23 Burst results for "Negro League"

Jackie Robinson Integrates Baseball

Black History in Two Minutes

02:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Jackie Robinson Integrates Baseball

"On April Fifteenth Nineteen forty seven when Jackie, Robinson, walked onto the field for the Brooklyn dodgers he broke Major League Baseball's color line forever changing the sport. And Race. Relations in America. Jackie Robinson was an extraordinary athlete lettering in four Varsity sports at UCLA. Doing more to, he was drafted into the army who was court martialled after refusing to move to the back of a segregated military bus Robinson fought his case he was acquitted then honorably discharged. So. He always had a sense of fairness always had a sense of racial justice and social justice. Nineteen forty-five because the major leagues remained segregated Robinson joined the Negro Leagues and played for the Kansas City monarchs. Meanwhile, sports writers from African American newspapers were pressuring the major leagues to integrate. Branch Rickey. General Manager of the Brooklyn. Dodgers decided he'd act and began a search for the perfect prospect. Robinson's college education and his ability to endure the racists attacks that inevitably would ensue convince Rickie. It was Robinson who was the ideal candidate to become the first African American. Major. League player. Ricky sign. Robinson to the Brooklyn dodgers in nineteen forty seven. Despite racist abuse from opposing teams and Taunting by the Crowds Robinson manage to focus on the game. But the cost was high. He suffered indignities because of a commitment not to fight back. Gradually. He build a fan base excelled on the field and then was named rookie of the year. Even. Naysayers couldn't deny his outstanding talent as he led the Brooklyn dodgers to their first and only World Series Championship. When he retired Robinson turned his attention to the civil rights movement. He's a frontline participant mending his prestige, his presence to these causes for civil rights. He supported protests in Alabama, attended the march on Washington and was one of the NWEA CP's biggest fundraisers. Yet Robinson Saul civil rights as more than a political movement. He engages in business and entrepreneurial activities. It speaks to his multifaceted approach new away with Jim Crow create opportunities five Americans. By breaking the color line America's favorite pastime Jackie Robinson Open the door for integration far beyond the baseball field.

Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers Robinson Saul Brooklyn America African American Newspapers Branch Rickey Ucla Jim Crow Ricky Sign Kansas City General Manager Alabama League Rickie Washington
"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

04:12 min | Last month

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"I I like to think we're laying the groundwork and that's why the new edition came out because I was trying to put it in this store perspective. But since then in early on Janet, Bruce. wrote the best account of the Kansas City monarch team. And other people now have done almost every team have a book about them. The group within Sabre has a Negro League committee doing even more research. That's great. My colleague cling. Craig Davidson, and I have just finished actually a film called island of baseball. Where we were down in Cuba because the Negro Leaguers who were down in Cuba From the night actually nineteen, six on. WOR when Rube foster was down there as a pitcher. were, very much a part of the story of all in Cuba. and Cuba was the most important place for baseball for whites and blacks for many many years. Until really the end of the Castro Castro came in. So you're talking from from the turn of the century to nineteen sixty. So we made a film about that. We were at the home of Martine two. He goes son in a little town in the backwater of Cuba. The the the relationship between Black Americans in baseball in the Caribbean Major Puerto Rico. Venezuela Panama if you look at, you know Tony Peres's son need water who wonderful announcer. But. He he gets the flavor of that because he knows it and its roots. That story that's a great story. The one left to be done I. Think is the story of Mexico. Because in the nineteen forties, the great black players were in Mexico because the Mexican there was a family who ran baseball in Mexico who set out to beat the beat the major leagues. And and the white major leaguers went some of them Whitey Ford People like that went to Mexico. But so did the best black players? And that's the final chapter. I think of what Craig and I are going to work on but. That's that's one that hasn't quite been told fully aware of the first one come out and Wendy, think you're working on that second one? Well Island in baseball. WE'LL PRE is premiering at the Harlem Film Festival unfortunately because of the virus, it's it's virtual. imminently. And we're very excited about that. So it's done. And, it'll be out there for the world. at any time really that's that's that's imminent. The other one is our dream, but we have a lot of material collected my colleague. Has. We've done interviews in. Mexico. and. We have tremendous Person Accounts from the players did because we always ask them about their Cuban. Well their entire Caribbean and Mexico experiences. So we have that material to, and hopefully we'll get to make that film as well. All. Right and let's slide into home where we kind of started that's where the battery usually starts before hitting that home run to actually go around the circle and come back home. Okay. Yeah. What do you think happens? With Major League Baseball and they're. You know renewed effort to. Determine. Quote Unquote Major League status for the Negro Leagues What what's your? What's your prognostication and and what do you think comes from that if and when indeed like how do you think that plays out you know? I hate to. Be. I have to pass on that. Because I don't. I don't know where it would go I think. I. Think the important thing is that the story of the Negro Leagues Kits bedded. In..

baseball Mexico Cuba Negro League Well Island Craig Davidson Caribbean Major Puerto Rico Castro Castro Sabre Rube foster Martine Whitey Ford Harlem Film Festival Caribbean Kansas City Venezuela Janet Tony Peres Wendy Bruce.
"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

04:25 min | Last month

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Strictly on the statistics he's close but not enough money. But for what he did as a coach with Bernie Williams, you keep hearing stories Lou. Brock the people that he helped discover and stood as a role model for and brought into baseball and was then the first. Black coach within the major leagues he deserves. You. Know the accolades. That that were heaped on him sort of in the press, but never within the baseball world to the degree that he deserved. Maybe even an unwitting ambassador. So to speak given his exposure baseball series, right? Yeah exactly. So you know, and then now they're they're putting people for all sorts of things. Of course was great and deserved to be in there as an important person to show that the the you know the female component was. was there they loved the ball players they love the game that came to the Games they dressed for the games etc.. and. They followed the Games and So. There's there's that whole dimension as well. Okay I hear those sort of baby round round here. we could go for hours on all of this, but this is a great. Sort of seen set for you know another angle frankly of of the whole Negro League Baseball Story. What what. I guess there are two main questions that I have sort of. To kind of still throw out there number one is. Why did it take? A you know a massive documentary to kind of inject perhaps or maybe even for the first time generational early. Inform people about these. Negro Leagues and. The. Not. Only the importance of it to the history of baseball but the cultural significance why was it and I know I'm sort of projecting this but it feels like it was relatively dormant. A topic until around then. Obviously your your book and and Peterson's book certainly. Stoked. Or began sort of the the flames of that. Why did it take? I guess that sort of. Media phenomenon to kind of. Put It on people's radars perhaps for the first time you're you're part of it because The power of the media is so strong. And the power is a visual media so strong. and. The the when you see something you kind of know it. I think that Greek word for. To know comes from seeing or something so can as skillful. Filmmaker artists that he was. Of this story, but it was the right time. You know now we have so many channels so many choices. But at that time. The whole country picked it up and Ken was building on the civil war story which nobody expected either right But he had he had a real knows for the right. Person in the right interviewing and he and Lynn Novick. And so. You know it it sort of exploded but I think it was already percolating a bit. You know the men the fire was burning, but but he he made it a flame. So the other question that I would say is You know obviously, this is the third. Version of your of your book. So it's kind of our hopefully the. The gift that keeps on giving although I know authors thirty argue otherwise Sunday especially these. Okay. Yeah Don't we hopefully we can get extra book sold, but you know I be able to retire on that but. What's left I guess to tell about. This sort of multi-flavoured and multilayered story right the happy to say that. Happy. This is a good one. Okay because First of all. Peterson's book came out then John Hallways. then. Invisible man. So we were kind of..

baseball Peterson Lynn Novick Negro League Lou Bernie Williams Ken Brock John Hallways.
"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:14 min | Last month

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Baseball and had ability. Often. For example, in the case of Buck O'Neil his father. Telling him you know. Son You gotta go somewhere else you can't get what what you what you want in life in. Working in a celery field in Sarasota Florida. You know you have to go grab life, go off and play or they would be on a team in the south. the the Negro League teams trained in the south. The baseball season wouldn't start until two almost me I. But. They'd be training in April little bit of March in southern cities in Florida sometimes. Arkansas Texas. And, they would they needed money. So they would play exhibition games against very good black local teams. And let's say you were tremendous. Player with talent in one of these teams playing against a Negro League team coming through Hot Springs Arkansas. And certainly they. Will. Kid. You got that ability. Why don't why don't you come with us you? Can we need an extra guy come with come with us? and. So person would be plucked out of the south. Now in the nineteen forties, there were many more blacks. In the North So said there were lax from the North but the majority of Negro Leaguers we're from the south. And they made it but the the games were played in the north. The teams were mostly in the north. And so here's the almost the archetypal story of up from the south. To the North Chicago which had east West game was the Mecca. For Blacks, all over America. The blacks from North Carolina or South Carolina might end up in New York or Philadelphia but. But Chicago was a magnet for almost everything else and. and. So these guys would see our in Kansas City to Kansas City monarch team, of course was the. Of the two. Greatest Negro League teams probably the Kansas City monarchs and for a very short period the Pittsburgh Crawford's. How are these players? The treated in the black community, right? So I it doesn't go lost on me that the title of the book is invisible men, right so in a segregated society, White majority if you will in terms of population may probably. So you know not sort of knowing some of the great exploits and. Athletic Prowess of these these players in a huge loss, right? Because you're not, you know not getting the CD's players day in day out like you might know on the My sense is and from what I've read and not only your book but elsewhere is that. Within the black community that these baseball players were I use the word earlier revered but they were you know they were there they were. High pedestal.

Negro League Baseball America Kansas City Greatest Negro League Chicago Florida North Carolina Buck South Carolina Sarasota Hot Springs Arkansas Crawford Arkansas Mecca Texas Pittsburgh Philadelphia New York
"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:32 min | Last month

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"I think frankly largely still to this day under misunderstood set of leagues and teams and players, and and. People involved as to why they were playing and how the messages that they were sending. We get into all of that stuff and much much more in this just tremendous conversation with our guest this week Don Rogerson again, the book is called Invisible Man Life in baseball's Negro Leagues and the reason why this book and and about Peterson's only the ball was white book. essential still are frankly is I. think a lot of people especially this generation and maybe even a generation ago. kind of really don't realize I think many people kind of take for granted that. The Negro Leagues is just sort of culturally known and understood and and you see plenty of garb wear and the logos and The Negro League Baseball Hall of fame in Kansas Lots of lead there's a lot that's happened but I think people need to remember that. You were having discussion say in the mid nineteen ninety s or so. It's really important to recognize that a lot of what was the story of the Negro Leagues was kind of frankly forgotten or glossed over or just not known to amass of baseball indoor sports fans especially those not of African American background or descent. And the the cultural. Sort of force that sort of changed all that was, of course, Ken, Burns tremendous and you know a historically a. PRESCIENT and invaluable. Documentary series on PBS called Baseball. and. If you've not seen that, of course, you need to see all nine or now ten innings slash chapters worth that's available out there on streaming and certain DVD's you still have one of those but. These books. The Peterson, book and invisible men by our guest on Rogerson really actually were very foundational. Elements in the creation of that documentary, and that is where that documentary particular is where. People like Buck O'Neil and other Negro League stars. and. Champions were really highlighted in depth. For a for the first time for a generation of sports fans, and that legacy continues to grow and and more frankly into a lot more things. So we talk about all of those things, the inclusion of of Negro League ballplayers in the hall of fame that sort of chequered history we get into a little bit of that with Don. We talk about the major league baseball current situation. Just literally two months ago finally, taking up the the exercise to figure out and do you really think that this is not going to be the case were the Negro Leagues quote Unquote Major League and from statistical and. Equality of play kind of assessment I think frankly it's safe to say it's kind of a foregone conclusion but whatever major league baseball and or the hall of fame I guess needed to do. To kind of sort of cement that as as the reality but Anyway all of that stuff. This is a fascinating discussion. The book is Great The conversation is just as great and we welcome you to it in just a few moments are. So let me quickly promote this thing here. So this book invisible man published by soon to be reissued in about a week or two by University of Nebraska Press..

Negro League Don Rogerson baseball Peterson Buck O'Neil University of Nebraska Press Kansas Ken
Hank Aaron: Breaking the Home Run Record

Black History in Two Minutes

01:55 min | Last month

Hank Aaron: Breaking the Home Run Record

"On April Eighth Nineteen seventy four Atlanta Braves outfielder Henry Louis Aaron better known as Hank, his seven hundred fifteenth home run finally breaking the record of the legendary Babe Ruth like everyone else in the country I've been following errands pursuit of the record since the previous season. He played in the Negro Leagues in the Early Nineteen Fifties, and now here he was just two home runs away new but the excitement was undercut by a sense of alarm as errands quest unleashed a torrent of vicious racism baseball is the quintessential American sport. Now, an African American, a dark skinned black man challenging the power, the supremacy of baseball and of white men. That's why the hate mail death threats bomb threats. This was driving a stake at the heart of American culture. Has All this made you more aware than you're a black baseball player? I've never forgotten. Later, he would confess that he was afraid. He wouldn't live long enough to break the record. Then at the start of the nineteen, seventy, four season. All. Of all. Errands triumph was electrified By the end of his Major League career nine, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six, he had hit a total of seven hundred and fifty five home runs. Errands record would stand for more than thirty years. The braves retired his number and he was elected to the hall of fame. To. This Day Hank Aaron is considered one of baseball's greatest players.

Baseball Hank Henry Louis Aaron Braves Babe Ruth Major League
"negro league" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

06:29 min | 2 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"That was thirty years ago and it doesn't encompass the sort of total educational reckoning four where the sport came from and what it's been and that I think is what needs to change in addition to all these other things we'll. So there is the annual Jackie Robinson Day, and I'm just thinking about this that baseball is kind of managed to reframe. It's shame into celebration and almost I, don't know if this is exactly right but it feels like it's. It's mostly true is that it's almost self-congratulatory around like aren't we great that we allow Jackie Robinson into the sport and it's you know it's obviously about Robinson's heroism and I think. When you learn the Jackie Robinson Story. When you're a kid, you also learn about the abuse that he taught and you learn that you know he wasn't in the major leagues because of racism and segregation but I think there is way more of an emphasis on the fact that Robinson is this is this hero and isn't it great that we integrated baseball? Yeah. You Know Ray for us and this story that Ben Rhodes Ben, Lindbergh for the Ringer about regarding the Negro Leagues is a major league. It's an example of thing that wouldn't like fix anything. It wouldn't make anything right necessarily, but it's just so symbolic of everything that we've been talking about here about how the people that created the baseball encyclopedia in the sixties like didn't even consider that the Negro Leagues might be on the same level because that's that's when there was like an MLB committee when the book was being produced to try to determine what constituted a major league for inclusion in the statistical history of the game and not not even a conversation, and then there's excuses like well, the statistical record is you know not as complete as. Well, why do you think the? Record is incomplete. It's because you. Didn't allow them to play in the major leagues like punishing these players for the kind of violence. Perpetrated against for their for their exile, and so it's fascinating. See these things being reckoned with finally that have never been reckoned with before these kind of fundamental baseline things and so that's positive. It's it's progress and again it's not like it would fix everything but it's like a thing that needs to happen right and I mean, it's not a surprise. I mean you can't just obviously lay this at the feet of major. League. Baseball because it's not like we're a country that's great with reckoning around these sorts of issues right I mean you know the civil war. The Civil Rights Movement? We. Celebrate. The ultimate end of discrimination or institutional racism. But we don't discuss much how it got to be that way and that's like any history course you take all the way up through high school is not really getting into the weeds of that sort of stuff. So it's not a surprise that major league baseball hasn't really been able to talk about how Cap Anson helped broker this gentleman's agreement amongst white professional teams and kept out black players and things of that nature. So yeah, I mean, I'm not saying that baseball doesn't bear its own responsibility for doing particularly poorly in this regard, but it's not a surprise. Given it it's America's game. It's America's pastime. So of course, it's not going to do really well with reckoning with its history right Joel I'm curious what you think when you look back at old coverage or photos or film of the Negro Leagues End you know in particular just kind of enormous crowds of black American baseball fans and how just as it was for every other demographic group in America basically the baseball was V sport in this country I mean does it just feel totally alien? Yeah. It does feel really foreign to me and it makes me sort of long makes me wish that I had. Like obviously I didn't wish I was a black person in the nineteen fifties but. I. I wish though really want to go to a sporting event in a fidora different. Right. But I would love to I would I would have loved to have been privy to that atmosphere and see what it was like you've mentioned it sounds like it was a lot of fun and I mean, what's the? Cool Papa Bell that you know by the time he turned out the light in his bedroom. He was already in bed you know that sort of stuff. So yeah, it sounds like a lot more fun than the baseball. I've grew up with and even even I was sort of a baseball fan growing up in my early years like until I was about ten or eleven years old astros had a really good team. It had black ball players like Kevin Bass, Billy Hatcher JR Richard, Gaas like that. But as I got older like a lot of other people, my interest sort of waned and I don't know if that's because I didn't think of baseball as a black sport my friends played it I don't know what but yeah I look back at. That Negro League stuff and then it looks that looks like that would have been cool like I would have liked to have experienced that and obviously this is just a different time I mean, what do you all really know of the Negro Leagues I was like an enormous baseball fan when I was a kid, I was Kinda my entree into reading as well as into sports, and so you've talked about this tall about kind of early reader sports books that I think a lot of us read and so I was like really deepened. Baseball stuff and so I kind of consumed the Negro Leagues Material and the way that I was mentioning earlier in the segment just the fun stories the Lore. I read that Cool Papa Bell quote and maybe fifty different. Like the stuff about Satchel page and about Josh Gibson and the Negro Leagues seemed really kind of fun and cool and I don't think as a white kid growing up reading this stuff. It, I don't think it actually served as a introduction or a primer until like the lake evils of American racism it was more like a different kind of fun thing in the sport that I enjoy and it's fun to read these stories because I like reading funds stories about like old timey players. But it goes back to the point I was making the beginning that we've historic sized it like we've except like the way it was you know there the Negro Leagues because well, there had to be a league for black players because they weren't allowed to play in the major leagues. Just was not a thing that that was perpetrated. Correct not a thing that was perpetrated and. The..

baseball Jackie Robinson Negro League League Papa Bell MLB America Josh Gibson Cap Anson Civil Rights Movement Ben Rhodes Ben Ray astros Kevin Bass Joel Lindbergh Billy Hatcher JR Richard
"negro league" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"The week of August Seventeenth two, thousand and twenty. On this week show, we're going to discuss the hundred anniversary of the Negro Leagues and what Major League Baseball should do to honor the Games Black Pioneers The New York Times is Rory Smith Ball. Join US for conversation about soccer's Champions League wearing American shined and Lionel Messi went down to a humiliating defeat. Finally, we'll talk with Thomas about losers dispatches from the other side of the scoreboard, a new Anthology Co edited by Louisa and Mary Pilon. Author of the and the host of slow-burn season four I'm in Washington DC where for the first time in a long time, the temperature is less than a billion degrees joining me from DC Stephan, fats us the author of the Books Word Freak and a few seconds of Panic Stefan I. Think it's important for the people in pod land to understand we make the ultimate sacrifice for them. We turn off the air conditioning. Yeah I'm in an attic. Attic, but it's fucking hot in this attic. So I will start sweating unless I turn on the air conditioner between segments even on a nice Balmy Day in the low seventies here in Washington with US always from Palo Alto slate staff writer host slow-burn season, three Joel Anderson. So devoted to the podcast listeners did he doesn't even have air conditioning. He's not tempted to turn it on. Yeah I didn't realize until I moved to the bay that air conditioning is considered an amenity. You know that it's not necessarily standard with your home and the way I found out was on the first day I moved here it was ninety five degrees and we asked our landlord hey, where's the air conditioning? It's like Oh we don't have that. So that's what I'm going through today I live in a hot box. Joel. Thank you for toughing it out you're an American. Hero. You I'm trying to do it. I can. All right. So for the last four months, I've been saying that the coronavirus pandemic to challenge for us to do the show and a financially sustainable way I've been saying it because it's the truth and so we moved our full show to slate plus every other week to try to encourage folks who listen us to sign up and support us and a bunch of you did just that and we are very grateful for it, and now while America is still an enormous. Colossal mess. It is again possible for us to do the show like we've typically done it. So that means no more slate plus only additions. So that is hopefully welcome news for all of you for everyone who has subscribed to slate plus used on it recently or a long time ago. Thank you again so much and we are going to keep doing bonus payments for you every week including on this very episode were getting it. You know for better or worse JAL we're getting into a very busy part of the sports calendar we've got NBA playoffs that are starting. This week we've got no baseball season. We've got football probably starting. So we're GONNA have a lot to talk about and we've also got a lot of other cool stuff plan for our members. The will be able to announce soon but please trust that we WANNA reward you for putting your faith in us..

Joel Anderson Baseball Washington Lionel Messi US The New York Times Mary Pilon NBA soccer Anthology Co Palo Alto Thomas Louisa Stephan Stefan America staff writer
"negro league" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Back in the day, as Netflix began to gain popularity, its rival blockbuster was looking for an edge. We're one point the investors were asking blockbuster to sell genes in the store. You're. Older. Investors being what the kids want. They want gene. You get a Tom Cruise movie in some stone wash jeans the downfall of blockbuster and the rise of networks listened to it's been a minute from NPR. Welcome back to Bullseye I'm Jesse Thorn. My guest is Bob Kendrick. He's the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum one of the only institutions in the world devoted to telling the story of the Negro Leagues. Let's get back to our conversation. I've always found that the life of a professional athlete is inherently tragic. Because if we're lucky, we live to be seventy five or eighty, five years old. But there are who can maintain professional level athletic skills beyond their thirties. What was it like? For Negro League players who were dealing with the fact that they were re entering quote unquote normal life burden both by racism and its attendant lots and structures in the United States and the fact that many of didn't have skills event sports you know they hadn't gone to college some some had. And you know one of the wanted to interesting the facts about the Negro Leagues and I'm so glad you mentioned that. Is that some forty percent of the athletes who played in the Negro Leagues had some level of college education. Less. Than five percent of those who played in the major leagues had any college education for the simple reason that the major leagues Jesse didn't want you to go to college. Then they got you right out of high school if. They got you write a high school, put your farm system, and then you work your way too big leagues. Well, the Negro Leagues didn't have that kind of sophisticated farm systems so whether they do they trained on the campuses of historically black college and universities, and then they would play the Black College baseball teams, and then they recruited a great deal of their workforce from those Hbo. So. They actually had a disproportionate number of college educated athletes in comparison to the major leagues but you're right when you're talking about a Po- sports career and I think this is what any athlete that transition into normal life is never easy..

Negro Leagues Negro League Baseball Museum Jesse Thorn Bob Kendrick Netflix Black College NPR United States
"negro league" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"There was there was a great legendary one of the most successful barnstorming professional baseball teams was called the House of David and they all pretended to be observant Jews. and. Some of them were involved in unusual religious organization. But they also had a lot of ringers who just wore fake four locks. There were all kinds of entertainments. If you went to see a a Negro League baseball game in nineteen, thirty or nineteen, thirty five, maybe you could describe both a a proper league game and a barnstorming game since they were both such big parts of how baseball players and teams made their money what would you see and and how might it be different from what you might see at a at a major league park? Totally Different Negro Leagues Baseball was the pace of the game was just different and just I think they understood really understood that baseball was entertainment and that means that you weren't going to see. Great. Fundamentally. Sound Baseball. Man You WanNa be thoroughly entertained or again as my friend Buckle Neil would say you couldn't go to the concession stand because you might miss something you ain't never seen before you know that's what they brought to the game. So the taste of the game was faster Major League Baseball was essentially a base to base kind of game. So a guy got on base you moved them over to second and then the big hitters came up and drove him in net brought with that. But again, the Negro Leagues would drop that button and then they were willing to steal second still third. Smart they still in home. That's the style Jackie took with him over to the major. League Jackie Robinson and so the pace of the game was just so fast and daring, and so the major leagues would oftentimes accuse the Negro League players of showboating. Yeah. So if a guy went into, Ho dove flipped behind his back started to double play the major leagues would say show boat they just showboating well as again my friend buckle was a number one if you got something to show show it. Again is homeless show boaty when you can do it and today is sportscenter top ten highlight every night of the week. When you see that happened that was commonplace in the Negro Leagues and so yeah, the styles were different. Fans flock to those gangs because it was so exciting, you mentioned the House of David. The House of David plays a great role in the story of black baseball because they would barnstorm all over the country. Playing with and Against Negro League teams most notably our Kansas City monarchs and Jesse one of my favorite stories associated with the House of David and ever those I know you mentioned them and kind of gave a little bit. But for those who might not know who the House today house of David was a religious sect based out of Benton. Harbor. Michigan who would typically characterized by the very long hair and very long whiskers..

Baseball Negro League Major League David Jackie Robinson Buckle Neil Benton Jesse Michigan Kansas City
MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 3 months ago

MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

"Baseball is marking the anniversary of the Negro leagues created 100 years ago. The league's showcased black baseball players players who couldn't play on the major teams because of the color of their skin. Only a few members of the leagues are alive to celebrate the centennial Michigan radios, Doug Tribute spoke to the only surviving team owner and others about the legacy of the legendary leagues. In 1920 owners of independent black baseball teams from the Midwest gathered in Kansas City, Missouri. At that meeting they created the Negro National Leagues had no idea they were making history. They didn't care about making history. Bob Kendrick heads the Negro Leagues Baseball museum there, he says. Faced with segregation, black owners and players kept pushing for organized baseball. These athletes never cried about the social injustice. They went out and did something about so you won't let me play with you and I create my own And they did today. Stars like Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard and Satchel Paige are enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but thousands of black and Latino players endured bigotry and racist taunts. It was Tear before the players at that time. Many Forbes owned the Detroit Stars from 1956 to 1958. She lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan, that players try of them. They had nowhere to stay because of the discrimination, so they slept in the buses. And they couldn't go in places to eat so one person would go to the back door. When get food for all the players. Pedro Sierra pitched in the Negro leagues for several seasons in the 19 fifties. He grew up in Cuba and says it was tough to adjust to segregation and racism he saw in the US It wasn't easy to see all the problem with the raise. I know all about it, herb artist. But I hadn't experienced today. Sierra lives in New Jersey In 1954 he signed with the Indianapolis clowns at the age of 16. His salary was less than 5% of what white players were earning dollars a month a month, $100 a month. And I look back and say, Oh my God. Jackie Robinson played briefly in the Negro leagues. Then, in 1947 he broke baseball's color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers in Cleveland, Larry Doby became the first black player in the American League. Coming seasons brought many more signings. But many Forbes sympathizes with the many athletes who were good enough to play in the major leagues, but never got a shot. Unfortunately, some of the good players by the time the time Came. They were too old to play. The last league folded in the early 19 sixties, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum estimates there are about 100 former players still alive. Forbes is 88 worries about being one of the last left to tell the story. And I just want a if I'm worthy of represent and speaking about the Negro League because When I got involved, things was easier for me. Then it wass father one before me. Many Forbes will keep sharing her stories with younger generations and others will to Major League Baseball has a day to honor the league's set for next month. The museum has pushed back its year long celebration of the centennial to next year and renamed it Negro Leagues. 101

Negro League Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Baseball Pedro Sierra Major League Baseball Forbes Baseball Hall Of Fame Bob Kendrick Michigan Midwest Kansas City Missouri Doug Tribute American League Grand Rapids Jackie Robinson Josh Gibson Satchel Paige Detroit
"negro league" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Podcast. APP also please do check out. These seem heads. Negro Leagues Database. It's really well done there. There are some fascinating stats on there and there some fascinating explanations of how those stats are calculated and displayed especially the advance stats as noted on a previous episode friend of the show. Dan Hirsch has done a lot of work on the back end there and just reading from a post on the front page that was published earlier this year called Normalizing Negro League statistics that gives you some sense of the difficulty here. It's talking about park factors here. It says the reason. Simple Park calculations work for normalization is that there's an underlying assumption that except for home parks players within a league. League I'll face almost identical conditions under which their teams perform. Those conditions include playing the same number of games as all other teams playing schedules with close to the same difficulty, playing an equal number of home in away games, and not playing any neutral site games and playing most or all home games in the same park for the Negro Leagues Those assumed conditions all fall apart not just for the pre league, nineteen hundred to nineteen nineteen era, but even after former leagues formed following conditions still prevailed in the Negro Leagues teams played varying numbers of total games. Teams play differing numbers of games. Games against other league teams teams played an unbalanced number of home and away games teams played in multiple neutral parks. So you get some sense of the challenges, they're even aside from the challenge of finding those box scores, and that data in the first place, and it goes through some of the steps that they use to kind of correct for those obstacles, so I will link to that too I will also linked to a few pieces by one of our guests from last week, Shuki a Taylor, who has written extensively about the Negro Leagues and she has covered some of the topics. Topics that came up on this week's episodes including FM manly and the centennial of the founding of the Negro Leagues and the continued underrepresentation of black leaders of baseball teams shell so wrote about the grave markers that we talked about today, so she's published pieces at both times, Fan, graphs and baseball prospectus estimation. I will link to some of those and encourage you to check them out. Also, please check out rub. Arthur's recent work at baseball prospectus where he has mind the statistical data to uncover evidence of racial bias in Scouting and in player valuation and promoting players and for much of this. This he is used the database of reds scouting reports that I was able to obtain in that he and I analyzed for series of articles at the ringer last year, and in that article we were able to determine that there is kind of coded language that Scouts in that period were using to describe non white players that certain terms which you can probably imagine got applied to white players more often than not white players and vice versa, and he has continued to dig into that resource, and has found that non white players have historically been undervalued compared to white players that they've. They've seemingly have been promoted more slowly given comparable performance so this week we've been talking about. Pressured is's that were in place several decades ago or a century ago or more and in baseball, some of those prejudices are still in place, just in less obvious and visible ways, but still significant ones. You.

Arthur baseball Dan Hirsch Taylor Shuki
"negro league" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:15 min | 4 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"WHOA, they've already. Eureka. Like. Doesn't get any better than this it's. So you get lucky sometimes. So I started looking at may was basically opening day Negro Leagues Not April like it is now because it comes with the weather, so I look at. Newspapers doing the month of May and see if I could find the entry of. Players in their new uniform and track 'em year-by-year pretty soon I had a whole notebook of every team for every year and the color scheme and everything and. Sent it off to the manufacturers like American needle Wilson's spouting, and they would make uniforms and make a lot of money. So through your efforts, efforts in scholarships of so many other baseball, researchers and historians. A Lot more about the Negro Leagues Negro League players now than we did. in seventies will continue to know Morris. This research proliferates, but I'm curious. What some of the unanswered questions are that? You're still keen to explore in your own research. Answer, the question has A. is there a game whose box score just? Needles you when you got better every night that you wish you could find. Is there some detail of postseason or players life that you wish you could just fill in and satisfy, I don't know if this is the sort of thing that keeps historians up at night, but if there's one fact that you wish you could know with certainty. There are a few games make. From the nineteen forty eight world. that. We have still not found the full box score. Sometimes they would play in the small town. Your tastes me to know in that. We have not been able to fan that one or two games. In nineteen, thirty, eight Josh Gibson hit four home runs, hit a ball game and ZANU. How one of the researchers with their in person? In fact all three newspapers from that hometown? The all validated there just keeps and hit four home runs in their game, but. There's no box score. So.

Negro Leagues Negro League Josh Gibson baseball A. ZANU Morris
"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

07:42 min | 4 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"The process didn't work very well. So. We KINDA WE KINDA doubled. The number of black baseball figures in the hall of fame in. One ear. Let student. I'm glad I'm glad I ask you that question then, and but also to it's also heartening to seem sense. Obviously. The the Negro League fame in Kansas City. which you know, can certainly in its own way right some wrongs as well as well as perhaps even go deeper. Into a more of the the the detail I guess of some of the. Of these players that don't for whatever reasons don't sort of make sort of the grand hall for whatever reasons all right? Here's my my last sort of question and I'm sorry I'm waiting till the end of it of this conversation kind of. Curiosity to me. Is and I I get a sense now as businessman. Maybe perhaps why this was the case. Explained to me this for lack of a better term adopted home of Washington DC because I think a lot of people who come across the homestead grays. For the first time, don't necessarily understand it. Being sort of a Pittsburgh regional domiciled kind of club, they may have become aware of it because of their doings in play, and the writings about it in Washington DC I don't. I don't get where that comes from during the war, Washington black population boom because. The federal government was providing. All kinds was growing during the war needed employees, and it was. Essentially non discriminatory. Probably not entirely, but mostly and African. Americans went there for jobs were good jobs. They were government jobs. Now. You have people who do have money to buy tickets. the major league owners. WHO! who own their own parks? which is basically all of them? Love to rent those parks when days and their teams weren't playing, gotTa Pay. You gotta pay the Electric Bill. The water bill the debt service whatever. And, even if there's nothing going on, but somebody out there mowing the grass, so. They love to rent out their parks to other sporting. Opportunities in Negro League Baseball was one of them Calvin Clark Griffith rather was. Happy to do this. Posey seize. The opportunity is only two hundred fifty miles from. Pittsburgh to DC, and you know these near leakers. Some one of them once told me I got so used to sleeping on a bus and we stop at a hotel. We couldn't sleep. We'd have to walk the streets all night because we couldn't sleep in a bed during the season, so you play a game at Forbes field in Pittsburgh on Saturday at hop on the bus. You're driving. You're driving during the night and end up in Washington DC in the morning. Get ready and play like a double header and grip stadium. In DC they did amazingly well it just. It was a real. Money maker you know also of course you were. You were. Publicizing Black Baseball place where. The activities of blacks got covered, so they were in the look they Washington papers and You know of course. They were the grays. They were always successful. That's that's how that came. About is just again. Just she's an opportunity and took it just at the right time. Why not move outright was there still enough? Money to be made within the Pittsburgh homestead region to. Separate it between two teams and maybe dilute. The. Black population in Pittsburgh was not in a growth mode at that point, and I'm not sure what to be honest with you, but you look at the census data and it clearly wasn't so. While? They were successful in Pittsburgh. It is sort of leveled off. But here you had thought not far away by meagerly travels bus travel standards here. You had this potential gold mine, and and actually the first couple of years. It wasn't all that successful. It was okay but nothing that probably justified. All of this disruption. But then. It got better they got. They got a better pr man, also they persuaded. The Kansas City monarchs to come and play several times. Of course they had Satchel page on their roster when page whenever paged pitched. At these neutral park, Major League parts attendance would like Double Negro League. Attendance would like double. And so page came and pitched a few games and attendance went through the roof. Again they they hired a guy named Art Carter. who was a sports writer for the Baltimore Afro American. To be their PR, Guy and Carter was very savvy. He courted the upper class. the doctors, the lawyers, a higher government middle level government officials with tickets made him got him convinced that it wasn't looking down. Being looked down upon to go to a ball game. and. They call him out influencers. These these people became influencers. Then the fans started, and the fans follow them. So Yeah the first couple of years it didn't and they almost gave up on it, but then. They. Did you know again? Cast about and hit on the right formula, and it worked like crazy satchwell page being a big part of it. All right well. Here's here's my last question and I'll let you promote Gimme a sense, then sort of looking, and obviously you know the decline of the the the Negro Leagues, the integration of Baseball and obviously sort of swept the grace to among all the other sort of. Successes by that time in the late forties early fifties. Give me a sense of what you. Take away from. The legacy I know it's sort of off. Houston thrown around word, but of not only Posey, but also the grays and they're sort of. I don't know what they meant not only to Negro League baseball, but baseball generally because it seems like there was some. And again I throw this term around, but I think it's it's apt is is there's some pioneering going on in the story? Yes, there is it's. Caves they've set the stage. They set the stage for integration really because. By the late thirties, the you know everybody including white sports some way. Writers Jimmy Powers in New, York and Hayward Broun. We're saying. Why aren't you guys the majors we've seen these guys play their great. Why aren't they into majors? So that and the wartime you know blacks were blacks were in the army. Black were in the navy. Blacks were in the Air Force Tuskegee airman. All of that. Time the war is over. Truman officially desegregated the military. And it's like well. Now is the time. For sure he was secretly out in front of the whole thing was scouting and evaluating black players and. Integration happened in forty six and forty seven to start with, and then by fifty. It was pretty. You know at least most teams had least these black player. I guess that's widespread. And it was like pulling the plug on Negro Leagues Because Wow, we can go see Jackie Robinson. We can go see him as we can see Roy Campanella. Don Newcombe. In the real big leagues and.

Negro League Baseball Pittsburgh Baseball Washington Posey DC Double Negro League federal government Major League Don Newcombe Roy Campanella Jackie Robinson Kansas City. Calvin Clark Griffith Kansas City Forbes field Truman meagerly Baltimore
"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:03 min | 4 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"I mean we looked at that list in two thousand and six, and basically a lot of players on us and people said. Why weren't these people already in well, they weren't in because the system. The process didn't work very well. So. We KINDA WE KINDA doubled. The number of black baseball figures in the hall of fame in. One ear. Let student. I'm glad I'm glad I ask you that question then, and but also to it's also heartening to seem sense. Obviously. The the Negro League fame in Kansas City. which you know, can certainly in its own way right some wrongs as well as well as perhaps even go deeper. Into a more of the the the detail I guess of some of the. Of these players that don't for whatever reasons don't sort of make sort of the grand hall for whatever reasons all right? Here's my my last sort of question and I'm sorry I'm waiting till the end of it of this conversation kind of. Curiosity to me. Is and I I get a sense now as businessman. Maybe perhaps why this was the case. Explained to me this for lack of a better term adopted home of Washington DC because I think a lot of people who come across the homestead grays. For the first time, don't necessarily understand it. Being sort of a Pittsburgh regional domiciled kind of club, they may have become aware of it because of their doings in play, and the writings about it in Washington DC I don't. I don't get where that comes from during the war, Washington black population boom because. The federal government was providing. All kinds was growing during the war needed employees, and it was. Essentially non discriminatory. Probably not entirely, but mostly and African. Americans went there for jobs were good jobs. They were government jobs. Now. You have people who do have money to buy tickets. the major league owners. WHO! who own their own parks? which is basically all of them? Love to rent those parks when days and their teams weren't playing, gotTa Pay. You gotta pay the Electric Bill. The water bill the debt service whatever. And, even if there's nothing going on, but somebody out there mowing the grass, so. They love to rent out their parks to other sporting. Opportunities in Negro League Baseball was one of them Calvin Clark Griffith rather was. Happy to do this. Posey seize. The opportunity is only two hundred fifty miles from. Pittsburgh to DC, and you know these near leakers. Some one of them once told me I got so used to sleeping on a bus and we stop at a hotel. We couldn't sleep. We'd have to walk the streets all night because we couldn't sleep in a bed during the season, so you play a game at Forbes field in Pittsburgh on Saturday at hop on the bus. You're driving. You're driving during the night and end up in Washington DC in the morning. Get ready and play like a double header and grip stadium. In DC they did amazingly well it just. It was a real. Money maker you know also of course you were. You were. Publicizing Black Baseball place where. The activities of blacks got covered, so they were in the look they Washington papers and You know of course. They were the grays. They were always successful. That's that's how that came. About is just again. Just she's an opportunity and took it just at the right time. Why not move outright was there still enough? Money to be made within the Pittsburgh homestead region to. Separate it between two teams and maybe dilute. The. Black population in Pittsburgh was not in a growth mode at that point, and I'm not sure what to be honest with you, but you look at the census data and it clearly wasn't so. While? They were successful in Pittsburgh. It is sort of leveled off. But here you had thought not far away by meagerly travels bus travel standards here. You had this potential gold mine, and and actually the first couple of years. It wasn't all that successful. It was okay but nothing that probably justified. All of this disruption. But then. It got better they got. They got a better pr man, also they persuaded. The Kansas City monarchs to come and play several times. Of course they had Satchel page on their roster when page whenever paged pitched. At these neutral park, Major League parts attendance would like Double Negro League. Attendance would like double. And so page came and pitched a few games and attendance went through the roof. Again they they hired a guy named Art Carter. who was a sports writer for the Baltimore Afro American. To be their PR, Guy and Carter was very savvy. He courted the upper class. the doctors, the lawyers, a higher government middle level government officials with tickets made him got him convinced that it wasn't looking down. Being looked down upon to go to a ball game. and. They call him out influencers. These these people became influencers. Then the fans started, and the fans follow them. So Yeah the first couple of years it didn't and they almost gave up on it, but then. They. Did you know again? Cast about and hit on the right formula, and it worked like crazy satchwell page being a big part of it. All right well. Here's here's my last question and I'll let you promote Gimme a sense, then sort of looking, and obviously you know the decline of the the the Negro Leagues, the integration of Baseball and obviously sort of swept the grace to among all.

Pittsburgh Washington Negro League Baseball Baseball DC federal government Double Negro League Major League Calvin Clark Griffith Kansas City Forbes field Posey Kansas City. meagerly leakers Baltimore Guy writer Art Carter.
"negro league" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"And so yeah, it's a special plate on a lot of levels and that's why I say you don't have to be a baseball fan too long for this exam. And of course, we certainly believe that if you're not a fan that's sacrilegious, but that's okay. You don't have you don't have to be a baseball fan. If you are a fan of American History, you're going to love this Museum. If you are a fan of the underdog overcoming trials and tribulations to go go on to Greatness. You're going to love this Museum, but if you are a baseball fan to boot you are in hog heaven, it provides everything that a baseball fan can absolutely love but it's there for any and everybody and I think having met so many people in the museum. I've met a lot of people in who have expressed the fact that they're not sports fans or baseball fan at all. But as one lady told me I just spent three years. Hours in your Museum and I was absolutely blown away. Well that is one of the greatest compliments. I think we could ever get because that's how we tried to build this experience so that when you walk through this Museum you were going to learn not only about these legendary ball players, but you're going to learn about the history of this country simultaneously, that's exactly what it is because baseball is kind of a microcosm of this country and of like life in general that the lessons that you learned from both the history of baseball and from how to play the game of baseball and be in the game of baseball to be a supportive teammate to play the game honorably to be inclusive and fair. Those are lessons that take you Way Beyond the baseball diamond those are things that you know play into how you become a person and you learn a lot. I think that the museum teaches you a lot of those things in the frame of this very epic story. Yeah, and I think that's why I thought Eight people leave here cheering a human Spirit. That's where I just wholeheartedly believe, you know again, what's not to love about the story? It is everything we pride ourselves about being American because it is about money. It's about passion. It's about perseverance. It's about refusing to accept the notion that you're unfit to do anything. So I'll show you absolutely we ask everybody. First of all, I want to ask you to just tell us quickly like one of your favorite Negro League stories because I'm sure a lot of people won't know the story that you tell because you have so many of them and then the second thing is your favorite sports memory is something we ask everybody who comes on the show because we know that everyone will end up having a different sports memory or a very least a different perspective on the same Sports memory..

baseball American History Negro League
"negro league" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

05:07 min | 8 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on The Lead

"What is your lasting impression of this museum and the legacy of the Negro Leagues? It's what it does to children honestly And I'm saying that because of what observed at the tour you know. One of the interesting things about children is that they don't know the racism the prejudice the segregation thankfully. They can't even fathom America. That was divided by color segregation. Summarized through the eyes of a child is done so very simply that was dumb and the right it was dumb but it was also the way that this country was and it's very important that we allow our children to look back in time. If they are to appreciate how far we've come when Bob Kendrick gives a tour you know. He's not shy about saying. Hey there were white baseball players. Who Spit on Jackie Robinson? When he was slide into second base and that sort of just a a small detail of what he faced throughout the course of his rookie season. So they're blown away when they come in and learn you go jail sitting in wrong. Section of Ballpark are drinking from the wrong water. Found using the wrong restroom. Lot of people as you well know lost their lives for breaking those simple societal standards. But the other thing that you have to admire is they never allow this to kill the love of the game of baseball. So if I've got to sleep on the bus and eat my peanut butter and crackers. I'M GONNA keep playing ball and really that's the prevailing spirit that you feel here at the Negro Leagues Museum and so you see these kids have fun when they get on that field after learning all that history they WANNA play baseball. You will see them mimicking. Hey here's how I'm going to swing the bat and I'm going to run the first base and I'm GonNa get this head off such paid a and again. We hope that we can be part of that equation. That gets kids excited about playing our sport and but it's important that they be able to come here and see themselves when they walk through this museum. They say people look just like them so to see how it transforms children in a way that you can see them see themselves in these nearly ballplayers when these men weren't able to get the same opportunities that we now have as Americans and while America was trying to prevent them from sharing and the joys of her so-called National Palestine it was the American spirit that allowed them to persevere and prevail and I think that's what makes this story so triumphant and so compelling and so are inspired while nate. Thank you so much for joining us for giving us your perspective and for being our eyes and ears into the Negro Leagues Museum. Yes thank you so much for having me and I hope. This encourages people to check out the museum for themselves. While Taylor clearly loves baseball he covers the Kansas City chiefs for the athletic and you can read his coverage of the chiefs at the athletic dot. Com here are some other stories. We're following at lead. Things are getting testy with the. Nfl's proposed new CBA. Which would make the season seventeen games? Instead of sixteen quarterback Aaron Rodgers and Russell Wilson took to social media denouncing the deal with Roger saying the length of the season was quote. Never something to be negotiated. Meanwhile Wilson tweeted quote the NBA and Mlb are doing it right. Players come first. All players deserve the same. We should not rush the next ten years for today's satisfaction. I vote no but despite this opposition. Nfl PA Executive Director. Demorris Smith told reporters Thursday that he's confident. The deal will be passed. This has been happening in Indianapolis where the NFL combine is also going on but interestingly enough. It's not the prospect workouts that have the football world buzzing the Athletics Lindsay Jones writes quote with apologies to Joe Borough and the rest of the rookies who have traveled here for the NFL scouting. Combine the most interesting quarterback named here in Indianapolis. Is Tom Brady? Where Brady ends up. And where Philip Rivers Cam Newton and Jameis Winston end up have been big talking points at. The Combine Jones writes that quote. It's all these. What ifs and speculation combined by a top heavy draft class of passers headlined by Borough and Alabama's to attack of Aloha? That make this. The most unique quarterback off season possibly ever. That's it for the week. Thanks for listening. Everyone producers. Caitlyn plummer Chris. Siegel and Chris Olen editing and production by senior producers Lea Hernandez and Matt. Strap fact checking by Ian Sound Design and mixing by air in. May Jake Gorski and Joe. Richardson the executive producer of the lead is under Calcio. Could beat the Davidson is our editorial director. Our Show is executive produced by Lea Hernandez Marshal Louis and earn on Lopez for wondering from wondering and the athletic. I'm under SCELZO. I'm could beat the Davidson Sia Monday..

Negro Leagues Museum baseball Nfl America Bob Kendrick Joe Borough Lindsay Jones nate Lea Hernandez Jackie Robinson Tom Brady Indianapolis Caitlyn plummer Chris Russell Wilson Philip Rivers Cam Newton Demorris Smith Calcio editorial director Taylor
"negro league" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

04:44 min | 8 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on The Lead

"So we can't talk about the Negro Leagues or the Negro Leagues Museum. Without talking about Jackie Robinson and the museum does a really beautiful job of chronicling his transition from the Kansas City. Monarchs to the Brooklyn Dodgers and I think people think Jackie just walked out of nowhere and started playing for the Brooklyn dodgers but Israel rookie season was nineteen forty five. Yeah tell people all the time before he was number forty two. He was number five for the Kansas City. Monarchs and of course the year that he spent in Kansas City. He fell in love with everything that Kansas City is famous for Barbecue and jazz. Everyone Remembers Forty. Two obviously Major League Baseball as retired the number on every Jersey except for one day when Jackie Robinson Day in the major leagues. But one of the things that Bob has to explain to anyone who will listen is that no Jackie Robinson. At the time in one thousand forty five was not the greatest big rallies baseball player. There were other meagerly players who you can make a legitimate argument for bed of baseball players. Then Jackie Robinson that. This wasn't just about talent you had to have someone who had the intestinal fortitude to deal with the adverse social conditions that they would be faced with as higher near breaking the color barrier and Jackie had him on. He wasn't a guy that was going to go out and party. It was gonNA make an embarrassment of himself once he got to the major leagues instead. He understood the entire weight the gravity that was placed upon him by saying. Hey you represent not just yourself not just your family but you present a whole race of people in your own country. Yeah you had to have the entire package. Because I gue- came failed. I cannot fail I guy failed. There is no second guy and so that was the enormous weight that Robinson was carrying on his back when he took that challenge becoming baseball's chosen. What and another important player you learn about during the tour is Hank Aaron. A player that Bob just talk so lovingly about his all time favorite player. Yeah. This is my favorite picture in the entire exhibition. Because I'm a huge Henrio Fan. He is my all time favorite baseball player. And my childhood idol as a kid growing up in Crossville Georgia That's who I wanted to be in it matters to Bob Kendrick because he grew up in Georgia and of course when Hank Aaron Broke immeasurably baseball record for the most home runs. He did it as Atlanta Braves. So Bob Griese disgrace story about how he was enacting. What occurred on the field in his own living room. When he reckoned homerun some fifteen he's circling the bases in Atlanta Fulton County Stadium and I'm circling the bases in my mother's living room in Crossville Georgia and as he was touching them all hours testing them all and so he holds a special place in my heart and nate. One of my favorite things about the museum is it does justice to the role of black women in the Negro Leagues. Were where there were three women who played professionally in the Negro News Tony Stone. Connie Morgan and Mamie Peanut Johnson Pioneers women who competed with an against the men in the one thousand. Nine hundred fifty. Tony Stone took the roster place of Henry Aaron when she joined the Indianapolis clowns so hank Aaron goes onto the major leagues the following year. Comes Tony Stone? Someone who had played barnstorm as a woman baseball player for many years and finally got the opportunity to be sort of a crowd pleaser and a really talented baseball player. Who got a chance to play in the Negro Leagues and is not just a women who played the game as well in the it was a very power nearing league. They also have female leaders executives owners in the Negro Leagues Way Ahead of Major League Baseball. Most notably EPA Manley effort manly and a husband Abe own Newark Eagles. But it was Mrs Manley who ran the day to day operations. That baseball team consider BOB. The first woman general manager in professional baseball history. She own and she knew the business of baseball as well as any man. The only thing that the nearly cared about is can you play or do you know the business a baseball if you know one of those two things? If you're pretty good at it they included you in a way that few other businesses were allowing that to occur in the nineteen forties.

Baseball Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues Negro Leagues Museum Hank Aaron Kansas City Major League Baseball Bob Kendrick Tony Stone Bob Brooklyn Dodgers Bob Griese Atlanta Braves Georgia Crossville Connie Morgan Mrs Manley Newark Eagles Israel Atlanta Fulton County Stadium
"negro league" Discussed on The Lead

The Lead

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on The Lead

"The.

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:50 min | 11 months ago

"negro league" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Let's talk about that because this is i. I'm guessing the first time that he not only is is a player but also a manager or is able to source straddle both of those roles goals for the first time. Yeah that's exactly right and and being a manager At least at that time at least for Charleston meant really putting together the roster. You're the general manager. As much as you are a manager The mandate the teams. A man named Colonel Struthers who was like the second black policemen? Lebron Harrisburg Way. Something like three hundred pounds but taught ballet dancing to use the parents use quite a character He wasn't necessarily so well connected in the world of Major League Baseball to put together To be able to together really good roster that was that was Charleston's job and that was something I think he really I wanted to do so. Give me a sense. Then of of of the Harrisburg experience because I think it's also important period of time In the Negro Leagues generally right. Where a lot of things in this country things kind of stumbled along as the Great Depression effectively took root if you will electronically macro to the point where there was a from all indications? It seems like You know the leagues that had had sort of gotten sort of their starting in the early part of the twentieth kind of kind of crumbling and and really kind of you know kind of went dark after a while after say twenty nine nine and thirty but this is during his time in Harrisburg where he's arguably kind of the peak but he's he's being able to do both thinks thanks right and and kind of stand out in in both those categories both managing and playing. Yeah absolutely it. Is it definitely part of his peak. I mean some of the statistics. Sixty was up in Harrisburg Are Crazy they were considered crazy at the time. And and and this sort of more exacting research down in the last few years that people going back to them. All box scores There's still crazy can nineteen twenty four. It's four zero five. Nineteen twenty five. It looks like he hit like four twenty seven. I mean insane numbers But Harrisburg this is twenty four twenty five. This is before the Great Depression. His four year. Run Their Eastern color the had probably problems were not caused by the incipient Great Depression. That was probably just more. The usual. All endemic now under capitalization issues of the Negro Leagues. It's when he goes to Hildale and that's in twenty eight twenty nine that's from. The depression starts to catch up with him. Another league folds in which Dale is playing and That creates a lot of this Again player movement like crazy only with L. deal for a couple of years and that's with the depression and the folding of that team in that league pushes them out to Pittsburgh Eric where he spends the last sort of prime vague if he's playing career and ends up with a man named Cumberland Posey and his homestead Greece. All going Eh. Get to come hosie in this in a minute and held in Pittsburgh in particular in a second but but maybe this is a good opportunity to kind of maybe delve in a little bit in to some of the the numbers that he's putting up both on all parts I guess fielding certainly in hitting and maybe as you sort of answer or give give our audience a sense of just how dominant and standout his stats and his play was slash work. Can you square that though also with what I would imagine magin would be you know a a trust factor when it came to statistics in these. Because you know how how how credible how not or how we're lucky exactly the question dead. That's exactly the question asked the question I asked right. I WANNA know that too. I don't WanNa just rely on sort of mythical. Oh number Unfortunately we don't have to so let me answer your question. In a couple of ways I bush is. How good are Negro League statistics today? Can we trust them. And it's really odd in if you think about it but the stats we have. Today are much much better than we've ever had before including at the time When teams were very lax about affording stats or league certainly relaxed about collecting them? oftentimes and then you know numbers just sort of get made up in the press o without too much to back them up so what happened and this is just one of the great things happen in sports forth in the last generation the last ten or fifteen years really this army of volunteer researchers have gone back all. These newspapers have been digitized. A lot of box scores were reported. And they compiled like we compile statistics from those scores and and the site. I'd recommend any of your listeners are interested in this this I called team heads dot com houses. All of this and it's really well done and only counts gains against top competition petition. So this isn't just games against the little sisters of the poor. This is Major Negro League competition and also includes games at these teams played against Major League. Teams As well as you'd like the Latin America as well so. That's a pretty good answer that first question the quality we don't have all of them The estimate that I've gotten from people who are really know this well. It's like seventy five eighty percent of the box scores between teams so it good representative sample for the stats are pretty good Sorry if you wanted to jump in there but the second thing is We know that and we know. I know that Oscar right now and they're still putting a new numbers from time to time. Box Go right now at about half the plate appearances Willie mays add get some context tax. He had two hundred ten runs. Three hundred fifty five stolen bases hits three fifty one four thirty one days five seventy five slugging percentage. That's really good and I've sort of played around constructing. Like what would an alternative Major League Oscar truly been able to do it seems to me. You just very conservative and say well what did he at least three hundred home runs. He would've still in at least four hundred basis. He almost does again in half the plate. Appearances may have. It was very durable. He would hit at least three hundred three fifty one the Negro Leagues Um and we know who would have been like a positive defender you know in the advanced analytics language language you know above zero defensive wins above replacement who else in major league history has done that nobody nobody has has hit those used for marks..

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The importance of the predominantly black Mamie Johnson team at the Little League World Series

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:07 min | 2 years ago

The importance of the predominantly black Mamie Johnson team at the Little League World Series

"The Friday. Morning Atlanta's, seventy two degrees in college park I'm Lucia here's here's. What's happening This. Is probably going to be the most pro black president that we've. Had in our lifetime that's a black Ohio pastor who was, an early, supporter of president Donald Trump's campaign speaking during a White House gathering faith leaders. Pastor, Daryll Scott thinks President Trump will be. The most pro black president in his lifetime Scott compare, Trump to his predecessor Barack Obama this. President actually wants to prove something to our. Community our faith based community and the community. The last president didn't feel like he had he felt like even have we. Gotta pass the, roundtable with the president was focused on efforts to reform the. Prison system during Trump's campaign he accused Democrats of doing too little to help urban communities often. As an often asked rather African Americans what they had to lose by voting for him the White House. Has been focusing its criminal Justice reform efforts on improving, reentry rehabilitation and workforce training programs instead. Of sentencing, reform with many advocates Argue which many advocates argue would make a. Bigger difference in other news the statue of liberty climber is due in federal court in Manhattan. Today to face charges Patricia Okumu scaled lady liberty on July four. To denounce is and what she consider President Trump's anti immigration, policies including, detention centers and the forced separation of families are protests calls a three hour. Police, standoff in the evacuation of liberty island. Her supporters are circulating an online petition calling on prosecutors, to drop the charges against her which. Include trespassing disorderly conduct and interference with a. Government agency sports now little leaguers from Washington. DC we'll make history this weekend the Mamie Johnson little leaguers from southeast DC. Will be the, first predominantly predominantly black team ever to represent the nation's capital. At the little league mid Atlantic regionals when the team took the DC championship last month late. Last month it was the first time in more than thirty years that a team from north west Washington's. Wealthy neighborhoods did not win the title The Mamie Johnson team is named for, the first woman, to pitch in the negro leagues the twelve member ball club that was founded only four years ago has eleven. Players who are black and one who, is white a multi vehicle crash has shut down, multiple northbound lanes, on, the downtown connector just before I twenty we'll have, a full traffic report, for. You just ahead a look. At the weather now flash flood watch is posted until eight this morning for many parts of northern Georgia expect a thirty percent chance of showers and thunderstorms we'll see cloudy skies today with a high near eighty three right now, seventy one degrees in east point for news and talk thirteen eighty w. a. okay I'm libra Harris now here's a look at traffic We're traveling down a connector headed north. Abernathy had to hold all the travel lanes getting the vehicles out of the travel portion of the roadway fell soon you'll be moving again. But Dili's begin in back before the seventy five eighty five the path Abernathy again all. Lanes temporarily held that will get you back in business and all the road again I'm definitely stop whereas on the dock thirteen. Eighty w. a. l. k..

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Trump to Go Away G-7 Premature, missing Ecological talks ~ Independent Recorder

24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Trump to Go Away G-7 Premature, missing Ecological talks ~ Independent Recorder

"For information in the murder of a twenty year old man whose body was pulled from pontiac lake divers recovering the body of amelia valdez from osmond lake thursday evening shortly after he had been reported missing president trump wraps up his visit at the g seven summit in quebec some tough talk on trade speaking to reporters before departing for his singapore meeting with north korean leader kim jong own the president said that the meeting had been very successful we'll have more from cbs at two thirty one detroit tigers negro leagues weekend celebration it all continues this weekend.

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Peter King on decision to leave MMQB; NFL draft fallout

The Paul W. Smith Show

02:12 min | 2 years ago

Peter King on decision to leave MMQB; NFL draft fallout

"Working on scattered outages as well from last week's windstorm news time seven thirty three here's steve courtney sports all rich and not a very good performance by the tigers in kansas city yesterday they wrap up the fourgame series as a matter of fact that skipper ron gardenhire referred to it as ridiculous anyway the royals get a four two win kansas city wins a series for the first time in eleven tries this season matthew boyd fourrun six hits in seven innings of work tigers in texas to kick off the first of three eight oh five tonight michael fulmer on the hill for the tigers he's wanting to two point eight zero the era nba postseason the warriors now with a stranglehold on their series with the pelicans golden state gets a one eighteen ninety two win yesterday golden state up three one there the rockets ditto they beat the utah jazz one hundred eighty seven in utah houston up there now three games to one chris paul by the way twenty seven points sanli cup playoffs the lightning advance again they beat the bruins three one they will face the capitals or penguins caps up in that series three to western conference had the golden knights of vegas shutting out the sharks three nothing marc andre fleury twenty eight saves four shutout of the postseason vegas advances at a conference final as an expansion team no less face either winnipeg or nashville the jets lead that series three games to two and justifies victory in saturday's kentucky derby was worth one point four three two million to the horse's owners and nearly as much to one texas woman who picked five straight winners in races eight through twelve at churchill downs the woman from austin texas one one point two million dollars whether eighteen dollar pick five bet steve courtney wjr sports traffic and weather first on the fives with dc straight ahead this michigan opera theatre presents the the summer came this story of negro leagues baseball legend josh gibson considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time his historic journey is told of talent heartbreak and overcoming prejudice and discrimination featuring the michigan opera theatre orchestra and chorus may twelfth through the twentieth at the detroit opera house tickets and information at michigan opera dot org a possible by general motors.

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