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"negro leagues" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:36 min | 1 d ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Played in the Negro leagues on this the 1/100 anniversary of the start of their run from 1920 into the early sixties. Here's Barack Obama a big White Sox fan. So here's the Satchel Paige. Josh Gifts Cool Papa Bell and everybody else, including three brave women who did us all proud. There was a great team names, too. Like the Chicago American Giants. Come think of a more fitting later for everyone. You suited up and George W. Bush, former owner of the Texas Rangers, when I was a kid, my favorite baseball players, Willie Mays, I can just imagine what baseball would have been like and the predecessors to really maze. I have been able to play Major League Baseball and Bill Clinton, a big fan of the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City. Satchel Paige. I love Byron Johnson from Arkansas who played for the Monarchs with Buck O'Neil in section and I love the people who made the move. Jackie Robinson. I love Willie Mays. He's still my friend. And I love my friends. Think you're a major league Baseball had planned today of tributes last Monday night, it all big league ballparks that would have been hosting games at the Sports desk. Steve Bigger KCBS write some code. I'm ready to do what? No. One on my block stunt before. Forget that with no one in the world has done before. Since 2011 Internet essentials from Comcast has connected millions of people from low income homes.

Willie Mays Satchel Paige baseball Barack Obama Negro Leagues Museum Major League White Sox Chicago American Giants George W. Bush Jackie Robinson Buck O'Neil Comcast Bill Clinton Byron Johnson Papa Bell Texas Rangers Kansas City Josh Sports desk
"negro leagues" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:56 min | 3 d ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Podcast. APP also please do check out. These seem heads. Negro Leagues Database. It's really well done there. There are some fascinating stats on there and there some fascinating explanations of how those stats are calculated and displayed especially the advance stats as noted on a previous episode friend of the show. Dan Hirsch has done a lot of work on the back end there and just reading from a post on the front page that was published earlier this year called Normalizing Negro League statistics that gives you some sense of the difficulty here. It's talking about park factors here. It says the reason. Simple Park calculations work for normalization is that there's an underlying assumption that except for home parks players within a league. League I'll face almost identical conditions under which their teams perform. Those conditions include playing the same number of games as all other teams playing schedules with close to the same difficulty, playing an equal number of home in away games, and not playing any neutral site games and playing most or all home games in the same park for the Negro Leagues Those assumed conditions all fall apart not just for the pre league, nineteen hundred to nineteen nineteen era, but even after former leagues formed following conditions still prevailed in the Negro Leagues teams played varying numbers of total games. Teams play differing numbers of games. Games against other league teams teams played an unbalanced number of home and away games teams played in multiple neutral parks. So you get some sense of the challenges, they're even aside from the challenge of finding those box scores, and that data in the first place, and it goes through some of the steps that they use to kind of correct for those obstacles, so I will link to that too I will also linked to a few pieces by one of our guests from last week, Shuki a Taylor, who has written extensively about the Negro Leagues and she has covered some of the topics. Topics that came up on this week's episodes including FM manly and the centennial of the founding of the Negro Leagues and the continued underrepresentation of black leaders of baseball teams shell so wrote about the grave markers that we talked about today, so she's published pieces at both times, Fan, graphs and baseball prospectus estimation. I will link to some of those and encourage you to check them out. Also, please check out rub. Arthur's recent work at baseball prospectus where he has mind the statistical data to uncover evidence of racial bias in Scouting and in player valuation and promoting players and for much of this. This he is used the database of reds scouting reports that I was able to obtain in that he and I analyzed for series of articles at the ringer last year, and in that article we were able to determine that there is kind of coded language that Scouts in that period were using to describe non white players that certain terms which you can probably imagine got applied to white players more often than not white players and vice versa, and he has continued to dig into that resource, and has found that non white players have historically been undervalued compared to white players that they've. They've seemingly have been promoted more slowly given comparable performance so this week we've been talking about. Pressured is's that were in place several decades ago or a century ago or more and in baseball, some of those prejudices are still in place, just in less obvious and visible ways, but still significant ones. You.

Arthur baseball Dan Hirsch Taylor Shuki
"negro leagues" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:45 min | 3 d ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"So I think you owed them pitching. And this is the article that I have ready for the Washington Post. And The New York Times. Showing how? Ya No. Major League Baseball has benefited from the Negro Leagues Because Memorabilia was starting to. Get Out and Major League Baseball was had an pearl campaign. And I said you're benefiting from these men I said basically you're pipping these players. That was the worst actually used. And they whispered each other, and they said well we. Do something if they play at least four years in the Negro Leagues s get them a pension. Past. WHAT ARE WE'RE GONNA? Do about the royalties? There's going to be pro bono. Fifty percents of the Jackie. Robinson Foundation think thirty percent to the Negro. Leagues Baseball Museum and twenty percent to the players. So now they get A. Royalty check. From, the sale of a Pearl, and they get a pitch and check for ten thousand dollars every year. Of course that. Created A lot of animosity. That's okay. You know is Reggie Jackson said people don't move. Nobody's so. I! I got booed and criticize, but it didn't bother me. I was not knowing the money came to me. It all came to the ball players and everybody who played for or more years in the Negro, Leagues Got Penchant for Major League Baseball, ten thousand dollars a year. My job was to provide documentation with the box scores that showed that they played four years or more. The grave market project was an eye of Dr Jeremy Crock. Outta of your a Illinois's an anesthesiologist. Great Guy he called me one day and. Asked me. About raising money. For an unmarked grave I'm like. No! I don't think that's going to work. Out The WHO cares I mean, do you do? And we shared stories how we go to family gravesites Memorial Day than plant flowers. My wife and I. We've done that for years I've said I'm on the same page which Jeremy but who's going to give us money. Where headstone and he said well, I got I did this were Jimmie. Crutchfield grew up his. Who grew up in his hometown of Ardmore Missouri I got permission from the Family Julia was still living Jimmy's widow and Mike Okay I'm least try I mean. And so I put it in the newsletter and start rolling in and I'm like. Wow, this works. But he had the idear and and the game plan and. I just had to reach out to my base of Saber members roughly six hundred. Members in the Negro Leagues Research Committee System Group. Email money start rolling in and then next thing you know he's on the New York. Front page New York Times or is. It SPN little segment owning. I'm like this. This is great. This is stuff. That is great. And you mentioned the memorabilia and the royalty from those sales, and in order to sell apparel or items. You had to figure out what it looked like so it could be recreated, and I'm sure it wasn't just lying around well preserved somewhere, and of course you only had black and white photos. So how did you track down those details so that these things could be reproduced and sold in that there could be proceeds from that. Used to processes. I would call ballplayers up and I would ask them. What was the color of uniform that you were nineteen forty four?.

Major League Baseball Dr Jeremy Crock Leagues Baseball Museum The New York Times Baseball Washington Post Reggie Jackson Crutchfield New York family gravesites Memorial Day Robinson Foundation Illinois System Group Missouri Research Committee Jimmie Julia Mike Jimmy
"negro leagues" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:57 min | 3 d ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"From I'm from the North West in in Washington. The every year, the Skagit Valley has a tulip festival, and you have fields and fields and fields of tubes. The only thing I know about tulips in terms of them, being kind of personality is willing. bobst of can be persnickety because they can rotten, it can be bad. Tulips and I think daffodils are bad for each other like they. They don't fight because their flowers, but they I think they extract the same stuff from the soil, and so they tend to die of their planted in close proximity to one another, but you can have a bunch of tulips like there's nothing about this, you know. I asked our listener. Jason Emeco to try to clarify what Borsa saying. Which of course is an impossible task because no one could ever do that, but I asked him if there was any other context and Jason says I think the Tulip line was in regard to the importance of insularity players who will never advance to the big leagues to the development of the few select guys who do so. He was saying. The minor leagues are about a system that develops. Develops major leaguers, but they're not explicitly about big leaguers in. It's important that we maintain those systems rather than downscale so I think he's saying that you need the other players the other, so they are like the soil and all. Yeah, so I think the tulips are the the future big leaguers top prospects, maybe and then the other guys, the guys who may be either teams are getting contracted, or they're getting released their the conditions that you need for those. Two flower I mean okay. That's true. That's the most you can ever really say about one of these boys metaphors. It's like I. Mean Okay. Okay? Okay. I guess all right I. Mean I I like the idea that that we can acknowledge that draftees you know are even if they are not themselves to become big leaguers are vitally important to the future development of big leakers that strikes me as a good thing to say out loud a bunch because if you do if you do that, then you look around, and you say while just because they don't develop into a beautiful flower themselves they allow the. The beautiful flower to do so in that beautiful flower has a lot of value to the to the field in which she grows, and so we probably should pay the manure to right. That's very important, because without the fertilizer and you know the soil and all the and the water. You can't get the beautiful flower and so gotta pay the water. It's important to do because otherwise you don't get your beautiful flower, so I'm I'm on board. You know like so many of skop horses quotes. The sentiment is sentiment I agree with, but boy. Does he make your work? which is the opposite of the point of making a metaphor? It's supposed to clarify something or eliminate something and that we spend many minutes talking about what exactly did he mean here? But there is a third one we're. Maybe it's a combination of two here, so he was talking about the sixty game season, and he said it's really about the coffee, not about the cup, so I think he is saying that it's about the baseball you do play not the container in which that baseball appears, so it's not about the structure of the season. It's about the Games. The action and Jason says that he went on to say. Say or preceded the Coffee Cup comment, saying the performance levels within a boundary basically what everyone had to deal with, and so to suggest that someone does it longer in the normal environment than it does in the environment that we're in the truth of the matter is you're not negotiating normal. You're negotiating the environment where within so he was saying you know. Don't blame the players or teams for sixty game seasons. It's not their fault that it's small sample, and that you should judge their value differently based on the length of the season so all right sure still think that Scott Boris needs some sample size understanding help. Yeah continues to be. This is like when he was like framing doesn't matter, and then you looked at his roster and I'm like Oh. You don't rep any of the good framers ways. Yeah will be curious to see if some of his clients have great sample seasons until say well can't hold it against them that it was Eric's games because it's about the coffee. Cup Which? What if other of his clients have really lousy seasons will. He tried to say well. It was healthy sixty games. You know. It's about the cup of coffee. That's what I've always said. We should well I. Mean I'm reticent to have anyone on the public side whose work I like and respect. Take it behind behind the wall of either a team or an agency. Because then we lose it, but I wonder we should anonymously we could do it because then. It won't be our work right. We should send him some of the. The work that that Russel as dawn on one particular step stabilize, and then then we'll know we'll we can. Then he can say well. You know this guy. He is just a small sample as fluky He was fine, but this guy you know hit the thing he was doing that. That's skill stable very early and then, and then we'll get to remind everyone what that really means because Scott Boris will. Use It wrong. Just like I kinda a little loosey Goosey with it, and then it'll, and then it'll be an educational moment for all of us, yeah! Like like you know it'll be the soil? The beautiful flower of our understand. So what goes with coffee in the morning coffee? If you're a coffee drinker, you need to wash something down with that coffee. Maybe breakfast and Scott Boras has thoughts on breakfast, too..

Jason Emeco Scott Boris Skagit Valley baseball Scott Boras Washington North West Borsa Eric Russel
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Sort of. Successes by that time in the late forties early fifties. Give me a sense of what you. Take away from. The legacy I know it's sort of off. Houston thrown around word, but of not only Posey, but also the grays and they're sort of. I don't know what they meant not only to Negro League baseball, but baseball generally because it seems like there was some. And again I throw this term around, but I think it's it's apt is is there's some pioneering going on in the story? Yes, there is it's. Caves they've set the stage. They set the stage for integration really because. By the late thirties, the you know everybody including white sports some way. Writers Jimmy Powers in New, York and Hayward Broun. We're saying. Why aren't you guys the majors we've seen these guys play their great. Why aren't they into majors? So that and the wartime you know blacks were blacks were in the army. Black were in the navy. Blacks were in the Air Force Tuskegee airman. All of that. Time the war is over. Truman officially desegregated the military. And it's like well. Now is the time. For sure he was secretly out in front of the whole thing was scouting and evaluating black players and. Integration happened in forty six and forty seven to start with, and then by fifty. It was pretty. You know at least most teams had least these black player. I guess that's widespread. And it was like pulling the plug on Negro Leagues Because Wow, we can go see Jackie Robinson. We can go see him as we can see Roy Campanella. Don Newcombe. In the real big leagues and did you grow just? Went from. Real prosperity, and by as late as nineteen forty six to. scrabbling around by the end of the decade is just. Reversal was amazing and they dropped out of sight, so yeah, they were pioneers. Unfortunately, they were unrecognized pioneers for Dan a couple of decades. Until. All the fame started to Negro Leaguers. Peterson wrote his seminal book on the ball. Was White John Hallway? Interviewed everybody get his hands on and turn those oral histories into two or three. Books that we all still read today because these stars have an owner's passed and John got it all down on paper for them from him. It's weird. We're still we're still. Rebuilding. A legacy that frankly should never died out. We shouldn't be doing what we're doing today, but was. He should've had a biography twenty years ago. It'd be I should not have stopped and twenty years ago I don't know but Yeah, it's very. It's sort of very strange repeal finding out. Details about people lose the statistics which were not kept well at the time are being rehabilitated particularly by the degray elite database. That scene heads dot com, which is. They have they have the most. Complete set of statistics at this point, and they're still working on them still happy to get the still happy to get a previously unknown box score in the mail or whatever and attitude database. Yeah, we're all working. We're working like crazy. It's something that should have been done twenty five years ago, but it wasn't so here we are. All righty then there we go watts to.

Negro Leaguers John baseball White John Hallway Don Newcombe Roy Campanella Truman Jackie Robinson Posey Air Force Tuskegee Houston Jimmy Powers Hayward Broun Peterson Dan York
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"How does he? How does he get into your? Into your consciousness to given that you've been focused on the FM endless Manley story excuse me. He become your next target so to speak of interest. Well, he He was a contemporary the her episode Newark Eagles who are active in the League at the same time, the homestead grays. In fact they were by the. Mid Forties. We're probably the two best teams in the League. So, in following the Manley Story of course I learned about all these other owners, and some of them are interesting. Some of them are not so interesting. Posey was Kinda fascinating I actually started research in twenty years ago. And I came to the. At one point I wrote a paper on him for seminar and I. Says You know I really don't like this guy. So I stopped working on him, and of course that was very naive, of course. If if why? Why did you not leave? You think well he he was. He was a very. Domineering and somewhat abrasive. Character. Upfront and I, said man. This guy's. This guy is kind of SOB. Of course I came to realize if if no one wrote, biographies of people were Nice and what we know about Napoleon Genghis. Kahn or any you know, so. That's Kinda stupid. He was intrigued. He was very successful so I cranked it up again a few years ago. And Once you get by his. Utter self confidence and his. Fact he was not at all shy about criticizing people whom he disagreed with which is practically everybody at one time or another? He was an amazingly successful businessman he was. A baseball businessman, which and basketball businessman, which makes it even more interesting. and. He did a lot. For. Not only his African American community and homestead, which is a suburb of Pittsburgh? But nationally in in some ways. He did a lot of good things you just had to get. Over his personality as I said in the book. He was. Admired respected by his fellow, owners would probably never be loved, but he could've cared less. That was not he wasn't in it to be loved. He was to be successful and to and to bring along the black community behind him to the extent, he could influence parts of it. Well, and and obviously arguably and very posthumously. Lauded as a member of the Baseball Hall of fame in two thousand six arguably way later than perhaps he should have been, but okay, but you're hinting at. The the foundation of this. Journey into ball and. Business, orientation of such as well as being as a player, this was sort of in the basketball realm, and maybe a little bit of a background in that, because it seems to be kind of his passion in during his collegiate years. Is this basketball thing and I think also interestingly maybe the first time we've kind of stumbled into this sort of the. I wouldn't call it the Negro Leagues of Professional. Basketball but certainly the. The the the Negro League if you will equivalence of if you will semi or fully pro basketball, this black fives kind of scenario. which even seems even less formed than save some of the Negro Leagues and that's saying something. Very very much so He was an all sport athlete at homestead. High School. He was football, basketball and baseball and know he played professional basketball and baseball, and he played semi pro football. he. Basketball Black Basketball You know pretty much entirely segregated at the time. I mean they were no integrated teams, but Black and white baseball teams played each other black and white basketball teams least outside of whatever city you're in rarely competed against each other But Posey, I and other good black players. Saturday semi pro team. In Pittsburgh called the Monticello Monticello Athletic Association. and. They got good, and and there were probably a dozen high level. Black basketball teams between? The East Coast in Chicago say one good one in Chicago. And there was absolutely no leak, but they would start at two. They got done polishing off the local opposition, which they usually did very easily. They would challenge each other's. It'd be these challenges generally you try to play each other three times during the season that way someone would win at least two and there wouldn't be no question who wanted who won the series, but you play at least a couple of games, home and home series and the black sporting press which sort of. Coalesce around. Who was the consensus champion? It was based upon the fact that well. A. B. B. and B.. So therefore. A is the champion And pose each team which was. He, the Monticello they went through different iterations of sponsors, but finally. The Premier Black Ben. Social Club in Pittsburgh the La- Wendy Club of which Posey's father. had been the president at one time and was still a member. Prominent member sponsored the team. and. It'll Wendy's started playing around teams in New York, they played. Philadelphia and they would beat them. And worthy consensus black national champions the nation, basically as I said running from like New York City Chicago. They were consensus black chickens, five years running in the early and mid twenties. Posey himself played, he was a guard. High score usually a high score because in those days the rules allowed. If anyone were fouled and foul shots were awarded..

Basketball Posey Pittsburgh baseball Chicago League Negro League Manley Negro Leagues of Professional Newark Forties Monticello Monticello Athletic Philadelphia Eagles Kahn Wendy New York High School La- Wendy Club East Coast
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"How does he? How does he get into your? Into your consciousness to given that you've been focused on the FM endless Manley story excuse me. He become your next target so to speak of interest. Well, he He was a contemporary the her episode Newark Eagles who are active in the League at the same time, the homestead grays. In fact they were by the. Mid Forties. We're probably the two best teams in the League. So, in following the Manley Story of course I learned about all these other owners, and some of them are interesting. Some of them are not so interesting. Posey was Kinda fascinating I actually started research in twenty years ago. And I came to the. At one point I wrote a paper on him for seminar and I. Says You know I really don't like this guy. So I stopped working on him, and of course that was very naive, of course. If if why? Why did you not leave? You think well he he was. He was a very. Domineering and somewhat abrasive. Character. Upfront and I, said man. This guy's. This guy is kind of SOB. Of course I came to realize if if no one wrote, biographies of people were Nice and what we know about Napoleon Genghis. Kahn or any you know, so. That's Kinda stupid. He was intrigued. He was very successful so I cranked it up again a few years ago. And Once you get by his. Utter self confidence and his. Fact he was not at all shy about criticizing people whom he disagreed with which is practically everybody at one time or another? He was an amazingly successful businessman he was. A baseball businessman, which and basketball businessman, which makes it even more interesting. and. He did a lot. For. Not only his African American community and homestead, which is a suburb of Pittsburgh? But nationally in in some ways. He did a lot of good things you just had to get. Over his personality as I said in the book. He was. Admired respected by his fellow, owners would probably never be loved, but he could've cared less. That was not he wasn't in it to be loved. He was to be successful and to and to bring along the black community behind him to the extent, he could influence parts of it. Well, and and obviously arguably and very posthumously. Lauded as a member of the Baseball Hall of fame in two thousand six arguably way later than perhaps he should have been, but okay, but you're hinting at. The the foundation of this. Journey into ball and. Business, orientation of such as well as being as a player, this was sort of in the basketball realm, and maybe a little bit of a background in that, because it seems to be kind of his passion in during his collegiate years. Is this basketball thing and I think also interestingly maybe the first time we've kind of stumbled into this sort of the. I wouldn't call it the Negro Leagues of Professional. Basketball but certainly the. The the the Negro League if you will equivalence of if you will semi or fully pro basketball, this black fives kind of scenario. which even seems even less formed than save some of the Negro Leagues and that's saying something. Very very much so He was an all sport athlete at homestead. High School. He was football, basketball and baseball and know he played professional basketball and baseball, and he played semi pro football. he. Basketball Black Basketball You know pretty much entirely segregated at the time. I mean they were no integrated teams, but Black and white baseball teams played each other black and white basketball teams least outside of whatever city you're in rarely competed against each other But Posey, I and other good black players. Saturday semi pro team. In Pittsburgh called the Monticello Monticello Athletic Association. and. They got good, and and there were probably a dozen high level. Black basketball teams between? The East Coast in Chicago say one good one in Chicago. And there was absolutely no leak, but they would start at two. They got done polishing off the local opposition, which they usually did very easily. They would challenge each other's. It'd be these challenges generally you try to play each other three times during the season that way someone would win at least two and there wouldn't be no question who wanted who won the series, but you play at least a couple of games, home and home series and the black sporting press which sort of. Coalesce around. Who was the consensus champion? It was based upon the fact that well. A. B. B. and B.. So therefore. A is the champion And pose each team which was. He, the Monticello they went through different iterations of sponsors, but finally. The Premier Black Ben. Social Club in Pittsburgh the La- Wendy Club of which Posey's father. had been the president at one time and was still a member. Prominent member sponsored the team. and. It'll Wendy's started playing around teams in New York, they played. Philadelphia and they would beat them. And worthy consensus black national champions the nation, basically as I said running from like New York City Chicago. They were consensus black chickens, five years running in the early and mid twenties. Posey himself played, he was a guard. High score usually a high score because in those days the rules allowed. If anyone were fouled and foul shots were awarded..

Basketball Posey Pittsburgh baseball Chicago League Negro League Manley Negro Leagues of Professional Newark Forties Monticello Monticello Athletic Philadelphia Eagles Kahn Wendy New York High School La- Wendy Club East Coast
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

05:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Into what used to be in professional sports. Thanks for finding us. and. People call me all kinds of things. The captain of contraction I've been called him to call the the Ivanka tour of expansion. The professor of previously domicile, also by the doctor of defunct the Reverend of relocation. Whatever you choose to call me again of course, please keep it clean. It's a family show to some extent I. Am you're humble host and the chief ringleader? Of the Frivolity and intrigue that we. Somehow. Find a we every something to do each and every week around this crazy topic that we've. Kind of made for ourselves that teams and leagues in various things that are no longer with us, for whatever reasons and we love any opportunity to go back to what we're GONNA get into this week again. The Negro Leagues, and we have our return. Guests Jim over Meyer who you may remember from? An episode Jeez I guess I was about four five maybe weeks ago. We talked about the Atlantic City back. Iraq giants. Atlantic city's really own you know or only ever real quote. Unquote Major, League professional team, any sort fascinating discoveries there boardwalk empire, and all Jim Brand new book out. It came out just a couple of months ago just before the pandemic outbreak, and all the craziness and other things that have sort of engulfed our world since but as a great book and where I learned an incredible amount and we talk about the life of a one Cumberland Posey. He of not only the homestead grays. He was the founder and the player and the manager and the owner. Of the longtime. Legendary. Negro Leagues Plural Different Leagues Different Environments Team. That played in suburban, Pittsburgh sort of homestead, Pennsylvania but also in Washington DC as we've kind of alluded to some of our previous chats about baseball indie. Yes, the homestead grays were kind of over a period of time kind of a dual city kind of situation, but this Guy Cumberland. Posey not only was he substantial in the creation, the running mb the legacy of this incredible. Arguably one of the most memorable Negro League teams the homestead, grays as we discover in our conversation with Jim, in just a couple of moments, Cumberland Posey was. By the way, not only a baseball hall of Famer. In, two thousand six posthumously of course but also a legendary and seminal basketball player is well back in the black fives, era, or also known as early black basketball. The black fives era were kind of like the you know the pre. National Basketball Association and The league's that kind of preceded that the the NBA. Basketball Association of America and these various industrial teams that we've talked about an in previous episodes as well but. This is almost like sort of the the basketball equivalent of the Negro. Leagues, that is in basketball and this black fives. Era is something we want to go much deeper in, but this is a great. shoehorned into the beginnings of of that exploration. You're talking about teams. I mean dozens of them. In the era, from roughly about nineteen, thousand, four, ninety, five, or so until you know arguably until about nineteen fifty, or so when the NBA finally became a thing as well as racially integrated. They were talking about like a teams that they were called Quince sometimes colored five or Negro fives or More simply and more reverentially now refer to his black fives. We're talking about a many many teams in in places like Philadelphia and Cleveland. And New York and DC in Chicago Pittsburgh and Cumberland Posey was arguably not so arguably regarded as. One of the greatest players of that era and frankly. As his induction into the national the naismith sorry. Naismith National Basketball Hall of fame as well in two thousand sixteen. Yes, a baseball hall of Famer inductees in two, thousand, six posthumously and the basketball hall of fame in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand six for baseball, two thousand sixteen for basketball. There you go. This is a guy who is regarded as one of the best basketball players of all time. No just the black fives here and this is a fascinating story of a phenomenal athlete and Sportsman and manager and runner of teams and owner, and all that kind of stuff in sports that I the. Is just a an amazing discovery that we get into with our guest this week Jim over Meyer. And his book is called Cum Posey of the homestead grays biography of the Negro Leagues owner and Hall of Famer, but as you're on our chat and as well in the book. It's really misnamed kind of title. Because we spend half of the conversation talking about not only the homestead grays and Posey's baseball legacy, but the black five era black fives era basketball. Realm that Posey was instrumental in as well. It's sort of a dual natured conversation with Jim. Coming up in just a few moments it is fascinating stuff and of the book absolutely well worth the read. You will learn a lot as I did..

Cumberland Posey basketball National Basketball Associatio Jim Brand Naismith National Basketball H Negro League Basketball Association of Amer Posey Atlantic City baseball founder Pittsburgh grays Meyer professor us. naismith Iraq Pennsylvania
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

05:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Into what used to be in professional sports. Thanks for finding us. and. People call me all kinds of things. The captain of contraction I've been called him to call the the Ivanka tour of expansion. The professor of previously domicile, also by the doctor of defunct the Reverend of relocation. Whatever you choose to call me again of course, please keep it clean. It's a family show to some extent I. Am you're humble host and the chief ringleader? Of the Frivolity and intrigue that we. Somehow. Find a we every something to do each and every week around this crazy topic that we've. Kind of made for ourselves that teams and leagues in various things that are no longer with us, for whatever reasons and we love any opportunity to go back to what we're GONNA get into this week again. The Negro Leagues, and we have our return. Guests Jim over Meyer who you may remember from? An episode Jeez I guess I was about four five maybe weeks ago. We talked about the Atlantic City back. Iraq giants. Atlantic city's really own you know or only ever real quote. Unquote Major, League professional team, any sort fascinating discoveries there boardwalk empire, and all Jim Brand new book out. It came out just a couple of months ago just before the pandemic outbreak, and all the craziness and other things that have sort of engulfed our world since but as a great book and where I learned an incredible amount and we talk about the life of a one Cumberland Posey. He of not only the homestead grays. He was the founder and the player and the manager and the owner. Of the longtime. Legendary. Negro Leagues Plural Different Leagues Different Environments Team. That played in suburban, Pittsburgh sort of homestead, Pennsylvania but also in Washington DC as we've kind of alluded to some of our previous chats about baseball indie. Yes, the homestead grays were kind of over a period of time kind of a dual city kind of situation, but this Guy Cumberland. Posey not only was he substantial in the creation, the running mb the legacy of this incredible. Arguably one of the most memorable Negro League teams the homestead, grays as we discover in our conversation with Jim, in just a couple of moments, Cumberland Posey was. By the way, not only a baseball hall of Famer. In, two thousand six posthumously of course but also a legendary and seminal basketball player is well back in the black fives, era, or also known as early black basketball. The black fives era were kind of like the you know the pre. National Basketball Association and The league's that kind of preceded that the the NBA. Basketball Association of America and these various industrial teams that we've talked about an in previous episodes as well but. This is almost like sort of the the basketball equivalent of the Negro. Leagues, that is in basketball and this black fives. Era is something we want to go much deeper in, but this is a great. shoehorned into the beginnings of of that exploration. You're talking about teams. I mean dozens of them. In the era, from roughly about nineteen, thousand, four, ninety, five, or so until you know arguably until about nineteen fifty, or so when the NBA finally became a thing as well as racially integrated. They were talking about like a teams that they were called Quince sometimes colored five or Negro fives or More simply and more reverentially now refer to his black fives. We're talking about a many many teams in in places like Philadelphia and Cleveland. And New York and DC in Chicago Pittsburgh and Cumberland Posey was arguably not so arguably regarded as. One of the greatest players of that era and frankly. As his induction into the national the naismith sorry. Naismith National Basketball Hall of fame as well in two thousand sixteen. Yes, a baseball hall of Famer inductees in two, thousand, six posthumously and the basketball hall of fame in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand six for baseball, two thousand sixteen for basketball. There you go. This is a guy who is regarded as one of the best basketball players of all time. No just the black fives here and this is a fascinating story of a phenomenal athlete and Sportsman and manager and runner of teams and owner, and all that kind of stuff in sports that I the. Is just a an amazing discovery that we get into with our guest this week Jim over Meyer. And his book is called Cum Posey of the homestead grays biography of the Negro Leagues owner and Hall of Famer, but as you're on our chat and as well in the book. It's really misnamed kind of title. Because we spend half of the conversation talking about not only the homestead grays and Posey's baseball legacy, but the black five era black fives era basketball. Realm that Posey was instrumental in as well. It's sort of a dual natured conversation with Jim. Coming up in just a few moments it is fascinating stuff and of the book absolutely well worth the read. You will learn a lot as I did..

basketball Cumberland Posey National Basketball Associatio Jim Brand Cum Posey Naismith National Basketball H Negro League Basketball Association of Amer Posey Atlantic City baseball founder Pittsburgh grays Meyer professor us. naismith Iraq
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

13:26 min | Last month

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"They picked up three or four of the of the better white semi pros in Atlantic City to fill vacancies. So you actually had an integrated black team playing for about a month which is pretty unknown. They one of them in fact was a guy named Whitey grueling. Who was seventeen years old? At the time he played that month for them later he became a sportswriter and became sports. Atlantic City daily press and in the forties was a constant proponent of integration of Major League baseball before Jackie Robinson. You gotTA wonder if if white he just didn't sort of get his start they're playing alongside black players in nineteen eighteen. So yes so they almost went out of business and then there was the thing that saves a lot of businesses somebody with cash and influence and Jackson took into partners from New York City. One was John Connors. Who had been a base he. He ran the restaurants in in Brooklyn and then in Harlem. He was pretty popular in that regard but he was very popular as a successful. As a baseball IMPRESARIO. He had had semi pro black team in Brooklyn as early as nineteen o four. He was forced out of business by Business Apolo white white business opponent named net. Strong who sort of dominated the semi pro seeing New York City by tying up Based available baseball fields and charging people to use them so connor was put out of business and he was happy to jump at the opportunity the backpacks and he brought in a business partner even probably even more money than him again. Even Barron Wilkins. Who is one of the leading speakeasy Operators in Harlem and had some sporting some sporting interest he was a backer of Jack Johnson the fighter and interested in sports not as Hands on guy but somebody like put some money into it and enjoy it. So they bought into the background checks and rejuvenated the team and this is in fact when they started playing part time in. New York City because they were from New York City. They wanted the team to play in New York City. They wanted to be outside of the the grip of Nat Strong. I didn't WANNA be paying him. A feed us a ballpark and that was feel strong. Strong had no sway over ebbets field or the Polo grounds so they wound a bit ebbets field for several important home series in those early twenties so the team was rejuvenated. And there's still not. They're still league ball in the east. But as you pointed out you go nationally could start it out in the Mid West and nineteen twenty and back rex. Rube foster was the president. Very energetic came powerful president of the Negro Nationally and he authored eastern clubs. What were called associate memberships? You could be an associate member of his league. Which gave you the opportunity to schedule Games with his teams. Which of course we're potential moneymakers. It also allowed you to be exempt from his his league teams rating. Your rosters treating you like an like an independent team. And where Free Agency reigned among the players and siphoning off your players and of course you. You couldn't siphon off his player his league's players either but it was a it was an arrangement that was often used in the Negro Leagues and the backpack became the first associate member of the Negro National League in Nineteen Twenty. Which helped them a lot. Day then became. They stayed associates of The Negro National League and got so they were playing a lot of they were playing a lot more high class black teams and traveling to New York City more playing in the high level semi pro world wide world of Semi Pro Bowl in New York City. Things were things were going very well. And then in nineteen twenty three the eastern the primary eastern teams most most of whom were so were Negro nationally associates came to what was pretty. In retrospect seems like a pretty obvious conclusion that they should have their only so the eastern Colored League was founded stretching from New York City due to Baltimore it was pretty compact. You didn't have to pay the train expenses to go all the way to Detroit or Chicago to play Play the National League teams. You could play among yourselves. And then you could then you if you wanted to. You could take a barnstorming trip. West or Western teams would come and see you for barnstorming trip which is always profitable so the eastern Colored League was founded in nineteen twenty three and were charter. Members bringing us up to how they got into a league. Maybe you sort of touched on it. But why would they not have gone the net Negro National League route and foster? Maybe not sort of trying to. If you will expand from the Midwest to the East Coast given a handful of associates at this point I would imagine that foster might have looked at the founding of this eastern Color League almost as as an affront made he did a matter of fact as a matter of fact you looked at it very much as in the front and they didn't negotiations for a Negro World series. Which you would have thought would have been a sort of an automatic dragged on for years and didn't end I series didn't take place until nineteen twenty four a lot of the colored teams. We're very undercapitalized. Because they catered to ten the catered primarily to ten percent of the American population which tended be people who held income jobs and they're simply was not that simply was not the discretionary income to buy ballpark taken that they were among the whites and so far so so barnstorming was very important going going on a road for a week or two at a time and you know hitting hitting some cities and playing some Negro League opponents but playing all these little towns along the way you picking picking up money all the way. The travel to travel to the mid west costs were extensive. Ed Bolden who who ran the team called Hildale in Philadelphia before when the League when a Eastern League was founded wrote in in the Philadelphia. Tribune that basically I can. I can play. I can play a week here in Philadelphia where my players can walk to work and make more money than I would after putting them on a train to Chicago and paying their way to and from Chicago for a series. So it was. It was a matter primarily economics it would be you know taking taking a trip to the mid west from the east and playing a bunch of teams and coming back say take for too much or two weeks rather would be a good thing happened to go there. All the time was a bad thing financially a bad thing but but almost immediately right you've got Atlantic City in this eastern Color League essentially kind of you know arguably plan some maybe more major markets being in the east coast and stuff so before we sort of getting the giants a little bit more where it feels like there was almost a the. I'M GONNA call it an uneasy peace right but There was certainly some post-season collaboration as the years went on between the two leagues right. Yes the ambassadors went to work and First Negro World Series was played in nineteen twenty four between the eastern cluber league champion and the Negro nationally champion and they there was in a Negro World Series in twenty five twenty six and twenty seven. There may have been more but the economy Got Worse prior leading up to the Great Depression and Eastern Colored League went out of business in the middle of the nineteen twenty eight. Which of course ended that relationship. Of course the Negro National League was only a few years behind and doing the same thing so so there were there. Were Twenty four twenty five. There were four Negro World series between DC L. and an eighth in the National League and the Bax went. We're in two of them. Although they did manage to win either of them they they got better and better as time went on and they were really a good team by the mid twenties. Well we'll talk about that team a little bit so so. Give me a sense of some of these players. We haven't really mentioned some of their names yet. But there's some really intriguing Anna solid characters on this on this team and maybe a little bit of how how they were getting better. I mean back. Not How much did he care? Know about the doings of the team and door who was running all of the sort of onfield stuff. Where are these players coming from? Well you had Jack Tom Jackson was primary own primary owner and then he brought in He brought in Connor and Barron Wilkins from New York City. Who BASICALLY NEUTRALIZED JACKSON? They were big money. Guys and Jackson was. I mean he was connected with the team but he was not getting out of power that he had before they bear in Wilkins. And kinda well. Let's give credit to Connor. He was really the baseball man. He knew a lot of people he he brought John. Henry Lloyd to the team Pop Lloyd D Hall of Famer considered to be maybe the best black shortstop there ever was one of the best shortstops anywhere. There was Lloyd he brought Loyd to the team Lloyd became the manager became the star of the team. One of the stars of the team. Interestingly enough Lloyd was getting a little on in years when he came to the backpacks and his first managerial. Decisions was to shift himself to second base because shortstop was one of the was basically his successor as the best shortstop at the time. Dick Lundy who had been one of the original duval giants seventeen years old when he came up from Jacksonville. Nineteen sixteen and before many years were gone. He was regarded as you know the the up and coming young Infield Star and black baseball so Lloyd's switched himself to second base shortstop. So you've got now in all star up to up to middle situation. They're outfielder say they really. You know we like to say well. This team had so many hall of famers. Besides Lloyd and Ben Taylor who played for the team early on and then at the very end? He managed the team and was a part time player. Only two hall of famers they had but they had lots of guys in that tier below. Outfielder name Chaney White. Who's really overlooked? I think I don't know if he's hall of fame category. He doesn't get the credit he should. He was in center field for several years. Guy Named Arthur Henderson whose nickname was rats because allegedly. Because when he was a young man going to work. He opened his lunch pail and one of his workmates. Had put a rat in his lunch peel and the jumped out and scared him to death so for their after supposedly Arthur Henderson was rats Henderson but he was a real good pitcher and he pitched for them for throughout the twenties. had read greer. Who is a his career was kind of short but it was really outstanding Win while it lasted. He pitched the first were Negro World Series No hitter for the backpacks in nineteen twenty six. The team had one of their star players again. I wouldn't exactly say Oliver. Marcelle is is underrated. The people know.

The Negro National League New York City eastern Colored League League Negro League Mid West Jack Tom Jackson National League Henry Lloyd Major League Connor Color League Atlantic City Brooklyn Harlem baseball John Connors Chicago associate member
"negro leagues" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

09:23 min | 2 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Producing from his home studio in Connecticut. Taylor Schwenk buster only working from my home studio. He just north of New York City Taylor. I remember early on during the lockdown. That you were every Friday every Saturday. You're taking a long drive. You still doing that now. That we're more than a month into this. The drives have dried up in the last two weekends. We might go for one this coming up next weekend but I'll pull back the curtain a little bit. My wife and I are two consecutive weekends to different people We've done these like zoom murder mystery parties which are a lot of fun. Actually I know that people do them face to face in real life. But we've gotten a little creative here and if you guys are looking to do something like that I would highly recommend it. It's fun to dress up a little bit. You know we did a twenty s era one and a seventy era once we made some different cocktails for it and My first time I wasn't really sure what to expect and I enjoyed it quite a bit. So that's taken over the drives a little bit so that's your recommendation. Mine is digging up. Dandelions which has become an obsession for me. Because you know because I'm home I've made up my mind. I'm going to have the best lawn in my neighborhoods and so over the weekend. My fifteen year old son who certainly has moments. When he doesn't like me very much. This weekend I assign him digging up two hundred dandelions. I dug up that many myself. We are on a hunt for Dandelions at our place. Is that sound. Like Fun Taylor It sounds like a negative fund. But where do you think you are on your quest to have the best looking lawn in the neighborhood like are you like seventy five percent of the way there or where where do you stand? Doodo mobster good start like my lawn is looking really good like I cut around the edges. All the things in the past where I get back from Sunday night baseball and Monday and I'd be tired and I'd see some clipping that I need to do and I wouldn't do it now. Like up at five in the morning just dying for that. I like to get out and do it so trying to make the best of it so you got you know. Murder Mystery Zoom. I've got dandelions it's all what whatever you need to get through it. It's it's dragging on here so you gotta you gotTa take what you can get there. You go well this is contributors week. Folks who helped the sport of baseball not necessarily as players managers are front optics executives. And we'll start with Bob Kendrick. Who is the President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City? In Alaska who he thinks is the greatest player of all time. We'll hear from Sarah Lines as well. I The news and notes retired Los Angeles dodgers broadcaster. Been scully's back home. After falling and being hospitalized the team quoted scully in twitter Saturday saying home and resting comfortably with my wife and we are both eagerly awaiting the time for dodger baseball. I almost can't say without trying to imitate. I'm not GONNA do that. The Cape Cod Baseball League. Renounce Summer League for top college stars cancelled. Its Two thousand twenty season due to the corona virus pandemic. It announced on Friday. The Cleveland Indians will pay regular salaries to full-time employees through June thirtieth. But the club has had to furlough others due to the Kobe. Nineteen pandemic the teams that senior executives took voluntary salary reductions to ensure the team could continue to pay staffers. The Indians confirm they furloughed Many of their part time employees and interns those will take effect on. May first and there is sad. News Steve Del Hausky a while. Left-hander was said to have been dubbed the fastest pitcher in baseball history. By Ted Williams died this week in new Britain Connecticut. He was eight years old. Before we get to Sarah into Bob. Don't forget about Jalen and Jacoby. The after show the guys are recapping episodes. Three and four of the last dance. The shows went up right after the last dance aired. And they'll continue doing that throughout the run of this Docu series Jalen and Jacoby. The after show is brought to you by State Farm and at and T. You can find it wherever you get your podcasts numbers game. They're laying say reporter producer for MLB DOT COM. And Sarah in a moment. We're GONNA be talking about Kendrick head of the Negro Leagues Museum in Baseball Museum in Kansas City. And so Sarah what I sent you an email over the weekend saying you know what? I'm curious about your perspective on who or the Five Best Negro Leagues players of all time. How would you rank them? Starting with number five. Yeah so I love looking into this and I love thinking about this because you know this is an area of baseball history that we don't know quite as much about and I know I personally have learned a lot about maybe over the last ten years or so but I feel like I'm always learning more and more about these players in reading more of these legends so it was a great great opportunity to dig back into this and I love it so my number five is Oscar Charleston. And you know they're so many great comparisons when you read about these players. Everybody is compared to some absolute legend and the one that I have for Oscar Charleston. Buck O'Neil said. He was the greatest player that he ever saw. He was compared to tie Cobb interest speaker and he was considered the Negro National in Israel. I real- superstar back in nineteen twenty and he could hit close to four hundred played a great outfield. Iran. Base while and Satchel page side. You have to see him to believe him anyway. And so the hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy six and of course buck. O'neil was a longtime first baseman and a manager and he we scout. He's got it later in life. There's actually an award at the hall of fame given every year now That's name for Buck O'Neil. Whose NUMBER FOUR. So number four. I've got cool Papa. Bell you know legendary speed one story. I saw said that he went from home home. In twelve seconds which is really fun. You know we can actually contextualized that now whether or not it's true we don't know but you know the fact that people thought that was true. I mean that's right there with the fastest home-to-home times who see on home runs you know now a stack cast so and he taught. Lubar have a steel basis. I think that almost tells you all you need to know in humans. The Hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy four and cool papa. Bell of course. The great story about said tongue in cheek was that he was so fast when he turned off the lights which he'd be back under the covers before the late actually went out. Who's number three so number? Three is Buck Leonard. He was the homestead grays first base for seventeen years which made him the longest tenure player with one team in the entire history of the Negro Leagues. He Josh Gibson were outstanding. Duo led the team to nine Negro nationally pennants and five world series. Aaron says and he went to the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two number. Two number. Two is Josh Gibson so dizzy Dean called him. One of the best that he ever saw it for a ton of power. The legends are absolutely incredible. They talk about five hundred foot home runs and maybe he hit nine. Hundred home runs in his career. We don't know you know for sure. But he certainly was. You know an absolute outstanding catcher an outstanding a power hitter and he wins the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two as well number one all time. So Am I number one. I have sexual page. I'm not sure that he was the absolute best player in the history of the Negro Leagues. But I think he is certainly the most famous on so I was sort of going back and forth between him Gibson whose number one number two I ended up with Satchel page number one. He was the first to go into the hall of fame. He's the most associated with the league. I think a lot of ways and you know a lot of people thought he was the greatest pitcher whoever left and I want to ask you about the greatest player of all time in any league for me. It's always been willie. Mays who to me? He did so many things well he was fast. He could play defense. He hit for power. He won the Most Valuable Player in the National League. A couple of times Led the League in a home runs multiple times. He won a batting title in One Thousand. Nine hundred fifty four. It's six hundred. Sixty homers had three thousand two hundred eighty three hits scored over two thousand runs in his career. That would be my pick for greatest player of all time. How about you? Yeah I mean I you. I have talked about many times on here. My mother grew up a huge giant. Stand a huge giant fan. Let's hear about Willie mays since I you know basically couldn't talk yet and I've always always default to him but I will say that you know as I learn more and more about these Negro Leagues players. I mean I do think that you know there are so many players who you hear that you know could have been the greatest of all time or would have been considered the greatest of all time in major league history. Had they gotten the chance to play their gotten a chance to play. They're in their prime. So I think that there certainly are You know other considerations to take but I always go slowly mace yes. Some people would argue Babe Ruth. Some people would argue Henry Aaron. I'm going to put that question of Bob in just a moment. Sarah thanks for doing this. Always great to talk with you. Basis for having me investor. Kendrick is President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Missouri and Bob. Thanks for joining us. Sit at time when everybody's looking for distraction and I know you've got a lot of stories always exciting for me because I'm looking forward to those same distracting about these baseball and baseball history because the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum like everybody else has been so greatly impacted by the health situation that we're currently.

baseball Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Sarah Lines Bob Kendrick Negro Leagues Josh Gibson Kansas City murder Cape Cod Baseball League Buck O'Neil Willie mays Oscar Charleston Negro Leagues Museum Henry Aaron League Taylor Schwenk President Summer League Connecticut New York
"negro leagues" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

05:07 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on The Lead

"What is your lasting impression of this museum and the legacy of the Negro Leagues? It's what it does to children honestly And I'm saying that because of what observed at the tour you know. One of the interesting things about children is that they don't know the racism the prejudice the segregation thankfully. They can't even fathom America. That was divided by color segregation. Summarized through the eyes of a child is done so very simply that was dumb and the right it was dumb but it was also the way that this country was and it's very important that we allow our children to look back in time. If they are to appreciate how far we've come when Bob Kendrick gives a tour you know. He's not shy about saying. Hey there were white baseball players. Who Spit on Jackie Robinson? When he was slide into second base and that sort of just a a small detail of what he faced throughout the course of his rookie season. So they're blown away when they come in and learn you go jail sitting in wrong. Section of Ballpark are drinking from the wrong water. Found using the wrong restroom. Lot of people as you well know lost their lives for breaking those simple societal standards. But the other thing that you have to admire is they never allow this to kill the love of the game of baseball. So if I've got to sleep on the bus and eat my peanut butter and crackers. I'M GONNA keep playing ball and really that's the prevailing spirit that you feel here at the Negro Leagues Museum and so you see these kids have fun when they get on that field after learning all that history they WANNA play baseball. You will see them mimicking. Hey here's how I'm going to swing the bat and I'm going to run the first base and I'm GonNa get this head off such paid a and again. We hope that we can be part of that equation. That gets kids excited about playing our sport and but it's important that they be able to come here and see themselves when they walk through this museum. They say people look just like them so to see how it transforms children in a way that you can see them see themselves in these nearly ballplayers when these men weren't able to get the same opportunities that we now have as Americans and while America was trying to prevent them from sharing and the joys of her so-called National Palestine it was the American spirit that allowed them to persevere and prevail and I think that's what makes this story so triumphant and so compelling and so are inspired while nate. Thank you so much for joining us for giving us your perspective and for being our eyes and ears into the Negro Leagues Museum. Yes thank you so much for having me and I hope. This encourages people to check out the museum for themselves. While Taylor clearly loves baseball he covers the Kansas City chiefs for the athletic and you can read his coverage of the chiefs at the athletic dot. Com here are some other stories. We're following at lead. Things are getting testy with the. Nfl's proposed new CBA. Which would make the season seventeen games? Instead of sixteen quarterback Aaron Rodgers and Russell Wilson took to social media denouncing the deal with Roger saying the length of the season was quote. Never something to be negotiated. Meanwhile Wilson tweeted quote the NBA and Mlb are doing it right. Players come first. All players deserve the same. We should not rush the next ten years for today's satisfaction. I vote no but despite this opposition. Nfl PA Executive Director. Demorris Smith told reporters Thursday that he's confident. The deal will be passed. This has been happening in Indianapolis where the NFL combine is also going on but interestingly enough. It's not the prospect workouts that have the football world buzzing the Athletics Lindsay Jones writes quote with apologies to Joe Borough and the rest of the rookies who have traveled here for the NFL scouting. Combine the most interesting quarterback named here in Indianapolis. Is Tom Brady? Where Brady ends up. And where Philip Rivers Cam Newton and Jameis Winston end up have been big talking points at. The Combine Jones writes that quote. It's all these. What ifs and speculation combined by a top heavy draft class of passers headlined by Borough and Alabama's to attack of Aloha? That make this. The most unique quarterback off season possibly ever. That's it for the week. Thanks for listening. Everyone producers. Caitlyn plummer Chris. Siegel and Chris Olen editing and production by senior producers Lea Hernandez and Matt. Strap fact checking by Ian Sound Design and mixing by air in. May Jake Gorski and Joe. Richardson the executive producer of the lead is under Calcio. Could beat the Davidson is our editorial director. Our Show is executive produced by Lea Hernandez Marshal Louis and earn on Lopez for wondering from wondering and the athletic. I'm under SCELZO. I'm could beat the Davidson Sia Monday..

Negro Leagues Museum baseball Nfl America Bob Kendrick Joe Borough Lindsay Jones nate Lea Hernandez Jackie Robinson Tom Brady Indianapolis Caitlyn plummer Chris Russell Wilson Philip Rivers Cam Newton Demorris Smith Calcio editorial director Taylor
"negro leagues" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

04:44 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on The Lead

"So we can't talk about the Negro Leagues or the Negro Leagues Museum. Without talking about Jackie Robinson and the museum does a really beautiful job of chronicling his transition from the Kansas City. Monarchs to the Brooklyn Dodgers and I think people think Jackie just walked out of nowhere and started playing for the Brooklyn dodgers but Israel rookie season was nineteen forty five. Yeah tell people all the time before he was number forty two. He was number five for the Kansas City. Monarchs and of course the year that he spent in Kansas City. He fell in love with everything that Kansas City is famous for Barbecue and jazz. Everyone Remembers Forty. Two obviously Major League Baseball as retired the number on every Jersey except for one day when Jackie Robinson Day in the major leagues. But one of the things that Bob has to explain to anyone who will listen is that no Jackie Robinson. At the time in one thousand forty five was not the greatest big rallies baseball player. There were other meagerly players who you can make a legitimate argument for bed of baseball players. Then Jackie Robinson that. This wasn't just about talent you had to have someone who had the intestinal fortitude to deal with the adverse social conditions that they would be faced with as higher near breaking the color barrier and Jackie had him on. He wasn't a guy that was going to go out and party. It was gonNA make an embarrassment of himself once he got to the major leagues instead. He understood the entire weight the gravity that was placed upon him by saying. Hey you represent not just yourself not just your family but you present a whole race of people in your own country. Yeah you had to have the entire package. Because I gue- came failed. I cannot fail I guy failed. There is no second guy and so that was the enormous weight that Robinson was carrying on his back when he took that challenge becoming baseball's chosen. What and another important player you learn about during the tour is Hank Aaron. A player that Bob just talk so lovingly about his all time favorite player. Yeah. This is my favorite picture in the entire exhibition. Because I'm a huge Henrio Fan. He is my all time favorite baseball player. And my childhood idol as a kid growing up in Crossville Georgia That's who I wanted to be in it matters to Bob Kendrick because he grew up in Georgia and of course when Hank Aaron Broke immeasurably baseball record for the most home runs. He did it as Atlanta Braves. So Bob Griese disgrace story about how he was enacting. What occurred on the field in his own living room. When he reckoned homerun some fifteen he's circling the bases in Atlanta Fulton County Stadium and I'm circling the bases in my mother's living room in Crossville Georgia and as he was touching them all hours testing them all and so he holds a special place in my heart and nate. One of my favorite things about the museum is it does justice to the role of black women in the Negro Leagues. Were where there were three women who played professionally in the Negro News Tony Stone. Connie Morgan and Mamie Peanut Johnson Pioneers women who competed with an against the men in the one thousand. Nine hundred fifty. Tony Stone took the roster place of Henry Aaron when she joined the Indianapolis clowns so hank Aaron goes onto the major leagues the following year. Comes Tony Stone? Someone who had played barnstorm as a woman baseball player for many years and finally got the opportunity to be sort of a crowd pleaser and a really talented baseball player. Who got a chance to play in the Negro Leagues and is not just a women who played the game as well in the it was a very power nearing league. They also have female leaders executives owners in the Negro Leagues Way Ahead of Major League Baseball. Most notably EPA Manley effort manly and a husband Abe own Newark Eagles. But it was Mrs Manley who ran the day to day operations. That baseball team consider BOB. The first woman general manager in professional baseball history. She own and she knew the business of baseball as well as any man. The only thing that the nearly cared about is can you play or do you know the business a baseball if you know one of those two things? If you're pretty good at it they included you in a way that few other businesses were allowing that to occur in the nineteen forties.

Baseball Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues Negro Leagues Museum Hank Aaron Kansas City Major League Baseball Bob Kendrick Tony Stone Bob Brooklyn Dodgers Bob Griese Atlanta Braves Georgia Crossville Connie Morgan Mrs Manley Newark Eagles Israel Atlanta Fulton County Stadium
"negro leagues" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

01:58 min | 4 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on The Lead

"The.

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Let's talk about that because this is i. I'm guessing the first time that he not only is is a player but also a manager or is able to source straddle both of those roles goals for the first time. Yeah that's exactly right and and being a manager At least at that time at least for Charleston meant really putting together the roster. You're the general manager. As much as you are a manager The mandate the teams. A man named Colonel Struthers who was like the second black policemen? Lebron Harrisburg Way. Something like three hundred pounds but taught ballet dancing to use the parents use quite a character He wasn't necessarily so well connected in the world of Major League Baseball to put together To be able to together really good roster that was that was Charleston's job and that was something I think he really I wanted to do so. Give me a sense. Then of of of the Harrisburg experience because I think it's also important period of time In the Negro Leagues generally right. Where a lot of things in this country things kind of stumbled along as the Great Depression effectively took root if you will electronically macro to the point where there was a from all indications? It seems like You know the leagues that had had sort of gotten sort of their starting in the early part of the twentieth kind of kind of crumbling and and really kind of you know kind of went dark after a while after say twenty nine nine and thirty but this is during his time in Harrisburg where he's arguably kind of the peak but he's he's being able to do both thinks thanks right and and kind of stand out in in both those categories both managing and playing. Yeah absolutely it. Is it definitely part of his peak. I mean some of the statistics. Sixty was up in Harrisburg Are Crazy they were considered crazy at the time. And and and this sort of more exacting research down in the last few years that people going back to them. All box scores There's still crazy can nineteen twenty four. It's four zero five. Nineteen twenty five. It looks like he hit like four twenty seven. I mean insane numbers But Harrisburg this is twenty four twenty five. This is before the Great Depression. His four year. Run Their Eastern color the had probably problems were not caused by the incipient Great Depression. That was probably just more. The usual. All endemic now under capitalization issues of the Negro Leagues. It's when he goes to Hildale and that's in twenty eight twenty nine that's from. The depression starts to catch up with him. Another league folds in which Dale is playing and That creates a lot of this Again player movement like crazy only with L. deal for a couple of years and that's with the depression and the folding of that team in that league pushes them out to Pittsburgh Eric where he spends the last sort of prime vague if he's playing career and ends up with a man named Cumberland Posey and his homestead Greece. All going Eh. Get to come hosie in this in a minute and held in Pittsburgh in particular in a second but but maybe this is a good opportunity to kind of maybe delve in a little bit in to some of the the numbers that he's putting up both on all parts I guess fielding certainly in hitting and maybe as you sort of answer or give give our audience a sense of just how dominant and standout his stats and his play was slash work. Can you square that though also with what I would imagine magin would be you know a a trust factor when it came to statistics in these. Because you know how how how credible how not or how we're lucky exactly the question dead. That's exactly the question asked the question I asked right. I WANNA know that too. I don't WanNa just rely on sort of mythical. Oh number Unfortunately we don't have to so let me answer your question. In a couple of ways I bush is. How good are Negro League statistics today? Can we trust them. And it's really odd in if you think about it but the stats we have. Today are much much better than we've ever had before including at the time When teams were very lax about affording stats or league certainly relaxed about collecting them? oftentimes and then you know numbers just sort of get made up in the press o without too much to back them up so what happened and this is just one of the great things happen in sports forth in the last generation the last ten or fifteen years really this army of volunteer researchers have gone back all. These newspapers have been digitized. A lot of box scores were reported. And they compiled like we compile statistics from those scores and and the site. I'd recommend any of your listeners are interested in this this I called team heads dot com houses. All of this and it's really well done and only counts gains against top competition petition. So this isn't just games against the little sisters of the poor. This is Major Negro League competition and also includes games at these teams played against Major League. Teams As well as you'd like the Latin America as well so. That's a pretty good answer that first question the quality we don't have all of them The estimate that I've gotten from people who are really know this well. It's like seventy five eighty percent of the box scores between teams so it good representative sample for the stats are pretty good Sorry if you wanted to jump in there but the second thing is We know that and we know. I know that Oscar right now and they're still putting a new numbers from time to time. Box Go right now at about half the plate appearances Willie mays add get some context tax. He had two hundred ten runs. Three hundred fifty five stolen bases hits three fifty one four thirty one days five seventy five slugging percentage. That's really good and I've sort of played around constructing. Like what would an alternative Major League Oscar truly been able to do it seems to me. You just very conservative and say well what did he at least three hundred home runs. He would've still in at least four hundred basis. He almost does again in half the plate. Appearances may have. It was very durable. He would hit at least three hundred three fifty one the Negro Leagues Um and we know who would have been like a positive defender you know in the advanced analytics language language you know above zero defensive wins above replacement who else in major league history has done that nobody nobody has has hit those used for marks..

Negro Leagues Major League Baseball Harrisburg Major Negro League Charleston general manager Colonel Struthers Pittsburgh Lebron Hildale Willie mays Cumberland Posey Oscar magin Latin America Dale representative
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

04:11 min | 10 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"And hell why not not even sign up for our weekly newsletter may be the first on your block before the the whole pulawy to find out what's gonna be driven this coming weekend all of our great episodes yet to to come so you can do all those fun things from the website there were directly as you may choose and byron of course is a the renaissance man he's got so much entertainment stuff out there he is a dynamic singer he has backed up folks like barry manilow and barbara streisand and john on warwick of course and celine dion you can check out his music his photography and maybe even some tidbits about the films that we are eagerly awaiting a on the history of the negro leagues and and also the story of epa manley all of that stuff and more can be found on his website at byron motley motley dot com that's b. y. r. o. n. motley motif l. e. y. dot com byron mountain dot com i'm sure he'll be glad you did and as we say goodbye not we're going to leave you with a cut from byron's i think it's two thousand eight if i'm not mistaken album jazz and cocktails and i thought this was the the probably the most appropriate to send us out on it it's the cover of the great woodrow buddy johnson and count basie composition and compilation compilation from one thousand nine hundred forty nine it's byron's cover version of did you see jackie robinson it that ball we leave you with this fine tune finally done by byron myron motley and we thank you for listening in until next week the sage jackie robinson hit that ball aw zoom in cross left bill jack hit babb uh-huh and when he slung is back the crowd went wild because he not fat baller a solid ma bob jack bad well now sacha pages i just mellow solis newcomb mandel who but it's a natural fact when it comes in the team is now did you see jackie robinson hit that ball i mean he hit it yes yes yes jack is show none dynamics of america contract at at the beginning of the modern guard we'll tell you now before he made the majors he was one of the play in the league with that joe page and shos double duty and colder must have been something to see what my daddy told me now the araba.

woodrow buddy johnson jackie robinson babb barry manilow barbara streisand celine dion byron motley b. y. r. o. n. motley byron byron myron motley bill jack bob jack america joe
"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:45 min | 10 months ago

"negro leagues" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Being the only living umpire of the historic krieger leagues and he has also served his country at the united states marine after receiving a purple heart for his service during world war two the umpired in the negro league for the lights of fuck o.'neil satchel page willie mays any banks in two thousand twelve he was awarded the nation's highest civilian honor the congressional gold medal of honor for his service during world war two bob is a founding member of the royal lancers and also serves on the board of directors for the league baseball museum in kansas city he has joined tonight by his wipe more than sixty years pearleen and his family please raise your budweiser and join us in honoring bob motley and all those those who keep our nation safe and free lance who ten her to today welcome to good seats still available a curious little i cast devoted to exploring what used to be an professional sports your host tim hanlin alright friends how you doing let's get this show on the road shall we my name's tim henman and this is indeed good seats it's still available it's are curious little podcast our journey each and every week despite all the odds against it into what used to be in professional sports i welcome welcome you to the proceedings and i truly appreciate you honoring me with a little download this week and putting us in your ear buds we know that you have just on the edge of zillions of choices in podcast landed i'ma tickled pink that you would allow us to hopefully entertain and and maybe educate and put a little song in your heart for a little while with this'll episode as as we continue our journey into the world of forgotten sports especially in the world of professional teams that have come and gone for whatever reasons and we are excited and very happy to finally be getting back to jack antic topic that we love to delve into much deeper and we're excited at the excuse to this week with our guest byron motley as we talk talk about his father's career as an umpire a groundbreaking and simply pioneering umpire in in the negro leagues in a book that was published back in twenty seven in both printed and in audio form it is a a a delight and a revelation i'm only sorry i hadn't read it until recently came out twenty seven it's called ruling over monarchs the giants and stars umpiring in the negro leagues and beyond and it is a work of both love and passion the bob motley story ori almost oral history based on his remembrances of his exploits calling balls and strikes and then some in the negro leagues of the nineteen forties and early early nineteen fifties written compiled and synthesized through the eyes and ears and the pen of his son byron who is our guest this week and and byron a creative renaissance man in his own right you may have heard him as a backing vocal for great aristo christa artists like barry manilow dionne warwick and a whole host of others he has a bunch of albums out he is a master photographer a a lot of a great creative efforts and energies and of course i don't know of course but certainly interestingly especially for this this conversation as an outgrowth of of of the book that he co authored with his dad who sadly passed away about two years ago at the tremendous well lived age of ninety one byron's also in the midst initial here of putting together what is probably an overdue documentary of substance about the history of the negro we grow leagues and also even a separate project in in the works on the life and times of epa manley obviously towering figure in the management it of negro league baseball but we're going to sort of get into kind of the beginnings of of byron's efforts and creativity around the negro leagues through the the story of his father's life as an umpire in the negro leagues and if that wasn't enough of a story and certainly it was you heard that clip there from kansas the city royals world series game at twenty four teens a matter of fact that was world series game number six if you were in the stands that's what you heard in i don't know what inning was elliot's between the fifth and sixth six innings and i'm not sure that made the national broadcast as well i'm sure some some call out was i'm sure some people yelling at their devices now going of course it was sir you know whatever but feel free to correct us or give us the specifics of that but bobby was in the crowd and he was saluted not only for being a pioneer empire in the negro leagues and and and obviously anybody involved in the negro leagues as a player manager as administrator or as an empire more rarely i guess is a pioneer just on that ah level alone but this is also a man bob motley who was a war hero always wore the purple heart for for being injured in combat during world war too and it's a very interesting story as to how bob motley went from being in the marines and fighting the good fight in a you know not so in racially integrated military nor country sadly but how we stumbled into the world of umpiring baseball is directly related to his war war experiences and we're gonna get it all at as well as not only some of the great stories and memories and anecdotes that byron experience with his dad growing up and in the interview process for this book but also the years afterwards were bob continued to fight the good fight he a passion you will hear nothing short i have a passion for baseball for umpiring for attaining the highest level possible and dedication to the job to the effort of being professional national on pirate baseball it's a great story it's it's a wonderful read and again it's called ruling over monarchs giants and stars umpiring in the negro leagues and beyond and you will find finding a link.

united states sixty years two years
The importance of the predominantly black Mamie Johnson team at the Little League World Series

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:07 min | 2 years ago

The importance of the predominantly black Mamie Johnson team at the Little League World Series

"The Friday. Morning Atlanta's, seventy two degrees in college park I'm Lucia here's here's. What's happening This. Is probably going to be the most pro black president that we've. Had in our lifetime that's a black Ohio pastor who was, an early, supporter of president Donald Trump's campaign speaking during a White House gathering faith leaders. Pastor, Daryll Scott thinks President Trump will be. The most pro black president in his lifetime Scott compare, Trump to his predecessor Barack Obama this. President actually wants to prove something to our. Community our faith based community and the community. The last president didn't feel like he had he felt like even have we. Gotta pass the, roundtable with the president was focused on efforts to reform the. Prison system during Trump's campaign he accused Democrats of doing too little to help urban communities often. As an often asked rather African Americans what they had to lose by voting for him the White House. Has been focusing its criminal Justice reform efforts on improving, reentry rehabilitation and workforce training programs instead. Of sentencing, reform with many advocates Argue which many advocates argue would make a. Bigger difference in other news the statue of liberty climber is due in federal court in Manhattan. Today to face charges Patricia Okumu scaled lady liberty on July four. To denounce is and what she consider President Trump's anti immigration, policies including, detention centers and the forced separation of families are protests calls a three hour. Police, standoff in the evacuation of liberty island. Her supporters are circulating an online petition calling on prosecutors, to drop the charges against her which. Include trespassing disorderly conduct and interference with a. Government agency sports now little leaguers from Washington. DC we'll make history this weekend the Mamie Johnson little leaguers from southeast DC. Will be the, first predominantly predominantly black team ever to represent the nation's capital. At the little league mid Atlantic regionals when the team took the DC championship last month late. Last month it was the first time in more than thirty years that a team from north west Washington's. Wealthy neighborhoods did not win the title The Mamie Johnson team is named for, the first woman, to pitch in the negro leagues the twelve member ball club that was founded only four years ago has eleven. Players who are black and one who, is white a multi vehicle crash has shut down, multiple northbound lanes, on, the downtown connector just before I twenty we'll have, a full traffic report, for. You just ahead a look. At the weather now flash flood watch is posted until eight this morning for many parts of northern Georgia expect a thirty percent chance of showers and thunderstorms we'll see cloudy skies today with a high near eighty three right now, seventy one degrees in east point for news and talk thirteen eighty w. a. okay I'm libra Harris now here's a look at traffic We're traveling down a connector headed north. Abernathy had to hold all the travel lanes getting the vehicles out of the travel portion of the roadway fell soon you'll be moving again. But Dili's begin in back before the seventy five eighty five the path Abernathy again all. Lanes temporarily held that will get you back in business and all the road again I'm definitely stop whereas on the dock thirteen. Eighty w. a. l. k..

President Trump Mamie Johnson White House Barack Obama Daryll Scott Washington Liberty Island Abernathy Patricia Okumu Lucia Atlanta Manhattan Dili Libra Harris DC Ohio
Trump to Go Away G-7 Premature, missing Ecological talks ~ Independent Recorder

24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Trump to Go Away G-7 Premature, missing Ecological talks ~ Independent Recorder

"For information in the murder of a twenty year old man whose body was pulled from pontiac lake divers recovering the body of amelia valdez from osmond lake thursday evening shortly after he had been reported missing president trump wraps up his visit at the g seven summit in quebec some tough talk on trade speaking to reporters before departing for his singapore meeting with north korean leader kim jong own the president said that the meeting had been very successful we'll have more from cbs at two thirty one detroit tigers negro leagues weekend celebration it all continues this weekend.

Murder Amelia Valdez Osmond Lake Donald Trump President Trump Detroit Tigers Pontiac Lake Quebec Singapore Kim Jong Twenty Year
Peter King on decision to leave MMQB; NFL draft fallout

The Paul W. Smith Show

02:12 min | 2 years ago

Peter King on decision to leave MMQB; NFL draft fallout

"Working on scattered outages as well from last week's windstorm news time seven thirty three here's steve courtney sports all rich and not a very good performance by the tigers in kansas city yesterday they wrap up the fourgame series as a matter of fact that skipper ron gardenhire referred to it as ridiculous anyway the royals get a four two win kansas city wins a series for the first time in eleven tries this season matthew boyd fourrun six hits in seven innings of work tigers in texas to kick off the first of three eight oh five tonight michael fulmer on the hill for the tigers he's wanting to two point eight zero the era nba postseason the warriors now with a stranglehold on their series with the pelicans golden state gets a one eighteen ninety two win yesterday golden state up three one there the rockets ditto they beat the utah jazz one hundred eighty seven in utah houston up there now three games to one chris paul by the way twenty seven points sanli cup playoffs the lightning advance again they beat the bruins three one they will face the capitals or penguins caps up in that series three to western conference had the golden knights of vegas shutting out the sharks three nothing marc andre fleury twenty eight saves four shutout of the postseason vegas advances at a conference final as an expansion team no less face either winnipeg or nashville the jets lead that series three games to two and justifies victory in saturday's kentucky derby was worth one point four three two million to the horse's owners and nearly as much to one texas woman who picked five straight winners in races eight through twelve at churchill downs the woman from austin texas one one point two million dollars whether eighteen dollar pick five bet steve courtney wjr sports traffic and weather first on the fives with dc straight ahead this michigan opera theatre presents the the summer came this story of negro leagues baseball legend josh gibson considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time his historic journey is told of talent heartbreak and overcoming prejudice and discrimination featuring the michigan opera theatre orchestra and chorus may twelfth through the twentieth at the detroit opera house tickets and information at michigan opera dot org a possible by general motors.

Josh Gibson Michigan Detroit Opera House Baseball Kentucky Nashville Winnipeg Marc Andre Fleury Utah NBA Matthew Boyd Kansas Steve Courtney General Motors Tigers Michigan Opera Theatre Austin Churchill Downs Jets