35 Burst results for "Negro"

Why MLK Was Wrong on Reparations

The Larry Elder Show

01:19 min | 23 hrs ago

Why MLK Was Wrong on Reparations

"Give me okay in 1968, spoke about he didn't use the term reparations, but that's exactly what he was talking about. Here's what he said in 1968 the year he was assassinated. And I'm quoting at the very same time that America refused to give the Negro in a land through an act of Congress, our government was giving away millions of acres of land in the west and in the Midwest, which meant it was willing to undergird its white peasants from Europe with an economic floor. But not only did they give them land, they built land grant colleges with government money to teach them how to farm. Not only that, they provided county agents to further their expertise in farming. Not only that, they provided low interest rates in order that they could mechanize their farms. And he also spoke about black people needing to get their check from the government. So MLK certainly was right in talking about equal rights. But frankly did wrong in suggesting government should do something to provoke equal results. To the extent that there were people who were discriminated against or their legal heirs, there have been lawsuits that have been filed, there have been settlements that have been reached. But beyond that, a government can only be just in its own time.

Midwest Congress America Europe
How Minimum Wage Laws Hurt People

The Larry Elder Show

02:20 min | 3 weeks ago

How Minimum Wage Laws Hurt People

"Ago I was having lunch or dinner with the brilliant Thomas soul. The man that David Mamet has called America's greatest contemporary philosopher. Still with us in his mid 90s, every day he's with us as a blessing. And I was talking to him, you might remember about the minimum wage. And it's probably been one of the most studied aspect of all of all of economics and the overwhelming consensus is that minimum wage laws hurt people. They hurt people who are unskilled because unskilled people can not ask for wages that are consistent with their level of expertise. If the law says that employer must pay somebody higher than what the employer perceives to be his or her level of expertise or level of productivity. Particularly hurts people that have less education and it hurts another way to you don't get that first job. It isn't so much the first job pays you a lot of money, teach you discipline, how to show up on time, how to deal with authority, how to deal with other people, if it's a job that requires you to interact with the public how to deal with public. So it hurts on all sorts of levels. And it's been studied over and over and over again, the joint committee on economics, which is a bipartisan panel of House Republicans and democratic Republicans years ago put out a series of studies looking at research going back over almost 50 years. Overwhelmingly showing the damage that these laws do. And as you know, the late great Milton Freeman, and Nobel laureate. Once said that the minimum wage quote is perhaps the most anti Negro, the term used in those days, that's how long he'd been talking about how bad this is. Anti Negro law on the statute books world. So I said to Tom, why is it you guys haven't one, this argument? Even Republicans. I heard that doctor Ben Carson wanted this. Rick santorum wanted an increase in the minerals. Did even Republicans are buying this nonsense. And he said, Larry, that's because most people haven't heard the argument.

Thomas Soul David Mamet Joint Committee On Economics House Republicans Milton Freeman America Ben Carson TOM Rick Santorum Larry
This Is the Biggest Social Problem Facing America

The Larry Elder Show

00:46 sec | Last month

This Is the Biggest Social Problem Facing America

"I've said a million times back in 1965 there was a booklet called the Negro family a case for national action, written by a man named Daniel Patrick moynihan, a Democrat. Later on became a Democrat senator from New York. And he said, 25% of black kids at that time entered the world without a father married to the mother. He attributed that to slavery and Jim Crow. Either way, though, he said it's bad. And we need to do something about it because it's going to have a relationship with crime and with inability to finish school and so forth. Well, now that number is 70%. It's now 25% of white kids enter the world without a father married to the mother. It is far and away the biggest social problem facing this country.

Daniel Patrick Moynihan Jim Crow New York
Biden Calls Satchel Paige 'The Great Negro' in Latest Gaffe and Liberal Media Defends Him

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:25 min | 2 months ago

Biden Calls Satchel Paige 'The Great Negro' in Latest Gaffe and Liberal Media Defends Him

"Think with the media would do if Donald Trump called a black man a Negro. Violating federal law incidentally, I mean, Obama signed a law in May of 2016 banning the word. We don't use the word Negro anymore, but obviously Joe Biden does. And what the media did to provide him cover is so comical. That it bears pointing out if you probably have heard it by now. There's a lot to get to today. It's Friday. We had a busy week. We're going to head into a busy weekend. This is a big breaking news day. You're not going to want to miss a second of today's Mike Gallagher's show 'cause we have a lot of great stuff planned for you. The Kyle rittenhouse trial is going to wind down early next week as it goes to the jury. There's only one reason that this jury would convict him. And we all know what that reason would be. We'll get to that in just a moment, but first in context, here's the 46th president of the United States on Veterans Day. You know, I've adopted the attitude of the great Negro at the time picture in the Negro leagues went on to become a great pitcher in the pros and Major League Baseball after Jackie Robinson. His name was satchel page. Now, we could probably assume he meant to say the great Negro league pitcher, maybe when he said that Barack Obama was clean, he didn't mean to say, like he was clean like he bathed, maybe he meant to say, has a clean record. When he said that you can go into any 7 11 and hear everybody talking with an Indian accent, maybe he didn't really mean Indian accent. I mean, you could give him a lot of, you know, cover, right? Because that's what the left does. When he said, you know, those Republicans want to put y'all back in chains. Maybe he didn't mean like literal chains, maybe even those little paper chains that our kids did in kindergarten. Because honest to goodness, the media sprung into action yesterday to defend

Kyle Rittenhouse Donald Trump Mike Gallagher Joe Biden Barack Obama Jackie Robinson Negro League Major League United States Baseball
'Combat Sports News & Clubb Bangerz (#7): Tyson Fury vs Deontay Wilder' ft. Clubber D the Combat G (Ball & Buds Podcast Episode #27)

Ball

04:47 min | 3 months ago

'Combat Sports News & Clubb Bangerz (#7): Tyson Fury vs Deontay Wilder' ft. Clubber D the Combat G (Ball & Buds Podcast Episode #27)

"Who who. Who will he choose. We are waiting with baited yes. It's minted baited breath. My friend take it away. I know everybody wants to know what is club. Radice pick who who is club or diga pick. Who does the combat she think will win the rubber match between tyson fury and deonte wilder. Who's gonna win before. I give my prediction. Let's see what led up to this so we all know about the first fight. It was a draw me personally. I thought wilder should one. That count was kinda slow. I kinda slow. The count was low and When weary with furious. I got floored he got up damn near one that round if wow they knock them down fear would win that fight. It was still close. It was a draw. Some people say if you're a one but because of that devastating knockout. Some people gave to wilder giving edge either way. It was a draw bill to the second fight. Second fight i mean fury swishes holtkamp. Camp up start training macron boxing with with with sugarhill legendary Transco for manual store recipes. You know saying nobody number legends in heart in hard hitters came out of a crop. Boxing up there in detroit but Gower sugarhill changes. Oh game playing math. Wilders ass out now louder has um you know a couple of excuses. He said here i. It was His suit was too heavy. But one actually address negro power engine recruiter table with attitude One should look like extra. Game of thrones. You chose look like that. So don't don't blame the suit. That was you buddy. So i said of the suit was actually twenty forty pounds in a long walk. look here you ain't demolition. You're not leaving the dum okay. If it was that bad maybe you should. Johnson arena around like us all awards going. I don't know but don't blame. Don't make excuses now. He fired mark zalin. His cornermen santa he always sabotage him and he did complain about the water and he was seeing double and it is a small conspiracy going right now because post fight. Fury refuses to the water. That that that they get. I speak fury refuse to take of the water that they gave him say that ten times. So you know at. I'm not gonna make excuses feerick. And what a great game plan came and heavier presa action. He is the best now with all those who i'd say He is the best boxer wade been. You might be a little bit of pure boxer but fury his ass goes bad and he really like the black olive oil like he's wilder. Didn't look prepared the second fight now here. We go third fight. Fury tried to skip him. Go straight to the anthony joshua so we can get undisputed. You know it was in the clause that water got a rematch. There was gonna be a rubber match if you wanna wait. Try to breach contract. Go fight josh. What they already had date they wanna fight. Wembley but there's issue with that because that's a fury does not have a license to fight in the uk. His has been suspended since he beats klitschko. Okay he tests positive for. Pd's for pets you know. He hasn't he doesn't have a license in in the uk. Now he can always get reinstated. He can call the queen he can call each elbow. He can call painting a bear. Maybe even danger mouse's somebody may wanna spice. Maybe they can help you know they could try license back into austin powers is helping trying to help out with that but you know. I don't know what happened. But he can't find the uk right now hasn't for years and he doesn't want them to go through investigation because the former that he bought the lamb meat from the contaminated lamb equal. That's kind of our special

Movies Music Entertainment Tyson Fury Boxing Detroit Deontay Wilder MMA Combat Sports Anthony Joshua Sports Radice Deonte Wilder Wilder Holtkamp Transco Gower Sugarhill Johnson Arena Mark Zalin Feerick Santa Wade Fury Wembley UK Klitschko
"negro" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"negro" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

"She awoke to find the magic negro standing on her dresser with a guttural cry brianna through her alarm clock at him when she returned home from school. The magic negro was once again standing on her dresser. She tried to appease him with an offering of jolly ranchers and bubblegum. But just hours later. Another thought was intercepted furious. Brianna wrapped multiple layers of duct. Tape around the pop. Its ears and mouth so that he couldn't hear her or talk all the while wishing the magic negro dead that was in june this morning on the twelfth day of august. The magic negro finally freed himself from bondage acceptance. She drifted toward home when she heard her brother calling her name as she stepped out of the urban wilderness to walk across her manicured lawn. She washed her little brother run to her in tears. They're fighting again. Cayden reported she knew who they were her mother and her aunt brianna his eyes narrowed as she hugged her brother fine. She thought to herself she would fix it after all she had a magic negro. That was the first time. Brianna smiled when she thought about jaakko. The magic negro brianna in cayden were barbarously waiting with their mother in the lobby of the medical center. Olivia had half a mind to take those damn ipads away from them. When she scan the lobby she noticed the quick glances people through her children's way some with smiles some with dismissive head shakes and others ignored the children completely. It was baffling at first. The doctor thought it was a simple case of laryngitis but after several months of silence they tested for an infection a growth or cancer. nothing. Jacqueline hated olivia's career. Her spoiled children her wealthy husband her sprawling home. The cars the clothes the jewelry and the staff. She attacked her sister at every opportunity constantly demanded money and blamed olivia for all. The wrongs in the world. Brianna rather enjoyed not hearing the sound of her wicked aunt's voice when jacqueline emerged with the doctor brianna smiled. She already knew what the doctor would say. The loss of her voice caused the loss of her employment which in turn made her lose her home. Her parents wanted to write a check. But with the help of the magic negro brianna change. The course of jacqueline's fate. Her mute aunt was now living with them surrounded by and reminded of all the things she so dearly hated in life. Jacqueline was miserable. Undisputed dominance the senator rose and commanded. Please raise your right hand. Brianna squeeze the hands of her mother and brother as her father did as he was told brianna did not consider herself to be a witch however due to her personal academic discipline others would beg. Pardon do you swear that the testimony you're about to give before the committee to be the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth so help you. God i do. Her father said in his opening statement during the first day of his confirmation hearing he thanked his wife and family for their overwhelming support and sacrifice because of all his hard work her father derek henderson was the presidential nominee to the supreme court because of jaakko bronze magic negro. His professional and political rivals had been eliminated. Derek henderson would be confirmed riyan. His best friend bethany won this year's miss america title and her brother now played for the new york yankees. Her mother was the doctor of the year sat on the state board of health and hadn't aged in years father time had been equally as gracious to her father. Live and let live was easy enough to do. As long as you didn't incur the wrath or rage of the hendersons eldest child many had died over the years and because she was not yet twenty five many more would fall.

brianna Brianna jaakko Cayden negro brianna cayden olivia Jacqueline jacqueline Olivia derek henderson cancer Derek henderson riyan Pardon supreme court bethany new york yankees america
"negro" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

05:44 min | 3 months ago

"negro" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

"That was good in the world. Red balloons cupcakes glitter a hug from her mom. Pancakes butterflies nail polish lip gloss bubble baths kittens raspberries red kool-aid her little brother. She thought her aunt was the most hateful woman in the world and she could barely stand the sight of her mother sister. She pushed past the woman and left the room while thinking about cream because nana god rest. Her soul had warned her to be careful. It took her awhile but eventually breeze had come to realize why that advice had been given jaakko was ill-tempered easily. Provoked an always overreacted. By the time she had realized what jaakko was truly capable of and remember the warning issued by her nana. Things had already started to get out of control. The school bully was a girl named anna margaret. Who spent more time competing in state pageants than at school. She thought she was better than everyone else because her daddy was rich. But that didn't make any sense to brianna. Because everyone's daddy was rich otherwise they wouldn't have been attending this school. Unfortunately living in alabama olivia was unable to shield her children from racial bigotry. Unfortunately for anna margaret brianna had a sharp tongue. No impulse control and a magic. Negro brianna had been sitting under the shade tree reading a book. When anna margaret and her disciples approached margaret had snatched away. The book. Brianna had bolted to her feet. Well this looks entertaining. If you don't mind. I think i'll read it. No actually you're going to give it back to me. You had no right to take it in the first place. And what are you doing here. Shouldn't you be in the bathroom putting on makeup. It's not like you know what to do with a book anyway. You're holding it upside down. Anna margaret had begun to tremble as someone in her entourage giggled. The book was thrown to the ground and margaret would permit no one to speak to her in that manner. See my daddy says. That's the problem with you uppity nicholas. You're always demanding..

jaakko anna margaret anna margaret brianna Negro brianna brianna olivia alabama Brianna margaret nicholas
The Beginnings of the Philadelphia Black Mafia With Former Police Officer Sean Griffin

Gangland Wire

02:47 min | 4 months ago

The Beginnings of the Philadelphia Black Mafia With Former Police Officer Sean Griffin

"African american people have notoriously been kept squeezed out from those kinds of things. We've got all kinds of reports red line. you can't get loans. There's just a lot of ways that african americans been squeezed down and a made drugs came along and boy. These owes young geyser being squeezed out. They saw a way to make money and make big mma to do any kind of crime on organiz basis like that you got a former organization is always usually ends up with the title. Mafia hit less cabot general term. Even though it's really sessaion in nature. But what's russians russian mob russian mafia. He get the black mafia. So how did that develop their in Philadel- well is most major. Cities had a lack of remorse. Lady hurts because they didn't have offices the banking. It met that. I find mulcher series source of pines in so long numbers. One is especially atms. Rows road bags for neighbors now is all throughout the country. We had one in kansas city. Guy named peyton. He was the banker and he had the policy and he had several bars and he was active in politics and he joined with the irish organization to help get the vote out actually converted all the african americans from republican because they all rebublican before because lincoln won the war at a dow. He turned him all the democrats to go with machine. So i bet you got the same thing in this country. I mean w registering ninety nine. Buffy negro now obviously it's not it's a microcosm of what was going on about such what he called rove ice and that's the influence of those people in that neighbor in those neighborhoods and they heading rented power. Forget it was a patriot. Serves no different than the irish who police and firefighter. You trash hold jobs. This is really not complicated. But it's complicated. Because the media academics ever talked about the so no already getting back to your phillies. Black mafia it. We don't know when it started wisdom. The common theme was they started in the mid sixties. I always the foot only. Because when i started my research in the nineties about outfits i was lucky i have the benefit of twenty years of hindsight sarai. Now new flu group was supposed to look like a new bieber. Were slack ago. Records law intelligence violence and newspaper active. And what you wind up seeing where clusters of these guys being arrested together so they will each other for years. Whether that was organized crime racket the matter of honest we get to the mid sixties. There are actually calling themselves. The black

Irish Organization Buffy Negro Peyton Kansas City Rove Lincoln Phillies FLU
The Necrobiome: Dead and Loving It

Kottke Ride Home

01:50 min | 5 months ago

The Necrobiome: Dead and Loving It

"Zuen talk a lot about fossils on this show and when discussing how a specimen ended up in the place where we found it. Thousands of years later the explanation is often something like the animal got trapped somewhere or died of some injury and then it just stayed there exactly where it perished for millennia. It wasn't moved or somehow disposed of but how often do you encounter that now huge animal carcasses just left out to decompose exactly where they died. I mean sure you may encounter the pick debt at corpse of a smaller animal in the woods on occasion but even those often get cleaned up by park rangers eventually the huge carcasses of predators that turned into some of our more famous fossils. Well those kinds of animals don't even really exist anymore and many smaller ones have been domesticated earmarked essentially to be turned into food or killed by human hunters. So we just don't see huge dead animal bodies littering the land anymore. As is bill kaminsky puts it in. Bbc's future planet. We have sanitized the land of the spectacle of death but did all those carcasses play a key role in our ecosystem would leaving more dead animal bodies out in the open help restore deteriorating ecosystems. That's the theory of scientists who study the neck row by ohm coined by eric. Ben bow a forensic entomologist and microbial ecologist the negro by buyum refers to those animal carcasses and the species that depend on them quoting bbc. The many species of the negro by own perform essential roles returning organic matter and nutrients to the food chain and removing potential sources of infectious disease. Some play other important roles in the ecosystem for example as pollinators and quotes

Bill Kaminsky Ben Bow BBC OHM Eric Infectious Disease
TEST 0445 20210817

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

TEST 0445 20210817

"He'll always regret his failure to include players from the negro leagues among the ghost players. Which you know looking back now makes me feel like that's enough to relegate this film to the aspen of history and it's not something that we should continue to celebrate say remake field of dreams. Call it feel fuck. Y'all and have cool papa. Bell and josh gibson oscar charleston and judy

Josh Gibson Oscar Charleston Bell Judy
Baseball Reference Adds Negro League Data in Record Books

Chicago's Afternoon News

01:03 min | 7 months ago

Baseball Reference Adds Negro League Data in Record Books

"Is a big day today for baseball statisticians and to help us explain all that is Larry Lester. He is the chair of the Negro Leagues Committee for the Society. American baseball research. And Larry This is personally got to be a pretty big day for you. Oh, yes, It's a confirmation for all the 50, plus years of work up mining data from newspapers and compelling it and president into a database and producing results has never been seen before. And so this is the day that the records from the Negro Leagues are being incorporated into Major league baseball records, right so The numbers for the most part are merged. Uh, that is correct. The Negro League players now have major league status, with the emphasis on major And has status available. So I'm happy that this is Sally come to fruition and hopefully, uh, some on unheralded players. We'll get some more

Larry Lester Negro Leagues Committee For Th Baseball Negro League Larry Major League Sally
Vernon Jordan Shares Experiential Nuggets on Business, Civil Rights

In Black America

02:00 min | 9 months ago

Vernon Jordan Shares Experiential Nuggets on Business, Civil Rights

"Vernon jordan. Junior has been called the rosa parks of american business born on august fifteenth nineteen thirty five in atlanta georgia. Jordan is a civil rights. Icon business consultant influential. Powerbroker jordan is a graduate of depaul university way earned a political science degree in nineteen fifty seven and howard university. School of law. Never want to sit on the sideline and nineteen fifty one. He helped desegregate colleges and universities in georgia from one thousand nine hundred sixty one to nineteen sixty three. He was the field secretary. For the national association. For the advancement of colored people in georgia and nineteen seventy jordan became executive director of the united negro college fund and nineteen seventy-one. He became president of the national urban league. He held that position for ten years on may twenty ninth. Jordan was shot and seriously wounded outside. The hotel in fort wayne indiana. This incident became the first story covered by cnn. And as we all know by now join me. Came close confidant and political advisor to president. Bill clinton this past spring. Jordan was a keynote speaker at the summit on race in america held at the lbj presidential library on the campus of the university of texas at austin. The following is an expert of that reason. Tation now let me explain to situation. You are in with me this morning. And i can only explain it by telling you a true story. I'm a member of the african methodist episcopal. Church all my life. And that was this young pastor who just graduated from seminar and the bishop assigned him to a church and a small town in georgia to begin his pastoral ministry

Georgia Vernon Jordan Jordan Depaul University Howard University School Of Law United Negro College Fund National Urban League Atlanta National Association Lbj Presidential Library Campus Of The University Of Te Fort Wayne CNN Indiana Bill Clinton African Methodist Episcopal
The History Of The Cola Wars

Conspiracy Theories

04:49 min | 11 months ago

The History Of The Cola Wars

"In the late eighteen eighties. Pharmacist named john doc. Pemberton decided to get rich selling homemade cures and elixirs. We should note in spite of his nickname. Doc wasn't a traditional doctor. He hadn't trained in mainstream medical practice instead advocating for alternative treatments and remedies and he wasn't alone in his passions late nineteenth century doctors and patients. We're wild about drugs. And even pharmacists could get rich quick selling inert or sometimes dangerous products as cure all remedies before pemberton's time even something as benign as ketchup was marketed. As a treatment for diarrhea jaundice and rheumatism bayer pharmaceuticals pedaled heroin as a cough suppressant and a safer alternative to morphine and literal snake. Oil salesman claimed that rattlesnakes fluids could cure their gullible customers. It's no wonder that. Pemberton figured he could brew his own dubious remedy in make a fortune. His first hit product was called. French wine coca. It contains several ingredients that would raise eyebrows today but they were considered healthy at the time. Things like wine and coca leaves which contain cocaine. Pemberton claimed that french wine coca was an energy drink and a remedy for morphine addiction and the people loved it. Unsurprisingly the beverage sold well but it wasn't long before pemberton ran into an obstacle just months after french. Wine coca hit. The shelves at the end of eighteen eighty five fulton county georgia outlawed alcohol atlanta based dot. Pemberton had a new problem realizing he probably never strike it big with his mental tonic. Pemberton went back to the drawing board. He wanted to replicate french wine. Coca success but with a non alcoholic beverage. Luckily he had a new product in. Mind it too featured coca leaves but he added the kola nut a west african fruit pit. That's high in caffeine. The mixture of coca and cola gave customers a mild buzz and inspired the drinks name. Coca-cola the beverage sold modestly in its first year unfortunately. Pemberton wasn't particularly skilled with marketing. and distribution. so shortly before his death he sold the business to a fellow druggist with more business. Sense acer candler from their candler built a beverage empire through soda fountains in the nineteenth century. Chola manufacturers generally sold syrup to local businesses. This was more efficient because soda. Bottling technology was fairly new and not widespread yet. They're carbonated water was added to the syrup. So the coke was fresh and fizzy when it was served. Gamblers forward thinking mindset. Didn't stop there. He knew he could reach more customers if he didn't limit his avenues of distribution so in eighteen eighty nine. He sold bottling rights to a plant in chattanooga tennessee. Now customers didn't need to visit the nearest soda fountain for a glass of coca cola. They could buy it the corner shop and drink it at home then. Candler made another even bigger shakeup. He altered the coca cola recipe. We don't know all the changes candler made to the recipe. But we know one of his goals. He didn't want to sell cocaine to his customers and he had two reasons why first candler was very religious second and more importantly he was racist. Most soda fountains were segregated. So only white people could drink coca cola on tap but once he started selling bottled coke. Southern newspapers began printing rumors of quote negro cocaine fiends. In quote white supremacists suggested that the soda drove people of color to commit violent crimes including sexual assault hypocritically. Nobody expressed any concern. That cocaine might drive a white people to commit crimes and to be realistic. There probably wasn't enough cocaine in the beverage to spur consumers to violence although it's hard to say because it doesn't seem like anyone was tracking how much they were using in the recipe. Regardless candler was committed to eliminating the coke from coke.

Pemberton Coca John Doc Diarrhea Jaundice Cough Suppressant Cola DOC Fulton County Candler Coca Cola Atlanta Georgia Acer Chattanooga Tennessee Coke
In wake of Vernon Jordan's death, tributes from Georgia pour in for civil rights activist from Atlanta

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

00:58 sec | 11 months ago

In wake of Vernon Jordan's death, tributes from Georgia pour in for civil rights activist from Atlanta

"Morning. Stacey abrams tweeted this about vernon jordan. Who died last night morning. The passage of my friend the extraordinary for jordan he battled the demons of voter suppression on racial degradation winning more than he lost he brought others with him and left a map so so moore could find their way love to his family. Travel on with. God's grace burley ever is the widow of the assassinated civil rights leader. Medgar evers said today. Our nation has lost a hero vernon jordan the civil rights warrior presidential adviser former. Ceo of the united negro college fund former director of the national urban league was a close personal friend of my husband medgar of mine and of my children he medgar road through the back roads of mississippi investigating some of the most horrific violence against black mississippians when medgar was assassinated vernon came to offer comfort and support for our family

Vernon Jordan Stacey Abrams Grace Burley Medgar Medgar Evers Jordan Moore United Negro College Fund National Urban League Travel Mississippi Vernon
Vernon Jordan, Civil-Rights Leader, Dies at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

Vernon Jordan, Civil-Rights Leader, Dies at 85

"Businessman, a civil rights leader and an adviser to then President Bill Clinton. Vernon Jordan has died at the age of 85. Jordan grew up in an Atlanta housing projects before his family bought a home, got his LA degree from Howard University and worked for civil rights attorney. One of this case is integrated the University of Georgia. He worked for the C P and United Negro College Fund and was head of the National Urban League in 1971. Jordan never held a government job, but no one knew better. How Washington D. C works. Jordan was a friend and adviser performer. President Clinton. Allison Keyes. CBS NEWS Washington

Vernon Jordan President Clinton Howard University Jordan Atlanta United Negro College Fund University Of Georgia National Urban League LA Washington Allison Keyes CBS
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

The View

03:55 min | 11 months ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

"One of the most dominant figures in talk radio in an architect of the conservative media movement. Rush limbaugh passed away aged seventy from lung complications lung cancer complications. There's been an outpouring of tributes along with a lot of criticism of his decades of controversial comments. So the question is how will you remember my start with joy. Well i did work. I worked at a radio station in. Nineteen ninety-one ish around that time. Wabc radio and he. I came on at ten. I believe and then he was on at eleven o'clock so i was engaged with him quite a bit in those days over the years. He's called me more bihar. Which i thought was interesting. I guess he was saying that. I was like b arthur in the in the show. Maude who was a raging liberal. I presume that's what he meant. And i consider that a badge of honor to be compared to maud. But it's interesting. I worked with him. I worked i've interviewed ann. Coulter many times Janine pirro has been on the view trump has been on the view. I went to his wedding for marla You know these people have gone through some kind of metamorphosis of of weirdness over the years and i was getting used to come on the show. She was actually fun. Ann coulter is basically. I consider her a comedian. I don't even consider her a pundit and we all know what trump was like before you know he was a democrat. So what's what happened to them. And i answer is money. Money is what happened to them. They have thrown at so much money at them at fox for example and various places that they could not resist the money so they go on the air and they spew their hatred their prejudices their lies as rush limbaugh for the almighty dollar and they fool americans into believing that they are authentic authentic. I know these people. They're not real right. So sonny what do you think his legacy will be. Well i been listening to to everyone. Eulogizing rush limbaugh. And i remember listening to him as a kid growing up and for me. He just normalized Hatred he normalized racism. And you know. I think he really weaponized. White male grievance and you know he sort of hard in these rural white listeners people sitting in their trucks and in the middle of america and in the south and listening to rush limbaugh and this is someone who called our president barack. The magic negro. This is someone who talked about an nfl football game as a gang match between the bloods and crips. This is someone who made fun of michael. J. fox's a parkinson's disease this is someone who likened a thirteen year old chelsea clinton to a dog. You know this wasn't someone who Was a nice person. This is someone that spewed racism and hatred yet. He is now considered. I guess the most influence the an influential person and building the modern republican party and conservatism. A to me. That's not something to be proud of. I mean how is that. A reflection of conservative values i thought conservatism was about small government and family values and if family values is making fun of black people and a child and a disease. I don't know where the the republican party is. I think his legacy is that he paved the way again for the modern republican party and trump is

Lung Complications Lung Cancer Rush Limbaugh Wabc Radio B Arthur Janine Pirro Bihar Maude Marla Coulter Ann Coulter Donald Trump ANN Parkinson's Disease Sonny FOX Limbaugh J. Fox Chelsea Clinton Barack NFL
This day in history - NAACP founded

This Day in History Class

06:34 min | 1 year ago

This day in history - NAACP founded

"The day was february twelfth. Nineteen o nine in new york city. A group of black and white people met to talk about the status of black people in the united states. There were sixty people at the meeting including suffrage is philanthropist journalist clergymen educators and people from other traditions in attendance and some of them have been part of the abolitionist movement. Many of the people there had also been part of the niagara movement which was a civil rights group founded in nineteen o five sociologist activists w. e. d. boys and editor an activist william morris. Trotter the date of this meeting was notable because it was the hundredth anniversary of former us. President abraham lincoln's birth which many found meaningful because. Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation. But anti black violence was still endemic in the united states. And the people who met in new york on this day. We're committed to fighting racism and discrimination in the us. starting what was sometimes called a new abolition movement. At the time. Jim crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south. Though discrimination on the basis of race was constant throughout the united states thousands of black people were being lynched by white mobs at public events that were made into spectacles and deadly race. Riots were taking place across the country. In the period after the reconstruction era interpersonal and institutionalized racism were plaguing american society but activists reformers in revolutionaries were using and fighting to combat rampant racism and violence in the country in august nineteen. Oh eight there was a violent race riots. In springfield illinois where mobs of white people destroyed the homes and businesses of black people in the community and killed in lynched others author and activist. Ns stransky and her husband. William english walling. A socialist journalist went to springfield to investigate the right and in september. A magazine called the independent published an article by walling titled the race war in the north in the article. He wrote that. People must revive the spirit of abolitionist. Entreat black people social and political equals or else the race war would continue to spread across the country and walling went on to write the following the day. These methods become general in the north. Every hope of political democracy will be dead other weaker. Racist in classes will be persecuted in the north. As in the south public education will undergo an eclipse and american civilization. We'll await either a rapid degeneration or another profounder and more revolutionary civil war which sell obliterate not only the remains of slavery but all other obstacles to a free democratic evolution that have grown up in. Its wake who realizes the seriousness of the situation. And what large and powerful body of citizens is ready to come to their aid. Marie white ovington a social worker and writer heated wallin's call and sent him a letter in support so in january nineteen o nine. She met with walling in social worker. Henry moskovitz at wallin's new york apartment to discuss proposing an organization that would fight for the civil and political rights of black people. So oswald garrison villar grandson of abolitionist. William lloyd garrison wrote the call which was a summons for civil rights activists to form an organization that would advocate for ending racial injustice in america and fight for african americans rights the call was endorsed by sixty people including w. e. b. voice journalist and activist ida b wells philosopher and reformer john. Dewey an activist jane addams and on february toldt nineteen o nine a group including mary turks. Tarot charles edward russell in florence kelly among others breath met for a national conference but they didn't hold their first large meeting until may when they organized as the national negro committee. There was some conflict at that first session as leaders tried to get the more conservative but washington to join in on the meetings also tensions rose between white and black members and the press beer the radical nature of the conference but by nineteen ten members of the committee had formed the national association for the advancement of colored people or in double. Acp the n. Double acp mission was quote to promote equality of rights and to eradicate cast a race prejudice among the citizens of the united states to advance the interests of color citizens to secure for them impartial suffrage and to increase their opportunities for securing justice in the courts education for the children employment according to their ability and complete equality before law the organization established is national office in new york city in named a board of directors and president moorefield story at this time w e b d boys was the only black executive in the organization but that same year two boys started the crisis a journal offered discussion on race relations politics and black life and present it black intellectual and artistic work in double. Acp members went on to challenge segregation laws. Stage boycotts start anti lynching campaign in lobby and advocate for new legislation the end ps methods aren't loved by people who use more direct action tactics but the organization did make gains in the movement for black civil rights and is still going today.

United States Stransky William English Springfield President Abraham Lincoln Wallin William Morris Trotter Marie White Ovington Jim Crow Henry Moskovitz New York City Oswald Garrison Villar Walling New York Ida B Wells Lincoln Mary Turks Charles Edward Russell Florence Kelly
Guanajuato And Quertaro

Travel with Rick Steves

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Guanajuato And Quertaro

"Moon guidebook author. Julia joins us now in an interview. We recorded prior to the kobe outbreak. One reason i haven't explored mexico as much as i'd like to. Maybe because i have a hard time pronouncing the pounds. But i think three towns near mexico city that really are like household words for anybody who loves exploring. Mexico are what those three towns. There's semi i n de guanajuato and kenneth at all and you could rent a car and being these towns. What a couple of hours. Yeah it's probably about two and a half to three hours to cut it that. Oh that's the closest san miguel. You're looking at probably about four hours to get there from mexico. City you can hop in a bus doesn't really nice comfortable bus lines or you could rent a car to. Would you do it. If you're flying into mexico city to get to these towns you know. I would take the bus. There are actually buses that come right out of the airport in mexico city to get at that oh and for their. It's you know striking distance to san miguel. So it's it's pretty easy to get around by bus. There's lots of great bus lines. They make it convenient so julie just so we can kind of get our bearings. Give me a quick thumbnail. Sketch of the three towns. Well going to what those starting with. That is a university town with a beautiful colonial central. San miguel day in day is a very laid-back. Small town that also has a very rich history and at the is a medium sized city where you'll get a mix of a lot of different things some business and a beautiful centro also plays really worth visiting julia. If you had to do your sightseeing before you started your actual bake ation. We'll be on your list. What are the top two or three things you gotta see in this town. Well i would start by wandering around the plazas and looking at all of the churches and baroque mansions throughout the central. One place worth visiting. Is the candidate that oh art museum. It's housed in an augustinian convent from the seventeenth century. So the building itself makes it worth a visit but they also have very interesting contemporary work by mexican artists other local artists. So i would definitely put that on my list in between to the market. The makoto crews would you find Artisanal things that come in from the countryside is at a farmers market. What would you be wondering through there. It's mostly a food marquette. And i really recommend visiting it because it gives you a very unique opportunity to wander through a really big bustling city market that again is not touristy at all so you're really getting a glimpse in mexican culture but you're not You know there's other people with their cameras out you feel like you're really getting an authentic experience there but it's also very clean and friendly and easy to navigate. It's not as overwhelming some of the big markets in mexico city say but it has a very similar atmosphere so i think it's a really cool place. I love visiting that. I mean in get at the dell in when you're there wandering through that market and just a little bit hungry. What are some of the regional. Specialties you look forward to trying well. One thing that is very typical of kenneth at o. Are gore dita's which is a big round. Corn cake flattened by hand. And then it's cooked on a griddle and it's usually stuffed with something like pork or she's no prickly pear cactus which is very popular to eat in whole area because the grow everywhere negro really the cactus pear do you call it Yeah and it's called the in mexico tuna. Yes and when you see tune on the menu. It's does not. Tuna fish actually refers to prickly pear fruit. Which is very popular especially in this region because these Cactuses grow everywhere. Wild

Mexico City Moon Guidebook Julia Joins De Guanajuato San Miguel Mexico Kenneth Julie Julia Dell Gore
Remembering Atlanta Braves legend and longtime MLB home run king Hank Aaron

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Atlanta Braves legend and longtime MLB home run king Hank Aaron

"It was a sad day in baseball last week. When hank aaron passed away at age eighty six. One of the all time greats sluggers in baseball history. He wasn't amazing player. An amazing person. And when you think about hank. Aaron and his impact on a game it was tremendous. Think about this hank. Aaron played in the negro leagues hank. Aaron came up to the big leagues and was a star from day one. And when you look at his body of work. It is an incredible incredible degree of consistency. When you think that hank aaron batted three oh five. Seven hundred and fifty five home runs almost averaged hundred. Rbi is twenty three seasons and think about this. If you took away as seven hundred and fifty five home runs from his hit total he still would have three thousand hits. Which by itself get you into the hall of fame so not only does he have three thousand hits. He has a five hundred home. More than five hundred home runs. Those two are markers for me that automatically get my vote and then when you think about what he had to go through to become the homerun champ and the hey and the threats and the racism that was pointed towards him. Think about that People saying that they were going to shoot him. Kill his kids and this guy never never came undone never lashed out at people never got angry. Just kept playing ball kept his head down. He is definitely someone you can admire. And then he did weeks that milestone passing babe ruth and what a monumental moment that was when hank aaron became the all time home run king and i know people some people say he's still my home run king and is not barry bonds and i don't really wanna get into the whole debate about this. This is about hank. Aaron and what he did. I respect what hank aaron put up his numbers he put up but in the record books he's number two and that's where he is and that's what i respect and there's nothing wrong with being number two when when you put up the body of work that hank aaron has done he will be missed. What an impact. He's had and the grace and the dignity everything he play with and he was a world series champion and he was a steady as a as a as a get. Never hit fifty home runs. How can a guy play twenty years. Hit all those home runs and never had those big years over fifty. It's it's an amazing amazing accomplishment. And hank aaron will definitely be missed

Hank Aaron Hank Aaron Baseball RBI Babe Ruth Barry Bonds
Storytellers: Lorraine Hansberry

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Storytellers: Lorraine Hansberry

"Today's storyteller was a playwright and activist. Who stories centered. African american working class families despite tragically short career. She became the first black woman to have a play produced on broadway half a century later her work remains one of the most celebrated snapshots of black struggles and black joy. Here's the story of lorraine hands berry lorraine hands berry was born on may nineteenth nineteen thirty on the south side of chicago. Her father carl. Augustus was a prominent figure. Within the city's black community having founded one of the first african american banks growing up lorraine and her three older siblings played host to a number of famous people including langston hughes. Wabc boys duke ellington and olympic gold. Medalist jesse owens. Despite their middle class status and cultural connections the hands berries were still subject to chicago's deeply ingrained. Housing segregation agreements known as restrictive covenants were widespread throughout the city. White property owners could collectively agree not to sell to african americans. This practice created a ghetto known as the black belt which ran through the south side when lorraine was eight years old. Her father secretly bought a home. In one of the so-called restricted heads in nineteen thirty seven when the family moved in a white mob attacked a brick was thrown through the window narrowly missing lorraine the local homeowners association filed an injunction for the hands berries to vacate lorraine her siblings were chased spat and beaten during their walks to and from school the supreme court of illinois doubled down on the legality of the restrictive covenant. And the hands. Berries were forced out of their home eventually the. Us supreme court overruled this ruling on a technicality. Thirty blocks subsequently opened up to black families across the south side while this ruling and the hands fight did not outlaw restrictive covenants. It did signal. The beginning of the end for the practice lorraine attended. Chicago's englewood high school where she became interested in theatre. She initially attended the university of wisconsin. Where she cut her teeth with the communist party but left after two years in one thousand nine hundred fifty lorraine moved to new york to be a writer by nineteen fifty one lorraine had found a home in harlem and began socializing with many of the great thinkers who had once visited her family back in chicago. She started writing for paul robeson freedom a progressive newspaper at a protest against racial discrimination at new york university lorraine met robert number off a jewish writer. They married at her family home in chicago. In nineteen fifty three in nineteen. Six robert co wrote the hit song. Cindy oh cindy it's prophets allowed lorraine to stop working to focus on writing. She began developing a play that she initially called. The crystal stair langston hughes poem mother to son she would later changed the name to a raisin in the sun. This too was from a langston hughes poem called harlem. What happens to a dream deferred. Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or faster like a sore and then run a raisin in the sun centers on a black working class family in chicago south side as they try to improve their financial situation. The patriarch of the family has died and a ten thousand dollar insurance payout is imminent they the money to buy a house in the cheaper all white neighborhood nearby to they use it to invest in a liquor store and education lorraine based many of the characters on the families who rented from her father and with whom she attended high school the cast safer one character was entirely black lorraine was in her twenties and the play itself dealt with racism life in chicago's black belt and the pain of assimilation into white culture topics that were considered risky for the predominantly white theater. Going crowd it took over a year to raise enough money to put the play up. When it debuted in nineteen fifty-nine a raisin in the sun was the first play written by a black woman to be produced on broadway and the first to be led by an african american director lorraine was twenty nine years old. The play was an almost instant. Hit the new york drama critics circle named it. The best play of the year just five months after its broadway debut arisen in the son of in london's west end in nineteen sixty one. A film starring much of the original cast was released and several of the actors received golden globe. Nominations perhaps the most important element of the play success was that entailing box stories. Lorraine also make theater accessible and previously unimaginable ways as the writer. James baldwin noted. I had never in my life seen so many black people in the theater and the reason was that never before in the entire history of the american theatre had so much of the truth of black people's lives and seen on the stage. Black people had ignored the theatre because the theatre had always ignored them lorraine would go on to finish in stage. Just one other. Play the sign in sidney bruce. Deans window about a jewish intellectual the play which explored themes of homosexuality and the bohemian lifestyle. Debuted to mixed reviews in nineteen sixty four. It ran for just over one hundred performances closing on january twelfth. Nineteen sixty five. That's same day. Lorraine hanbury died of pancreatic cancer. She was thirty four years old. After lorraine's death. Her ex husband robert had several of her plays produced posthumously to be young gifted and black became an autobiographical work. Drawing on lorraine's letters interviews and journal entries the title came from a nineteen sixty four speech of lorraine's when she spoke to the winners of a united negro fund writing competition. She said speech though. It be thrilling marvellous thing to be merely young and gifted in such times it is doubly so w dynamic to be young gifted and black

Lorraine Chicago Berry Lorraine Langston Hughes Local Homeowners Association Supreme Court Of Illinois Englewood High School Jesse Owens Robert Co Cindy Oh Cindy Duke Ellington Augustus Us Supreme Court Berry Carl Paul Robeson White Theater University Of Wisconsin Harlem
"negro" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Business School

"And she's just telling me about like bawling crying after losing out to roll to melanie griffith like it doesn't matter where you are. Yes you feel it you get told no and you continue to get told no and you know i guess for me the worst part of it i mean just trying to boil this down the the worst part of it is if you really want something if you wanna roll what happens you all. It's hard to help this from happening. You want the role and you want to just focus on the work but intrinsic in this audition in this opportunity is well if you get that work for me right now. I'm in brooklyn. You know. I've been here for however many months intrinsic and getting that roll your whole life will logistically shift where you are what you're paid who you're working with all of that so it's hard in visualizing getting that role not to visualize how that changes your life so you go down a whole path of what could be and it's you that's helpful to getting the role because you're you're visualizing it when you're told no or they're not going in that direction that all gets pulled away from you in an and so there's a bit of it's like a combo platter of like that whole thing is not happening like someone else just changed your plan without you making the design right and that that's kind of frustrating then there's also a feeling of like they didn't pick me you know like they don't think comes special. They don't like are they. Think that person's more special. I do think over time of doing this so long. I've gotten better. Maybe at like separating that stuff from the work and also realizing like. I don't think i'm i'm as as attached to or enamored with the the results of the thing. I'm able to look at the work of it and then go okay. I'm going to go in there. I'm basically going to go. Here's the rough sketch of what you're going to get. If you pick. Matt del negro. This is my take on the role right now. Hopefully it's gonna get more refined. If i get the gig and were you know months down the road with it but this is the rough gig the the rough sketch of where i am right now and then. If i don't get it i am more able these days to go wasn't meant to be put it in that didn't happen. It's not all a loss you know. Take whatever work you did and you put it into the next one. But but when i was younger and still a little bit so these this day when you would closer and closer to something and you'd go back you get called back and called back and call back.

melanie griffith brooklyn Matt del negro
"negro" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Business School

"Check this out. The seeds that you planted many years ago may not break through the ground or start growing for a lot longer than you anticipated when you planted them said my friend matt. Del negro matt is an a-list hollywood from the west wing sopranos goliath scandal. And all so the host of the ten thousand knows top rated podcast and recently launched his book of the same name. Ten thousand knows how to overcome rejection on your way. T- us mad as a fantastic guy. In fact i was on his podcast wall. Would you should go back and listen to that episode. But more importantly mac tells the story of how it all started how it all started when he was when he first became an actor on his way to being what he is and building what he has today with thousand nose and more. This is must-listen to episode. And you will love the warmth the compassion and the story of how anybody can make it. And how you can too with matt del negro and it starts right now at that one thing is.

Del negro matt matt hollywood matt del negro
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"One thousand nine hundred seventy, eight, nine, hundred, ninety, four veterans. Seventies largely was sort of this. Arguably now beginning face but but you're. Now shifting into another gear here in the late Seventies. Right and so you can imagine there eighteen. Former players on the veterans. Committee. Put to Negro Leaguers on their among the eighteen. You know what incentive to these guys who didn't know about the Negro Leagues have to elect you know spend seventy five percent of their votes. Negro Leaguers they elected to people over sixteen years. Wonderful was room foster who is probably one of the most important figures in eagerly history. So, then The hall of fame realized this is not working. So they basically gave the Veterans Committee and eight-man. And said You you're allowed you have to put in one person a year for the next seven years. and. So they elected one person a year they book Neil on the committee and he would tell the other veterans who should be elected. And then about two thousand and one, they said, okay. Our ballots almost out. That's the end of it. But you just described that in yeah I'm sorry you describe your book almost as essentially like Oh as a quota type system. Yeah. Quarter you know they were told one person you put in no more no less just you know get this anywhere basically told to vote for because they were given a very short ballot. And the you know the way I look at it is the hallways was dragged. Kicking and screaming into admitting Negro League members was never this type of open voting which was allowed for you know the white. Major Leaguers. So finally in two, thousand, five, the hall of fame and Major League Baseball, authorize this study which I, which I mentioned before where they been two hundred and fifty thousand dollars putting official statistics together for the nineteen twenty to nineteen, forty eight, they brought a historians committee together twelve people they said seventy five percent vote you get in, they gave him thirty five name ballot which had been pre cleared by the hall of fame and they said you can put in as many as you want from the thirty five. But. Again, you know I interviewed committee members and they felt there was an implied. Obligation. Not. To go too crazy. In Effect I. Think it's very impressive that they elected seventeen people out of the thirty five. But you know as I say in my book, I. Think you know there was a good case for almost all thirty five to be in. There were very, very strong players. There's never been a situation where there was an open and fair ballot over a period of time where people could build a consensus..

Veterans Committee Major League Baseball Negro League Neil official
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Chequered history that leads up to your framing and stuff in a second, but it almost feels to me like and obviously I'm. I'm not near I'm up Saber Guy I'm not. This is more of an expansive exploration and personal journey. So to speak I, guess versus an in depth sort of baseball. Statistician kind of approach, but it almost feels to me if I could really simplify some of this that. In some respects because of the. Shall we say lack of uniformity around statistics and? Game Coverage and All that other stuff, right? It almost feels like it's Almost through the through the historical, almost A. A second version of discrimination in some respects when it comes to the equation of the statistics and the quality of the players. When it's thought about in the grand scheme of baseball, right? It's almost like a another knock against the stories and the and the. The justification of some of these players and management. I think you're getting very close to the truth because the statement that will we don't have statistics. So we can assess these guys is basically racism but not understanding how the Negro Leagues operated. You know they did not operate as formal leagues playing seven Games a day seven. Days a week. In League Games, they operated very differently and there are other things you could look at their statistics. We can make judgments as to quality of players. You know there's a, there's a site online now called seam heads when they've gathered every statistic, they can concerning all these Negro Leaguers and it's very extensive. It gives you a real solid basis for comparing these players to each other and also to major league players they have a they have something called similarity scores where they match Negro League players up with Major League players based upon their comparative statistics and some of those you know. Comparisons are amazing. You know. Maybe we'll talk a little bit about players later on I can tell you about some of those..

Negro League baseball
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"You know as I did my research, some facts really jumped out at me. For example, you know that the National League integrated before the American. League. are you aware that nine of the eleven? AM VP's in the National League between Nineteen Forty, seven and nineteen fifty, nine more former major were former Negro leaguers interesting I mean that's a stunning fact it's not only stunning. It's IT'S A it's A. It's almost as positive as to the quality of the Negro Leagues. Yeah, and so it also brings up the question is like. We can sort of get into some of that here nephew want but like the proverbial. What took. So long right this just taking all the other sort of. Distracting issues aside just from pure talent perspective, right? It just seems I guess through the frame of history. So illogical. Racism is logical. And that was clearly is Lee. Answer I. Mean Many teams thought about. Integrating earlier, nineteen, forty seven. Nineteen forty three, the Pittsburgh pirates have try out scheduled with three of the top players, Negro Leagues, and at the last minute, the pirates lost their nerve and backed out. There were chances but nobody really had the guts to go through with this until the dodgers did it in nineteen, forty seven so from your perspective then so This clear that you know there are differing levels of. Of Negro League play right over that period of time that you just discussed right and there's no, there's no doubt that. Some of the top tier of those, right whether that be the Negro National League or the American League even. The East West League for a year or two I mean. We can get into the I. Guess There's almost a a A. A grading if you will have certain. Leagues within this bigger umbrella of the Negro Leagues but I guess the question in there somewhere is. As you're getting in involved in sort of investigating this stuff further. What where, where do you focus most of your energies to kind of even get to where the best players in the best teams were sort of sitting Probably wasn't all that obvious or May or was it? Well you know I think the first thing you need to do is to understand that the Negro Leagues were not an exact equivalent to the American National League they operated differently I view them as a multi-diverse. That they had many levels of high level play. You know not only did they have the official Negro Leagues Operating the United States, the ones you've just mentioned you know they grow National League that Negro American League Negro Southern League for one year. You know they were basically any high level league that loud dark skinned players to play baseball and they were they. Operated not only in the United States but throughout the Caribbean Cuban ball wizard played at a very high level During the Twenties Thirties that were South American Winter Leagues that let the players gravitated to they.

Negro Leagues Negro American League Negro So Negro National League American National League American League East West League dodgers United States Pittsburgh pirates Twenties Thirties baseball VP Lee official
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Here's your host Tim Hamlet. Well now here we go. Again, how are you everybody? My name is Tim Hamlin and it is good seats still available. Yes. The curious little podcast that each and every week. Strains to go into the the realm of what used to be in professional sports we we leave no stone unturned. We've got a ton of stories to get to. And it's endlessly fascinating as this week hopefully will be especially for you baseball fans, and those of the Negro Leagues the proverbial gift that keeps on giving for this little show for sure. so many great. So many great teams so many great players. Frankly, a whole ton of them quite unheralded, and that's kind of sort of the The focus of this week's conversation with our guest. This week Stephen Greenies. As we talk about the hall of Fame relative to the Negro Leagues and. And frankly there's a lot of work to do friends There's so many great players. Managers administrators etc. Negro Leagues that for whatever reasons are still not part of the hallowed hall. The Pinnacle. Baseball? It is said and it's history. But frankly of of perhaps a of all of sports probably the quintessential hall of fame maybe the blueprint. For halls of fame everywhere. In cooperstown. We, get into a fascinating and frankly well-deserved conversation. With Stephen about his his new book, it's called Negro League. Of Fame, the case for inducting twenty four overlooked ballplayers it's published by our Palate McFarland, but it's it's not just twenty four players. It's actually a couple of dozen others that are also worthy of Merit. It is tremendously well researched and well written book that makes the case not only for these individuals as we'll get into a few of them in our conversation. But also just the general. issue. Of Negro Leagues. In general not being fully accorded there do if you will in baseball's highest. Shrine There's no doubt. There's some debate of course about various players, the the lack of statistics and the relative rag tag or at least some of the some of the structure of Negro League Baseball certain all of it. But all kinds of excuses frankly and politics. Around perhaps Y Negro League inhabitants. Still to this day, have not gotten their equal do I would argue, and you could make the case that this year twenty,.

Negro League Y Negro League Baseball Stephen Greenies Tim Hamlin Tim Hamlet cooperstown Pinnacle McFarland
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Strictly on the statistics he's close but not enough money. But for what he did as a coach with Bernie Williams, you keep hearing stories Lou. Brock the people that he helped discover and stood as a role model for and brought into baseball and was then the first. Black coach within the major leagues he deserves. You. Know the accolades. That that were heaped on him sort of in the press, but never within the baseball world to the degree that he deserved. Maybe even an unwitting ambassador. So to speak given his exposure baseball series, right? Yeah exactly. So you know, and then now they're they're putting people for all sorts of things. Of course was great and deserved to be in there as an important person to show that the the you know the female component was. was there they loved the ball players they love the game that came to the Games they dressed for the games etc.. and. They followed the Games and So. There's there's that whole dimension as well. Okay I hear those sort of baby round round here. we could go for hours on all of this, but this is a great. Sort of seen set for you know another angle frankly of of the whole Negro League Baseball Story. What what. I guess there are two main questions that I have sort of. To kind of still throw out there number one is. Why did it take? A you know a massive documentary to kind of inject perhaps or maybe even for the first time generational early. Inform people about these. Negro Leagues and. The. Not. Only the importance of it to the history of baseball but the cultural significance why was it and I know I'm sort of projecting this but it feels like it was relatively dormant. A topic until around then. Obviously your your book and and Peterson's book certainly. Stoked. Or began sort of the the flames of that. Why did it take? I guess that sort of. Media phenomenon to kind of. Put It on people's radars perhaps for the first time you're you're part of it because The power of the media is so strong. And the power is a visual media so strong. and. The the when you see something you kind of know it. I think that Greek word for. To know comes from seeing or something so can as skillful. Filmmaker artists that he was. Of this story, but it was the right time. You know now we have so many channels so many choices. But at that time. The whole country picked it up and Ken was building on the civil war story which nobody expected either right But he had he had a real knows for the right. Person in the right interviewing and he and Lynn Novick. And so. You know it it sort of exploded but I think it was already percolating a bit. You know the men the fire was burning, but but he he made it a flame. So the other question that I would say is You know obviously, this is the third. Version of your of your book. So it's kind of our hopefully the. The gift that keeps on giving although I know authors thirty argue otherwise Sunday especially these. Okay. Yeah Don't we hopefully we can get extra book sold, but you know I be able to retire on that but. What's left I guess to tell about. This sort of multi-flavoured and multilayered story right the happy to say that. Happy. This is a good one. Okay because First of all. Peterson's book came out then John Hallways. then. Invisible man. So we were kind of..

baseball Peterson Lynn Novick Negro League Lou Bernie Williams Ken Brock John Hallways.
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Baseball and had ability. Often. For example, in the case of Buck O'Neil his father. Telling him you know. Son You gotta go somewhere else you can't get what what you what you want in life in. Working in a celery field in Sarasota Florida. You know you have to go grab life, go off and play or they would be on a team in the south. the the Negro League teams trained in the south. The baseball season wouldn't start until two almost me I. But. They'd be training in April little bit of March in southern cities in Florida sometimes. Arkansas Texas. And, they would they needed money. So they would play exhibition games against very good black local teams. And let's say you were tremendous. Player with talent in one of these teams playing against a Negro League team coming through Hot Springs Arkansas. And certainly they. Will. Kid. You got that ability. Why don't why don't you come with us you? Can we need an extra guy come with come with us? and. So person would be plucked out of the south. Now in the nineteen forties, there were many more blacks. In the North So said there were lax from the North but the majority of Negro Leaguers we're from the south. And they made it but the the games were played in the north. The teams were mostly in the north. And so here's the almost the archetypal story of up from the south. To the North Chicago which had east West game was the Mecca. For Blacks, all over America. The blacks from North Carolina or South Carolina might end up in New York or Philadelphia but. But Chicago was a magnet for almost everything else and. and. So these guys would see our in Kansas City to Kansas City monarch team, of course was the. Of the two. Greatest Negro League teams probably the Kansas City monarchs and for a very short period the Pittsburgh Crawford's. How are these players? The treated in the black community, right? So I it doesn't go lost on me that the title of the book is invisible men, right so in a segregated society, White majority if you will in terms of population may probably. So you know not sort of knowing some of the great exploits and. Athletic Prowess of these these players in a huge loss, right? Because you're not, you know not getting the CD's players day in day out like you might know on the My sense is and from what I've read and not only your book but elsewhere is that. Within the black community that these baseball players were I use the word earlier revered but they were you know they were there they were. High pedestal.

Negro League Baseball America Kansas City Greatest Negro League Chicago Florida North Carolina Buck South Carolina Sarasota Hot Springs Arkansas Crawford Arkansas Mecca Texas Pittsburgh Philadelphia New York
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"I think frankly largely still to this day under misunderstood set of leagues and teams and players, and and. People involved as to why they were playing and how the messages that they were sending. We get into all of that stuff and much much more in this just tremendous conversation with our guest this week Don Rogerson again, the book is called Invisible Man Life in baseball's Negro Leagues and the reason why this book and and about Peterson's only the ball was white book. essential still are frankly is I. think a lot of people especially this generation and maybe even a generation ago. kind of really don't realize I think many people kind of take for granted that. The Negro Leagues is just sort of culturally known and understood and and you see plenty of garb wear and the logos and The Negro League Baseball Hall of fame in Kansas Lots of lead there's a lot that's happened but I think people need to remember that. You were having discussion say in the mid nineteen ninety s or so. It's really important to recognize that a lot of what was the story of the Negro Leagues was kind of frankly forgotten or glossed over or just not known to amass of baseball indoor sports fans especially those not of African American background or descent. And the the cultural. Sort of force that sort of changed all that was, of course, Ken, Burns tremendous and you know a historically a. PRESCIENT and invaluable. Documentary series on PBS called Baseball. and. If you've not seen that, of course, you need to see all nine or now ten innings slash chapters worth that's available out there on streaming and certain DVD's you still have one of those but. These books. The Peterson, book and invisible men by our guest on Rogerson really actually were very foundational. Elements in the creation of that documentary, and that is where that documentary particular is where. People like Buck O'Neil and other Negro League stars. and. Champions were really highlighted in depth. For a for the first time for a generation of sports fans, and that legacy continues to grow and and more frankly into a lot more things. So we talk about all of those things, the inclusion of of Negro League ballplayers in the hall of fame that sort of chequered history we get into a little bit of that with Don. We talk about the major league baseball current situation. Just literally two months ago finally, taking up the the exercise to figure out and do you really think that this is not going to be the case were the Negro Leagues quote Unquote Major League and from statistical and. Equality of play kind of assessment I think frankly it's safe to say it's kind of a foregone conclusion but whatever major league baseball and or the hall of fame I guess needed to do. To kind of sort of cement that as as the reality but Anyway all of that stuff. This is a fascinating discussion. The book is Great The conversation is just as great and we welcome you to it in just a few moments are. So let me quickly promote this thing here. So this book invisible man published by soon to be reissued in about a week or two by University of Nebraska Press..

Negro League Don Rogerson baseball Peterson Buck O'Neil University of Nebraska Press Kansas Ken
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Hard to say for their sponsorship and bring our attention. To this book by Dan Diane Shaw, he says a farewell to arms, legs and Jock straps. I know you'll enjoy the free sample and I know you'll enjoy the book. Try it out, and as they say, you'll be glad you did all right back to our conversation Erica's. Seems like we're getting a sense of of Posey sort of idea that there's there's money to be made. There's there's a business so to speak in this, but I'm also really curious as to. It seems like it's a pretty successful enterprise, if not daunting in terms of travel and getting all the players he needs and being on the move all the time. I? Guess the flirtations as the only word I can come up with right now of quote Unquote League play, and there seemed to be a couple of different starting points for that one in I guess it was nineteen twenty nine. There's an interesting year to circle. Right with this quote. Unquote American Negro League again. With this East West League thing in thirty two. So I. Give me a sense of maybe why and what these? Formative leaks were and why maybe the attraction? You had the second. The first rupe roster in Chicago, founded and others founded the first Negro National League and Nineteen Twenty which is primarily mid, western basically. Did in nineteen, twenty, three the eastern Colored League. Started in Along the eastern seaboard, roughly from our basically from New York City. Down to Baltimore. And some places in between. Posey Had Opportunities to join both leagues and. This is what I HIS WHO so canny! I mean he he would go against the grain. If you thought it would work. He resisted joining. Two Leagues for a couple of reasons. One of which was if you didn't belong to the League's. He could Without real impunity. Read their rosters signed the best players and degrades made money. He said this is probably true. At the Graz made money every year until the depression There is no overarching commissioner or czar or judge, Landis or whatever of black baseball. And you can go shopping for players, and if you're in the league, there was there were a lot of restrictions, but if you weren't in the League. You can entice good talent. Away from somebody who was in the league. It wasn't a whole lot. They could do about it. They could refuse to play you, but then the greys were such a good draw. They probably wouldn't do that either. He also marketed his Pittsburgh area. The Eastern League stopped short of Pittsburgh to Western. League stopped Short Pittsburgh but the two leagues would play. Exhibition Games if you will with each other and he, he said. Hey, you're coming back. East to West West to east wants to stop in Pittsburgh and play the grace. For a day, and then move on, and that worked, that worked pretty well to. He tried to get a formal arrangement, but That didn't really work out, but in but. He started to play Negro Degrade, started to play Negro. League teams by picking them up as they pass through western Pennsylvania and route to either Chicago say or Philadelphia whatever. So there was so so he was. On the. Outskirts on the fringes of league baseball, but he refused to get involved until nineteen twenty nine. When he when he put to graze in the. In the American Negro League and by that point we think of. We think of the depression and you know starting with the Wall Street crash. You Know Tober but what? What really was happening? which there was a real decline in American manufacturing starting by Nineteen Twenty, seven. I mean. The depression. Largely started because. Manufacturer just making too much in the. Warehouses were full of refrigerators and. Furniture and everything else that people. We're making more than people could buy so. Manufacturing jobs at the tail off two or three years before the so-called beginning data the depression that affected black wage earners. You know they. They stay had been most recently hired generally speaking. In manufacturing and they held lower paid positions. You know what they say. Last, in first out, so unemployment started to grow in the black community. And the more unemployed there are the fewer baseball tickets are. GonNa be sold? And the. Pittsburgh was very industrially based, and it's just hurting the white teams to what the white semi pro team started to go out of existence because they're sponsors could no longer. Afford to fund them and. I think he looked around and saw the. His base, which is the regional semi pro base money base was starting to disintegrate, and so he hopped into league. And from then on, if there was a league to grays, we're probably in it. He just looked he just. He looked around the land. They financial landscape saw that he. His reasons for avoiding the League's. We're no longer paramount, so they joined the League, and of course they were more than welcome because they were always a good draw. Right, that's actually but that obviously that that version of the American Negro League was literally a one year wonder, and obviously now in a much more broadly depressed that nation and economics, and all that stuff beyond the the the lead in you're describing prior to the actual crash, and all the obviousness of it I. Guess in Twenty Nine so I mean. Now I'm really interested in so okay I. I get the idea that perhaps there might be sort of strength in numbers, and maybe there's more of a financially advantageous rationale sort of be within something, a bit more structured, and obviously that all sort of goes to Helena handbasket by the end of this one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine ninth season had. How does he I guess? Go back to being an independent team and fun for a long I. Guess for a couple more years because. That seems to also lead him to the conclusion of of maybe going back to the league structure again a few years later, but albeit maybe with him. I don't know having designs on how to maybe set one up. Well the the Negro National League folded in nineteen thirty, two, the eastern Colored League and the American National League and already gone by the boards. Except for the Negro Southern League which you're sort of. Always considered to be a minor league, but in thirty two. It was like the last man standing, so they were a major league even. Just because they were there. So he actually had very good independent teams in thirty and thirty one, and in thirty two. He made what I'd have to say. Is His only really dumb? Decision he started. He started a league in the depths of the depression called the East West League. He controlled two teams outright in it of the six, and probably had a lot to say of the management of the team in Cleveland because it was. Run by one of his old basketball, but he's from Pittsburgh. Who told everybody? No, this is my money. This is my money. I'm not sure anybody believed him so posey control literally controlled somewhere between a third to a half of the league. And it didn't work by July. Was Out of business. Why why do you think didn't it work was largely the for all the other reasons that other leagues were not surviving frankly obviously other worst time in the world to start a new baseball league. Not, even the white majors are doing well in nineteen thirty two. No was doing well I. Have No idea why did this?.

League American Negro League Negro National League eastern Colored League East West League Pittsburgh Negro Southern League depression Nineteen Twenty Eastern League Posey baseball American National League Chicago Dan Diane Shaw Erica Baltimore New York City Cleveland Pennsylvania
"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"And so yeah, it's a special plate on a lot of levels and that's why I say you don't have to be a baseball fan too long for this exam. And of course, we certainly believe that if you're not a fan that's sacrilegious, but that's okay. You don't have you don't have to be a baseball fan. If you are a fan of American History, you're going to love this Museum. If you are a fan of the underdog overcoming trials and tribulations to go go on to Greatness. You're going to love this Museum, but if you are a baseball fan to boot you are in hog heaven, it provides everything that a baseball fan can absolutely love but it's there for any and everybody and I think having met so many people in the museum. I've met a lot of people in who have expressed the fact that they're not sports fans or baseball fan at all. But as one lady told me I just spent three years. Hours in your Museum and I was absolutely blown away. Well that is one of the greatest compliments. I think we could ever get because that's how we tried to build this experience so that when you walk through this Museum you were going to learn not only about these legendary ball players, but you're going to learn about the history of this country simultaneously, that's exactly what it is because baseball is kind of a microcosm of this country and of like life in general that the lessons that you learned from both the history of baseball and from how to play the game of baseball and be in the game of baseball to be a supportive teammate to play the game honorably to be inclusive and fair. Those are lessons that take you Way Beyond the baseball diamond those are things that you know play into how you become a person and you learn a lot. I think that the museum teaches you a lot of those things in the frame of this very epic story. Yeah, and I think that's why I thought Eight people leave here cheering a human Spirit. That's where I just wholeheartedly believe, you know again, what's not to love about the story? It is everything we pride ourselves about being American because it is about money. It's about passion. It's about perseverance. It's about refusing to accept the notion that you're unfit to do anything. So I'll show you absolutely we ask everybody. First of all, I want to ask you to just tell us quickly like one of your favorite Negro League stories because I'm sure a lot of people won't know the story that you tell because you have so many of them and then the second thing is your favorite sports memory is something we ask everybody who comes on the show because we know that everyone will end up having a different sports memory or a very least a different perspective on the same Sports memory..

baseball American History Negro League
"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"And I've been doing a number of these interviews and we spent Jackie Robinson day pretty much all day talking about the museum and Jackie Robinson's connection to the Negro Leagues. And so I think more people now may be aware of the museum never before at a time when we're shut down people are looking for things and for me, it was important that we at least stay on top of mind for folks who were interested in, Georgia. The subject matter and this story, you know, that makes me so happy because I like a lifelong fan, but I do think like you said out of a dark time. There are so many possibilities and so many reasons to hold on to hope and that's exactly what this time can be for the Negro Leagues Museum because you have this chance to spread it around the world for parents to be like instead of letting your kids stare at Call of Duty or I don't know what I don't know video games. I've honestly never fucked up my life but to offer them the chance to like learn about an incredible piece of sports history. That's an unbelievable opportunity for families that might otherwise not have the time or resources to be able familiarize themselves with what you guys are doing. Yeah, and it's given us a new business model to kind of now look at and so now we're starting to look more at digitizing some of our assets even the traveling exhibition log. And I think we're finding some avenues that could be revenue streams for the museum through that process. And so, you know, yeah, we've had a little time as a result of the shutdown to kind of think about other ways in which we can enhance the museum experience for folks. So I do think out of this shutdown, it has given us an opportunity to challenge ourselves to find new and creative and interesting ways to not only Market the museum and provide access to the museum, utilizing a digital platform. And so now we're starting to examine other possibilities even without traveling exhibitions and digitizing them and creating an experience where people who may not get a chance to see it in a forgiven sinner. You can still see it and experience and still generate some revenue for the museum in doing so and so yeah, there's already been something positive that has come out of this page. Coronavirus shut down even though as you well know I can't wait for this to be over and I want things to be back to normal and I want to be able hang out with people here a museum and shake hands and high five and take pictures with people again. And you know, I miss that immensely but at least that while we're in there's down time. We're we're trying to be inventive and creative as we can and it's helped shape a new business model. I believe for the museum. There's going to be beneficial for us for years to come. Yes. Will you are a very Hands-On president. So it's not like, you know, you're just like I want to get back to work to sit behind my desk you're out there every day. You're you're not only the president your life the I don't want to say mascot cuz that's not that doesn't give you enough of the glory that you deserve for what you do, but you know, it's important to me and I've never been one that just says, okay. I'm going to sit behind job. The death and tell other people what to do. I just want to be out there in front as well. And I love mean some of the most special days for me is when I'm in the exhibition in walking around the museum with people and not seeing their reaction to this story and telling the stories that I love to tell the stories that I learned first-hand from the great Buck O'Neil and Monte Irvin Minnie minoso. The Ernie Banks is of the world and sharing those stories..

Negro Leagues Museum Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues Coronavirus Ernie Banks president Georgia Buck O'Neil Monte Irvin Minnie minoso
"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"BoB Kendrick president of the Negro Leagues baseball Museum and Negro Leagues historian and baseball historian. I am so excited to have you on thank you so much for being a guest. It's an absolute pleasure to catch up with you again. Thanks so much for having me on I'm cannot express like to listeners and to you. I'm fangirling right now. This is such a such a treat to get to talk to you again, especially because you recently celebrated your nine year anniversary as president of the museum. Yes. Yes, you know time flies. It seems like it was just yesterday. I was sitting my boxes back down. I had left the museum in 2010 to take on another role with another not-for-profit organization and then thirteen months later. I am coming right back to the Negro Leagues baseball Museum or coming home to the Negro Leagues baseball Museum, and it seems like I just set my boxes down and literally hit the ground running. We've been running ever since but it's been a match. To call nine years as we've had, you know, a really significant turn around here at the Negro Leagues baseball Museum. And so I'm really proud of what we've been able to accomplish over those nine years. Now that being said we still have a lot of work to do we've just scratched the surface. But yeah, it's been nine amazing years for me as president. It's hard to believe it's been I ain't twenty-seven years of affiliation with this Museum. So I got involved with this place almost from its infancy going all the way back to 1963. So it's been a glorious ride for me working with an organization that I am just absolutely passionate about and never in my wildest dreams. You have your own what I thought that this would have turned into a career when I began volunteering with the museum way back in 1993, but it's done just that and it's been one of the most rewarding and gratifying things. I think could have ever met. They're so lucky to have you I was actually going to say you began as a volunteer when you were working with the Kansas City Star..

Negro Leagues baseball Museum Negro Leagues president BoB Kendrick Kansas City Star
"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"negro" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"So it was like a bunch of years and also shout out to like the Eleven Hundred plus athletes and coaches and 300-plus front office Personnel across football basketball and MLB who signs that players Coalition thing I get Congress to pass the ending qualified immunity act just like really amazing to see all these athletes stepping up LeBron doing that voter thing to end like voter suppression and make sure people vote just so many amazing athlete activists out there doing stuff. It's great to see we just have to like keep going. I mean like last week we dedicated our episode to Brianna Taylor and the police report came out today and like dead. They honestly have the audacity to say that she had no injuries and that there was no forced entry when they broke into her home while she was sleeping and shot her eight times. Yeah, she was literally sleeping in bed. And also like the person they were looking for had already been arrested was in custody then it turns out one of the cops has been accused of sexual assault by multiple women and like nothing has come from that either and these guys still haven't been fired or suggested and the new Cycles moving on and like it can't move on like we have to fight for this woman. Absolutely this woman and her family deserve justice just it's inexcusable. There's so much wrong with the situation. But basically we need to email call sign petitions donate to important causes organ a link to setting a freaking rooftop. Yeah tweet about her just like took her memory alive and we're linking the same act blue racial Justice organization page in the podcast description. They split your donations between multiple very worthy causes that are working off. To dismantle systemic racism and just make this country a better place for everybody and get Justice for Brianna. Just like do everything you can don't let this stuff happen. I mean, this is Sade acceptable. It's so beyond unacceptable. So we are continuing with our initiative to pass the mic to black people and we have another awesome guests for you guys this week, I grew up playing this game called stratomatic which is like a baseball board game apparently now, they have an online version, but I played it the old-fashioned way with my dad on Saturday afternoons after synagogue. It's how I fell in love with baseball. You may have player cards. They're kind of like Advanced versions of baseball cards and my dad being like a collector of all things educational had literally 30 different debit cards, and one of the decks of cards was like different from all the rest. I remember asking my dad about it and he was like, well, this is the Negro League. So I learned about the Negro Leagues from playing strat-o-matic with my dad and he told me all these stories. Yep. Asked BoB Kendrick who is the president of the Negro Leagues Museum one of the most incredible people in the Baseball World. He's been the president for over a decade. He's been volunteering and working for the Negro Leagues Museum since the early nineties. He has the most incredible stories.

Brianna Taylor Negro Leagues Museum Justice baseball Negro League BoB Kendrick MLB president LeBron assault Congress
"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"negro" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Let's talk about that because this is i. I'm guessing the first time that he not only is is a player but also a manager or is able to source straddle both of those roles goals for the first time. Yeah that's exactly right and and being a manager At least at that time at least for Charleston meant really putting together the roster. You're the general manager. As much as you are a manager The mandate the teams. A man named Colonel Struthers who was like the second black policemen? Lebron Harrisburg Way. Something like three hundred pounds but taught ballet dancing to use the parents use quite a character He wasn't necessarily so well connected in the world of Major League Baseball to put together To be able to together really good roster that was that was Charleston's job and that was something I think he really I wanted to do so. Give me a sense. Then of of of the Harrisburg experience because I think it's also important period of time In the Negro Leagues generally right. Where a lot of things in this country things kind of stumbled along as the Great Depression effectively took root if you will electronically macro to the point where there was a from all indications? It seems like You know the leagues that had had sort of gotten sort of their starting in the early part of the twentieth kind of kind of crumbling and and really kind of you know kind of went dark after a while after say twenty nine nine and thirty but this is during his time in Harrisburg where he's arguably kind of the peak but he's he's being able to do both thinks thanks right and and kind of stand out in in both those categories both managing and playing. Yeah absolutely it. Is it definitely part of his peak. I mean some of the statistics. Sixty was up in Harrisburg Are Crazy they were considered crazy at the time. And and and this sort of more exacting research down in the last few years that people going back to them. All box scores There's still crazy can nineteen twenty four. It's four zero five. Nineteen twenty five. It looks like he hit like four twenty seven. I mean insane numbers But Harrisburg this is twenty four twenty five. This is before the Great Depression. His four year. Run Their Eastern color the had probably problems were not caused by the incipient Great Depression. That was probably just more. The usual. All endemic now under capitalization issues of the Negro Leagues. It's when he goes to Hildale and that's in twenty eight twenty nine that's from. The depression starts to catch up with him. Another league folds in which Dale is playing and That creates a lot of this Again player movement like crazy only with L. deal for a couple of years and that's with the depression and the folding of that team in that league pushes them out to Pittsburgh Eric where he spends the last sort of prime vague if he's playing career and ends up with a man named Cumberland Posey and his homestead Greece. All going Eh. Get to come hosie in this in a minute and held in Pittsburgh in particular in a second but but maybe this is a good opportunity to kind of maybe delve in a little bit in to some of the the numbers that he's putting up both on all parts I guess fielding certainly in hitting and maybe as you sort of answer or give give our audience a sense of just how dominant and standout his stats and his play was slash work. Can you square that though also with what I would imagine magin would be you know a a trust factor when it came to statistics in these. Because you know how how how credible how not or how we're lucky exactly the question dead. That's exactly the question asked the question I asked right. I WANNA know that too. I don't WanNa just rely on sort of mythical. Oh number Unfortunately we don't have to so let me answer your question. In a couple of ways I bush is. How good are Negro League statistics today? Can we trust them. And it's really odd in if you think about it but the stats we have. Today are much much better than we've ever had before including at the time When teams were very lax about affording stats or league certainly relaxed about collecting them? oftentimes and then you know numbers just sort of get made up in the press o without too much to back them up so what happened and this is just one of the great things happen in sports forth in the last generation the last ten or fifteen years really this army of volunteer researchers have gone back all. These newspapers have been digitized. A lot of box scores were reported. And they compiled like we compile statistics from those scores and and the site. I'd recommend any of your listeners are interested in this this I called team heads dot com houses. All of this and it's really well done and only counts gains against top competition petition. So this isn't just games against the little sisters of the poor. This is Major Negro League competition and also includes games at these teams played against Major League. Teams As well as you'd like the Latin America as well so. That's a pretty good answer that first question the quality we don't have all of them The estimate that I've gotten from people who are really know this well. It's like seventy five eighty percent of the box scores between teams so it good representative sample for the stats are pretty good Sorry if you wanted to jump in there but the second thing is We know that and we know. I know that Oscar right now and they're still putting a new numbers from time to time. Box Go right now at about half the plate appearances Willie mays add get some context tax. He had two hundred ten runs. Three hundred fifty five stolen bases hits three fifty one four thirty one days five seventy five slugging percentage. That's really good and I've sort of played around constructing. Like what would an alternative Major League Oscar truly been able to do it seems to me. You just very conservative and say well what did he at least three hundred home runs. He would've still in at least four hundred basis. He almost does again in half the plate. Appearances may have. It was very durable. He would hit at least three hundred three fifty one the Negro Leagues Um and we know who would have been like a positive defender you know in the advanced analytics language language you know above zero defensive wins above replacement who else in major league history has done that nobody nobody has has hit those used for marks..

Negro Leagues Major League Baseball Harrisburg Major Negro League Charleston general manager Colonel Struthers Pittsburgh Lebron Hildale Willie mays Cumberland Posey Oscar magin Latin America Dale representative