18 Burst results for "Negro Leagues Baseball Museum"

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:41 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Friday's moving into Saturday. Some parts of the country already in Saturday as the world of sports gets ready to continue and open things back up. It's been ah In a historic three days here in the world of sports, and it may be difficult to understand and see while we are living in it, But we've had major athletes. We've had major sports take it stand as it relates to equality here in justice in the United States of America, So the N B A is gonna have three games on Saturday afternoon and In the evening time as a part of their playoff restart. They're going to have three more games on Sunday. Major League Baseball has got back to back to action old teams except for the Athletics and the Astros. Who decided to walk off the field before the game and protest and left a black lives matter. T shirt on home plate similar to what the New York Mets in the Florida Marlins did yesterday. We also in major league Baseball Friday was a celebration of Jackie Robinson Day would generally takes place on April 15th to commemorate the day that he broke the color barrier in 1947. At that point in time. It was 63 years since an African American had an opportunity to play baseball in the majors. So as a part of that we had on the president of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum. Ah, Bob Kendrick. And the museum is based in Kansas City, and unfortunately as a part of that conversation involving Jackie Robinson, we also discussed the Negro Leagues 1/100 anniversary..

Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Baseball Jackie Robinson Florida Marlins Bob Kendrick New York Mets Astros United States Kansas City president Athletics America
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:26 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Of the all time greats? So while It was a huge step forward in the country and in the fabric of America. It also sort of put a death nail. And what was the Negro League? So we're gonna hear from Bob Kendrick on the other side, a really fun interview, And I think it's fitting with what's going on in the country today and being that we don't have a ball game. Really to talk about. Yeah, I'm looking at us. Fans way didn't have a giant ball game to talk about. We kick off the second half of the season today against the Dodgers. 6 45 right here can be are one of 45 and 6 80. I think this is They a good jumping off point being that we're celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the Negro leagues, as well as Jackie Robinson Day here in 2020, and I'm thrilled that we're still celebrating, But I'm hoping Major League Baseball keeps moving forward. I'm hoping that AA lot of what's happening in this country does not get lost because sports are back on the other side of conversation with Bob Kendrick, then we're going to get into some or NFL stuff their teams understand. Hey, we're going to put fans in the stands and some other teams are saying, dude. We're coming to play. You were not allowed fans in our stands. We want to keep our players safe. Ah, specifically, I'm talking about the Miami Dolphins here and the Buffalo bills. Miami's like We don't have a shot. Let's put fans and against Buffalo is like a man were a playoff team. We want to keep our guys healthy throughout this campaign. So we're from Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum on then we'll get into Ah, some of the NFL stuff after that, so all that and more is coming up you're listening to can be are one of 45 and 6 80. It's the sports leader. You're smart speaker is a radio here. The leadoff spot with Adam Copeland at home. Just say your apple pie play KNBR a better life with Dr Sanjay Gupta. How are your kids doing right now, with everything that's going on. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta, CNN's chief medical correspondent. As a dad of three very different girls. I know every kid has their own unique personality. Some kids are scared right now. Others are anxious or bored or depressed, but happy. Well, it's true Cnnhealth contributor. Elissa Strauss wrote a really interesting story about this, she said. That kid's air less busy. They're having more control over their time, sleeping better seen more of their parents playing more alone or with siblings. And they're feeling better for it. And parents see some of what was going wrong before the pandemic and contemplate how they might want to restructure their lives after this is all over. That might mean.

Bob Kendrick Negro League Dr Sanjay Gupta Miami Dolphins NFL Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Dodgers. Elissa Strauss Miami America Adam Copeland Jackie Robinson Baseball Buffalo bills CNN president
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

07:59 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro League Baseball Museum, joins me and Bob Why did you pick the site where the museum is today? And would you like more space? I mean, is the room where we thought that when we first opened this museum in 97 the Negro Leagues Museum itself is 30 years old this year, So we're celebrating a milestone anniversary, too. But we moved into our current home and in November Of 1997. And so when you go from a one room office, now 10,000 square feet of space, it seems like it was a lot of room at that time is not anymore And there's a a growing me for the museum to expand and we're in the process of doing just that. As a matter of fact, the building that the Negro leagues were formed in the castle Y M C. A Is just right around the corner from where we operate that is going to become the future home of the Buck O'Neil Education and Research Center. So we're going full circle right back to the very building at Gae Birth to the story that we're now charged with preserving and we're going to create his education and research center. In memory of the late Great John Buckle Meal, the founder of this Great museum, a legendary Negro leader himself and perhaps the game's greatest ambassador. Let's do that. Go back and do a little time line here. Ah, I did a little homework here. But Ah, 1920 was the Organization of the Negro League, and it was a Andrew Rube foster that created it. And everybody. Everybody has a nickname right? And you didn't have a good man. If he didn't have a good nickname. They're probably meant you could play. That's right. But he was a player manager and then created and you talked about. Ah You know, around the corner where this took place there was they got together. There was eight owners correct eight teams, But, hey, a fish that he initially were they all black owners. With the exception of one J. L. Wilkinson, where the only way owner of the original eight Negro League franchise Wilkie, as we believe, you know, is effectively know. Wilkie owned the Kansas City Monarchs. Ah, one of the greatest baseball franchises. They're not in. Like baseball history, but in baseball history and jail, Wilkinson Was a 2000 man in the 1900. He did not see color. Yeah. Wilkerson made his entire living in black baseball and see initially route Foster was against anyway. Ownership. But he can't hear these great things about jail. Wilkinson and buckle. Neil would describe Joo Wilkinson in this manner. He says he was the first white man he ever met, who had no president said When there weren't enough hotel rooms to go around. They slept in the same big get. Wilkerson treated his players with great respect and admiration, and they all loved her. And so Wilkinson had a team called the All Nations even before the monarchs, and they were homogenous group of athletes made up a black, white, native American, Asian Hispanic. So he really didn't see color on DSO Wilkerson route relented. But then Wilkinson also had what room needed there, and that was access to stadiums as the rule religion. And Wilkinson would become secretary of the Negro Leagues bring in his Kansas City Monarchs. As a charter member. The Monarchs would go on to become one of these great They wanted a great baseball franchises of all time. There are those who will say that the Kansas City Monarchs for the New York Yankees Literally. Today, and others will say that the New York Yankees where the kid is a city man, monarch had one losing season in there almost 40 year existence in the Negro League. Does that mean they got to get all the good and the best of the best players in just saying Wilkinson seem to have a neck? For finding the kind of talent that fit into the way he wanted his team to play. And it just seemed always have great guy playing on a team, you know, and like I said he sent more players to the major leagues and any other Negro League franchise. They were a model organization. And I say this and I said they have no disrespect. Should my beloved Kansas City Royals Kansas City Mama, They're still the greatest baseball franchise this city has ever seen. You talked about was the will person that had access to stadiums and doing my homework here. It seemed like there was a tough Time trying to get stadiums to have these guys played in, and then sometimes they would actually play after let's say the Chicago White Sox left town or something or did their game you guys would play and there'd be more fans there watching that, Then they did the major league team. Well, you don't Dan is interesting, because that's one of the reasons that it took so long integrated game because there were a number of major league teams that were making money off the legally. So when the devil leaves Rene Yankee Stadium they filling up. My understanding is they're getting a percentage of the gate. And likely all of the concession. The same thing is your Congress Comiskey Park. And so yeah, making league Baseball was making money off the table. It's because very few of the Negro League owners have their own state. And for me, that's the fundamental difference between The major leave and the Negro League. Was money. Jim, all the major league owners had their own ballpark, for the most part. Very few legally, teams at their own stadium. You know you had In Memphis. The modern brothers had their own stadium in Pittsburgh guts. Greely had his own stadium in ST Louis or ST Louis, far as faras part, But you know, outside of that there were very few. Negro League teams that had their own stadium, so they were beholding to the major leagues because they were reading to ball front and then they had to set their schedule based on that major league schedule. And so, yeah, That was part of the reason. But you're right. They were outdrawing. Many major league teams did the money that did the money Then that was coming in? Because you guys have an all Star game to over 50,000 fans did that money then I know you. You know, you still being held up by the I guess the white owners of Major League baseball because they own the stadiums and if you want to come play here You're gonna pay my price my front so and Is it similar today to still today that they're still paying the price? Ah! But did that money residual do? They didn't drip down to the owners into the players Get to the players. So did the players signed contracts. Contra. Okay, did it state what they would make Then they would negotiate deals even for those East West on Star Gazer Man. They were only getting a, you know, And you know, In retrospect, they were only getting a small pitons of those resources that were coming from those All Star games. But you know a gay the owners have full control Bandit in amazingly And they had it in an equally and so the players were making a decent living playing the game. They look but you know, nobody was really getting rich. Now. The superstar Negro leaders, the Satchel Paige is otherworld. Josh Gibsons of the world..

Negro League baseball J. L. Wilkinson Negro League Baseball Museum Negro Leagues Museum Kansas City Monarchs Buck O'Neil Education and Rese Monarchs Wilkerson Major League Great museum president Kansas City Bob Kendrick Chicago White Sox Rene Yankee Stadium New York Yankees founder Bob Why Wilkie
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Back in the day, as Netflix began to gain popularity, its rival blockbuster was looking for an edge. We're one point the investors were asking blockbuster to sell genes in the store. You're. Older. Investors being what the kids want. They want gene. You get a Tom Cruise movie in some stone wash jeans the downfall of blockbuster and the rise of networks listened to it's been a minute from NPR. Welcome back to Bullseye I'm Jesse Thorn. My guest is Bob Kendrick. He's the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum one of the only institutions in the world devoted to telling the story of the Negro Leagues. Let's get back to our conversation. I've always found that the life of a professional athlete is inherently tragic. Because if we're lucky, we live to be seventy five or eighty, five years old. But there are who can maintain professional level athletic skills beyond their thirties. What was it like? For Negro League players who were dealing with the fact that they were re entering quote unquote normal life burden both by racism and its attendant lots and structures in the United States and the fact that many of didn't have skills event sports you know they hadn't gone to college some some had. And you know one of the wanted to interesting the facts about the Negro Leagues and I'm so glad you mentioned that. Is that some forty percent of the athletes who played in the Negro Leagues had some level of college education. Less. Than five percent of those who played in the major leagues had any college education for the simple reason that the major leagues Jesse didn't want you to go to college. Then they got you right out of high school if. They got you write a high school, put your farm system, and then you work your way too big leagues. Well, the Negro Leagues didn't have that kind of sophisticated farm systems so whether they do they trained on the campuses of historically black college and universities, and then they would play the Black College baseball teams, and then they recruited a great deal of their workforce from those Hbo. So. They actually had a disproportionate number of college educated athletes in comparison to the major leagues but you're right when you're talking about a Po- sports career and I think this is what any athlete that transition into normal life is never easy..

Negro Leagues Negro League Baseball Museum Jesse Thorn Bob Kendrick Netflix Black College NPR United States
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:29 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"And so that was big power. So he was way too outspoken way to gregarious and flamboyant for the Yankees but big power. Your father was right was outstanding baseball player Vic Power out play, and I don't think he gets enough credit for how good he really was. Bob. You're not a young man, but you're far from an old man and I wonder when you were growing up. What you knew about the Negro Leagues and what their legacy was to you as a you know whatever age it is that one becomes really identified with sports if you do become really identified with sports like twelve or whatever. Yeah exactly, and the thing is just I didn't I didn't identify I only identified when I started volunteering with the Negro Leagues. Baseball Museum going back to nineteen ninety-three I consider myself to be a baseball fan. And he was his entire chapter of Baseball in American history that I really did know about now I knew the name Satchel paid cool Papa Bell Josh Gibson because those names they trend transcended mainstream league most baseball fans have heard those names even if they don't know how great these players were you've heard those names but I had no idea about the breadth, the death, the scope, the magnitude. That this league represented both on and off the field, and then I started to meet the players and of course, one player in particular my friend the late great John Buck O'Neil and as I said, on many occasions once you were bitten by the buck books man it was a rap you just wanted to be on bucks team the charisma, the passion, the commitment that he had to building. An edifice where they would not be forgotten and I do think in the final equation. That's what we all want. We want people to remember US and bunk wanted people to remember them for what they had accomplished in this country, and then to also embrace the life lessons that come from their story because to me, they're safe. The story is the fact that these athletes never cried about the social injustice. They went out and did something about it. You won't let me play with you the analogize just create a League of my own, and then my league will rise to rival. You'll Lee and when you stop to think about that, that is the American way, and so while America was trying to prevent them from sharing in the joys of her so-called national pastime. Spirit that allowed them to persevere and prevail what's not to love about this story. All BASEBA- in all professional sports are an entertainment I. think There is a sliding scale of the extent to which a professional sport is an entertainment in the extent to which it is I don't know quote unquote pure athletic competition and there were a lot more baseball game specifically in the early part of the twentieth century and going earlier that were more dedicated to entertainment. You know there were barnstorming teams where Everyone wore address and pretended to be a woman except for a few people who actually were women..

Baseball Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Yankees Vic Power John Buck Bob Papa Bell Josh Gibson Satchel Lee America
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:38 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Dedicated to my favorite sport baseball usually try and put it out around opening day. Of, course, baseball is very different this year the season started late the stadiums are almost empty and by the time this airs. It's possible that the season. Will Not exist anymore. So, this year's Bullseye Baseball Week is going to be a little different to we're GonNa talk about baseball's history I up an interview with Bob Kendrick Bob is the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum. He's had that job for almost a decade. The MLB M is pretty much the only place in the world dedicated to telling the story of the Negro Leagues. The leagues that gave rise to players like Hank Aaron Jackie Robinson. Willie mays and Satchel page not to mention of course, the many players who were never allowed to play major league. Baseball. Bob and I had a really great conversation so I won't say much more than that because I want to get out of the way but. I'll just say that even if you aren't a fan of baseball I, really encourage you to hear what Bob has to say about this remarkable piece of America. Let's listen. I. Welcome to both I am so grateful to have you on the show. I certainly appreciate the opportunity to join you. Thanks for having me. So Bob, this is the one hundred th anniversary of the start of the Negro Leagues and I want to talk about the Negro Leagues in a minute but it occurred to me that I should ask. In what context were African Americans and other dark skinned people in the United States playing professional baseball before a hundred years ago before nineteen twenty. Professional baseball goes back decades before that. Oh absolutely and African Americans. Playing professional baseball goes well before the actual formation of the Negro Leagues here in Kansas City in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty. Jesse we've been playing baseball since the late eighteen hundreds and actually there was some evidence of African Americans playing even while being enslaved. So it was certainly not a new phenomenon for black folks to play baseball. Unfortunately, it was so haphazard and booking agents were taking all of the money..

baseball Bob Kendrick Bob Negro Leagues Negro League Baseball Museum Hank Aaron Jackie Robinson Willie mays MLB Kansas City president Jesse United States Satchel America
MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 3 months ago

MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

"Baseball is marking the anniversary of the Negro leagues created 100 years ago. The league's showcased black baseball players players who couldn't play on the major teams because of the color of their skin. Only a few members of the leagues are alive to celebrate the centennial Michigan radios, Doug Tribute spoke to the only surviving team owner and others about the legacy of the legendary leagues. In 1920 owners of independent black baseball teams from the Midwest gathered in Kansas City, Missouri. At that meeting they created the Negro National Leagues had no idea they were making history. They didn't care about making history. Bob Kendrick heads the Negro Leagues Baseball museum there, he says. Faced with segregation, black owners and players kept pushing for organized baseball. These athletes never cried about the social injustice. They went out and did something about so you won't let me play with you and I create my own And they did today. Stars like Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard and Satchel Paige are enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but thousands of black and Latino players endured bigotry and racist taunts. It was Tear before the players at that time. Many Forbes owned the Detroit Stars from 1956 to 1958. She lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan, that players try of them. They had nowhere to stay because of the discrimination, so they slept in the buses. And they couldn't go in places to eat so one person would go to the back door. When get food for all the players. Pedro Sierra pitched in the Negro leagues for several seasons in the 19 fifties. He grew up in Cuba and says it was tough to adjust to segregation and racism he saw in the US It wasn't easy to see all the problem with the raise. I know all about it, herb artist. But I hadn't experienced today. Sierra lives in New Jersey In 1954 he signed with the Indianapolis clowns at the age of 16. His salary was less than 5% of what white players were earning dollars a month a month, $100 a month. And I look back and say, Oh my God. Jackie Robinson played briefly in the Negro leagues. Then, in 1947 he broke baseball's color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers in Cleveland, Larry Doby became the first black player in the American League. Coming seasons brought many more signings. But many Forbes sympathizes with the many athletes who were good enough to play in the major leagues, but never got a shot. Unfortunately, some of the good players by the time the time Came. They were too old to play. The last league folded in the early 19 sixties, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum estimates there are about 100 former players still alive. Forbes is 88 worries about being one of the last left to tell the story. And I just want a if I'm worthy of represent and speaking about the Negro League because When I got involved, things was easier for me. Then it wass father one before me. Many Forbes will keep sharing her stories with younger generations and others will to Major League Baseball has a day to honor the league's set for next month. The museum has pushed back its year long celebration of the centennial to next year and renamed it Negro Leagues. 101

Negro League Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Baseball Pedro Sierra Major League Baseball Forbes Baseball Hall Of Fame Bob Kendrick Michigan Midwest Kansas City Missouri Doug Tribute American League Grand Rapids Jackie Robinson Josh Gibson Satchel Paige Detroit
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

03:35 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"Just happened last week and that was Henry Aaron wage. Breaking a Babe Ruth's record. I was nearly twelve years old when Henry and hit record home run number 715 in Atlanta Fulton County Stadium. I was a kid growing up in nearby Crawford Georgia, which is about eighty miles east of Atlanta and I told him this story when he hit record homeruns 7:15. I'm in my parents living room and bath. He's circling the bases in Atlanta Fulton County Stadium. I am literally circling the bases in my parents living room. So the old couch was first base the old TV was second base. He had another account that was third base and my mother's recliner was home plate and so as my childhood Idol, Henry Aaron was tension them all I was touching them all jumping for joy and nearly twelve years old. I would toss twelve in June of that year. And so that is I think my greatest sports memory Of all time, you know and because again even in my little town of Crawfordville, Georgia, there was a lot of separation and there were some angst because he was this black man in the Deep South about to break a record that nobody ever thought would be broken. And so even in the 1970s there was a lot of racial tension going on particularly in the South and so there was division even in my little Hometown and so this was an epic moment for me as a kid to witness because you know Hank Aaron is my all-time favorite baseball player. And this was before I even knew he had played in The Negro Leagues. I really learned that he played in New Orleans until I got involved with the Negro Leagues baseball Museum. And so and that was one of the most eye-opening things for me and it set the stage for me wanted to learn as much as I could about this Rich history. So that's my favorite sports memory. Oh, there's so many great stories that I like to tell and one of my favorites Satchel Paige stories of many Satchel Paige stories is a story that Buck O'Neil tow for me because a lot of people because Satchel Gabrielle was so outgoing and so gregarious and so charismatic that and they for men who didn't have a formal education. He was as wise-beyond-his-years and so Buck said there in Florida and Satchel says the night before he called buck nasty. He's an answer the home who was sacked his wife. The Houma is going to cook fish and grits for breakfast. Well to catch you we got to go catch the fish. So they hire a guy who had an old outboard motorboat that going to go on the Tamiami Trail and Satchel not only thought he was great at pitching the world. He thought he was the greatest Fisher and Hunter in the world and so yep. Everybody's fishing and Gabrielle. Everybody's caught a fish except for such and they're rats satchels Satchel. We thought you were the greatest fisherman in the world. You came cheese, you don't and box are satchels got a line in the water and the line has three hooks on it and he says wouldn't you know three fish with hit off at the same time after pulls out the line. He jumping around in the boat. I told you all I was the greatest fisherman in the world. I told you I'm the greatest of all time..

Hank Aaron Henry Aaron Atlanta Fulton County Stadium Satchel Paige Buck Satchel Gabrielle Satchel Crawford Georgia Babe Ruth Negro Leagues baseball Museum Atlanta Fisher Crawfordville Houma Tamiami Trail Florida New Orleans Hunter
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"So I enjoy that immensely obviously the role itself takes on so many different levels and needs and so I don't get to do that even that much as I like to but I am very Hands-On and I do think people appreciate that the look on the eyes and a surprise on their and their eyes sometimes when people say well, you know, you you just walk around the museum with president of the Negro Leagues baseball Museum and they're blown away because I don't really ever say a whole lot. I just thought running my mouth and people start to kind of gather around and we yep, Talk to a storage and have a good time and then somebody will say or maybe at the very end of the experience. I will thank them and and then tell them who I am if they don't already know who I am and so I enjoy that as much as anything I could just never sit behind the desk and and bark out instructions for other people. I try to get out on the front line with my team and cuz of our team and there's no task that is too menial for me to do and and so, you know, I think that it's been part of the reason why we've had so much success with these last nine years. I can't imagine the Negro Leagues Museum without you, but that's also because I have been fortunate enough to hear stories from you firsthand, and it's actually very fortuitous. We are recording the day after Jackie Robinson day, and I'm sure that usually the museum does special things on April 15th every year. Yeah, we were we were planning to open a brand new exhibit both here as well as a new a traveling a new traveling exhibit called Barrier Breakers and the barrier breaker exhibit Gabrielle. Will Chronicle all of the players who broke their respective major league team color barriers going from Jackie Robinson in nineteen, forty-seven through the lake Palm see green in 9059 who of course was the last player with the Boston Red Sox. And of course, we lost Mister green last July sadly. And so this exhibit was going to Chronicle all of their own stories because as I tell people all the time, it didn't get any easier for pumps and green when he broke the color barrier with your Red Sox in 1959 than it did for Jackie Robinson in nineteen fifty-seven. These athletes all had the trials and tribulations as they were trying to navigate their path into the major leagues and yet as we so often times doing our society, we just only celebrate wage. First and and rightfully we celebrate Jackie Robinson for it being that pioneering first, but it doesn't diminish the others who also were the first with their respective major leagues. And so Larry Doby would break the color barrier in the American League just weeks after Jackie. He is almost an afterthought. But again, that's how we are now Society..

Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues baseball Museum Boston Red Sox Barrier Breakers Larry Doby Mister green president Chronicle American League lake Palm
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

03:47 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"You're so synonymous with them at this point that I cannot imagine them without you. I didn't even know until I was you know, preparing a catch up with you that you had ever left the museum. You went to the National Sports Center for the disabled in Kansas City. Yes. Yes, wonderful organization did provide a therapeutic Recreational Sports Programming for folks with disabilities and it was very heart-warming and very gratifying as well. But, you know to be honest, my heart was always here at the Negro Leagues baseball Museum. It's following in the footsteps of my friend My Mentor am confident the late great buckled meal. And so when I left it was under some circumstances when the museum was not doing well. They had brought in a new leader of the organization and to be frank..

Negro Leagues baseball Museum National Sports Center Kansas City
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"BoB Kendrick president of the Negro Leagues baseball Museum and Negro Leagues historian and baseball historian. I am so excited to have you on thank you so much for being a guest. It's an absolute pleasure to catch up with you again. Thanks so much for having me on I'm cannot express like to listeners and to you. I'm fangirling right now. This is such a such a treat to get to talk to you again, especially because you recently celebrated your nine year anniversary as president of the museum. Yes. Yes, you know time flies. It seems like it was just yesterday. I was sitting my boxes back down. I had left the museum in 2010 to take on another role with another not-for-profit organization and then thirteen months later. I am coming right back to the Negro Leagues baseball Museum or coming home to the Negro Leagues baseball Museum, and it seems like I just set my boxes down and literally hit the ground running. We've been running ever since but it's been a match. To call nine years as we've had, you know, a really significant turn around here at the Negro Leagues baseball Museum. And so I'm really proud of what we've been able to accomplish over those nine years. Now that being said we still have a lot of work to do we've just scratched the surface. But yeah, it's been nine amazing years for me as president. It's hard to believe it's been I ain't twenty-seven years of affiliation with this Museum. So I got involved with this place almost from its infancy going all the way back to 1963. So it's been a glorious ride for me working with an organization that I am just absolutely passionate about and never in my wildest dreams. You have your own what I thought that this would have turned into a career when I began volunteering with the museum way back in 1993, but it's done just that and it's been one of the most rewarding and gratifying things. I think could have ever met. They're so lucky to have you I was actually going to say you began as a volunteer when you were working with the Kansas City Star..

Negro Leagues baseball Museum Negro Leagues president BoB Kendrick Kansas City Star
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

09:23 min | 6 months ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Producing from his home studio in Connecticut. Taylor Schwenk buster only working from my home studio. He just north of New York City Taylor. I remember early on during the lockdown. That you were every Friday every Saturday. You're taking a long drive. You still doing that now. That we're more than a month into this. The drives have dried up in the last two weekends. We might go for one this coming up next weekend but I'll pull back the curtain a little bit. My wife and I are two consecutive weekends to different people We've done these like zoom murder mystery parties which are a lot of fun. Actually I know that people do them face to face in real life. But we've gotten a little creative here and if you guys are looking to do something like that I would highly recommend it. It's fun to dress up a little bit. You know we did a twenty s era one and a seventy era once we made some different cocktails for it and My first time I wasn't really sure what to expect and I enjoyed it quite a bit. So that's taken over the drives a little bit so that's your recommendation. Mine is digging up. Dandelions which has become an obsession for me. Because you know because I'm home I've made up my mind. I'm going to have the best lawn in my neighborhoods and so over the weekend. My fifteen year old son who certainly has moments. When he doesn't like me very much. This weekend I assign him digging up two hundred dandelions. I dug up that many myself. We are on a hunt for Dandelions at our place. Is that sound. Like Fun Taylor It sounds like a negative fund. But where do you think you are on your quest to have the best looking lawn in the neighborhood like are you like seventy five percent of the way there or where where do you stand? Doodo mobster good start like my lawn is looking really good like I cut around the edges. All the things in the past where I get back from Sunday night baseball and Monday and I'd be tired and I'd see some clipping that I need to do and I wouldn't do it now. Like up at five in the morning just dying for that. I like to get out and do it so trying to make the best of it so you got you know. Murder Mystery Zoom. I've got dandelions it's all what whatever you need to get through it. It's it's dragging on here so you gotta you gotTa take what you can get there. You go well this is contributors week. Folks who helped the sport of baseball not necessarily as players managers are front optics executives. And we'll start with Bob Kendrick. Who is the President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City? In Alaska who he thinks is the greatest player of all time. We'll hear from Sarah Lines as well. I The news and notes retired Los Angeles dodgers broadcaster. Been scully's back home. After falling and being hospitalized the team quoted scully in twitter Saturday saying home and resting comfortably with my wife and we are both eagerly awaiting the time for dodger baseball. I almost can't say without trying to imitate. I'm not GONNA do that. The Cape Cod Baseball League. Renounce Summer League for top college stars cancelled. Its Two thousand twenty season due to the corona virus pandemic. It announced on Friday. The Cleveland Indians will pay regular salaries to full-time employees through June thirtieth. But the club has had to furlough others due to the Kobe. Nineteen pandemic the teams that senior executives took voluntary salary reductions to ensure the team could continue to pay staffers. The Indians confirm they furloughed Many of their part time employees and interns those will take effect on. May first and there is sad. News Steve Del Hausky a while. Left-hander was said to have been dubbed the fastest pitcher in baseball history. By Ted Williams died this week in new Britain Connecticut. He was eight years old. Before we get to Sarah into Bob. Don't forget about Jalen and Jacoby. The after show the guys are recapping episodes. Three and four of the last dance. The shows went up right after the last dance aired. And they'll continue doing that throughout the run of this Docu series Jalen and Jacoby. The after show is brought to you by State Farm and at and T. You can find it wherever you get your podcasts numbers game. They're laying say reporter producer for MLB DOT COM. And Sarah in a moment. We're GONNA be talking about Kendrick head of the Negro Leagues Museum in Baseball Museum in Kansas City. And so Sarah what I sent you an email over the weekend saying you know what? I'm curious about your perspective on who or the Five Best Negro Leagues players of all time. How would you rank them? Starting with number five. Yeah so I love looking into this and I love thinking about this because you know this is an area of baseball history that we don't know quite as much about and I know I personally have learned a lot about maybe over the last ten years or so but I feel like I'm always learning more and more about these players in reading more of these legends so it was a great great opportunity to dig back into this and I love it so my number five is Oscar Charleston. And you know they're so many great comparisons when you read about these players. Everybody is compared to some absolute legend and the one that I have for Oscar Charleston. Buck O'Neil said. He was the greatest player that he ever saw. He was compared to tie Cobb interest speaker and he was considered the Negro National in Israel. I real- superstar back in nineteen twenty and he could hit close to four hundred played a great outfield. Iran. Base while and Satchel page side. You have to see him to believe him anyway. And so the hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy six and of course buck. O'neil was a longtime first baseman and a manager and he we scout. He's got it later in life. There's actually an award at the hall of fame given every year now That's name for Buck O'Neil. Whose NUMBER FOUR. So number four. I've got cool Papa. Bell you know legendary speed one story. I saw said that he went from home home. In twelve seconds which is really fun. You know we can actually contextualized that now whether or not it's true we don't know but you know the fact that people thought that was true. I mean that's right there with the fastest home-to-home times who see on home runs you know now a stack cast so and he taught. Lubar have a steel basis. I think that almost tells you all you need to know in humans. The Hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy four and cool papa. Bell of course. The great story about said tongue in cheek was that he was so fast when he turned off the lights which he'd be back under the covers before the late actually went out. Who's number three so number? Three is Buck Leonard. He was the homestead grays first base for seventeen years which made him the longest tenure player with one team in the entire history of the Negro Leagues. He Josh Gibson were outstanding. Duo led the team to nine Negro nationally pennants and five world series. Aaron says and he went to the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two number. Two number. Two is Josh Gibson so dizzy Dean called him. One of the best that he ever saw it for a ton of power. The legends are absolutely incredible. They talk about five hundred foot home runs and maybe he hit nine. Hundred home runs in his career. We don't know you know for sure. But he certainly was. You know an absolute outstanding catcher an outstanding a power hitter and he wins the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two as well number one all time. So Am I number one. I have sexual page. I'm not sure that he was the absolute best player in the history of the Negro Leagues. But I think he is certainly the most famous on so I was sort of going back and forth between him Gibson whose number one number two I ended up with Satchel page number one. He was the first to go into the hall of fame. He's the most associated with the league. I think a lot of ways and you know a lot of people thought he was the greatest pitcher whoever left and I want to ask you about the greatest player of all time in any league for me. It's always been willie. Mays who to me? He did so many things well he was fast. He could play defense. He hit for power. He won the Most Valuable Player in the National League. A couple of times Led the League in a home runs multiple times. He won a batting title in One Thousand. Nine hundred fifty four. It's six hundred. Sixty homers had three thousand two hundred eighty three hits scored over two thousand runs in his career. That would be my pick for greatest player of all time. How about you? Yeah I mean I you. I have talked about many times on here. My mother grew up a huge giant. Stand a huge giant fan. Let's hear about Willie mays since I you know basically couldn't talk yet and I've always always default to him but I will say that you know as I learn more and more about these Negro Leagues players. I mean I do think that you know there are so many players who you hear that you know could have been the greatest of all time or would have been considered the greatest of all time in major league history. Had they gotten the chance to play their gotten a chance to play. They're in their prime. So I think that there certainly are You know other considerations to take but I always go slowly mace yes. Some people would argue Babe Ruth. Some people would argue Henry Aaron. I'm going to put that question of Bob in just a moment. Sarah thanks for doing this. Always great to talk with you. Basis for having me investor. Kendrick is President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Missouri and Bob. Thanks for joining us. Sit at time when everybody's looking for distraction and I know you've got a lot of stories always exciting for me because I'm looking forward to those same distracting about these baseball and baseball history because the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum like everybody else has been so greatly impacted by the health situation that we're currently.

baseball Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Sarah Lines Bob Kendrick Negro Leagues Josh Gibson Kansas City murder Cape Cod Baseball League Buck O'Neil Willie mays Oscar Charleston Negro Leagues Museum Henry Aaron League Taylor Schwenk President Summer League Connecticut New York
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"Off today stick it's the negro leagues baseball museum, which by the way, if you never been down there you need to get down there. The cool thing about that place. You go down see something every time. I love it down. There. Also, see dot B. Bob, kendrick. Yeah. Bob's the oh, I guess they're talk baseball with Bob Kendrick, all the time. But yeah. So there he's gone today. Brinkley's fill in and now, we've got the one and only Peter Sweeney editor in chief of era had pride in studio today. I heard you or not this morning early this afternoon. You're all about the downtown stadium. I appreciate that. So y'all of that too. I would love that. But I'm not again, I'm not a Kansas City. I'm I'm willing to I'm willing to Pete. The possibility because you've got the greatest minds in the in the world when it comes to sports architecture here in Kansas City. Don't tell me aero head. You do that. No, not God. No. You gotta leave at stake. More. I think baseball with the backdrop it just feels like it's time. Yeah. I think it's time. Maybe that's the best way to put it feel. It feels like it's time to have that discussion. So piece witty and studio for the next thirty minutes. Talking cheese football. He is the editor in chief of aero head pride. I want to start you off with this one of my favorite off-season NFL Aussies chiefs offseason. Thanks to do is to keep an eye on Patrick Mahomes on social media. So there was this video from the forward star telegram and Mahomes took his puppy to the gym are. Yeah. So he's the you know, what happened to the rest of us took a dog the gym. They're calling the cops get thrown out a call an animal control. No doubt. Does it? He can do it in Mahomes on a beach in LA with his girlfriend and two other girls modeling his gear now as well. We're gonna get to the point where it's we're getting Mahomes lash like like Bush last from Jerry Maguire, he certainly feeling himself. I think a little bit more than he he was last offseason. And he's a twenty three year old. Of the National Football League. So I think you kind of expect that but you are starting to see a little bit. I wouldn't say jealousy. I think that would be stretching it, but you are starting to see little nudges on social media with Tyree kill joking about hey, can you push my gear? Anthony, Sherman tweeted the other day. Hey, by the way, we're working out to just in case anyone else's worried about it. So there are these little nudges from these teammates. I am wondering what version of Patrick Mahomes that we get because you get back off an MVP season. You're in your early twenties. There's certain ways you can act. I really don't expect the homes to be jerk by any means. But there is that percentage of him. Maybe coming back a little bit full of them. So I just wonder why how you ended up a Collins. You see that he's but stay there with the Forber or the he's hurting so far walking his dog one time it's crazy to say in Kansas City, but he's one of the most popular athletes in the world. You know, if you want your art, you're starting to even think approach top ten top twenty if he's not ready. They're already so I'm sure. There's athletes from other sports that are reaching out to him says, hey, you're in Texas one issues my place. I'm shocked Mahomes. Benjamin cereal is not out yet. Because I talked to Steinberg said it's gonna hit the shelves. I have been there looking every night. No not every night every week. They go to the store. I look for Mahomes. Magic crunch time out your Steinberg, man..

Patrick Mahomes baseball Bob Kendrick Kansas City Jerry Maguire National Football League editor in chief downtown stadium leagues baseball museum Mahomes dot B. Bob Steinberg Pete Brinkley Collins Benjamin Peter Sweeney LA Tyree
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"Jeep brand. The winner of today's pop quiz won a pair of tickets to the national to the negro league baseball museum. Today's pop quiz was it was released in two thousand and three I wouldn't allow specter the satisfaction of pressing play in the movie clip today. We were having a debate. And we'll get into the chiefs here momentarily because I said that every man fits in one of these two categories either you have run out of deodorant and had to use your wife or girlfriend or you stayed over someone's house didn't bring the essentials, and then you had to use her the odorant specter says he is never worn woman's the owner before I'm talking to to real men here at some point you put on secret. I I'm thinking that I have I remember I can't really think of precise story. But yeah, I think I've done it. Absolutely. And. I don't see anything wrong with it fresh fresh dove, smells, so much better than whatever right guard. You're trying to give me like some sort of athlete. I got some secret today on the smell me or not. From here. He's terrific during the break a little bit closer over there. What's going on in the show? Smell you closer? I mean, it's on a cardinals week. Barron came in and told the store that I ran out of DOD, I was pissed and so I had to call it audible, and I got my wife's dealer, and I smelled amazing aspect and he wanted to smell it smell it. He said, no. And he said he would never wear women's the owner. And I said, what are you euro, what are you talion from the Mediterranean, totally defensible where women's the better to wear women's Yoder, the Nodio, that's that's the logic specter. He doesn't apply that logic right now. It is our head pride roundtable in his Pete Sweeney. Joe thornton. They are in studio. I wanna read a text to you guys and get your opinion on it was we were talking earlier in the guy. Text in gentlemen. Pump your brakes have you guys ever heard of trap games? This is a classic trap game. If you think about it you play the cardinals. Then the Rams last week. I was rolling with the trap game theory on the road at Cleveland Cleveland to me very easily their record to go another way because of the tie games. If you lose to the Zona Carter that is not a trap game. That is the worst loss in the. Eighteen twenty nineteen NFL season. There is not a war. There is not a loss worse or possibly worse than losing at home to the Zona cardinals. Who have only scored more than twenty points. One time this season. It's not like Arizona's like scrappy team. Like Denver Denver's, not good..

specter Zona cardinals negro league baseball museum cardinals Jeep Zona Carter Pete Sweeney Denver Joe thornton chiefs Cleveland Arizona Barron NFL Mediterranean Yoder Rams
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Is inside cardinals nation on camera wax. My guest is Bob Kendrick who runs the negro leagues. Baseball museum NTN to city. Hey, Kramer nation. Meet cardinals nation at your nearest white castle. We continue my conversation with Bob Kendrick. Can I put you on the spot? Okay. So you're you got buck O'Neil. You got satchel. You've got Josh Gibson. You got all these great names. Cool Papa bell. When you hear all these stories. Let's talk best hitter. People say, Josh Gibson. I I'd have to go. Okay. I have to go Josh. Because when you look at what Josh did. And he was doing it as a catcher this incredible combination of power and average see sometimes you get lost in the power. Right. We forget that Gibson was a great hitter. Lifetime. Batting average of three fifty four Seattle to mess that up. I always think the power and in head to head competition against major leaguers and countless exhibition games. Over four twenty while to go with that big bat. So he wasn't just a big bet and he didn't strike out a lot. No Josh was that kind of hit who might strike out twenty twenty five times in a season. Buck O'Neil would describe him in this way. And if you can envision this. Josh Gibson had the eyes of Ted Williams and the power of Babe Ruth road into one dynamic packet his house where loud loud out. Yeah. As buck would say to third baseman and shortstop were damn near left. You could get killed. It basically said if you wanna to go round. The best pitcher satchel. There were a lot of great pitchers in the negro leagues. There's only one satchel Paige, right? And for me. Yeah. They're guys who stuff may have been just as good. Nobody was better though. But when you talk about the complete package when you talk about longevity, great, stuff charisma as only one satchel pay. Absolutely our just sharing here recently this week marks the anniversary of him playing in Saint Louis for the St Louis Browns, and he pitches a twelve inning one to nothing shutout over the Detroit. Tigers Dan, he was supposed to be forty six years old at that. Right. If you believe that he was born in nineteen zero six, which I absolutely do not believe, right? He was more closer to fifty to fifty six. He was forty six at that time twelve any one to nothing shutout. He struck out nine gave up seven hits. And the most remarkable surprising on this that like he walked to people sat rarely ever walked his likely were intentional walk right in that game at eight. Forty six. Just incredible. Well, he makes it to Austar games as a member of Saint Louis Brown. Right. Yeah. He he's named the two all star teams well into his forties with Saint Louis Browns. How old do you think he really was modest believe he was at least ten years old any claim? Yeah. At least here, and you can rest assured they released no less than five years older than what he claimed. But most believe us at least ten and of course, being the savvy businessman that he was he played that a up to the hill. He milked it for everything he could get out of it. And and it it added to the lore and legend of this great ball player, but I can tell you now. Nobody pissed that baseball any better than Saturn. That may have been some that. Whereas good nobody was better than south paid cool Papa bell. We, you know, so many of our fans and Saint Louis can be listening. So give me an idea of what this guy was like how good he was never wanted to tell me. They gotta street there in Saint Louis as name for him. And I believe the speed limit on that street. Probably thirty to thirty five miles per hour. That's too slow. Slow basically had a section of the freeway name. Beyond having the greatest nickname. I believe. Yeah. In baseball history coup Papa was outstanding. He's one of the stars of the negro leagues. And he's also one of those transcending stars that name went mainstream. You know, you knew that name cool and subtle and Josh. He was everything that they said he was and then some he came to Saint Louis as a pitcher. And as fate would have it. He hurt his off. And when he hurt his arm. They moved them to the outfield and the rest is history. He used that blazing speed to run down everything in the outfield. Didn't have a great throwing on because he had hurt his arm, but he had a very quick release. And because of the great speed he could play so shallow that you couldn't bloop it in front of him. And unless you hit it over on a rope. You couldn't get it over his head. Switch primarily about it off the left side. So he's running out of the box. Yeah. And so this the stories of his speed are just leading dairy. And this is the honest to God truth. Cool Papa bell twice scored from first base on a bunt in exhibition games against major league Allstars. Yeah. And one time it was satchel page who dropped the. But is that right? Well, cool just never stopped running. Yeah. So the major leaguers really hadn't seen this before. And so the pitcher didn't back up home plate intact could get there before before who got it by the time the catching the third baseman fit field converse to feel a ball third baseman. Guided threw the ball to first base cool was rounding third. He's incredible easily. It's incredible. And they're always been a lot of fast guys. Matter of fact, we have fast guys here. The other day from your ballclub Willie McGee. Yeah. Yeah. So at Vince Coleman, so the cardinals no speed absolutely history of guys who could run but buckle meals said the difference between cool Papa bell and the other fast guys was his uncanny and amazing ability to cut that bag on the inside. Where most guys gotta take that big round here. He says cool is only inside of the bag, and Dan buck said that cool would be so low to the ground that he could literally smack the bag with his hand and not fall. Incredible. It isn't it? Is physics define is what it is. Yes. But again, I think every now and then somebody comes along they born to do what they do Saturday was born to piss dot ball. Cool was given a little something that the rest of us. Just didn't have you know, what I mean? And so he was he was special. Yeah. All those guys that you just name were special. How many of the current major leaguers come by? We're getting more and more. We're giving. Delight to my absolute delight because it used to be that I would have to try to call two teams. Yes. And say God we in town. Why don't you come on? By one extent has invitation for you come back. But now more and more guys are calling me saying, hey, I got guys who wanna come by the museum. Can you be there to meet him? And the answer is. Yes, I will be there to me Mike Claiborne from your team. Of course, brought down some guys this week. And we had just a wonderful time. I don't know how much they knew about the negro leagues prior to the visit. They had heard about the negro leagues is hard to play ball there and Saint Louis and walk past that statue of cool Papa bell at least not have some recognition of the negro leagues. But I think yesterday when they delved and I said yesterday on Thursday of this week when they delve into this story at a much deeper meaningful fashion, they were blown away. Yeah. Yeah. They were blown away. They were blown away by the circumstances in which these men had to play this game young kids. Don't even know they can't fathom an America that was divided by color. Right. Yeah. They may. Racism in their life, but they won't experience. Segregation. And so yes, segregation through the eyes of young people are summarized quite simply that was dumb. And they're right. It was dumb. But that was the way that our country was and we've continuously and perpetually evolved from that. Even though we still got work to do. We still have a lot of work to do in this country as it relates to race relations. And if they're going to be asked to kind of carry that mantle than they have on at least have some understanding that life had always been as good as it is today for some of the citizens. So you can imagine a look on their faces when they come in and see segregate sections at ballpark, and you could go to jail for sitting in a row section of a ballpark or drinking from the wrong water fountain or using the wrong restroom, and as we both know going to jail with some of the good things that happen. A lot of people lost their lives for breaking those simple societal standards. And so what we attempt to do here to negro leagues. Baseball museum is take segregation complex subject matter. Difficult for us as an adult to understand no less our children and try to simplify it by telling it through the eyes of these enormously talented black baseball players who just wanted to play ball. And so we had a great time on Thursday just walking around telling lies. But they were fascinated by it, and and really intelligent young people. And so they were no really delving into this in a much deeper capacity. Then sometimes some of the athletes do when they come there. So amazed by some of the artifacts, and those kinds of things particularly old equipment. Yeah. There you see the evolution. Yeah. You know, you see these old wooden shin guys and they took him aback Woodson. Yeah. They were wooden bagging right back in the day. And then you see there's oh chest protected. I really wasn't much of it and protect a whole lot. No. It was there. But and so always fascinated by that. But I think they to enjoy the stories that we share and many of these stories there's stories that the lake right buck O'Neil shared with me first hand, and I get to share them with a new generation of baseball players, and it never gets old about. No, it doesn't..

Papa bell Josh Gibson Buck O'Neil Saint Louis cardinals baseball Dan buck Bob Kendrick Saint Louis Browns Saint Louis Brown St Louis Browns Kramer Austar Seattle Baseball museum Tigers white castle Willie McGee
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"What cut through was a little little bronze, right? There's a lot of there's a lot of content that, and so what certainly what made me noticeable when I was doing Khan was LeBron stuff, but I think I like to think the I know the, the thing that I did that was the single most viewed thing in the history of Fox Sports online was actually an anthem take which pin tweet. I, it's tough to be the football guy in woke. Yeah. It's tough to be the football guy on his show with Chris Carter writing, people believe that I can talk sports. So my my point is though like I the reason why I didn't like you first because I thought you were one note guy. I thought you just went on a show. Did your like hardcore LeBron thing? And that was all you obviously have a lot more so you you went to Syracuse, you went to journalism school? Yeah. You when you because I think this is fascinating like a bigger conversation about where journalism is when you graduate in two thousand seven. Did you ever think that like you would be where you are now, or did you think it was going to be more traditional route and like how everything has shifted sense? So the so my you guys are probably gonna kill me for this. I the did I ever think I'd be where I was now, I sure yes, but only because I've been very listen. I was twelve years old. If I may tell you guys real quick when I was twelve years old, I was fortunate enough to meet Kostas. I walked up to him. I said, where you are taller than him. I said, I, I was at a of function negro league baseball museum in Kansas City. Big woke. And I walked walked up and I said, hey, we're, Where'd you go school? What'd you do? You do what I wanna do. I thought I wanted to play by play told me w. a. r. went to Syracuse, worked at w. a. r. that's the only school I applied to. I went there. I got cut from the play by play staff as a student which is like hard to do because I was so bad at it. They had talk show staff that was kind of for like the at the time, the undesirables doing the broadcasting. I said, I guess, talk shows where I'm going to do. And from that moment for is the only thing I revoked on it, I did. So I always thought it was going to do sports talk radio. Right? And that's what I I did for nine years, and then I got the opportunity that efforts on television. I sued some radio on mad dog, but yeah, like I, I kind of had one goal in mind was to be this sports commentators only thing. That's interesting because you ever think like if it wasn't Bob Costas if it was like Mike Lupu, you probably would just be, you know, owning your site would have been at a different school. Lupu would have been laying, hey, kid get outta here. My coffee. But I mean, if I if it was, I think about the fact that I had no idea anything about Syracuse. I walked up. He told me Syracuse, I said, that's where I'm going to go. And that's where I went. And so like, yeah, I mean, it was that that was a fork in the road moment of my life and I didn't know what I was just a little kid and so, but yeah, this is the only thing I ever wanted to do. And I actually people talk about the media changing and if I was a reporter, it wouldn't Hera fi me. Yeah, I think you guys have as I begrudge Ingley give you a compliment PF t deserve as well as always you've been a friend of mine for a long time. We're friends now can say. Frenemy frenemies. No, I don't think we're depends on what we're talking about, but I think you guys are good example of why. I think people that do what we do sometimes worry too much about the future of media because people always want to consume content. It is not. I don't believe my job to figure out the delivery mechanism like people will. Corporate folks will figure out the delivery mechanism, but people will always want to consume content and for because I cut my teeth doing local radio. I still love local radio, local.

Syracuse Mike Lupu LeBron Fox Sports football Chris Carter Bob Costas Khan baseball Big reporter Kansas City Ingley w. a. r. w. a. twelve years nine years
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"What cut through was a little little bronze, right? There's a lot of there's a lot of content that, and so what certainly what made me noticeable when I was doing Khan was LeBron stuff, but I think I like to think the I know the, the thing that I did that was the single most viewed thing in the history of Fox Sports online was actually an anthem take which pin tweet. I, it's tough to be the football guy in woke. Yeah. It's tough to be the football guy on his show with Chris Carter writing, people believe that I can talk sports. So my my point is though like I the reason why I didn't like you first because I thought you were one note guy. I thought you just went on a show. Did your like hardcore LeBron thing? And that was all you obviously have a lot more so you you went to Syracuse, you went to journalism school? Yeah. You when you because I think this is fascinating like a bigger conversation about where journalism is when you graduate in two thousand seven. Did you ever think that like you would be where you are now, or did you think it was going to be more traditional route and like how everything has shifted sense? So the so my you guys are probably gonna kill me for this. I the did I ever think I'd be where I was now, I sure yes, but only because I've been very listen. I was twelve years old. If I may tell you guys real quick when I was twelve years old, I was fortunate enough to meet Kostas. I walked up to him. I said, where you are taller than him. I said, I, I was at a of function negro league baseball museum in Kansas City. Big woke. And I walked walked up and I said, hey, we're, Where'd you go school? What'd you do? You do what I wanna do. I thought I wanted to play by play told me w. a. r. went to Syracuse, worked at w. a. r. that's the only school I applied to. I went there. I got cut from the play by play staff as a student which is like hard to do because I was so bad at it. They had talk show staff that was kind of for like the at the time, the undesirables doing the broadcasting. I said, I guess, talk shows where I'm going to do. And from that moment for is the only thing I revoked on it, I did. So I always thought it was going to do sports talk radio. Right? And that's what I I did for nine years, and then I got the opportunity that efforts on television. I sued some radio on mad dog, but yeah, like I, I kind of had one goal in mind was to be this sports commentators only thing. That's interesting because you ever think like if it wasn't Bob Costas if it was like Mike Lupu, you probably would just be, you know, owning your site would have been at a different school. Lupu would have been laying, hey, kid get outta here. My coffee. But I mean, if I if it was, I think about the fact that I had no idea anything about Syracuse. I walked up. He told me Syracuse, I said, that's where I'm going to go. And that's where I went. And so like, yeah, I mean, it was that that was a fork in the road moment of my life and I didn't know what I was just a little kid and so, but yeah, this is the only thing I ever wanted to do. And I actually people talk about the media changing and if I was a reporter, it wouldn't Hera fi me. Yeah, I think you guys have as I begrudge Ingley give you a compliment PF t deserve as well as always you've been a friend of mine for a long time. We're friends now can say. Frenemy frenemies. No, I don't think we're depends on what we're talking about, but I think you guys are good example of why. I think people that do what we do sometimes worry too much about the future of media because people always want to consume content. It is not. I don't believe my job to figure out the delivery mechanism like people will. Corporate folks will figure out the delivery mechanism, but people will always want to consume content and for because I cut my teeth doing local radio. I still love local radio, local.

Syracuse Mike Lupu LeBron Fox Sports football Chris Carter Bob Costas Khan baseball Big reporter Kansas City Ingley w. a. r. w. a. twelve years nine years
"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"negro leagues baseball museum" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Oh thank you uh yeah i can pinpoint the beginning of the project it was uh two thousand and feerick my wife and i were in kansas city touring the negro league baseball museum which everyone should see uh put that on put on your list to to visit uh it's worth a special trip to kansas city but uh but uh absolutely national treasure and uh we're looking at the excellent exhibit the history of african american in baseball and came upon the a picture of the 19 24 negro leagues world series which was the first uh a world series baseball and they had a picture of one of the two teams in in the series of kim city monarchs all the players lined up it on the end it is this white guy and i immediately thought what what what is what is a a white man doing uh with the with the black kansas city monarchs his name i found was jail wilkinson he was the founder and owner of the of the monarchs uh and as i left exhibited a boy would be interesting to to find out more about i'm in as we left uh standing in the foyer there at the at the museum is a very distinguished looking older a bug gentleman buck o'neill uh who uh is one of the most famous uh monarchs for sure certainly uh in he uh spent on timed museum he's one of the founders of the museum and uh i'm looking at a picture of a hidden signing his autobiography is what m one most treasured baseball a possessions uh so that got me interested in i picked up his autobiography and if it will book o'neill also he's as young boy nineteen 24 he's looking at that picture in the in the chicago defender african american weekly ince's who said way guy in in in he came to know him very well so said genesis of the project ahead uh i was working on another book on uh uh john tortoise myers one of the first native americans to in major league baseball so i had to finish that before it could get going on the uh.

kansas city negro league baseball museum world series founder baseball ince native americans kansas buck o'neill chicago