19 Burst results for "Neale Hurston"

"neale hurston" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"You have a son. I'm imagining there are the books of Zora Neale Hurston. Maybe the photography of Gordon Parks, you know is that what it is for for an again? This should not be your responsibility to sell white parents out. Do best for their adoptive black Children. But is it not just leaning into that in your stomach but jumping into the black culture for your Children? No, It's definitely not jumping into it for your Children. It's jumping into it with your Children. And it's less about drawing attention to blackness for a white parents self. It is living amid blackness as a way of helping to give that and recognize that within their black Children. That is parenting. Are you saying doesn't sound like you are that you don't think white parents should adopt black Children? No, It's not what I'm saying at all, but I do have a piece in the Washington Post. That is advice. You know, they're very particular things. You should ask yourself before adopting black Children. I eat. Do you have any black people in your life if you don't Think about that first. I'm not certainly discouraging it. I am asking white adoptive parents to think deeply and engage deeply with blackness, black culture, black history and to consider that an integral part of their parenting. That's culture critic and essays. Rebecca Carroll, her new memoir, Surviving the White Gays about growing up in a well meaning liberal family and roll light, New Hampshire. Rebecca. Thank you so much I read.

Rebecca Carroll Rebecca Zora Neale Hurston New Hampshire Surviving the first Washington Post Gordon Parks White
The History of Animal Trials

Your Brain on Facts

07:16 min | 4 months ago

The History of Animal Trials

"According to author ep evans in the criminal persecution and capital punishment of animals. There were two types of animal. Trials are strengthen and their process. Their straw phin were for capital crimes. Which would warrant the death penalty. I e homicide usually committed by pigs horses and other larger domesticated animals which were presided. Over by a secular tribunal. Their processor were judicial proceedings in ecclesiastical courts against vermin like rats mice locusts and weevils the object being to spell the vermin from the orchards. Vineyards and croplands. They were eating by means of exile extra schism or excommunication in sixteen fifty. Four sentences were handed down against of locusts in a spanish obvious. Santamaria the last sentence calling for the locusts excommunication and in order for them to leave the region in the next fourteen hours bishop alonzo de madrid excommunicated another plague of locusts condemning them to confinement in a cave and a bishop in cordova excommunicated a flock of swallows that had set up shop inside their parish. These were at best here. Eric victories just to make the people feel better. While evans's book lists nearly two hundred such cases the animals in their process cases never really seemed bothered by the ruling domestic animals. Barely listen to us. What do we expect. The wild wants to do either way. It was thought to be important that the animals have day in court. Why not just exterminate the offending critters. We're pretty good at that. Since even weevils and rats were considered god's creatures the destruction they caused must also have been part of the plan so destroying them would be an act against god's will but if the animals were tried in a church court and excommunicated or otherwise condemned then it was kind of okay for example in the fourteen eighties. The cardinal bishop of autun in france ruled against some slugs that were ruining the estate grounds under his purview. Ordered that for three days announcements be made to the slugs that they were to leave the area or be cursed. They didn't leave so it was game on for the gardeners to get rid of them. On purely legal side of things were the cases against livestock typically for murder. Apparently pigs are just mad for murder at least when it comes to humans and most cases involved them eating the victim whole or in part. This was a time when both animals and children might freely roam through fields and streets and accidents did happen. Pigs may not eat everything as people think but they will taste everything and god help you. If they find out your made of meat it reminds me of a bit from zora. Neale hurston story where the family sow gets into the kitchen where toddlers zora is alone and her mother panics. Even though the sal was less interested in eating. Mrs hurston baby than the other way around evans describes one fairly typical case from thirteen. Seventy nine in which two herds of swine were feeding together. When suddenly three pigs became agitated and charged the swine. Master's son who died from his injuries. All of the pigs from both herds were tried and fort after due process of law were condemned to death on appeal. All but the three instigating piggies were later pardoned. The courts really do seem to have put effort to try animals in the same way they would humans which is less woke than it. Sounds when you remember how readily the death sentence was handed out in those days. I've never tried to hang a pig. But given their incredibly muscular necks. I imagine it doesn't go easily. Also high ranking in the crimes animals could be charged with was bestiality. Although those cases were usually known to go in the animals favor both the human and the animal might be put to death but sometimes the case could be made that the animal was not at fault as it didn't consent to participate in the act so it wasn't punished if they were convicted. The animal might actually be imprisoned with the human who got them in the mess in the first place. In those cases the owner of the animal was charged for the animals care and feeding as a sort of second hand punishment for as much as. I'd like to say that animal. Trials are brutish fossil symbolic of a decayed era gratefully forgotten and i've got stickers for anyone who can identify that movie quote without googling it cases persistently pop up even in more recent times in tennessee in nineteen sixteen. An elephant named. Mary murdered her trainer. The strangest verse of the cell block tango ever and was hanged with crane in nigeria. In two thousand nine a goat was arrested. After a mob of vigilantes told police it was a shape shifting car thief no word on how that case turned out of all the creatures critters and creepy crawlies that plagued late medieval france. None could hold a candle to the weevil ricochets artists not to be confused with the palmetto. Weevil rinca forests fabricius the largest weevil species. You might say are. Eras is the lesser of two evils. Working the first complaint against the insects was made by a group of grape growers in fifteen forty five which resulted in a proclamation for the public to atone for their sins in hopes that the weevils would leave and it worked a generation later though the weevils returned and the town was forced to take them to court lawyer. Antoine filial was appointed the weevils public defender after all. It's hard to carry cash in carapace. So they reason. The weevils wouldn't be able to pay for representation feel argued that his clients had been placed on earth by god along with the food that they needed to survive. And it wasn't the bugs fault at that food happened to belong to some local farmers. The prosecution who i will picture being played by sam waterston and his glorious eyebrows contended that animals are meant to be subordinate to man and the weevils towing the line. The villagers believed their sins. Brought the pests. But the pests were part of god's plan but but humans are supposed to have dominion over animals so they should be able to do with them as they darn well please this back and forth. Stalemate is the central theological paradox of animal trials. Maybe i'll recast the da as linus roache.

Ep Evans Straw Phin Bishop Alonzo De Madrid Zora Neale Hurston Evans Santamaria Mrs Hurston Cordova France Eric Weevil Rinca Master Antoine Filial Nigeria Tennessee Mary Sam Waterston Linus Roache
"neale hurston" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

04:48 min | 6 months ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on The Zest

"What are <Speech_Female> the lessons <Speech_Female> that we can <Speech_Female> take with us today <Speech_Female> about her work <Speech_Female> in about how she <Speech_Female> aids and just <Speech_Female> society <SpeakerChange> <Silence> during her time. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think there's a <Speech_Male> number of <Speech_Male> lessons. You can take <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> fact. That <Speech_Male> zora <Speech_Male> came from <Speech_Male> a family <Speech_Male> of blackie athletes <Speech_Male> for. Everybody <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> had an education. <Speech_Male> She was fortunate <Speech_Male> enough to <Speech_Male> have a college education. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> think it <Speech_Male> despite <Speech_Male> the cast. <Speech_Male> She was in <Speech_Male> and been <Speech_Male> a member of the african <Speech_Male> american casts. He was <Speech_Male> one of the league's within <Speech_Male> an cast <Speech_Male> but she did <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> consider herself <Speech_Male> better <Speech_Male> then working <Speech_Male> class folks <Speech_Male> and so she <Speech_Male> had no problem <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> into these <Speech_Male> communities <Speech_Male> going into some <Speech_Male> of these juke joints <Speech_Male> and other places <Speech_Male> that most <Speech_Male> dignified <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> whereas my father <Speech_Male> was a high falutin. <Speech_Male> Black folks <Speech_Male> would not go. She <Speech_Male> went there and she <Speech_Male> had no problem <Speech_Male> and she had <Speech_Male> the ability <Speech_Male> to win their confidence <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> when she went there <Speech_Male> and she also <Speech_Male> appreciated <Speech_Male> the folk wisdom <Speech_Male> that they had. She <Speech_Male> knew these people <Speech_Male> very humble <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> she understood <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> appreciated the <Speech_Male> culture that that <Speech_Male> they had And <Speech_Male> i think that's one of the things <Speech_Male> that we need to do <Speech_Male> is to <Speech_Male> consider. You can <Speech_Male> learn something from <Speech_Male> everybody. <Speech_Male> And there's <Speech_Male> there's you <Speech_Male> can't <Speech_Male> privilege <Speech_Male> reading <Speech_Male> over over <Speech_Male> story to knowing <Speech_Male> you can learn just as <Speech_Male> much from a storyteller <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> can from <Speech_Male> somebody who's a scholarship. <Speech_Male> I think that's one <Speech_Male> of the things <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> she shows. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The strategy <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> surviving <Speech_Male> with very little <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> what my definition <Speech_Male> of soul <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> surviving <Speech_Male> hard times in <Speech_Male> making the look easy <Speech_Male> msci <Speech_Male> learned from <Speech_Male> her own experience <Speech_Male> from the people <Speech_Male> she studied how to <Speech_Male> survive herself <Speech_Male> had to take <Speech_Male> care of herself. <Speech_Male> And certainly during <Speech_Male> this copay <Speech_Male> time there are <Speech_Male> so many of us <Speech_Male> that have to <Speech_Male> turn to different resources. <Speech_Male> That are no <Speech_Male> longer there force. <Speech_Male> There are pharmacies <Speech_Male> stores. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> are no longer there some <Speech_Male> of us <Speech_Male> in a we don't have the <Speech_Male> same income we have <Speech_Male> before <Speech_Male> many of us <Speech_Male> need to turn <Speech_Male> to subsistence <Speech_Male> guards that you have <Speech_Male> yards <Speech_Male> you have even <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> decks. Will you <Speech_Male> create Start <Speech_Male> planting food <Speech_Male> that you could <Speech_Male> eat from their yourself. <Speech_Male> The things that she <Speech_Male> teaches people <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> what you can grow <Speech_Male> in is available at one of <Speech_Male> the things. It's on my <Speech_Male> list right now. <Speech_Male>

"neale hurston" Discussed on Get A Grip On Life

Get A Grip On Life

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on Get A Grip On Life

"Yaris and he made a mockery. It so i'm very very very proud. And why don't why. Why isn't the narrative. Why is the narrative. Because so one of the things that i was a history and english major in university and i took two courses on african american fiction and of course on african american history and is fascinating. It really is and there's such a huge rich history of literature. There you go back to lakes hughes. In frederick douglass zora neale hurston and the native son. I can't remember the guy's name who wrote the book and then yet your eyes were watching. God you have go tell it on the. There's a rich history of of of black american fiction. And i don't hear reference to that i constantly From the communities reinterpreting the narrative of victimhood. I think that's there and i agree with it. I'm not saying that that's not true. And certainly you're talking about the greatest catastrophe to happen. Any people in the history of of humans that we know of in history but also you have a. There's also a narrative of of you know there is a lot to to study and to point to that is positive in their culture. And you don't hear much of that from people that you know in in twenty twenty. That are discussing these issues. Why is there in. There's a question. I wanna ask you at some point about number forty. Two i remembers number was jackie robinson. I wanna ask you a question about jackie robinson. Second but why is there not more instead of this the resentment. It's almost like there's a and i've talked to people where they don't know who langston hughes is they don't know who's ornell hurston is but they're angry about something. I think there needs to be rediscovery of all of us. I'm a canadian. But of americans of all colors of the rich literature and history of the of the of the people that were once slaves. Why is there not more focus on that. And why why is the focus. So much on anger and resentment and and damage in two thousand and twenty is a social media thing that people don't have the time to go read a book. What is it about that okay. i'll give you. I'll give you one good answer at thing. Education educational system is the especially minorities. Don't get a pure look taught history. They you have to teach a child amino would know..

frederick douglass zora neale jackie robinson langston hughes
"neale hurston" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on KCRW

"Built by and for the black community. It was the first all black city to be incorporated into the state of Florida in the year 18 87 and it's the town where famed writer folklorist and anthropologists aura Neale Hurston was raised in the late 19th and early 20th century. I first red Zora Neale Hurston is a teenager randomly discovering her book, Their eyes were watching God as a young woman. The book opened a door to a culture and life about which I knew basically nothing. Kristen's books are riveting, filled with horror and grace. People she writes about are often the struggling poor and food figures predominantly in her stories. In 2015 I spoke to historian Frederick Douglass Opie about how she used food in her work. Hi there, Fred. Hi, Evan. What made you want to explore Florida food through Zora Neale Hurston Zais. Well, as you mentioned in the intro, I also read their wives. Their eyes were watching God and I've used it in one of my courses on history. And just was amazed how much food was in it, so it may begin to think. Okay, So if it's in this book, this woman's been AH, prolific as faras publications in the number of Jonah's What else does she have to say about food and the rest of her work? And she's an interesting person because she was born in Alabama to sharecropper parents. But he moved her family moved to Eatonville, Florida, which was quite a particular town during the time could you describe it? Yes, it's one of the oldest all black townships. It was founded in turn of the century, and it was very unique for its time again. We're talking about thie. The height of Jim Crow just briefly, So everybody understands. After 18 77 federal troops were removed from the South wall in the Civil war and anybody who wanted to turn back the political dialogue. The South could wreak havoc on African Americans. So if you had a black township, it means you had political independence. And sovereignty from, you know, white racist. So it was. It was a very unusual experience for anybody that's out there in that time. So let's talk about this town. Eatonville. Where's Zora? Neale Hurston really grew up and and sort of the circle of community food were there. Sharecroppers, or did people own their own plots of land that also had their house? You had a black upper class, very small percentage of people who had money like Joe Clark from Joe Clark's Only store in the town. But there there is no sharecroppers. You had blacks who were day workers who would work for other people who would go out the communities. Like tea cake, tea cake, and the story is a guy who's kind of Ah, aroused about not from Eatonville, but would make his way through different towns. Most people were farmers, self sufficient. Farmers assistance farmers her since her father was a preacher. She's a peak, a kid. And her father, like many ministers at that time, was the pastor of several churches. But he also raised just about everything the family consumed. In her case, the general store assumed a really big importance. The general store is everything. It's Ah, Will you purchase those things that you can't grow things like salt or of the spices, Sugar? It's the place where you get your mail is to post office there. Other instances it's the barber shop. It is the place where you go to meet friends and to share and swaps, you know stories. Let's start talking about some of her stories and some of the food that figured importantly, like pig's feet, not related to the general store. I mean it. What's really interesting is the definition of courting food if you were Cording. Somebody you wanted Teo and press them. You know, Now you'd give him chocolate back Then you get a pickled pig's foot. I mean, that was that was like, Wow. I really like you type of food. So if you looked at what would be on the counter of a Of a store like Joe Clark's. It would be a large bottle of pickled pigsfeet. Other things that you see as she as she goes out into the field, she interviews and spend time And she's embedded as it were in several different type of work camps. One of them is a sawmill camp turpentine camp and then plantation agricultural plantations where people will be picking anything from beans. The great fruits, oranges. Around those spaces, Things like pickles. Pig's feet would show up at a Saturday night party. Most of these people worked six days a week, and they would get paid maybe on Friday or Saturday night. And that's when they had let their hair down and party So you see pigs feet. You see fried chicken. You see things like fried gator. You you see All types of moonshine. It's amazing to me what people can make alcohol out off. Another important part of of that leisure coach our culture in the Florida areas that she studies in the backwoods. Our juke joints and juke joints have great music, jazz blues music. Food, lot of times, barbecue and then chicken and pork we talked about and then the other thing is this unbelievable Moonshine? Those are the three things that you see in juke joints were allowed The workers that she studied and took down their folklore from were in these spaces and they were dangerous places, you know. She was a bit of, you know, she's like, I don't know if you call her loose cannon or Voyager, But there are scenes that she describes where fights break out, and people were pulling razors out and shooting and she's hiding underneath the chair. Or she quickly finds out who is the biggest, baddest and tough his woman in that joint and becomes your best friend. Smart lady. We've been talking a lot about barbecue on the show. Where does Florida barbecue have its roots? And how is it different from barbecue that we might see in Texas or the Carolinas? Florida Barbecue is essentially whole hog barbecue done on in and over an open pit. I mean, deep open pits, it's would barbecue always would. Pecan apple, a number of those type of woods hickory. But it's pork almost all the time. Sometimes you'll see chicken barbecued sometimes you know, you might see things with some Stu's. But the center of barbecue in Florida is definitely poor. And and what does the Diddy wa did he have to do with this? The Diddy Wa Diddy is this mystical city? It's almost like A fairytale land..

Florida Zora Neale Hurston Neale Hurston Zora Neale Hurston Zais Eatonville Joe Clark black community Frederick Douglass Opie Kristen Evan Jonah Fred writer Alabama Jim Crow apple Stu Teo
"neale hurston" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Writers across the country hand out to record stories about the American experience including oral histories from formerly enslaved Americans that collection so part of the library of Congress the writers were often out of four teachers ministers and in one case a young anthropologist named Zora Neale Hurston you can hear her voice on a WPA recording of songs by Florida turpentine workers the pharmacology of it over and if the Latin rhythm but it generally just have it all over again and I you know then now is I'm going to read the middle though about the Largo Hurston had just written her novel their eyes were watching god now an American classic the WKRG projects ended in nineteen forty three but by that time they had established hundreds of community arts centers and murals decorating post offices and schools critics than denounce these projects as propaganda and historian and printers Wagner says it's wishful thinking to imagine they might be revived today to her though their importance has never been more clear the generation that was saved by that funding turned out to be the greatest and most acclaimed generation in the history of American art how do we know what we've got this time around how do we know what creative minds can be working on right now unless we give them a chance frontline workers grocery store clerks and people packing meat or working for Amazon you won't see them admirals funded by the federal government anytime soon Wagner says nor do we need them as badly as P. P. ease or coronavirus vaccine but she says paying people to tell stories promoting shared American values might help heal another sickness the country suffers from right now meadows living.

Congress Zora Neale Hurston Wagner Amazon Florida P. P.
The Harlem Globetrotters

The Past and the Curious

09:20 min | 1 year ago

The Harlem Globetrotters

"The Savoie ballroom was a jewel of jazz age. Chicago theatre opened in the nineteen twenties just before people in the United States were hit by the Great Depression which left many Americans poor and hungry throughout the difficult time. The Savoie was a place to find joy on the south side of Chicago. The building was regularly filled with residents from the largely African American neighborhood. Who gathered to dance to some of the biggest stars of the day count basie Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong? Were just a few of the people who banged out. Tunes as people jibed across the giant DANCEFLOOR. Dancefloor was so big that it actually doubled as a basketball court for the Savoy. Big Five in the late. Nineteen twenty s the five-man team hosted games to fill the slow nights in the ballroom. A young man in cab. Calloway would sometimes seeing during halftime but back then basketball wasn't very popular people cared about contests like horse racing and boxing baseball. Not The five on five game that depended on getting a ball through a hoop. It was a long way from the sport. We know much slower and much lower scoring than today. This team from Chicago would eventually work to change that. But they're Savoie audience could never have guessed how at some point. There was a dispute among the players of the Savoie five and they broke up. Three of them led by Tommy. Brooklyn's start a new team and rename themselves. The globetrotters it was an era of barnstorming. And when not at the Savoy they set out from Chicago to tour the Mid West region of America there were no organized leagues of teams and players in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties. Instead semi professional teams would travel from town to town and earn money playing teams from whatever town they were in sometimes. Businesses might have a team of employees so a barnstorming team like the globetrotters might play against some guys who had spent the whole day assembling cars canning vegetables or even driving taxi caps. Other Times barnstorming might play a team made up of members of a religious group. The House of David. Those guys never shaved so they played basketball with beards down to their bellies. Making James Harden's beard look like a five o'clock shadow soon. A young Jewish immigrant named Abe Sapper. Steam entered the picture with the globetrotters. Abe was a terrible basketball player but his other skills were valuable. He knew a lot of people who did bookings and many of these towns and more importantly he had a car these five teammates and their manager. Abe would pile into his model t like sardines attend camp and hit those cold slick winter roads. It was the nineteen twenties and they understood that random people in random midwest towns might be surprised to find that all five members of the team coming to play their local guys were African Americans. There were very few professional sports comprised of African Americans at this point so they decided to alter their name to help people know what to expect at the time. The most notable and best all black basketball team was known as the Harlem rent which was short for the Harlem Renaissance in the Nineteen Twenties and early thirties. The New York neighborhood of Harlem was an epicenter of black culture and it was a time referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. People knew about these incredible artists and musicians. Who lived there along with the writers like Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston so the globetrotters who were very much from Chicago? Ask themselves how do we make ourselves sound dignified worldly and clearly a team of African Americans the Harlem Globetrotters? Will it matter that? We're not from Harlem that we've never tried it around the globe new super nope cool. Let's pile into a small unheeded car and go beat some people in basketball and they did just that it was remarkable. How good they are. They beat nearly every team from Wisconsin. Illinois Iowa anywhere else they went then they pile back into the car and head on down the road to the next game throughout the nineteen thirties. The team built up quite a reputation. They might have been the best basketball team in the world. No one agrees on how the famous tricks came into the game. A popular explanation is that they'd slip into the fun and flashy dribbles and drives after they safely put plenty of points on the board against their opponent. This did several things one it entertain the audience. Once the actual threat of competition was gone. No one wants to watch a blowout so a fun. Show of tricks kept the locals entertained but also no one wants to watch their local fellas get trounced a group from the city coming in and wiping the home team can really anger a local audience and the Harlem globetrotters new. This trick plays would thrill any crowd and win them over. The focus slowly became not about the final score but about how much fun it was to watch these incredible athletes and their astonishing an often humorous approach to the game. I we win. And then we cloud Abe Saperstein once said now most people agree that the real clowning didn't start until a man named goose. Tatum joined the team. Goose was an incredible athlete. Who could put the basket ball through the hoop with ease? But he also had a keen eye for comedy he found inspiration and funny movies and carefully watched the acts of clowns and other entertainers his favorite gags would show up on the basketball court. Sometimes goose would tiptoe over and pretend to spy on the opposing team's huddle all while making sure the audience in on the joke other times he'd hand the refs at trick ball after a timeout upon dribbling the ball. The referee grow angry because the ball never bounced back up. It just plopped devoid of air on the ground. Sometimes goose would disappear from the court altogether while the game continued only to be found in the audience eating popcorn. He even had a bit where he would pretend to be knocked unconscious on the court. The refs in his teammates would try everything to wake him up. But no amount of shaking or poking prodding would open his eyes. It was only the smell of his own Stinky Shoe. That would get him back up on his feet again. Much to the disgust delight of the audience in Nineteen forty-eight Abe Sapper Stein was with a friend who just so happened to own a basketball team called the Minnesota Lakers. The Lakers were the best team in the brand new professional basketball league which would soon become known as the NBA. The League did not allow black players on any of their teams regardless of League affiliation and regardless of the color of the player skin each man believed his team was the best in the world. They'd never meet in a league as it was so the natural solution was to stage an exhibition game between the Lakers and the globetrotters. It didn't seem so to the men at the time but game between an all white. Nba team and an all. Black semi pro team would prove monumental. Eighteen thousand people came out to watch which was easily twice. As many people as most professional basketball games would attract the time. And despite the fact that the Lakers star center who stood six speed and ten inches tall was seven inches taller than anyone else. On the court. The globetrotters one on a last second shot. It was a powerful moment. The next season those Lakers would go on to win the National Championship. But when they played the Harlem globetrotters a second time for a second exhibition between the two teams. The globetrotters came out on top yet again. The following year the NBA ended segregation and three of those same Laker Whooping Harlem globetrotters Chuck Cooper Nat Clifton and hang designee. Became three of the I four African Americans to join the League and play professional basketball. This was nineteen fifty three years. After Jackie Robinson had broken the color barrier in baseball the globetrotters still continue their entertaining shows today. Keeping the spirit of barnstorming alive. They get a lot of credit for how they support communities and bring joy to so many and educate kids about health. But it's easy to forget about how important they were in integrating professional basketball. They now tour and play with just one team often known as the Washington generals according to most sources the globetrotters have beaten the generals over sixteen thousand times. How many times have they lost though? That question is harder to answer. But it's just a few. The most recent globetrotter loss was way back in one thousand nine hundred seventy one when both teams lost track of the score when clock expired. The generals were ahead. That was not supposed to happen. And people expected the GLOBETROTTERS TO WIN. And it's usually agreed that they will today. It's all about the show the fun and the love of basketball not the competition. This is what made that loss. So shocking reports from nine hundred. Seventy one SE. The stands were filled with silent shocked faces and even a few crying children. Luckily it's been smiles for all since then

Basketball Harlem Globetrotters Harlem Chicago Nineteen Twenties Minnesota Lakers Savoie Savoie Ballroom NBA Harlem Renaissance Chicago Theatre Abe Sapper Abe Saperstein ABE Ella Fitzgerald United States Baseball Abe Sapper Stein James Harden
"neale hurston" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Earlier this year is amazing and she sings and celebrates people that have brought inspiration to her to her as a black woman celebrating her confidence that comes from her spiritual and intellectual lineage from Zora Neale Hurston to Nikki Giovanni the other song I just played by her earlier was a was Giovanni and that was actually the first song that she wrote for the album which is based in Giovanni Nikki Giovanni's poem ego tripping all about the amazing ways and means for her to be a woman and you mail Jimmy list song Giovanni is truly and she says the cornerstone for the whole project I'm actually going to get into some of her poetry Nikki Giovanni's poetry not Jim Miller would she's great you can check out a lot of but yeah Nikki Giovanni poetry that she's often said to me her own music she's also and make music but she's also a musician and a the poetry we're going to listen to a few others that have brought inspiration to me on this theme of joy making talking might join making as a fundamental birthright and necessary to liberate people from the weight of white supremacy patriarchy and capitalism we're going to yeah check out some poetry so let's dig into you go tripping with Nikki Giovanni right now you're listening to patch works by Laurie Spiegel be from her out in the expanding universe some are really a kind of early on an experimental minimalist electronic music down love so much also brings me joy this is yeah shipping to put this on like seventy two anyway yeah and just set the whole making music computer thing for us yes she did that but yeah so with that let is get into this beautiful piece it's actually set to music with the New York community choir this is ego tripping by Nikki Giovanni I was born in Chicago hello the first person to speak up that is the only close everyone next I got this in an ice age my oldest daughter is never from my I am a beautiful one I gaze and yeah and a change of clothes I I gave my son he gave the role last must and yet we fail so three I am one with delivery the I know and no I say I went and I am so so so.

Zora Neale Hurston Giovanni Nikki Giovanni Laurie Spiegel Chicago Giovanni Jim Miller New York community Nikki Giovanni I
"neale hurston" Discussed on The Big Podcast With Shaq

The Big Podcast With Shaq

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on The Big Podcast With Shaq

"I do not know Zora Neale Hurston Zora. Neale Hurston the Harlem Renaissance. This is set up. Uh It is easy to coach with mine I am saying is getting harder tests from the same your crm. Neil What prominent African American woman is proudly represented ended on her own syrup. Bottle at Jemima. No it's not that you know exactly blow your mind AS Roma's Mrs. This is Butterworth. Is the bottle full figure life. I would like to make it known during black history month. Yes my wife will not by me. Mrs Butterworth's what do you mean why she will not she she because because she thinks it's too sugary and not good for you and my wife won't buy it so she wants to the bringing into my house now. Maybe that's why I enjoy it so much but she won't bring it into the house. Put it down ice Mrs Butterworth's I needed all right. John McCain who was the first African American to serve as a US senator in eighteen. Seventy no idea. Hi this is. Nine Hiram revels revelled wholesome man black man for the Los Angeles Lakers. There's word twenty four next question next question. What teacher the famous African American athlete just had his number retired by the Miami is like it's not as questions? I have a better question. Famous African American woman refused to give up her seat at the front of the bus Rosa Parks. The man is a black history month. They asked me what black man set on was on Delta flights a thirteen take off. Yeah this is a space to run here at the rush hour auber mortgage you know you're black history month long okay. John cade revenge thing nineteen sixty five civil rights sleater Malcolm X. was assassinated during a speech that what prominent Manhattan Ballroom Studio Fifty Four. The very famous Audubon ballroom in Manhattan. I wouldn't have known as giving his speech would've never been invited all right last question for shack seeping closes thing out. Probably the toughest question able to board for him. What African American woman rose to fame is the host of the Oprah Winfrey Show Oprah was the Jeffersons made question would be in eighteen sixty sixty blind? Tom Wiggins was the first African American to perform at the White House. What president did he famously performed for eighteen sixty Abraham Lincoln President James Buchanan with wheel could be blackie he plex black black black black black. Ask a black the block block block block the best one of the hardest civil service exam. I believable just want to say. Yeah because Oh my favorite is is like you said On calling questions written by people that went to your house. Okay okay. So that's it great ball of the guys on twitter at Shack at John Kincaid and at Rob Jenner's or get more clips and nonsense on instagram and facebook facebook at the big podcast with shack. This has been an exclusive presentation of podcast one sports with new episodes every week at podcast. One DOT com..

Mrs Butterworth Zora Neale Hurston Zora Los Angeles Lakers Neale Hurston John McCain Malcolm X. Audubon ballroom Harlem Renaissance John cade Tom Wiggins facebook Oprah John Kincaid Neil Manhattan twitter US Rosa Parks president
"neale hurston" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

The Bitter Southerner Podcast

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on The Bitter Southerner Podcast

"Most people when they first learned that song here that second one is something like johnny conquer ru and they may be think muddy is referring to a man by that name. And that's what I thought. Back in. Nineteen seventy seven. When I first saw muddy perform but money wasn't saying about a man. He was singing about the root of the plant specifically John. The conqueror root now some people say it John. Conquer some people say John? The conqueror either way that's what it refers to that route represents folk tale that was spread among slaves about a man named. Hi John John was folks say. A slave spirit could not be broken. He was they say a trickster who could always pull the wool over his masters up. Now why did the slaves need a man like John? Well WE'RE GONNA turn to the Great Zora Neale Hurston. Who was as great a folklorist as she was a novelist. This is a portion of what Ms Hurston wrote about. Hi John and it's read by. Gp's La- Raven. Taylor Hi John. The conqueror was a man enfold and had come to live and work on the plantations and all of the slave folks knew him in the flesh. The sign of his men was a laugh and his sinking symbol was wrong. It was an inside thing to live by. It was sure to be hurt when and where the work was hardest and the lot the most cruel it helps us slaves endear. They knew that something better was coming so they laughed in the face of things and saying I'm so glad trouble don't last always and the white people who hurt them were struck dumb that they could laugh owed massacred in no of course but high. John de Conquer. Was there walking his plantation. Like a natural man Tim. Duffy believes the spirit of how John Is. What led him all over the south for more than twenty five years as he searched out the people who made this music and the ones who are keeping alive today now went to visit him at his foundation's office in Hillsborough North Carolina. And the next day we loaded up and drove east to a little town called Farmville to see four women who make the Sunday morning version of our nation's native Muse..

John John John de Conquer Zora Neale Hurston johnny Duffy Gp Hillsborough North Carolina La- Raven
"neale hurston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:00 min | 2 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Michelle Martin we've been talking a lot about race in this country most recently because of comments by president trump about certain lawmakers and certain cities and countries that many have criticized as racist critics say that because Mr trump's comments so often seem to rely on a racial hierarchy placing people like himself at the top and people different from him especially people of color at the bottom given the fierce push back it might be hard to remember that in the early nineteen hundreds at the dawn of what we've come to call social science nearly all the research was seen through a white supremacist lands until a German American professor started developing and then teaching them radical idea that race is a social rather than biological construct that most ideas about race a really rationalizations for political positions and all cultures deserve to be regarded with respect that professor Franz boas pioneered the field of anthropology and his influence spread to students who also became pioneers such as market meat and Zora Neale Hurston their collective story is the subject of a new book gods of the upper air how a circle of renegade anthropologist reinvented race sex and gender in the twentieth century it was written by Charles king author and professor of international affairs at Georgetown University he joins me in our Washington DC studios to tell us more about Franz boas and just how unconventional his ideas were at the time well he was a revolutionary because of course of the time you started doing this new kind of social science which he and his students had to name is cultural anthropology there was widespread consensus about this idea of cultural racial gender hierarchy that the natural order of the world was one in which you had folks at the top and folks at the bottom and you stayed in those categories over the entirety of your life and those categories were inheritable you were taught this and you experience it everyday depending on what swimming pool you could go to a street car you could ride and where you were buried so from literally cradle to grave you work inside this hierarchy and he worked very hard to teach people that that was a product of our own society not of god or nature well given the fact that he was as you said surrounded by this point of view how did it happen that he started to see the world differently what changed him well in some ways he and everyone he gathered around him Zora Neale Hurston Margaret Mead Ruth Benedict and others were themselves outsiders in some way he was a German Jewish immigrant to the United States who found himself on the wrong side of the first World War he said it was the greatest disappointment of his life when he witnessed the nationalism that attended that conflict of course we forget today but at the time of the first World War German Americans were the largest minority group in the United States immigrant minority group in the United States and they were treated abysmally by both the American government at the time by state governments and so forth the teaching of German was banned in some in some states and so this experience I think propelled him forward with the idea that every society creates its own kind of hierarchies and to live intelligently in the world to live as a social scientist in the world what you had to do was to try to recognize those would you make the point in your book that a lot of his ideas started to come from his field work where he was going out and experiencing you know what we would call native cultures are traditional cultures first hand a lot of people were doing that at that time why is it that he was able to go out and realize that basically what he had been taught was was just wrong well I I think at some point beau as in each of his students had a kind of transformational experience somewhere for media was and American Samoa football as it was up on on Baffin Island living with the in you what in the architect and all of them at some point had an experience in which they realized that while they were educated they could make their way through their own culture and there's this in the place that they found themselves in that moment they were stupid they didn't know how to survive they didn't know how to be a proper person they didn't know what kind of food you could eat or what would kill you and each of them took from that experience I think the understanding that how you make your way in the world is a product of your education your circumstance your culture it's not a thing that is inherent to you your place in the world is determined by your surroundings and they elevated that in the two entire theory of society one of the points that you make in the book is that there were always competitors to bosses ideas in fact one of his sort of chief antagonists was a person named grant with Madison grant Madison grant who actually created some of the institutions which continue to survive to day as anti immigrant think tanks that's right on the one hand medicine grant you know we owe the survival of the American bison to him we owe so many the great conservation institutions to him and conservation areas in American west to him but he would be at the same time at believed deeply that what he was seeing in New York he was from New York living in New York was the same thing he had experienced in traveling through the American west that is he understood what it was like when noble creatures could suddenly be brought down by invading species or their environment changing and suddenly the bison the L. the walls were in danger and when he walked across lower Manhattan of course he saw all of want to him were invading species as well people from southern Europe and Eastern Europe would come into the U. S. as part of this great waves of migration and in nineteen sixteen he wrote a very famous book called the passing of the great race which people don't talk much about now but was a best seller at that I'm hugely influential Roosevelt teddy Roosevelt another's reddit commented on it and he became a national celebrity and and an authority on race and immigration well given that both houses point of view here was not popular at the time rather that grant had much more currency then ball as did I mean you make the point the book you say the bonus was making a point that required readers to make a difficult conceptual leap he was asking Americans and western European stoops to suspend their belief in their own greatness grant for his part had something simpler and more powerful on his side the deep self confidence of western society founded upon the observable reality of the Anglo Saxon dominance around the globe okay so how is it that now it leave it out I think we've established that there are still some people who believe in racial hierarchy that white people are better than everybody else I mean that that just as a fact but I would it be accurate to say that among most educated people it is understood that race is a social not a biological concept that people are much more similar than they are different and all the other things how did that happen I think the idea that racism is bad that you should treat people as if there is no such hierarchy in the world is a widespread idea we grow up with it is part of the American creed now in a way that we might not have at some point but I think many Americans still deeply believe in the idea of race that races biological and is not socially constructed that there's some deep genetic difference between people across racial categories I can find this in classrooms when I'm teaching or lecturing on these things were students I think come in to even come into university still struggling with some of the things that bow as was trying to teach more than a century ago and you know the reality of course of American history is that we have a set of foundational documents that speak about the inherent equality of all people but of course there's the entire history of racial segregation of hierarchy and what this book tries to do I think is to talk about that braided history it's not a set of dark chapters in American life this is a strand of American history that continues up to the present moment we need to understand reading the book I was very much struck by how many of the themes of the book are we search it you know your your city is bad my city is good arguments about unconscious bias arguments about erasing your own immigrant history and or even if you don't it race it sort of implying that there's some sort of hierarchy here I'm just I'm just wondering does that say something to you well that era can teach us a lot because the things that we're experiencing this country now aren't particularly new they're actually part of American history in understanding the ways in which they're part of American history is absolutely critical I think but I think the other thing that comes out of the book is a kind of moral code that ran along side the social science that these folks were were trying to do you know they were trying to teach us not to give much credence to any theory that just happened to put people like us at the top of some heat the critical of the society you're living and at the same time you're trying to be an expert in living in it and that's a very hard thing to do Lois said you know there's no real progress in morality that in every society that he had studied there were people you could killed people you shouldn't kill people you should have romantic relations with those who you shouldn't have romantic relations with the thing that changes he said it's a circle of people to whom we owe ethical behavior whatever we think it is is it your family is it your tribe is your village or is a humanity and that's the world view that he and his students try to impart and I think it makes as much sense now it is as urgent now as it was in their day Charles king is the author most recently of gods of the upper air how a circle of renegade anthropologist reinvented race sex and gender in the twentieth century he was kind of to join us in our studios in Washington DC professor can thank you so much for joining thank you very much love triangles they dance accidental pregnancy evil twins a face changing crime lord I know straight out of a little a lot right well right a telenovela was in fact the inspiration behind Jane the virgin a TV series on the CW starring Gina Rodriguez as Jane via and whether a chaste Catholic girl who in true so proper fashion is artificially inseminated by accident the show has been beloved by fans were now mourning the season finale that aired earlier this week bringing the show to a close after five truly dramatic seasons game to these gene was accidentally inseminated with lives when the doctor that happened to the highest I'm Lisa also happened to be improved enough yeah we throw their step mother both rose turned out to be crime lords the hospital yeah that's that's a lot and are very Linda Holmes is here in.

Michelle Martin NPR president one hand
"neale hurston" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on Lexicon Valley

"Listen to Zora Neale, hurston speaking here, it is particular ambi-, whom I photograph whom I think I'm the first place on earth and probably the last one ever photograph was ambi-. She had died in nineteen hundred and seven. And nobody so her anymore until nineteen thirty six when she was found naked on a rolled. But she remember little she remembered where she used to live, and she went to plantations that used to be fathers, which was now brothers. She was a dentist bide by her brother. Her ex husband or son was now grown. He was three years old when she died and nineteen hundred seven shoes, a dentist fide, and she was officially dented by the Haitian government, and that was all the records of her death and her barrel, and I voted grabbed her in nineteen thirty six noticed. She says placing for person because she's southern and so as we've seen on the show, saying fireworks is an only Brooklyn. It's also south. You never know what sounds are going to do. So Lillian Carter said Boivin on our southern show and Neil hurston. If you listen closely placing not person, but just a little bit of it. But it would tell you right away that she was born. Born in the south like, the vast majority of black people back, then you wanna believe everything. That's order. Neil hurston says, and we an seem so strange, but you know, there's a lot of evidence that people did use am that way black people specifically. So there's a Harlem renaissance novel called home to Harlem, and it's full of sentences like to pick one of the ones that's better for general consumption. Oh, these here different ships. I tell you so chip, I guess is roughly honeys girls, whatever. And so these here and different chip's. I tell you and how the Brown skin babies am humping it alone, which I openly admit sounds like some great song from the time. But the thing is this book is anthropological. This man is writing about these people with serious perspective. He's trying to describe the lives of southern migrants to Harlem in the nineteen twenties. So it's unlikely that he would have them talking like minstrels, you get the feeling that these men really did say and like that at times. And it's in books. Thank you to my research. Assistant cash Chaman for digging some of these up it's in a lot of serious literature written by black people in for example, the late eighteen hundreds so there's a novel called imperium in Imperio, by Sutton Griggs. This is a black person. And at one touching point a mother says about her son his name am Belton, Piedmont, arteries, granddaddy, so do that. Again, his name in Belton Piedmont actors, granddaddy, Artor, you know, what that is. That's after in black dialect of the time, which you can also find in England in an answers a question, which is why Jack and Jill sucks, so Jack. And Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water Jack fell down and broke his crown and Jill came tumbling after that doesn't rhyme. If it's water than what after is that the best that they could do. No. Of course, not it's because the way they composed. It was Jack and Jill. Up the hill. The fetch a pail of water Jack fell down broke his crown. Jill came tumbling ardor and rhymes water otter. So here's this person saying his name Belton Piedmont. Now, we're back across the Atlantic artery. Granddaddy. Now, if this is accurate enough to get that ardour, and you can also see that ardour used by Jim in Huckleberry Finn and other places that is genuine old tiny black England's well, why is the am wrong..

Jill Neil hurston Jack Belton Piedmont Harlem Zora Neale England Belton Haitian government Lillian Carter Piedmont Sutton Griggs Brooklyn Imperio Boivin Huckleberry Finn Jim Artor three years
"neale hurston" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

Yes, Girl!

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

"Yeah. I see this point angry on meaty extra. It makes me think of this job. Ross speaking. Zora Neale hurston quote. If you are silent about your pain, they'll kill you and say, you enjoyed it. One million percent. I mean, my biggest lesson has been learning. How to be as effectively vocal about my pain? Right. I mean, I think here and being able to talk to you all I'm going to save space, and I can present it you all in a way. That's also not like coming from anger as much as coming from passion. And I feel like you can read that. Because I have learned how to present that to you. And I think so much of us have a long way to go in refining our age right because we are so mad. We have every reason day, and then we don't get the opportunity to refine that you know, because we're having to use our energy to suppress it. And to you know, make the people feel safe in. Yeah. Make other people feel smart and all this other shit, and we don't get the chance to make ourselves feel comfortable in our own feelings. So it's like and also you're here. Right. Like, you're doing this interview. You've given us what you're. Of your time. You're still you're still talking. But you don't I mean when you feel that you don't have to write. So that's the other thing. People just don't show up for the conversation anymore. You didn't you know? This is the culture, you know, what I mean over it next. I don't wanna do. I don't address it. I don't talk about. I just feel not yet to me. That's the thing. It's like, I get cancelled culture when you've reached a certain point of like, well, if I vocalise d-, and there's no response cancel, you know, like. Oh, cancel it. You know, there's people in my life who it's like, okay. I've said in there's been at least three occasions where have voiced compassionately that. This makes me feel this way. I would love for this behavior to cease. So that I can not be influenced to feel this way by you. If you don't adjust. Like, I'm not gonna say how do you in the street, but my access ability like you've lost security clearance. You know, you're you're like you're like area carry on Showtime homeland, you know, she just Clinton. The highest. Again. Anything ever your locker combination? Like, that's what happens though, it's like people just move out to outer rings eloquently put. Thank you. To me of celebrity is not really like people think it's like the money and the financing of the jobs that to me is about the people in the managing people around you and the transition of realizing, I think what's crazy is. I earlier today was saying like. There are people who wanna show up to my big events. One to like, hold me down as a friend there there when I do the event there when I do the show there when I do the dinner fighting, but when I need you to feed my cat, where you you said, you wouldn't. Forgot I'm gonna be out of town. I was busy. Worse. So relieve you wanna read. This. So, you know, and there's people who like you show up for you show show for you show up. And I'm not saying everybody has the same capacity to do that. Right. I'm not. But you give people outs. And they don't take those outs for whatever reason. And then they start now affecting you and like resentment towards you don't want to have that. Right. So, you know, you realize like, oh, I gotta recombine mental is these people, and that we that compartment may be like, you ain't Inigo Arment. And as I was talking about this today, Tiffany haddish did a tweet basically saying the same thing. So it's like, you know. I'm here when you. The amount of the way. Thanks. Through such black. Excellent. Yes. Thank you. When the special airs, what do you do I'm doing a private screening nine Los Angeles my screening will be represented as a wedding reception because this is my wedding. I am carrying my future. I have a cake. Chopper live at my mic the mic as bowtie the microphone is a bowtie. Yeah. So it's you know, semiotics putting the other squad. And yeah, I mean, we all have different milestones..

Zora Neale hurston Clinton Ross Tiffany haddish Inigo Arment Los Angeles Showtime One million percent
"neale hurston" Discussed on The Read

The Read

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on The Read

"I need some vagina girl. We need some the I'm the one to call right? We need some feeback He don't hellishly. publish. I don't wanna hurt his feeling, but you don't really have to you can me just say poetry's, not my thing. It's never really been interested an art and poetry. But I appreciate that yourself asked about it. Like, I think it's really cool that you're driven about it or something like that. And if he doesn't get the message from day or find somebody else to give you some good, maybe hurts his feelings, and he's like, well, I don't wanna share my seminal energy with somebody who doesn't vibe with my art, or whatever that's just the chance you have to. I know you said the dig is good. He made you come before you even started fucking, which I mean. Wow sounds miraculously at that age. So I get that. You don't wanna let that go. But. Sitting through somebody else's shitty poetry just to have sex. When you can do fuck that you really have to worry about being. I mean, I guess you'd have to worry about his feelings. But like you not here to to create some deep emotional connection. You. So tender so yeah, I mean, I don't know how Tinder is like jacker thought it was like the hookup straight Hooker straight people. I think that's what it is. So okay. Yeah. I would definitely just be honest with him about what you are interested in what you're not interested. Him like critique over half. And you think it's bad. You just tell them you're not interested because that's true. Well, I can't even give you feedback on poetry because nothing about it. Right. Never been into it. Sounds so good. Ooh. I felt Zora Neale hurston author that love to just say that just Zora Neale hurston. He'll die. Your. Brown and the moon line. Your real through your real. And I am hypnotized. We ain't shit Johnathon poets. Yeah. Doing great work you guys. All right. We're going to wrap it up because we've been in here entirely too long Sanjay questions to ask the read edgy, mail dot com. And we will be back. So when you're selling stuff online getting all your orders out of the door..

Zora Neale hurston Tinder Sanjay Brown
"neale hurston" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on KCRW

"Is happening roots of America. Subject of black folks, the blood of black and Brown black and Brown native, folks. Yes. Blood blood blood. What was what's on grossly blood on lease? Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, it really, you know, it's bound grimy, Nina, Simone apologized down any of the grey homegrown. Barry Jenkins, of course, meant Zora Neale hurston because until you. Tony morrison? And all them respectfully being our elders. Yes. All right. So back to Bill street, though, you know. So you you have this amazing story. Yeah. This amazing book you go about adapting it into a film. What is your process to figure out? Okay. How do I capture this literary? Aw. But in cinema like what's that for you? You know, it was tricky because the book is non linear saw speak purely in story terms, the book is non linear, and there's this amazing freedom you can arrive at when you're working that way. I think as you said Baldwin is mostly concerned about the route. He's not concerned with story progressions not concerned with plot. He's like what's at the root? And what's the feeling at the root, and for me and translating especially because this is only the second time Baldwin's ever been translated the first time in English. It was important to me to to not muck up the source to sort of preserve again. I've mentioned this again this all the literary. Aw that Baldwin creates his work the prison. He creates his work through. And so it was interesting about cherry. Picking in a certain way, but cherry picking in a way that would still align or overlap with this feeling of all that I get from the book from the source material. And then as you said describing me onset trying to find a way to give the actors enough where they could also flow in that same kind of off, but not with the very typical knowledge of. Okay, I came from from a and I'm going to see. And then after COPD is like now, this kinda doesn't function that way. You know, the feeling is that what you're saying a cascading series of moments. You know, that is sort of woven together by the spine of shocking, Lena, Baldwin universe a crime procedural. So it was a very delicate dance that cannot wait movie. There are times when it is so searingly evocative that I look at it. And I go how did that happen? You know? But then.

Baldwin Zora Neale hurston Brown Tony morrison Barry Jenkins America Nina Lena Simone
"neale hurston" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

"But then I believe it I believe is a quote by, you know, Zora Neale hurston. I think that says, you know, if you silent about, you're paying kill, you say you enjoyed it. You gotta speak up, speak up. My brother. You got to say the clothes out. To all my brothers out here. This shit happens to us too. Man. We, we haven't really. And the thing is, I think it's a shame thing there that I don't think. I think man don't report their sexual assaults rapes and even molest Asian because there's a shame that goes along with. I mean, these priests are getting caught up. I mean, I mean, nobody has questioned these men that have come out thirty years later talking about these Catholic priest like that. So. Protecting neck. Rajah balls. No, you're worth what I gotta say. Oh yeah, it's it's it's time out time out for leading shit, right? Yeah. Like if you're going to be a black man in America and you're going to be a black man who cares about his community in this country, then you have to a protect black women and be whole black man accountable for their bullshit. It ain't no man. You know, he just talking ain't no man. You know, he cool. He's doing man. You know, he ain't no excuses. No bre lie you no longer have an excuse to ignore y'all homeboys would they rape? He asks tendencies, you know, you know, good and well, when your homeboys are, you know, making women uncomfortable doing some sideways shit. You know who it is, you know what it is and if you don't check them, they gonna keep doing. And eventually like to be perfectly honest, you can't be caught up. My thing is. I say this all the time, and I believe if you condone sucker Shitu assumed catoon number one and number two birds flock together. So if you hanging around right, BS, Nick, you probably rape. Fuck to be.

Zora Neale hurston rape homeboys Shitu Nick America thirty years
"neale hurston" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Sleep custody at lyrical approach intense her quicksilver technique, and she's a woman of energy and determination, and all this is reflected in music, Rachel. How are you? Great. Thanks for having me here today. Oh, I'm so glad you could come and I must tell you really love to peace in in jazz is magazine. It was so fascinating. I mean, you really told about all the trials and tribulations of trying to be wanting to be a jazz musician, winding up playing smooth jazz. Yeah, it's a terrible thing. But it can be, you know, it's smooth jazz, I guess, reaches some people and straight ahead. Jazz reaches other people, and I just try to play as much music as possible in between well, and you do an of course, there's so much music out there. Well, I dying to hear some of yours up play a song called gently sleeps the pear tree, which is off of my second record room of one's own, which is a dedication, ten songs dedicated to the Arctic achievements of women. I think that's right. Now why the title of this tune? Is it from a book or something? Yeah, it's it's from the book there is were are watching God by Zora Neale hurston and it's a chapter about the young girl who's about thirteen. She's sitting under the pear tree, and it says, gently sleeps the pear tree as the pear tree blossoms. She's looking down the street at this boy, and she's like just having her first, you know, female yearnings. So she's just becoming a woman and the ways nil hurston wrote. It was so beautiful. It was just so beautiful. I had to write a song about what a great idea now. I really have something I can. I can imagine my mind Cy. Okay. You know, it's a strange thing like there's a whole. Different way of playing like what you did just then an it's really, really beautiful. When you're writing, do you think of the thing is a whole bunch of cords? Do you think of a melody line? I'm just interested in your thought processes because mine would be so different. What do you do when you go to write something? Does it come to you and your head yet? Yeah, it comes sort of as Pia, no peace most songs that are right. I don't know why it it's like after many weeks of dealing with some kind of emotional issue, I'll sit down and I'll just basically play something like..

Zora Neale hurston Rachel Pia
"neale hurston" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"In the data show in like that just wasn't true we knew to be true the all time was that it was just straight up racism and people won't people like nervous about that people are not even nervous he just like won't admit the truth what's interesting we'd is that we arrest more people for we than all violent crimes combined which is like a fascinating thing to just like sit with in that we know that blacks and whites used pot at about the same rate white people when you look at the data there's a study that just came out from the recent from mesa you is that why people actually use we'd more than by people but again but blacks have been nearly four times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than white people in an iowa dc minnesota and illinois black people are seven point five to eight point five times more likely than whites to be arrested this is not a matter of like who is who is doing what it's a matter of like who is being policed for doing what and these are all choice like we can make a different choice over fifty percent of americans support the legalization of marijuana so there seems to be something deeper at the route that just like wants to penalize people for engaging in this behavior that we know actually doesn't lead to like it's unclear there they are medical downsides it doesn't lead the impair judgment that like alcohol does so i'm hopeful that this study will help open up space for legalization to take off and so i just wanted to talk about how there's an exciting new book that's come out and it's not it's actually not very new at all it's a it's a book that was written by zora neale hurston who who if you have not for some reason beyond anything i'm able to understand for some reason you have not read their eyes were watching god you should pause the podcast and immediately go read the novel because it is one of the most central.

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"neale hurston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"neale hurston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reminder that these pulitzers extend beyond journalism to so many areas of our culture and our life jeffrey brown thank you thanks judy meantime hollywood writer nell scoville talks about the culture of harassment that has plagued her industry tonight she shares her humble opinion on why it is still so hard for women to speak out recently i shared my story about being sexually assaulted by a boss when i was just starting my career as a tv comedy writer i was in my twenties he was in his forties now i'm in my fifties three decades later going public has stirred up a lot of fresh emotion but when a friend recently asked me aren't you happy about the metoo movement i was thrown happy of course i feel relief and satisfaction that women who can are raising our voices and naming names but happiness doesn't really factor into this with all the toppling of famous directors actors and anchors you may think it's become easier to speak out about this nope hollywood is still a place where if a powerful person behaves inappropriately and you call them on it you run the risk of paying the price which reminds me of an old jewish joke there's a terrible pogroms in the shadow all the villagers are rounded up by the cossacks and lined up against a wall for the firing squad the rifles are raised and the head cossack says before we opened fire does anyone have any last requests one of the villagers raises his hand timidly and says as a matter of fact i do his neighbor leans over and whispers don't make trouble we're conditioned to see the world through the eyes of the people in power even when our backs are up against a wall by standing up for ourselves somehow we get branded as troublemakers we're not writer zora neale hurston observed if you are silent about your pain though kill you and say you enjoyed it as difficult and as awkward is speaking out can be those who can should it's our responsibility to so many who must remain silent and i don't agree with people who say that it's time for male colleagues to shut up and listen just the opposite we need meant to add their voices to.

harassment writer hollywood jeffrey brown nell scoville zora neale hurston three decades