17 Burst results for "Negro Leagues Museum"

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

05:30 min | 5 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Narrated poem in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Negro leagues, and let's Keep this thing going. How did the celebrations? How did these homages come to be? Here's Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Museum. Here you are again. This was more out of this and we created. You know June 27th as you mentioned in the lead in what going to originally be this national day of recognition for the legally wick in itself. Was unprecedented. This is the first time that all major league teams were goingto Nicholas. And so we were going to do and in stadium, tip your cap to the live with fans and clear again and stadium. Well, when it became very apparent that this was going to take place on June 20 of it, and at that time we didn't even know win if and when baseball was coming back. And so just, you know, trying to find a way to salvage some of our plan. I came up with this crazy idea to do a virtual tip your cap to legally To see if we could give fans still maybe a few dignitaries and some current athletes former major leaguers, perhaps who would join us by either taking a photograph? Or posting a short video of them, tipping their cap to the little League. And as you well know, and sport, nothing more honorable that you could do it in a little tip of the cap. It is the ultimate show of respect. Well, when we launched this campaign on June 29th as you mentioned, we actually lost it with three US presidents on video tip your cap and President Obama, Clinton and Bush and 1/4 U. S. President. And Jimmy Carter, who said photograph tipping his cap because he certainly wanted to be included in this effort, and he's not in the greatest of health, but he wanted to be a part of this. A man that meant so much to us at the Negro League Baseball Museum, But then you look and there's Michael Jordan and Matic Jordan Magic Job Village in King, Bob Costas Stephen Colbert. Conan O'Brien. Hey, even a motel, the loose on the temptation for you where we were when we went into outer space literally. I got asked or not Chris Cassidy, who was aboard the international space shuttle to tip his cap. I knew then that we had something British It's awesome stuff. That was Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Museum, which is in Kansas City. If you haven't gone, I encourage you to. It took a little detour there on my way in Kansas City last year for the Vikings game, there's a week nine or 10 just truly remarkable place and you can just kind of feel the history there. Ondas Baseball has honored the 100th anniversary mean this is a long time coming. It's a special day. I just seeing some of the scenes around the You know around the league today with the shoes of the Marlins players wore that Don, that, you know they paved the way for them so they could play. You have Philly fanatic hanging out with the stars in of the Negro leagues in the outfield. They did cut outs, and they put them all on the chairs, and it was just really cool stuff. Andi. It's kind of it just kind of reminds you body honoring history as it happens in that, you know, 100 years ago, This was a city that we were in a situation where you know racially our country was a lot different for sure. But to be able to bring, you know, bring Passed back into a time Now, our racial climate even still, it's still kind of in this, you know, Period of flocks. I think it's you know. It's not to say it. It's it it it's it's fitting that we're celebrating the 100th year of it this year, amid kind of everything that's happened the last few months in terms of teams and you know sports in general, finding its voice amid social justice causes and causes against racial injustice. It's pretty awesome. I mean, you take a look around. You know, around baseball today, everybody was really into this, And I think it was a really cool initiative that baseball came up with. Yeah, Baseball always does a good job when celebrating Jackie Robinson Day. I think all the players really get into it, and they get to wear the 42 But this is different. This is 100 years. As you said, things looked so different and we're so different 100 years ago and how fitting that now in 2020 the 1/100 anniversary we're in the midst of a total reform of social justice and the way society operates when it looks at racism when it looks at people I'm different skin colors, beginning with the murder, of course of George Floyd and how from so many times after that, Now that we're having conversations, we're looking at situations differently. People are having their eyes opened in ways that I don't think we ever have before. And it's pretty remarkable, pretty wonderful. I love seeing all the players really get excited about it and celebrating it. And so much of it is just having a conversation and just talking about it. And so the fact that we got to do this on the radio show today is super cool on DH Super God to be a part of it. Josh Gibson, Oscar Charleston, Cool. Papa Bell Buck Leonard. Remember those names along with the Jackie Robinson, Satchel Paige and Ernie.

baseball Negro Leagues Museum president Bob Kendrick Negro League Baseball Museum Jackie Robinson Jimmy Carter Kansas City little League Conan O'Brien Chris Cassidy Papa Bell Buck Leonard goingto Nicholas Matic Jordan Magic Job Village Bob Costas Stephen Colbert US Marlins Josh Gibson Vikings
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

05:38 min | 5 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Wonderfully Narrated poem in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Negro leagues, and let's Keep this thing going. How did these celebrations? How did these homages come to be? Here's Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Museum. Roger. You're way again. This was more out of necessity, and we created. You know, June 27th as you mentioned in your lead in what going to originally be this national day of recognition. Or the Negro League, which in itself was unprecedented. This is the first time that all major league teams were goingto the legal eagle. So we were going to do and in stadium, tip your cap to the leagues with fans and clear again and stadium. Well, when it became very apparent that this was going to take place on June 20 of it, and at that time we didn't even know win if and when baseball was coming back. And so just, you know, trying to find a way to salvage some of our plan. I came up with this crazy idea to do a virtual tip your cap to legally To see if we could give fans still maybe a few dignitaries and some kind of athlete former major leaguers perhaps who would join us by either taking a photograph? Or posting a short video of them, tipping their cap to the little League. And as you well know, and sport, nothing more honorable that you could do in a simple tip of the cap. It is the ultimate show respect. Well, when we launched this campaign on June 29th as you know, we actually launched it with three US presidents on videotape in a cap and President Obama, Clinton and Bush and 1/4 U. S president And Jimmy Carter, who said photograph tipping his cap because he certainly wanted to be included in this effort, and he's not in the greatest of health, but he wanted to be a part of this. A man that meant so much to us that the Negro League Baseball Museum, but then you look and there's Michael Jordan and Magic Jordan. Magic Jobs. I'm sorry Village in King Bob Costas Peanut, Stephen Colbert. Conan O'Brien. Hey, even a motel loose from the temptations for you where we were when we went into outer space literally. I got asked or not Chris Cassidy, who was aboard the international space shuttle to tip his cap. I knew then that we had not British It's awesome stuff. That was Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Museum, which is in Kansas City. If you haven't gone, I encourage you to. I took a little detour there on my way. Ah, in Kansas City last year for the Vikings game, it was a week nine or tempo, just truly remarkable place and you can just kind of feel the history there. Ondas baseball has, you know, honored the 100th anniversary mean? This is a long time coming? It's a special day. I just seeing some of the scenes around the You know, around the league today with the shoes of the Marlins players wore that Don, that, you know they paved the way for them so they could play. Ah, you have the Philly fanatic hanging out with the stars in of the Negro leagues in the outfield. They did cut outs, and they put them all on the chairs, and it was just really cool stuff. Andi. It's kind of it just kind of remind you about the honoring history as it happens in that, you know, 100 years ago, This was a city that we were in a situation where you know racially our country was a lot different. For sure, but to be able to bring You know, bring Passed back into a time Now, our racial climate even still, it's still kind of in this, you know, Period of flocks. I think it's you know. It's not to say it. It's it it it's it's fitting that we're celebrating the 100th year of it this year, amid kind of everything that's happened the last few months in terms of teams and you know sports in general, finding its voice amid social justice causes and causes against racial injustice. It's pretty awesome. I mean, you take a look around. You know, around baseball today, everybody was really into this, And I think it was a really cool initiative that baseball came up with. Yeah, Baseball always does a good job when celebrating Jackie Robinson Day. I think all the players really get into it, and they get to wear the 42 But this is different. This is 100 years. As you said, things looked so different and we're so different 100 years ago and how fitting that now in 2020 the 1/100 anniversary we're in the midst of a total reform of social justice and the way society operates when it looks at racism when it looks at people From different skin colors, beginning with the murder, of course of George Floyd and how from so many times after that, Now that we're having conversations, we're looking at situations differently. People are having their eyes opened in ways that I don't think we ever have before. And it's pretty remarkable, pretty wonderful. I love seeing all the players really get excited about it and celebrating it. And so much of it is just having a conversation and just talking about it. And so the fact that we got to do this on the radio show today is super cool on DH Super glad to be a part of it. Josh Gibson, Oscar Charleston, Cool. Papa Bell Buck Leonard. Remember those names along with the Jackie Robinson, Satchel Paige and Ernie Banks of the Negro Leagues? There were many, many great players coming up the MBA playoffs.

Negro League baseball Negro Leagues Museum president Negro League Baseball Museum Bob Kendrick Jackie Robinson little League Conan O'Brien Roger Kansas City Chris Cassidy Papa Bell Buck Leonard Bob Costas Peanut US Marlins Josh Gibson Jimmy Carter Vikings
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

07:45 min | 5 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Shell pens. Total performance line. Major League Baseball is honoring the 1/100 anniversary of the Negro leagues. With all players, managers, coaches and umpires wearing a commemorative patch on their uniforms. The logo will also appear on bases. And the lineup cards. The celebration had originally been scheduled for June 27th but was postponed when the start of the season was also delayed because of the Corona virus. Joining us now on the shell pencil performance line is Bob Kendrick, president of Negro Leagues Museum, Bob This celebration, of course, had to change like we said, because of covert 19. How were you able to continue that? How successful do you think it's been so far? I tell you what, guys. It has been tremendously successful and really because of Corona virus. We had to come up with alternative strategies and approaches. Just from heightened interest in what was going to be a truly milestone year long celebration, But what we've seen, particularly from our friends over at Major League baseball And the Players Association. Is this just embracing of this milestone and perhaps everything that we've gone through with the corona virus pandemic and even the social unrest. That has been so prevalent in recent months as heightened and made this celebration that much more meaningful. Bob really appreciate your time. You know, you mentioned the MLB and the MLB Papa and what they've done. I mean, a $1,000,000 donation to the museum back in February, and you're talking about highlighting things also there, there have been three former presidents that took part and this celebration if people miss that and don't know what that was all about, tell, Tell everyone what happened there. Here you are again. This was more out of this institute and we created. You know, June 27th you mentioned in the lead in what going to originally be this national day of recognition. For the legalese, which in itself was unprecedented. This is the first time that all majorly change. We're going toe out of the vehicle, so we were going to do and in stadium, keep your cat to the League with fans and clear again and stadium. Well, when it became very apparent that this was going to take place on June 27th and at that time we didn't even know win if and when baseball was coming back. And so just, you know, trying to find a way to salvage some about plan. I came up with this crazy idea to do a virtual tip your cap to legally See if we could give fans still maybe a few dignitaries and sometimes athletes former major league is perhaps you would join us by either taking a photograph. Or posting a short video of them, tipping their caps to the belief that you both well know in our sport. Nothing more honorable that you could do in a simple tip of the cap. It is the ultimate show of respect. Well, when we launched this campaign on June 29th as you know, we actually lost it with three US presidents on video tip in a cap and President Obama, Clinton and Bush And 1/4 U. S president and Jimmy Carter, who said photograph tipping his cap because he certainly wanted to be included in this effort, and he's not in the greatest of health. But he wanted to be a part of this at a man that meant so much. The US at the Negro League Baseball Museum. But then you look and there's Michael Jordan and Magic Jordan. Magic Johnson. I'm sorry Village in King Bob Costas Feeling cold bath. Conan O'Brien. Hey, even a motel loose from the temptations for y'all Wait where we went into out of literally. They got us. We're not Chris Cassidy, who was aboard the international space shuttle to tip his cap. I knew then that we had something British It's amazing, just hearing the excitement in your voice. And just knowing how emotional that must have been for you and how exciting it wass. You know, the last couple of months Bob have been Really serious for our country and we've dealt with a lot of things and we've had a lot of conversations, especially when it comes to civil rights and social justice. How important is it for you to be able to have this moment and for the league to be honored in this way after the last several months of what we've been experiencing in this country? No. Honestly, I think this celebration couldn't come out about it. And I think probably reading to tip your cap campaign or as I call it a movement because it went beyond the campaign and turn into a movement. Was so special is because I think our country needed that We needed something that we could rally around. Things have been so divisive and here comes there's very Simple kind of campaign effort around the courageous athletes. Who forced the glories of history in the midst of it in glorious time in American history, and people rallied around this and now for us You know, a coaster institution. Negro League Baseball Museum to be at the forefront of these discussions to try and impart change and equality in our country because people have started to Rightfully embraced the Naval Museum for exactly what it is. It is a social justice museum. It is a civil like museum. It is just see through the lens of baseball, but more importantly, it is. Try up over that adversity. And so, yeah, the the campaign effort today's celebration through baseball. I don't know if the timing could have been better. He is Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, Missouri. And you mentioned all the support that you've had because of what's been going on in our country and this social justice, reform and movement, and part of that is not just I think, showing support but also, what we're seeing is a lot of people want to know more and want to educate themselves and do that. And and we know guys like Satchel Paige or Buck O'Neil, just a few of the names that helped pave the way But what are some other name? Is that we should be talking about in saluting as you celebrate this 100 year anniversary. You know, they say that I admire about legally They didn't care what color you were, and they didn't care what gender you work. So you know their motto. What can you play and if you could play you can play and so Spanish Lady athlete found home In an equally so today we should be talking about clear like the great Martin did he go? El maestro as he was nicknamed from Cuba. Played all nine positions played all nine of the well is the only baseball player in the history of our sport. Audience line into five different countries Baseball Hall of Fame in the Mexican, Cuban, Venezuelan, Dominican and in Cooperstown, and we should remember my friend the late great minimum and no so Also from Cuba, who called the Negro League home before he was able to transition and have what I believe is a hall of Fame worthy majorly career. But we should also remember those three pioneering women who.

Baseball Negro League Baseball Museum Negro Leagues Museum president Bob Bob Kendrick Negro League Baseball Hall of Fame Major League Bob Costas US MLB Cuba Michael Jordan Conan O'Brien Magic Johnson Chris Cassidy Naval Museum Players Association
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro League Baseball Museum, joins me and Bob Why did you pick the site where the museum is today? And would you like more space? I mean, is the room where we thought that when we first opened this museum in 97 the Negro Leagues Museum itself is 30 years old this year, So we're celebrating a milestone anniversary, too. But we moved into our current home and in November Of 1997. And so when you go from a one room office, now 10,000 square feet of space, it seems like it was a lot of room at that time is not anymore And there's a a growing me for the museum to expand and we're in the process of doing just that. As a matter of fact, the building that the Negro leagues were formed in the castle Y M C. A Is just right around the corner from where we operate that is going to become the future home of the Buck O'Neil Education and Research Center. So we're going full circle right back to the very building at Gae Birth to the story that we're now charged with preserving and we're going to create his education and research center. In memory of the late Great John Buckle Meal, the founder of this Great museum, a legendary Negro leader himself and perhaps the game's greatest ambassador. Let's do that. Go back and do a little time line here. Ah, I did a little homework here. But Ah, 1920 was the Organization of the Negro League, and it was a Andrew Rube foster that created it. And everybody. Everybody has a nickname right? And you didn't have a good man. If he didn't have a good nickname. They're probably meant you could play. That's right. But he was a player manager and then created and you talked about. Ah You know, around the corner where this took place there was they got together. There was eight owners correct eight teams, But, hey, a fish that he initially were they all black owners. With the exception of one J. L. Wilkinson, where the only way owner of the original eight Negro League franchise Wilkie, as we believe, you know, is effectively know. Wilkie owned the Kansas City Monarchs. Ah, one of the greatest baseball franchises. They're not in. Like baseball history, but in baseball history and jail, Wilkinson Was a 2000 man in the 1900. He did not see color. Yeah. Wilkerson made his entire living in black baseball and see initially route Foster was against anyway. Ownership. But he can't hear these great things about jail. Wilkinson and buckle. Neil would describe Joo Wilkinson in this manner. He says he was the first white man he ever met, who had no president said When there weren't enough hotel rooms to go around. They slept in the same big get. Wilkerson treated his players with great respect and admiration, and they all loved her. And so Wilkinson had a team called the All Nations even before the monarchs, and they were homogenous group of athletes made up a black, white, native American, Asian Hispanic. So he really didn't see color on DSO Wilkerson route relented. But then Wilkinson also had what room needed there, and that was access to stadiums as the rule religion. And Wilkinson would become secretary of the Negro Leagues bring in his Kansas City Monarchs. As a charter member. The Monarchs would go on to become one of these great They wanted a great baseball franchises of all time. There are those who will say that the Kansas City Monarchs for the New York Yankees Literally. Today, and others will say that the New York Yankees where the kid is a city man, monarch had one losing season in there almost 40 year existence in the Negro League. Does that mean they got to get all the good and the best of the best players in just saying Wilkinson seem to have a neck? For finding the kind of talent that fit into the way he wanted his team to play. And it just seemed always have great guy playing on a team, you know, and like I said he sent more players to the major leagues and any other Negro League franchise. They were a model organization. And I say this and I said they have no disrespect. Should my beloved Kansas City Royals Kansas City Mama, They're still the greatest baseball franchise this city has ever seen. You talked about was the will person that had access to stadiums and doing my homework here. It seemed like there was a tough Time trying to get stadiums to have these guys played in, and then sometimes they would actually play after let's say the Chicago White Sox left town or something or did their game you guys would play and there'd be more fans there watching that, Then they did the major league team. Well, you don't Dan is interesting, because that's one of the reasons that it took so long integrated game because there were a number of major league teams that were making money off the legally. So when the devil leaves Rene Yankee Stadium they filling up. My understanding is they're getting a percentage of the gate. And likely all of the concession. The same thing is your Congress Comiskey Park. And so yeah, making league Baseball was making money off the table. It's because very few of the Negro League owners have their own state. And for me, that's the fundamental difference between The major leave and the Negro League. Was money. Jim, all the major league owners had their own ballpark, for the most part. Very few legally, teams at their own stadium. You know you had In Memphis. The modern brothers had their own stadium in Pittsburgh guts. Greely had his own stadium in ST Louis or ST Louis, far as faras part, But you know, outside of that there were very few. Negro League teams that had their own stadium, so they were beholding to the major leagues because they were reading to ball front and then they had to set their schedule based on that major league schedule. And so, yeah, That was part of the reason. But you're right. They were outdrawing. Many major league teams did the money that did the money Then that was coming in? Because you guys have an all Star game to over 50,000 fans did that money then I know you. You know, you still being held up by the I guess the white owners of Major League baseball because they own the stadiums and if you want to come play here You're gonna pay my price my front so and Is it similar today to still today that they're still paying the price? Ah! But did that money residual do? They didn't drip down to the owners into the players Get to the players. So did the players signed contracts. Contra. Okay, did it state what they would make Then they would negotiate deals even for those East West on Star Gazer Man. They were only getting a, you know, And you know, In retrospect, they were only getting a small pitons of those resources that were coming from those All Star games. But you know a gay the owners have full control Bandit in amazingly And they had it in an equally and so the players were making a decent living playing the game. They look but you know, nobody was really getting rich. Now. The superstar Negro leaders, the Satchel Paige is otherworld. Josh Gibsons of the world..

Negro League baseball J. L. Wilkinson Negro League Baseball Museum Negro Leagues Museum Kansas City Monarchs Buck O'Neil Education and Rese Monarchs Wilkerson Major League Great museum president Kansas City Bob Kendrick Chicago White Sox Rene Yankee Stadium New York Yankees founder Bob Why Wilkie
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

07:11 min | 5 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Matt Chick, along with Myron Metcalf. Of course, one of the stories major League Baseball trying to complete its season teams unable to play because of covert 19 The's air. Still sort of first world problems. Nothing like they experienced 100 years ago in professional baseball. Jackie Robinson, Satchel Paige, Hank and some of the best players in the game of baseball began their careers in the Negro Leagues. The Negro Leagues began in 19. 2100 years ago in major league baseball this weekend honoring that anniversary, Raymond as well, is the vice president at the Negro Leagues Museum and joins us now here on Sunday morning on ESPN radio. Dr dot as well. Thanks so much for being with us. What is the significance of this weekend and this anniversary? Thanks for having an excited to be with you. I think it's it's fair to say that if you look back in the history, some might think that, you know, reason why there was a big relief in the first place is because Major League Baseball deny those places opportunity so that MLB now recognizes these players and supports history, I think is a significant milestone. We've had a number of small celebrations throughout the years with major league team. Honoring the Negro leagues with the throwback jerseys and different activities very supportive, But for the first time, every team will honor the league's all at once is an exciting day. When I think about the black athletes I see today from LeBron James to you know, Patrick home, just athletes all around, and I look back to the Negro leagues in terms of opening. The door. How instrumental was that? I mean, we have to talk about Jackie Robinson going to Major League baseball. But I important where the Negro leagues in, you know, maybe changing the image of the black athlete and opening doors going forward. That that's a very good point. President by Kendrick often says that all roads lead through the Negro leagues when you think about of the integration of sports, uh And it's fair to say that other sports actually did in a great technically before baseball in the NFL integrates before Jackie Robinson, But baseball is king in our country For many years, baseball was something that I think it's fair to say no matter what your race or background was common ground in terms of what people enjoyed and what's on the leisure sport that was really down in this sport. In our country for many years, so to see integration of baseball in the success of Jackie Robinson was something that opened the eyes of many to what was possible. Uh and I think black athletes can appreciate that. Especially but I think all athletes can appreciate that, Um And for baseball to be too be that leaving sport I think is extremely important, and people like Robinson people like LeBron James people like Muhammed Ali. People like all these other folks stand on the shoulders of those After American baseball players. We travel the road of the country endured racism endured segregation all because they loved the game. They certainly did. Pay for the play. I mean, a place for the pay. I should say. Ah, they wanted Teo. Aah! Aah! Enjoy the game. They made a living, but they had fun. And in doing so they broke a lot of barriers. One of the things that the lose had was a sense of autonomy and ownership. I'm curious. When you look at Major League baseball today, how much does the lack of that president that presence at the executive and ownership levels? You think effect? How young black athletes see the game and make a decision about whether or not they want to play. I think it's fair to say that the young black athlete doesn't see himself in the game from the standpoint of his contemporaries and players are there that's changing. It's growing, and it's getting better. But not seeing other athletes played a game has had. I think a tremendous impact over the last few years in the mid eighties was about the apex of when you see African American players a Sfar numbers of around close to 18 19% May days right after that baseball strike in the early eighties. But also that was at that same point. You had a Latino athletes aboutthe same number since Stan and has gone up for Latino athletes and down for asking American born athletes to the point now than in the last decade. We've been traveling between seven and 10% participation. So you don't see yourself in the game. You don't resonate with what The game teaches and what it offers. But I think baseball is very sensitive to that on. They've made a lot of inroads with urban youth academies and their support of programs like R B. I and today's effort with their support of the baseball museum and understand the history of the game, I think is also important to to showcase that history so close can Grab that connection to it, and you know it. After Americans were owners, they were players. There were executives in the game. We have a stake in this game and in the history and I still think that baseball is the best game in our country. Dr Raymond as well. Vice President Dorothy Negro League's Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Joining us here is we celebrate Major League Baseball honors the anniversary of the 100 year anniversary of the start of the Negro Leagues, which began in 1920 here on ESPN Radio, Matt Shikha Byron Metcalf. And are you guys in the In the museum have a Bible verse talks about prepare yourself for testing said a straight course Keep to it and do not be dismayed in the face of adversity. Could you just describe what kind of perseverance was required to play in the those leagues during that time? I think it's important to understand that when we think of baseball in a romantic way that young people, um no matter what their race to our cultural stripe was back, then love the game because it was so important to the country. But obviously for asked American players they couldn't play at the highest highest level. Because of segregation and racism, so Be to be able to create a lead in a place in the space of your own. Ah, within that, and certainly not make the same levels of resource of finances. He really had to love the game in order to be able to do that, Um, former commissioner say, Vincent Ah said. Thank God for the Negro leagues in this way. Getting back to your previous question of If not for the Negro leagues. There's not opportunity nurture that great black athletes to imagine this mean Jackie Robinson, for example, place Paul He was a columnist in track and field. You imagine him not playing baseball. He could have had opportunities to play in the NFL with Kenny Washington fellow You make, uh, Willie Mays playing a different sports..

Major League Baseball baseball Negro Leagues Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues Museum baseball museum Dorothy Negro League vice president ESPN LeBron James Dr Raymond President NFL Dr dot Matt Chick executive Myron Metcalf MLB Satchel Paige Um
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:36 min | 6 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Played in the Negro leagues on this the 1/100 anniversary of the start of their run from 1920 into the early sixties. Here's Barack Obama a big White Sox fan. So here's the Satchel Paige. Josh Gifts Cool Papa Bell and everybody else, including three brave women who did us all proud. There was a great team names, too. Like the Chicago American Giants. Come think of a more fitting later for everyone. You suited up and George W. Bush, former owner of the Texas Rangers, when I was a kid, my favorite baseball players, Willie Mays, I can just imagine what baseball would have been like and the predecessors to really maze. I have been able to play Major League Baseball and Bill Clinton, a big fan of the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City. Satchel Paige. I love Byron Johnson from Arkansas who played for the Monarchs with Buck O'Neil in section and I love the people who made the move. Jackie Robinson. I love Willie Mays. He's still my friend. And I love my friends. Think you're a major league Baseball had planned today of tributes last Monday night, it all big league ballparks that would have been hosting games at the Sports desk. Steve Bigger KCBS write some code. I'm ready to do what? No. One on my block stunt before. Forget that with no one in the world has done before. Since 2011 Internet essentials from Comcast has connected millions of people from low income homes.

Willie Mays Satchel Paige baseball Barack Obama Negro Leagues Museum Major League White Sox Chicago American Giants George W. Bush Jackie Robinson Buck O'Neil Comcast Bill Clinton Byron Johnson Papa Bell Texas Rangers Kansas City Josh Sports desk
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Well, we're home or hear more about that coming up in about five minutes for now, though, at 9 15 we're on sports, with Steve Baker, three former presidents among the list of luminaries paying tribute to some of the greatest baseball players of all time. Including 35 Hall of Famers who played in the Negro leagues on this the 1/100 anniversary of the start of their run from 1920 into the early sixties. Here's Barack Obama a big White Sox fan. So here's the Satchel Paige. Josh Gifts Cool Papa Bell and everybody else, including three brave women who did us all proud. There was a great team names, too. Like the Chicago American Giants come to think of a more fitting later for everyone who suited up and George W. Bush, former owner of the Texas Rangers. When I was a kid, my favorite baseball players, Willie Mays. I could just imagine what baseball would have been like and the predecessors to really Mae's been ableto play Major League Baseball and Bill Clinton, a big fan of the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City. Well, Satchel Paige. I love Johnson from Arkansas who played for the Monarchs with Buck O'Neil in section. And I love the people who made the movie. Jackie Robinson. I love Willie Mays. You're still my friend. And I love my friends like you're a major league Baseball had planned today of tributes last Monday night, it all big league ballparks that would have been hosting games. At the Sports desk..

baseball Satchel Paige Willie Mays Negro Leagues Museum Barack Obama Steve Baker Major League Chicago American Giants White Sox Jackie Robinson Buck O'Neil Sports desk Bill Clinton George W. Bush Texas Rangers Papa Bell Kansas City Josh Mae Johnson
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:13 min | 7 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Recluse or something, but it sounds like you'd was very admired. Respected and liked were exit even more surprising it does mean, and that's coming right out of the newspapers of the time as well as out of some of the recollections you get from from former players. Yeah, it's clear I mean he was the biggest gate attraction in black baseball, and he's always talked about his personality out charismatic. He was a great singer. Billiards player stuff like that great dresser race snappy dresser. Very charismatic and very well liked by almost everyone now. Not everyone's these very intense. Amir's a superintendent competitor. Is something we don't see as much anymore. I've been trying to think of somebody contemporary baseball. Maybe you guys can help with this. You've got a really intensely competitive. Personality on the field, maybe isn't very well like on the field, but then. Is. But off the field is is well likely Chase Utley Kinda. Maybe the last guy can think of. I mean the sort of standard bearer for me. For intensity on the field is is Max Scherzer. Yeah, that's who comes immediately to mind who I think by all accounts is I think mostly well liked by his his teammates. I, don't hear many Max, Scherzer dissenters. Yeah! That's good. I like that I'll. I'll take sure. Are I mean Harper to some extent? Bryce Harper right also who sets people off in the wrong way, and we'll get the fight with teammate from time to time. That was. Gives you some sense of what Charleston. Maybe was like on the field be he was. He wasn't cuddly rates. Who maybe wasn't the kind of guy you that you gave a nickname to? But he was, he was very very respected. Military. He joined the army. When is the young man that really left its mark on him and so I think of him as? For some reason I always Mike Single Terry when I think of Charleston to some sort of intellectual tough, I think it was built like Mexican linebacker, so maybe maybe Max Scherzer meets Mike single dairy. So, what were some of the more fruitful sources for you? Just in terms of the record and we can ask about who he was is person, but just the newspapers that covered him the most or that covered black baseball, the most or the writers who you find yourself relying on most often the newspapers of record for the black game or the Pittsburgh courier in the Chicago defender. preeminently there were others the, New York Amsterdam News a handful of others around the country, but but the courier in the defender were hugely important. They covered the Negro Leagues well and pretty thoroughly, so those would be the most important sort of public sources, but then as I was kind of saying, it's really. If anybody If you're a baseball fan, and you haven't like you know, pick up a used copy. These books by John Hallway H. L. W. A. Y. or Brent Kelly is another it just compilations of interviews with former players, a lot of former Negro Leagues, players in does men's cases. They're just a joy. Reid and they're just incredible source of historical information. Information to they'll tell you where people were this time that time who fought with whom who did like who and what the game was like, but it was like the travel to play in America was like at the time. Those those oral interviews as well as the newspapers were really the key sources of information or reviews are easily accessible and as I say. What turned the tide for him in terms of his hall of fame induction. What would sort of shifted between when? I think Ted Williams rightly called out the absence of nearly players in the hall through to Charleston's induction. Yeah, not sure anything turned the tide for him. Once the hall started inducting players regularly, and they were doing this one year thing for a while, which wasn't making anybody happy and Charleston was inducted during that time I think meg. He just. He was always on the list for the beginning. It's just that they were gonNA. Take care of of some of the guys who were stores time Gaffe Yup so but people it's. It's kind of unfortunate in the sense that people will assume that because he was a seventy litre inducted. Maybe that's sort of what his status or stature was in the black game, indicative of it and I don't i. don't think it was so I know that you wanted to try to get at what he was like as a person, which is difficult to do long after the fact and you succeeded in that to some extent, you were able to find some sources that shed a little light on his inner thoughts and. So what was the the breakthrough there? And what did you learn about him? Not just as a player, but a person. Yeah, sure a couple I mean besides the people is able to talk to you. Including one of the women who played for him in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty four eight apples, clowns maybe Johnson. WHO said he had a beautiful personality that was her description of him besides that there were two things one. There's a a sports writer named John, Shuman who wrote a great piece on Charleston for sports illustrated in two thousand around that time and John. John's the creator of xena Warrior Princess so by the way you should know that his. Player princess and a great sports writer, and he had all his notes from interviews he had done with with people like double duty, Radcliffe and buckling the ill and others less well-known, who knew Oscar and he generously on how we still had them in a box he could find, but generally found him a ship them to me, so it was like I was able to go back in time, eighteen years and interview people who are still alive now. That was great in terms of getting. To the man and the personality of Charleston. Ninety percent of those those fellows were were dead, and the other thing was, and this is an index. Not It's not promoted all mind you. You just have to know about it, but from John I think it was I found out that. Charleston's personal scrapbook and photo album were has at the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, and that like my heart is never left more joy than it did on the day that. I found that out from John, because as just gold for biographer, so I'll able to spend a day. The museum going through those materials, taking pictures of every precious page, and they tell you a lot about what Charleston thought was important. You know for instance every every fight. He was in pretty much every fight. He was in on the field. He clippings in the scrapbook I mean it was like he just is as if he sort of found. It was comical, you know. You had no no embarrassment about it, but also like who did. A lot of clippings about Lou. gehrig lot clicks about tie Cobb lot of clippings about Jimmy. Fox and Dizzy Dean. Indicate maybe who he. Respected in the white game, or who may be was friends with him. He was friends with Jamie Foxx actually, both were in Philadelphia for a number of years, and then you could see that a lot of clippings in.

Charleston John Hallway H. L. W. A. Y. baseball Max Scherzer Billiards Bryce Harper Chase Utley writer Amir Jamie Foxx superintendent Negro Leagues Museum army Mike Single Terry Amsterdam News America Reid Ted Williams Lou. gehrig New York
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:12 min | 7 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KCBS All News

"19 treatment justified L A Times columnist David Lazarus will join us in about five minutes to talk about that. Though the vicar has sports news forest Fulton County Election officials have approved a plan suggested by the Atlanta Hawks to turn their own state farm arena into a massive polling station, the biggest in the country. For George's primary runoff election August 11th and, of course for the November 3rd general election, and that includes early voting for a 19 day period prior to Election Day. The Hawks are covering all expenses. Many voters had to stand in line in Atlanta for hours during the June 9th primary because of logistical issues, including way too few polling stations. The Hawks Arena has 680,000 square feet of inner space. Three former presidents among the list of luminaries paying tribute to some of the greatest baseball players of all time, including 35 Hall of Famers who played in the Negro leagues on the 1/100 anniversary of the start of their run from 1920 until the early sixties. Barack Obama, a big White Sox fan. So here's the Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, Cool Papa Bell and everybody else, including three brave women who did us all proud. There were some great team names, too. Like the Chicago American Giants. Come think of a more fitting later for everyone. And George W. Bush, former owner of the Texas Rangers. When I was a kid, my favorite baseball players, Willie Mays, I could just imagine what baseball would have been like and the predecessors to really maze. I have been able to play Major League Baseball and Bill Clinton, a big fan of the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City. Satchel Paige. I love Byron Johnson from Arkansas who played for the Monarchs with Buck O'Neil in section and I love the people who made the movie. Jackie Robinson. I love Willie Mays. You're still my friend. And I love my friends. Think you're a major league Baseball had planned today of tributes yesterday and last night at all Big League ballparks that would have been hosting games at the Sports desk. Steve bigger, KCBS. Let's say You just bought a house. Bad news is you're one.

baseball Satchel Paige Atlanta Hawks Willie Mays George W. Bush Hawks Arena David Lazarus Barack Obama Negro Leagues Museum Major League Fulton County Atlanta Chicago American Giants Jackie Robinson White Sox Steve bigger Buck O'Neil Bill Clinton Sports desk
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on The Lead

"What is your lasting impression of this museum and the legacy of the Negro Leagues? It's what it does to children honestly And I'm saying that because of what observed at the tour you know. One of the interesting things about children is that they don't know the racism the prejudice the segregation thankfully. They can't even fathom America. That was divided by color segregation. Summarized through the eyes of a child is done so very simply that was dumb and the right it was dumb but it was also the way that this country was and it's very important that we allow our children to look back in time. If they are to appreciate how far we've come when Bob Kendrick gives a tour you know. He's not shy about saying. Hey there were white baseball players. Who Spit on Jackie Robinson? When he was slide into second base and that sort of just a a small detail of what he faced throughout the course of his rookie season. So they're blown away when they come in and learn you go jail sitting in wrong. Section of Ballpark are drinking from the wrong water. Found using the wrong restroom. Lot of people as you well know lost their lives for breaking those simple societal standards. But the other thing that you have to admire is they never allow this to kill the love of the game of baseball. So if I've got to sleep on the bus and eat my peanut butter and crackers. I'M GONNA keep playing ball and really that's the prevailing spirit that you feel here at the Negro Leagues Museum and so you see these kids have fun when they get on that field after learning all that history they WANNA play baseball. You will see them mimicking. Hey here's how I'm going to swing the bat and I'm going to run the first base and I'm GonNa get this head off such paid a and again. We hope that we can be part of that equation. That gets kids excited about playing our sport and but it's important that they be able to come here and see themselves when they walk through this museum. They say people look just like them so to see how it transforms children in a way that you can see them see themselves in these nearly ballplayers when these men weren't able to get the same opportunities that we now have as Americans and while America was trying to prevent them from sharing and the joys of her so-called National Palestine it was the American spirit that allowed them to persevere and prevail and I think that's what makes this story so triumphant and so compelling and so are inspired while nate. Thank you so much for joining us for giving us your perspective and for being our eyes and ears into the Negro Leagues Museum. Yes thank you so much for having me and I hope. This encourages people to check out the museum for themselves. While Taylor clearly loves baseball he covers the Kansas City chiefs for the athletic and you can read his coverage of the chiefs at the athletic dot. Com here are some other stories. We're following at lead. Things are getting testy with the. Nfl's proposed new CBA. Which would make the season seventeen games? Instead of sixteen quarterback Aaron Rodgers and Russell Wilson took to social media denouncing the deal with Roger saying the length of the season was quote. Never something to be negotiated. Meanwhile Wilson tweeted quote the NBA and Mlb are doing it right. Players come first. All players deserve the same. We should not rush the next ten years for today's satisfaction. I vote no but despite this opposition. Nfl PA Executive Director. Demorris Smith told reporters Thursday that he's confident. The deal will be passed. This has been happening in Indianapolis where the NFL combine is also going on but interestingly enough. It's not the prospect workouts that have the football world buzzing the Athletics Lindsay Jones writes quote with apologies to Joe Borough and the rest of the rookies who have traveled here for the NFL scouting. Combine the most interesting quarterback named here in Indianapolis. Is Tom Brady? Where Brady ends up. And where Philip Rivers Cam Newton and Jameis Winston end up have been big talking points at. The Combine Jones writes that quote. It's all these. What ifs and speculation combined by a top heavy draft class of passers headlined by Borough and Alabama's to attack of Aloha? That make this. The most unique quarterback off season possibly ever. That's it for the week. Thanks for listening. Everyone producers. Caitlyn plummer Chris. Siegel and Chris Olen editing and production by senior producers Lea Hernandez and Matt. Strap fact checking by Ian Sound Design and mixing by air in. May Jake Gorski and Joe. Richardson the executive producer of the lead is under Calcio. Could beat the Davidson is our editorial director. Our Show is executive produced by Lea Hernandez Marshal Louis and earn on Lopez for wondering from wondering and the athletic. I'm under SCELZO. I'm could beat the Davidson Sia Monday..

Negro Leagues Museum baseball Nfl America Bob Kendrick Joe Borough Lindsay Jones nate Lea Hernandez Jackie Robinson Tom Brady Indianapolis Caitlyn plummer Chris Russell Wilson Philip Rivers Cam Newton Demorris Smith Calcio editorial director Taylor
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

04:44 min | 11 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on The Lead

"So we can't talk about the Negro Leagues or the Negro Leagues Museum. Without talking about Jackie Robinson and the museum does a really beautiful job of chronicling his transition from the Kansas City. Monarchs to the Brooklyn Dodgers and I think people think Jackie just walked out of nowhere and started playing for the Brooklyn dodgers but Israel rookie season was nineteen forty five. Yeah tell people all the time before he was number forty two. He was number five for the Kansas City. Monarchs and of course the year that he spent in Kansas City. He fell in love with everything that Kansas City is famous for Barbecue and jazz. Everyone Remembers Forty. Two obviously Major League Baseball as retired the number on every Jersey except for one day when Jackie Robinson Day in the major leagues. But one of the things that Bob has to explain to anyone who will listen is that no Jackie Robinson. At the time in one thousand forty five was not the greatest big rallies baseball player. There were other meagerly players who you can make a legitimate argument for bed of baseball players. Then Jackie Robinson that. This wasn't just about talent you had to have someone who had the intestinal fortitude to deal with the adverse social conditions that they would be faced with as higher near breaking the color barrier and Jackie had him on. He wasn't a guy that was going to go out and party. It was gonNA make an embarrassment of himself once he got to the major leagues instead. He understood the entire weight the gravity that was placed upon him by saying. Hey you represent not just yourself not just your family but you present a whole race of people in your own country. Yeah you had to have the entire package. Because I gue- came failed. I cannot fail I guy failed. There is no second guy and so that was the enormous weight that Robinson was carrying on his back when he took that challenge becoming baseball's chosen. What and another important player you learn about during the tour is Hank Aaron. A player that Bob just talk so lovingly about his all time favorite player. Yeah. This is my favorite picture in the entire exhibition. Because I'm a huge Henrio Fan. He is my all time favorite baseball player. And my childhood idol as a kid growing up in Crossville Georgia That's who I wanted to be in it matters to Bob Kendrick because he grew up in Georgia and of course when Hank Aaron Broke immeasurably baseball record for the most home runs. He did it as Atlanta Braves. So Bob Griese disgrace story about how he was enacting. What occurred on the field in his own living room. When he reckoned homerun some fifteen he's circling the bases in Atlanta Fulton County Stadium and I'm circling the bases in my mother's living room in Crossville Georgia and as he was touching them all hours testing them all and so he holds a special place in my heart and nate. One of my favorite things about the museum is it does justice to the role of black women in the Negro Leagues. Were where there were three women who played professionally in the Negro News Tony Stone. Connie Morgan and Mamie Peanut Johnson Pioneers women who competed with an against the men in the one thousand. Nine hundred fifty. Tony Stone took the roster place of Henry Aaron when she joined the Indianapolis clowns so hank Aaron goes onto the major leagues the following year. Comes Tony Stone? Someone who had played barnstorm as a woman baseball player for many years and finally got the opportunity to be sort of a crowd pleaser and a really talented baseball player. Who got a chance to play in the Negro Leagues and is not just a women who played the game as well in the it was a very power nearing league. They also have female leaders executives owners in the Negro Leagues Way Ahead of Major League Baseball. Most notably EPA Manley effort manly and a husband Abe own Newark Eagles. But it was Mrs Manley who ran the day to day operations. That baseball team consider BOB. The first woman general manager in professional baseball history. She own and she knew the business of baseball as well as any man. The only thing that the nearly cared about is can you play or do you know the business a baseball if you know one of those two things? If you're pretty good at it they included you in a way that few other businesses were allowing that to occur in the nineteen forties.

Baseball Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues Negro Leagues Museum Hank Aaron Kansas City Major League Baseball Bob Kendrick Tony Stone Bob Brooklyn Dodgers Bob Griese Atlanta Braves Georgia Crossville Connie Morgan Mrs Manley Newark Eagles Israel Atlanta Fulton County Stadium
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

01:58 min | 11 months ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on The Lead

"The.

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Baseball museum in Kansas City, Bob, how you doing today? Booked up to a great man. Thanks so much for having me on the show. Absolutely always love talking with you. All right. I wanted to get John because we're, we're coming up to the to the one year anniversary of the negro leagues museum being a target of vandalism that happened on June twenty second two thousand eighteen take us back to that day, if he can about how you heard the news. And, and what exactly the damage was. God to play at an early morning around of golf and was that one of my favorite breakfast by eating some breakfast with my coupley, Dr Raymond dies will come and say, man, you gotta get down here in a hurry. The buckle. Neil center is flooding and BUSTER, that time we didn't know exactly what was going on. We just knew that, that was what all over the place. And so, by the time I got there, it was the aftermath, and so they had called a fire department in and you know kudos to the fire department who came in and found a water shut off valve and turn it off, and then they were literally in they're trying to squeeze you all of this massive amount of water that had guiding into the building. And the building that was speaking of is the former Pacelle YMCA, which we've designated as the home of the buckle Neil education and research center, and for those who will be listening, the YMCA Priscilla, why MTA is the birthplace of the negro leagues. That's where the leaks were formed in nineteen twenty we started restoring that. Abandoned building historic landmark, and so when I get there is the after man. And it was really only until we started to explore the building that we finally realized that this wasn't just flooding that the building had been vandalized that someone that very Stephanie got into the building cut a main line waterpipe turned the water off, then cut the pie turned water back on and intentionally flooded to building. And so I think at that point my heart just sank into my stomach. You know, I tell people all the time had it been just an accident. We would have had the same amount of damage that we occurred, but knowing that it was done very maliciously and deliberately hurt even more. And at that point buck the United way to white flag, man. You read to give up old people, and, you know, you can't give up old people if anything that I ever learned being around buckle Neil for so many years. You can't give up on people. But at that point in time, I read the weighted right? Flank, you know, you're just saying that people will do some despicable things who in the world would want wanna hurt this building that the community was so excited about the effort that the museum put into it to save it. And so, and that's when we saw this incredible outpouring star to occur. And so, and I want to get to that in a moment. I wanna ask you first off what have we learned about possibly the person or persons responsible for this not only for this, but that happened the vandalism at the museum happened just a month after. A police believe that there was a fire set intentionally at the homosexual page. Yeah. People, I think, if an eerie coincidence, 'cause I don't think that you had anything connected, but it is just that a very Erie coincidence, that two of the most renowned names and black baseball, and particularly at release to Kansas City black baseball history. Both had something with the names associated to it vandalize in this case Arsim at the former home of the legendary LeRoy satchel page. And then the flooding damage to the buckle Neil education and research center. And again, I don't think that they were connected. But again very Irie coincidence, and to this point, we've not learned very much about either. I'm not sure we gonna have a find out who did these despicable things to those.

Neil center vandalism Baseball museum Kansas City negro leagues museum Bob Pacelle YMCA baseball golf John LeRoy satchel Dr Raymond Stephanie Arsim MTA Erie twenty second one year
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Hey, Kramer nation. Meet cardinals nation at your nearest white castle. We continue my conversation with Bob Kendrick with the museum. How did you find the artifacts the pictures the gloves the uniform, man, I can't imagine? What would that was like it was a challenge? And we're so fortunate because I'd say ninety five percent of the things that you see on display at the negro leagues museum came from the players and or their families. It's only been over the last decade or so that we've started attempting to compete for memorabilia, tell people all the time. We've almost become our own worst enemy the more. We're popularizing the story. We're driving the market Audifax to the point that makes it difficult for us to compete to go get them. Now, these things fetch a hefty price tag virtually every time that they come up for when they do come. Up to be sold in that kind of thing. And so we have to be very prudent. We have to kind of be very smart about the things that we tried to go get because we just simply don't have the budget to go out purchase a lot of this stuff. But fortunately, many of the players families are and or the players donated some of the things I tell people all the time though, I wish this museum had been born twenty five thirty years before a man, we would have so much more stuff. But you know, the thing that drives this museum is not the stuff. It's the story and that story had escaped the pages of American history books. So countless generations of us with our own former educations without knowing one of the most significant chapters not in baseball history. But in American history, and that's the powerful and compelling story of the negroni when you well, let's let's talk about this. I always tell our fans and here we are in a weekend with the are the cardinals and the royals. I always say if you're gonna make the trek from. Saint Louis to Kansas City, you have to stop by the museum because it's a it's a unbelievable place. You're going to teach your children, you're gonna learn. I can't do Justice. So if I was to get a ticket. Yeah. And I'm walking through that museum. What am I going to get Bob or you're going to get an amazing experience? And as an experience that is obviously anchored in the ugliness of American segregation harbor chapter in this country's history. But that's not the story here. Now, the story here is out of segregation rose is one of the story of triumphing conquest, and it's all based on one small simple principle, you won't let me play with you. Then out just create a league of my own the negro leagues. And when you stop to think about that that is the American way. So even though America was trying to prevent them from surrogate joys of her so-called, national pastime. It was the American spirit that allowed them to persevere and prevail. And I think that is the spirit that drives the story. So if you come here expecting to be introduced to a sad samba story, you got the wrong place. No, this is a celebration. It is. The celebration. Dan of the power of the human spirit to persevere and prevail. So you're going to be introduced to an amazing story of baseball in Americana. And then of course, you're going to be a pretty good dog on athletes. They could play they really could play and their contemporaries knew that they could play. Yeah. It was just the social conditions of our time and fear that kept these athletes from playing in the major league. So of course, the for the African American Hispanic ballplayer the negro leagues provided a place for them showcase their world class playing abilities. And so you basically take him a static journey back in time. And so you get to see how our country was. But you also get to see how country unfolded and really started to live out this greatness that we know about America. And I think the negro leagues the story of that really embodies that American spirit. I love the fact that you say, it's it's a story. And yes, it's a horrible chapter in our our country. But you come away saying we're gonna make it positive to absolute. That's what I love that. And that was buck O'Neil, and that's you. Absolutely. And that's the premise to the story. I think sometimes people. Expect sadness. But when you walk through that museum, you don't see sadness. No, you see these beautiful people dressed immaculately going to a ball game. You see the pride that emanated from the players face as they were getting to the opportunity to play the game that they love. Now, did they like some of the things that happened to them as they travel the highways and byways of this country? Of course, not there would be occasions, Dan, when they could go into a town Philip the ballpark, yet not get a meal from the same fans who had just cheered them or not have a place the cerebral. So they would have to sleep on the bus and eat peanut butter and crackers until they could find a place that would provide basic services for them. But they never allow that to kill the love of the game. So if I got sleep on the bus eating a peanut butter crackers. I'm gonna keep playing ball, and that's the prevailing spirit here. And so they love this game. And they were good at this game. And because the passion because of the passion that they have five sport. They not. It only changed our game. They changed our country and that comes across so triumphantly when you visit the negro leagues baseball museum, there's still a handful of negro league baseball players that are live. Yes today. Reach out to you all the time. Yeah. Now, we still stay in communication. We keep a list of those. And you know, we try to keep up with those. And every now, and then a guy surfaces that we didn't know about. And then, unfortunately, the flip side of that guy passes away that always know about and so you know, when we built this museum back in nineteen ninety. We realized that we were literally in a race against time that the people who made this story, we're all going to die. Not a matter of fact, not a matter of if but win right? So you knew it was a race of time a race against time. And every time you lose one. You lose a piece of that history that window closes a little bit more. And it does put a little added pressure on the museum to make sure that we document and substantiate as much of this history as we possibly. We can while we still have those living members. But not only are you going to lose the people who played in these leagues you're going to lose the people who saw them play. Absolutely. And they too can attest to what the stories. I, you know, I love when people from that era come here to the museum, and you can see these cascades of memory coming back. Yeah. They're remembering what they wanted a game where they went what club they went to day. So even though we were living in a segregated society merely baseball brought joy to so many absolutely to so many..

negro leagues museum negro leagues baseball museum cardinals Bob Kendrick America Dan baseball market Audifax Kramer buck O'Neil white castle Saint Louis Kansas City Philip twenty five thirty years ninety five percent
"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Welcome to inside cardinals nation on Campbell wax. I'm your host, Dan McLaughlin of Fox Sports. Midwest. My guest tonight is Bob Kendrick. He began his association with the negro league baseball museum as a volunteer in nineteen Ninety-three became president of the not for profit association in two thousand eleven the negro leagues. Baseball museum is the world's only museum dedicated to preserving and celebrating the rich history of African American baseball and its impact on the social advancement of America. It's an unbelievable conversation with some of the great players that ever played in the negro leagues and its impact on baseball and society. Bob, Kendrick is my guest tonight. Remember cardinals nation, meet graver nation at your nearest white castle. Coming up, it's a visit with Bob Kendrick. Well, I find this place Bob to be magical. Is that is that a good way to describe it? I think is an outstanding. Way to describe Astier have that feeling and not come here every single day for the better part. And it is something very special, and you feel it when you walk into the negro leagues baseball museum. How many years for you? Now. Count years professionally. I started in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight as the museum's first director of marketing, but my involvement goes back to nineteen Ninety-three as a volunteer with this organization, and it's exploded obvious laureate has grown leaps and bounds. Since the time that it was organized a little one room office bigger than this space that barely bigger than this space that risk sitting in recording this in one thousand nine hundred and of course, the recognition and the awareness of this history and the museum as a caretaker that history has grown enormously since that time, it's a big responsibility. Isn't it? Well, it is because you understand that you are basically carrying a piece of baseball at Americana that was really going to die. See this history was going to go extinct when that lasts negro league left to face this earth. We cannot allow that to happen. So, yeah, if a dotting task to know that you've got a piece of history in your hands that if you don't say, there's a good. Likelihood that it will fall by the wayside. It will die when that lasts negro leaguer passes away. We don't want that to happen. I tell our guest all the time Dan that the negro leagues museum that need to survive. It has to survive. Absolutely. So that we don't lose his precious piece of baseball at Americana, and the more majority of people who come here. They don't really know the full depth the breadth the scope the magnitude of what this history represented both on and off the field. I do think the work that we've done now over the past twenty eight years has certainly elevated the consciousness of those and so they come in expecting to meet some pretty good baseball players. And of course, you're gonna leave not being disappointed some of the greatest baseball players ever put on a baseball uniform. Absolutely. By the time you walk away from this experience. I truly believe that you walk away with an even greater appreciation and understanding of just how great this country really is. How did it all start right here in Kansas City now? Yeah. Twenty is an organized negro league. Now black folks been playing baseball since the late eighteen hundreds some will say even as far back as slavery, but in an organized fashion the negro leagues organized right here in Kansas City, nineteen twenty right around the corner from where we operate the sale YMCA the building steel. Stands. It's unbelievable. Yeah. Andrew rube foster the architect led a contingent of eight independent black baseball team owners in the Kansas City. They met at the old pa- sale YMCA out of that meeting came the birth of the negro National League the first successful organized black baseball league. And then of course, the negro leagues would go on to operate in this country remarkably for forty years from nineteen twenty until nineteen sixty people don't realize that. No, no. Because even if you understood that there was a negro leagues, I think the more majority will say well Jackie Robinson breaks down the barrier forty seven. So if there was a negro leagues surely ended in and around that time while the league's would go on to operate another thirteen years after Jackie why. Because it took major league baseball twelve years. Sure for every major league team had at least one black baseball player. The Boston Red Sox would become. Last team to integrate in nineteen fifty nine when they signed pumps the green, and that would complete integration cycle by nineteen sixty the negro league ceased operations because by then the best young black stars had moved into the major leagues or into the minor league system. And there was no replenishing system. So the league's would dissolve where would they play in? How would they originate the teams how did that all come about? Well, in one thousand nine hundred twenty eight teams made up the negro National League, including the Saint Louis giants, right? One of the original members in Saint Louis giants would become the great Saint Louis stars. So the city of Saint Louis certainly has had his representation as it relates to black baseball history and rich black baseball history because he had some superstar negro league players that call Saint Louis home, including the great cool Papa bell, and Willie whales and mule Suttles. These are hall of famers that played there for the Saint Louis stars. And so yeah, Saint Louis has certainly seen his fair share of great. Baseball being played there from a black baseball perspective. But these were independent black baseball teams that came into the fold. So when rube organizing negro leagues in nineteen twenty he organized, the negro National League well in nineteen Twenty-three guy named Ed Bolden formed a rival league known as the eastern colored league nineteen twenty four your very first negro leagues World Series, the Kansas City monarchs against hildale daisies out of Darby, Pennsylvania, and the monarchs would actually win that inaugural World Series led by the great hall of Famer Wilbur bullet, Joe Rogan a walking encyclopedia man, Dan. I consider myself to be a baseball fan. Am a baseball fan. And was just fascinated by this other chapter of baseball history that I didn't know anything about when I got involved with the museum going back to nineteen ninety three. And I just fell in love with the story. I fell in love with the athletes who made this story, and I just wanted to learn as much as I possibly could. I think I became almost a little self absorbed with this wanting to know as much as I could. And then I didn't want to keep it to myself. I want to share it with other folks. And of course, I met buck O'Neil for the first time in nineteen Ninety-three. And I tell people all Dr once you met buck. It was a rap. I just wanted to be on bucks team. And so I was so blessed to spend so many years with him. And I got to meet so many of these former negro league players guys who really played in the heart and soul of the negro leagues thirties and forties, and those guys are virtually all gone, right? You're listening to inside cardinals nation on Campbell ex. Hey, cardinal nation, me crave. Nation at your nearest white castle. Back with more in a moment. Depend.

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"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"That was my revolutionary war was always my favorite growing up and as i got more like colleague collegeage uh world war two was probably my favorite thing studied but i really the revolutionary war i say overall um when like growing up interested me the most last week we had bob hendrick who's the president the negro leagues museum on the podcasts and i asked him about what his favorite artifact was there and i know you visited their what did you love it when what did you love when you sought my favorite i i like seeing all the jury that they were whose uh they were all a really cool looking jerseys and uh they were game use from mike the 20s and everything like that so you see seeing what they were i mean they were too heavy wool jerseys and i'm sure i mean they play it'd be kansas city hosted a team i'm sure it was extremely hard in those things but but back then i don't think that really mattered it was it was uh you know just getting the opportunity to play baseball and and uh go out and compete every day um was just a a big reward um and just kind of appreciating everything that those players went through in and their conditions in and they didn't get paid a lot of money uh if you're really really big appreciation for them now moment you're always going to be remembered for especially in baltimore his home ring in your major league debut as his story goes your grandfather was a seasonticket holder to orioles games your mom grew up in maryland and it in the imam with beth is very much remembered for her reaction that home run of curious if at some time you ever get a chance to sit down and watch that with her and with your dad.

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"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"negro leagues museum" Discussed on KOMO

"School students in their research of baseball's negro leagues today buta night in seattle bob kendrick is the president of the negro leagues baseball museum in kansas city he and the teacher who spearheaded the project gary thompson spoke with comas tom hutyler now is a big baseball fan as a public address a whatever the mariners obviously i have a great interest of this but i think even maybe the peripheral fan would have an interest in this first of all gerry if you would tell us kind of how this project started in what prompted you're involving innocent and getting these students together we had a project based class and it was was surprising at that time to find out how many kids didn't know about the negro leagues and as we started to do some research we found out there really was nothing out there about this history which prompted a phone call to bob at the negro leagues museum and that was kennedy at that is disturbed what turned out to be a two year project both reese searching the player movements of those guys in energy in the recreation of a barnstorming trip in two thousand bob first of all i wanna walk of you to seattle i'm sure you've been here before and i've been to your place before they realized museum it kansas city which is where this trip ultimately wound up with these this yesterday these youngsters how did you become aware of it and and what did you do to kind of foster what they were doing near call that is having bmi off his late one evening and he gave me a call and the call kind of turned into this idea that well i wanted to soccer personal region support negro leagues baseball museum but i've got a more grandiose idea we've got some ideas that.

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