and math and the district. The the the LA unified school district has its response to this in programs like magnet schools and other programs have choice that have a lot of these same programmatic themes, but in that, you know, you sort of have this lost in the middle. You know idea of what happens to the neighborhood school? What happens to the default public school of your choice? And when choice becomes such a factor for parents. I think that it sort of raises this question, what is the LA unified school district four? I think that that anxiety is part of the reason that these teachers feel like we need to stand up for what we believe this should be for. We're speaking to KPC K twelve education reporter, Kyle Stokes. Let me get to one quick voicemail. Got from a listener on the other side of the country back in our home base in DC. Here's what they left in our inbox. I'm delay Bian in Washington. DC calling about the California teachers strike, please help me understand how California which according to its former governor Jerry Brown has the sixth largest economy in the world is unable to pay teachers a living wage and has small classes. California used to be in the top core tile in the United States in spending. It's now in the bottom core, title, what has caused this dreadful change in education quality for the students of Los Angeles such that the teachers need to go on strike when there is all this wealth in that state delivery, and thanks for sharing your question with us before we add another voice to our conversation. Call what would you say to her the answer in short is proposition thirteen there's a property tax cap in California that that essentially makes it very difficult for school districts to collect revenue from property taxes, which across the country is a very key source of education funding, and after proposition thirteen passed the abaya voter the voters in in thousand nine seventy eight cow, California school funding, essentially collapsed and since then they've been playing catch up. Can we just make it clear, by the way prop thirteen is not just the third rail of California politics? The third through eighth three no one wants to handle prop thirteen and knows that if they touch it. They're going to get hurt. But there is an effort to reform prop thirteen that that could be coming in future years valid, and and forgive me for not knowing the exact year when this is coming, but there's a talk about removing some of the restrictions of that property tax cap from commercial properties and potentially having them pay a higher property tax Bill that would support education, let's zoom out a little bit. Because last year brought some similar protests in West Virginia, Oklahoma and elsewhere. So we should look at how this strike in LA differs, and whether we're likely to see more walkouts this year joining us from our home base in Washington is lily escalation Garcia. She is the president of the national Education Association any as the nation's largest union for public school educators. Lily, welcome to the program. I'm so thrilled to be here. I was in that pouring rain with our with our teachers and support staff yesterday. What did you take away from being in the pouring rain? Hopefully didn't get. This nagging cough that you're going to be hearing all through this interview. I'm telling you, I was in West Virginia to I was in Oklahoma and Arizona, these are all our any a affiliates. We represent three million educators across the country, and here you had very different situations from West Virginia. Where they've really suppressed union strength to UT LA where they are. They are they are the powerbrokers in in so much of the decisions in in California. But what I saw was identical where I went and talked to some of the teachers holding those picket signs and ironically, two people one in West Virginia one in Los Angeles said the same thing that I am not the kind of person that holds a picket sign this is just not made. But I know that if I don't take a stand that nothing will change it's getting worse every year where we're we're seeing fewer and fewer resources. They're cutting back on school nurses counselors. I talk to people who had over forty kids in their classroom, Utah sixth grade teacher. I had thirty nine kids one year. Anyone that tells you that class size doesn't matter has never faced has never rang. Three. And and hear the passion the commitment and the energy. These were not depressed people these were not people going. Oh, dear. What are we gonna do? They were people who said we need a plan and we're going over the superintendents head. We're taking this to the public. We're taking this to the parents where people inside, you know, regular bureaucratic negotiations were they can be ignored talk to the hand the public thaw that and and they're watching the six o'clock news. They're listening to a radio program like this, and they're going what would make someone do this radio program. Posture just one second, and I do want to talk more about where this goes from here when we continue our conversation with any president lily escalation Garcia and KPCC's Kyle Stokes later on. We'll get a preview of some of Hollywood's big projects in two thousand nineteen with KPCC's. John horn. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A from W A, M, U and NPR. Support comes.

Los Angeles Kyle Stokes LA unified school district California KPCC West Virginia lily escalation Garcia UCLA reporter USC LA United president Oklahoma neighborhood school Joshua Johnson Washington USDA California school national Education Association
"neighborhood school" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:37 min | 2 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Joshua Johnson. Visiting KPCC southern California Public radio the last time teachers in Los Angeles went on strike. Paula Abdul had hit on the billboard charts. Now thirty years later. Tens of thousands of teachers are being straight up about their demands. Again, they've walked out of their classrooms to demand larger paychecks, smaller, classes, and better resources teachers are marching and on the picket line despite the rain. The Los Angeles unified school district is the nation's second largest district officials say they cannot afford to meet teachers demands, and they want more time to talk negotiations went on for two years before this strike joining us to discuss it here at key PCC is education reporter, Kyle Stokes. Kyle welcome to one A need to be with you. We also welcome your questions thoughts and stories about this teacher strike, or if you have been party to another strike in another part of the country. What your thoughts are on this labor action? One A W A M U dot org. You can comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at at one. A Kyle we start with that protest. They were chanting UT LA United teachers, Los Angeles. They can borrow the UCLA chant. Right. Although there use USC grads among them. So that would be of of of issue for them. I'm sure as the teacher's union, the teachers union they represent more than thirty thousand teachers as well as other edited kind of teacher educator type positions like librarians, which have their own special certification, nurses, as well as counselors and psychiatric social workers and a lot more than just teachers are encompassed by this union. What exactly is the union asking for? Well. So the the big issue right now is class size. They want class size reduction, which is a very complicated issue in the context of these negotiations. You know, because there is this language in the contract that has proven very toxic to this whole process. And it says that L A USD can basically raise class sizes whenever it wants more or less in order to save money. The school district LA USD can raise classes save money. The reason that this exists is because the district has gone through it and still is going through a lot of financial challenges enrollment is declining. That means funding declining pension costs are growing and other squeezes. That are making it difficult to balance the budget. And so there is contract language that says if we need to will raise class sizes. So the district has promised to at least for one year spend one hundred and thirty million dollars on targeted reductions to class sizes in certain grades in schools. But the union says this doesn't really mean much so long as there is this language in the contract that says we can raise class sizes whenever we want. How do we take this money that you're willing to spend class sizes if a that money could go away and be you could just decide to ignore it? Anyway, so they want more of a structural fix for class sizes something that's not like a stopgap. I mean, it's both. I mean, it is both structural at in terms of like this. This regulatory piece in the contract. They it's kind of like a safety. Valve, and they want this safety valve closed off basically for good. The other thing is that they do want to spend more. They want to lower class sizes from the current, you know, say twenty seven students in kindergarten through third grade and a lot of schools they want that that number reduced, and there are some classes that are as high as forty students plus forty students in in certain classes, and they want those reduced to I should note, by the way, we did invite the Los Angeles unified school district L USD to join us on the program. We didn't get a response by airtime. But of course, our invitation still stands how much support Kyle does. This strike have overall in the union does it seem like the majority of teachers were ready for this was a little more split. I do think that there's a lot of support in the union for this strike. There's been a lot of I think that this union feels very much be set and beleaguered by different waves of education reform that have come through Los Angeles in recent years. This is a district that has seen charter schools, proliferate everywhere. Charter. Schools being public schools that you know, also receive public money, but they also basically compete with district students for funding. And and for for enrollment. And you know, said that's been a big pressure. There have been different succeeding waves of superintendents. A lot of turn a turnover at the top of the district with each of each their sort of own idea of how to manage. You know, what's the vision? What's the purpose of the Los Angeles unified school district in this community? That's been changing so much. And I think that there's a there was a lot of readiness when it came down to it, you know, for this strike because now they distrust the current superintendent, and what he intends to do when you say what the purpose of the district is is in the purpose of a school district to educate children. I will also I guess in that sense in Los Angeles. You parents have a lot of choice about where they send their kids to school. And that's just a reality. There's a a large percentage of parents who opt their children into the private school system because it's becoming much more difficult to afford to live here. But if you can't afford to live here, you probably have the resources to to consider private school. Now, I'm talking about a specific subset. You know, the the upper end. The demographics scale, of course, now for everybody else. They're they're including a wide swath of the middle and even for middle class. You know, there is this choice about where do you send your kids to school charter schools have been this growing option and each has their own specific, programmatic, focus, you have charter schools that are focused on the arts and science and math now the district. The the the LA unified school district has its response to this in programs like magnet schools in other programs have choice that have a lot of these same programmatic themes. But in that, you know, you sort of have this lost in the middle. You know idea of what happens to the neighborhood school? What happens to the default public school of your choice? And when choice becomes such a factor for parents. I think that it sort of raises this question, what is the LA unified school district four? I think that that anxiety is part of the reason that these teachers feel like we need to stand up for what we believe this district should be for. We're speaking to KPCC K twelve education reporter, Kyle Stokes. We would love to hear from you to one a. W A M U dot org show what you know about working conditions for teachers, especially if you've been through something similar, you could also comments on our Facebook page or tweet us at one A. Let me get to one quick voicemail. We got from a listener on the other side of the country back at our home base in DC. Here's what they left in our inbox. I'm ben. In Washington DC, calling about the California teachers strike, please help me understand how California which according to its former governor Jerry Brown has the sixth largest economy in the world is unable to pay its teachers a living wage and has small classes. California used to be in the top core tile in the United States and spending. It's now in the bottom. Core tile, what has caused this dreadful change in education quality for the students have Los Angeles such that the teachers need to go on strike when there is all this wealth in that state delivery, and thanks for sharing your question with us before we add another voice to our conversation. Call what would you say to her the answer in short is proposition thirteen there's a property tax cap in California. That that essentially makes it very difficult for school districts to collect revenue from property taxes, which across the country is a very key source of education funding, and after proposition thirteen passed the abaya voter the voters in in nineteen seventy eight cal-, California school funding, essentially collapsed and since then they've been playing catch up. Can we just make it clear, by the way prop thirteen is not just the third rail of California politics like third through eighth thrill of California. No, one wants to handle prop thirteen and knows that if they touch it. They're going to get hurt. But there is an effort to reform prop thirteen that that could be coming in a future years ballot. And forgive me for not knowing the exact your when this is coming. But there's a talk about removing some of the restrictions of that property tax cap from commercial properties and potentially having them pay a higher property tax Bill that would support education, let's zoom out a little bit. Because last year brought some similar protests in West Virginia, Oklahoma and elsewhere. So we should look at how this strike in L A differs, and whether we're likely to see. More walkouts this year. Joining us from our home base in Washington is lily escalation Garcia. She's the president of the national Education Association any as the nation's largest union for public school educators. Lily, welcome to the program. I'm so thrilled to be here. I was in that pouring rain with our with our teachers and support staff yesterday. What did you take away from being in the pouring rain? Hopefully, you didn't get to this nagging cough that you're going to be hearing all through this interview. I'm telling you, I was in West Virginia to I was in Oklahoma and Arizona, these are all our any a affiliates. We represent three million educators across the country, and here you had very different situations from West Virginia where they've really suppressed union strength to UT LA where they are. They are they are the powerbrokers. In in so much of the decisions in in California. But what I saw was identical where I went and talked to some of the teachers holding those picket signs and ironically, two people one in West Virginia one in Los Angeles said the same thing they said, I am not the kind of person that holds a picket sign this is not made. But I know that if I don't take a stand that nothing will change it's getting worse every year. We're we're we're seeing fewer and fewer resources. They're cutting back on school nurses counselors. I talked to people who had over forty kids in their classroom. I'm Utah sixth grade teacher, I had thirty nine kids one year anyone that tells you that class size doesn't matter has never faced has never rang. Exactly. And and hear the passion the commitment and the energy. These were not depressed people these were people going. Oh, dear. What are we going to do? They were people who said we need a plan, and we're going over the superintendents had we're taking this to the public. We're taking this to the parents where people inside, you know, regular bureaucratic negotiations were they can be ignored talk to the hand the public thaw that and and they're watching the six o'clock news. They're listening to a radio program like this, and they're going what would make someone do this radio program. Just one second. I do wanna talk more about where this goes from here when we continue our conversation with any president lily escalating Garcia and KPCC's Kyle Stokes later on. We'll get a preview of some of Hollywood's big projects in two thousand nineteen with KPCC's. John horn. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A from W A, M, U and NPR..

Los Angeles LA unified school district California Kyle Stokes Facebook Los Angeles unified school Joshua Johnson West Virginia reporter Paula Abdul Washington KPCC Lily president PCC Oklahoma USC UCLA neighborhood school
 Netflix Picks Up Madam CJ Walker Series from Octavia Spencer and LeBron James IGN Entertainment

Programming

02:22 min | 3 years ago

Netflix Picks Up Madam CJ Walker Series from Octavia Spencer and LeBron James IGN Entertainment

"Buy specifically over Columbus Day weekend and finally once the school year is up and running it's a really, good tip from experts to actually pack your kid's lunch. Can save you a lot of money in the long run reporting. Live Olisa, Donovan RTD six Eliza thank you for those temps will most, IBS students don't go back to school until August six for the district's innovation network schools do head back to class this week with some of them starting today we're going. To tell you who those are students attend Ending. Edison school of the. Arts Purdue polytechnic high school and Thomas Greg neighborhood school they go back this morning and then tomorrow even Avon Dale meadows middle school starts, off the school year on. Wednesday it's the first day for. Kids going to cold spring school in urban act academy school fourteen and if you are sending the kids out to the bus stop today, they might want to bring that umbrella, along Todd absolutely you're going to need that umbrella off and on throughout the course, of the day today so you need it during all day parts here morning afternoon. And into the evening hours so make sure you have it handy. Not going to be dealing with any real heavy rainfall and severe weather. But these, showers will just continue to stream through at, times and here's where we stand right now and you notice most essential Indiana dealing with. Some showers there's some spots where there's no rain falling but still, probably a pretty. Damn feeling and then across the state line in Illinois there's a pretty good batch of rain that'll be sliding here in. Central Indiana as we work our way throughout the day so here are rain, chances from start to finish throughout the course of this This Monday nearly, one hundred, percent here. To the morning commute then as we go throughout. The course of the remainder of the day those rain chances you see are straight with us. Through the eleven o'clock hour and they continue into your Tuesday we'll talk, more about the rest of the work week here, coming. Up in just a few minutes all right Todd thank you a big announcement from net. Flicks it's wanting a series about an Indianapolis icon it will tell the story of Madame. CJ Walker she created a line of, hair care products for African American women that made her a millionaire and, she also began the development of the historic Walker feeder on. Indiana avenue before her death in nineteen nineteen the series on Madame Walker will be produced by. TV Spencer and LeBron James with Spencer also, set to star in this show it. Will be based on the biography on our, own ground by Madame Walker's great great granddaughter Alenia bundles eight release date has not been announced coming up.

Indiana Madame Walker Avon Dale Meadows Middle Schoo Edison School Purdue Polytechnic High School Todd Thomas Greg Neighborhood Schoo IBS Spencer Indianapolis Olisa Donovan Rtd Illinois Alenia Eliza Lebron James
"neighborhood school" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on Code Switch

"Students she also wears the scarf the twenty three year special education teacher in san jose says the problems also started in the fall of two thousand sixteen i'd hear someone shout from outside my classroom you know you're working with isis or your terrorist others would say shoot her in motion like they were firing a machine gun she talked to the administrators and may mona help them put together a program to teach kids about inclusion and celebrating diversity so at the end of that school year was like wow like we made some progress and so this past fall she was excited to start teaching again she showed up early on september eleventh to get everything ready for a new unit on suspense she turned the corner to classroom and i find the windows and doors vandalized with words associated with terrorism you know isis it just very hateful words profanities and it was like shocked my mona went to the school again she says one person asked if she wanted to change schools your solution is essentially to get rid of me i'm not the issue here it's not even these students it's a fact that we haven't done a good enough job of educating our students i mail is on the principal at the middle school where may mona teaches says my mona turned her trauma into teachable moments for the kids she has such great courage to speak up against the injustice that she had experienced pacific ly hair at our school and school is you know school supposed to be a safe place for everybody right may mona says if this was happening in her school a place with a majority student body of color than it was happening other places too so when a seat on her neighborhood school board opened up she applied i'm the granddaughter of a refugee in orphan who fulfills his dreams in this country through an educational experience she was up against five other candidates and may mona was chosen over on also the constitution.

san jose principal mona twenty three year
"neighborhood school" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on The Daily

"As separate is made equal so as long as black facilities and wife associes are equal then that is actually legal my father pondered why why should we have to tell our children that they cannot go to their school in their neighborhood because their skin is black so linda brown father's oliver brown and oliver brown is a war veteran he is a welder and he is a pastor into pika and he's also very active in the local in aa c p so he is very aware that end up lacey pe had been bringing legal challenges to segregation in colleges and in professional schools and that they were now seeking to make a full frontal attack in k twelve education so they put a call out across the country for plaintiffs who are willing to challenge separate but equal in k twelve and that's how oliver brown to size that he is going to challenge that into pika he aligned with twelve other parents met with vocal end of lacey pe and their lawyer to make plans for each family to try and enroll their child in the white school near their home during september nineteen fifty and so all of brown takes linda brown at the beginning of the school year and takes her to her neighborhood school which is the white school and attempts to enroll her in that school and he is rejected and then that leads to the filing of the lawsuit and brown becomes one of five cases that will ultimately make up brown v board of education we lived in the calm of the hurricanes i gaze ing out at the storm around this and wondering how it all in.

oliver brown white school brown linda brown
"neighborhood school" Discussed on Israel Story

Israel Story

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on Israel Story

"Charter school that's like the first preference hiv harlem and district pre stretches across the city upper west side and harlem but we have students from outside of the district from the bronx from brooklyn m a amazingly from the east side of manhattan so we see kit from everywhere and of course were attracting students whose families want them to learn hebrew language but were also attracting students who just live in the neighborhood whose families want their kids to go to the neighborhood school and so you have this really intense mex which is fabulous appearance ever have a as we'll see some of the neighborhood parents kind of like a a moment of shark in which you like almegrahi was like a great school and you seem so lovely in the buildings fantastic and everything but they're studying what what language yeah i mean i think the 'cause it's in the name most people know when they come here that the hebrew is happening i think what am shocks parents the most is how quickly their kids learn it especially when they come here so young and having no background in and being able to you know sing in hebrew and and speaking hebrew i that's what i think shocks most families who don't have the hebrew background now the diversity of the population also extends of be no it's necessity religions et cetera it is is that at challenge to some people is that have you ever encountered people saying work you know i i don't know that i'm a hundred percent comfortable here or are people just very cool the concept i think ideally everybody is very cool with the contact by there have been certainly i would say healthy conflict that creates dialogue among the different groups of people in our school and that we've been working through together and so the schools like a a work in progress is what what what are what are some of the issues of these over example look we're a public charter school so we don't do anything religious but when the families were having.

harlem brooklyn manhattan hundred percent
"neighborhood school" Discussed on The Atlantic Interview

The Atlantic Interview

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on The Atlantic Interview

"Just a downstream problem of of housing segregation policies now go on i mean they're they're clearly linked but whether you have integrated communities a segregated communities we have school segregation in committees at our jansher finding the justification stopped at the schoolhouse door white communities want neighborhood school that their neighborhood schools white the neighbors schools black they want choice so the problem is clearly uh housing segregation is linked but also just becomes a convenient excuse the problem is it and i never used the phrase white supremacy because i feel like it's aware that people automatically discount as soon as you use it but that is the problem is is is uh we have a system where white people control the outcomes in the outcome that most white americans want is segregation and i don't mean the type of segregation that we saw in nineteen fifty four fifty five with george wallace standings whilst door i don't mean complete segregation i don't i don't think they're very many white americans who want entirely white schools would they do one is a limited number of light even richard curated diversity yes rate yet juckes language curated diversity is to me so i never talk about a school inequality in terms of diversity because i think it's a useless word i think it's aware that white people love um i think it's a word that means so when i say curated diversity it means white parents like a type of diversity with a certain type of kids so there's a career soldier black children majority that's right and they won't 'between black it is the percentage that you think wait lives acceptable white liberals.

george wallace
"neighborhood school" Discussed on Civics 101

Civics 101

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on Civics 101

"Efforts to reduce bullying restrain and inclusion and it affects where that federal funding goes for these programmes so when we're thinking about the department of education and the secretary of education those policies come out of that department there signed in the congress so while the department of ed makes very clear that they don't create curriculum and they don't create standards they do have a history of imposing what they think should be standards on local schools so what you saw with the common core initiative that was not federal legislation but suggestions for schools and you were incentivized with money for implementing those suggestions so with the new every students succeeds act it makes clear of that local schools should not be incentivised by the federal government for implementing their suggestions that should come at the local level right okay so the notre left behind that was two thousand one bush administration era act two thousand fifteen the obama administration passes every student succeeds act those had to go through congress they had to be voted on so it's not the secretary of education alone pushing for policy but maybe i guess influencing policy is that fair to say yes yes their checks and balances an an a process so does the secretary of education get to advise the president on public and private education you will it's primarily the public education and where the public funds go so when you look at the merging of the public and the private what we've seen recently is a push towards school vouchers and school choice so that is when federal money that goes into school can go to parents to choose the school that they want their child to go to right now you go to the school that's in your neighborhood school so every child should be educated in their neighborhood school regardless of their disability but if they're neighborhood school is failing school choice and vouchers would provide the choice for parents to take the money that would be going into that school and put it elsewhere and as we know the current secretary of education is very pro school choices at a fair assessment fair assessment yes.

secretary congress president department of education ed bush administration obama
"neighborhood school" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"I don't recommend it actually already early i you know me on a saturday night me and if it makes you feel better they tried to create something like that for detroit that would encompass encompass all of the detroit public schools and their charterers and then there would be one place that you went to enrol for everything rather than having to seek out each individual school building in the case of charters or the the public schools in the crease of detroit and it was turned down they said no so at least you had a 150page book at least a did no i i you know in advance degree right and i had so much trouble figuring out what her options even were in schooling like i can't even imagine most parents trended i suspect most burns just give up and don't try because it's so confusing i mean there's charter schools there's magnet schools there's magnet glocester schools there's selective enrollment schools are two different kinds of selective enrollment schools of the andrew school of rule there is your neighborhood school i mean it's just it's nominating like in all of that is just like with in the public school system in chicago just in the city of chicago vice sympathizer few sending your children to private because one two thousand when we lived in gran wrap it we love to living in city but decker the school district just wasn't great though there were pockets that were really awesome and it was really confusing to try to figure out which ones are there really awesome schools do i send him to a private school even though i am a pretty fierce public school advocate do i sent him to whatever elementary school because my husband and i are both at caters we can make up the difference there is a six grades who school do i wanna keep them in the public's belichick so he can go to the school at the zoo during six grade like it's mindboggling and that district does not even anything near the size of chicago public so i can i can imagine making the decision to send your kid.

detroit andrew school chicago belichick
"neighborhood school" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"I think it's been forgotten primarily because it's so difficult to deal with um it's as you say if you uh you know we pass the laws civil rights laws in the 1960s that prohibits it uh discrimination in hotels and the next that you could stay in any hotel um if law was enforced we prohibited the segregation of water fountains and once that was done you could drink from any water fat we prohibiting discrimination on buses in the next day you could certainly seats i could go on and on um even when we prohibited uh discrimination in schools you could attend your neighborhood school schools remained segregated not because uh segregation in schools remains because neighborhoods in which their locate segregate but if we hit segregation in in housing as we have done fair housing act prohibits ongoing discrimination in housing uh the next day uh the landscape looks pretty much the same south african americans are able to move and two neighborhoods but basically is is a talked about earlier uh the the communities that were created as white only suburbs now unaffordable to working class families so a lot more needs to be done but then simply prohibiting segregation and since it is such a difficult problem the deal with it's easier to forget about how it was created uh than to uh confront the unconstitutional system with its obligation to uh remedy it richard rothstein the book is the color of law a forgotten history of how our government segregated america we will put a link to that at majority dot fm camp thank you enough it's a fascinating uh uh uh a book in in in in in really obviously in incredibly important piece of history that uh people need to be aware of and i appreciate your coming on to talk about it.

the deal america civil rights south african richard rothstein
"neighborhood school" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on Here & Now

"Regardless of whether or not there is anyone at school to supervise them and make sure they're safe or they can leave their kids as young as eleven years old responsible to get themselves to school and you have to remember we have school choice here in california so not everybody attend the neighborhood school within walking distance but what are you say about all the science all the studies university of minnesota found students who sleep eight or more hours less likely to have depression or fall asleep and class both the american academy of pediatrics the american medical association say middle and high schools should start no earlier than 830 what do you say to that we definitely want our kids to arrive on campus rested and ready to learn there seems to be a mistaken impression out there that school boards are not qualified to weigh the scientific evidence and to make that the appropriate decision but in fact school boards routinely way this type of evidence when we are deciding what kinds of programmes and interventions to set up for our students and it's important to note that uh the studies that have been presented to our legislators here in california omit some pretty an important points for example they don't talk about the effect that exposure to the blue light from cell phones and tablets is having on circadian rhythms of teens nobody doubts that there is an issue of cell phones and kids and staying up late at night but as you know a clinical professor at the stanford center for sleep scientists in medicine raphael poiree o wrote a letter to your organization saying that you've misrepresented the study that was published in the journal nature in 2017 there is simply no controversy dr polio rates adolescence in the u s are sleep deprived it's affecting their health and he urges your group to reconsider your opposition to this bill isn't there a chance that something can be done.

california american medical association circadian rhythms clinical professor stanford center university of minnesota american academy of pediatrics eleven years
"neighborhood school" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"neighborhood school" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"A school assignment strategy that allows us to keep divers schools in our community um so there there are examples around the country but again no place is perfect and we still don't have sadly we don't have an urban community that you can point to and say every school in that community is thriving and and next selling and we have work to do to get there and it just so i don't overlooking kim we can your lynnwood a portfolio model is yeah so often a portfolio models that there is a mix of different school types are denver you've got charters and denver really views the charters as a part of the portfolio of options available to families you've also got district schools that are uh focus on a particular theme or a particular vision of what students are going to get my could do a language school where students might learn both english and spanish that kind of thing out so that's another set of options within the district and some portfolio districts you also have just traditional neighborhoods schools that serve the kids from particular geographic region and idea the portfolio models that you'll have this range of options they'll be flexibility for principles around how they design their school but everyone is ultimately accountable to a public entity for ensuring good results got it that you talked about that we don't have yet nurbin school district where every schools formerly well and that is often measured by invest escorts now there's been a lotta critique of us in aceh scores is not being the best measure of our kids learning as potentially being culturallybiased in a way the disadvantages kids of and kids from marginalised communities um and we both teacher so we have our own experience with tests what's your response what is the state stamina testing is there a an ideal that we should be working towards are we in like a holding pattern in there's something great coming next like what's the what yes we have a new federal education law under president obama signed in december of 2015 called ever succeeds act it's actually a reauthorization of the original elementary and secondary education act nineteen sixty five to civil rights law.

lynnwood denver obama nurbin school district aceh president civil rights