12 Burst results for "Neal Kumar"

"neal kumar" Discussed on First Rounders

First Rounders

07:46 min | 2 months ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on First Rounders

"My name is brady. Hogan i'm the host of this show you you probably know that by now if not. Maybe you're a new listener. In which case. Welcome aboard the the guest. Today is neal kumar. He co founder and ceo of bridge bio a company. That was founded in two thousand fifteen. They had a sizable ipo in two thousand nineteen. They raised almost three hundred fifty million dollars and they are set up as a I'm not gonna say new but a sort of tweaked. Business plan which has changed the investment proposition for investors. They've erased some of the issues around drug development and one of the co founders is andrew lo who's an economist and i found it fascinating to think about the way they are trying to run this company and the way they're trying to run this business and that's why when i was thinking about you know we'll would be a good fit for the show. I thought yeah i. I think there's a lot of things about bridge bio that are interesting to think about not only about the company itself but about greater trends in start up formation. And the the way you have a good interview is sometimes someone comes in. And they are guarded and open to talking about anything and through the conversation you get down to some sort of truth about who they are as a person which then informs the way they see the world which informs the way they run their companies that informs away tackle complex biological questions and a little bit of that did happen here with neil but also sometimes what makes a good interview is a robust exchange of thoughts and ideas. And i think that's what happened in the in the later. Half of this interview you. I just got to sit with neil and ask him wise bridge bio built this way. It looks like it's built this way for these reasons. Am i wrong about that. What does this say about the future of venture capital funding. was it. Say about the risks inherent in biotech really. Good conversation i. I came away thinking about things that are different way I learned some stuff. And that's how you know you had to go talk anyway. That's how i knew. I had a good talk. I hope it's also interesting for you and also just on top of it. What a nice guy really enjoyed talking to them. I think that's probably all you need to know so here. It is your first round his podcast. With neal kumar. Listen up yes all right about that. I literally dotted early day too. So i around from to install the audio driver on my computer. Because just goofed up so on your say that you get up you get up at four thirty for your kids. Yeah i usually. I usually get up at four thirty so like my kids when they have practice. I got it okay. You get everything out of the way early and then you've got that time with them. Although in my office. But i get up early. Go down to the basement. I thought for a second. I thought boy. His kids are hardcore if they're getting up four thirty day work ethic eight year old and a five dark phase. But so i. I was thinking about this. I know that you know that bridge byles in california. Of course in that you went to stanford where did you grow up your no. I actually was born in boston. But i don't remember anything of it because we moved to rochester minnesota when i was about three weeks old and i grew up there so minnesota southeast minnesota toward the no clinic is and i spent most of my formative years there. How was that. I mean i. It's not often that. I have some from minnesota on the show certainly from from rochester. Ideally you know. I mean i think it's interesting. Reflect on a little bit. It's it was a small town back then and probably less than sixty seventy thousand people Lots of You know diversity of thought socioeconomic diversity net. No racial diversity. I think we were the racial diversity. Yeah but it was a it was a really i think. Great grow up in middle from stuff to Air and those kind of simple living. How how is it so you just said. No racial diversity. How is it that your family was there in the first place i mean. My father is a physician researcher in the area and apologies so the male clinic was there and i think he's been there for over thirty years. That's the reason why the move from boston. Yeah okay so that so this leads into my next question so your dad is a physician and and a researcher. Yes did that sort of lead you into thinking about a life science or medicine. I think in you're effective about what you grow up around and i grew up around a lot of examples of people working on basic science. Translate basic science into stuff that could be meaningful for people and help people with it so certainly that was l. was an influence on me. I was never all reasonable pressure from to become an adopter gonna get going to go down that route queasy and data from ills a large. I certainly must have been affected by growing up in our community. You are health care since you got big part of everyone's that you could just the idea of translating research into medicine. Was your father. Also was his research also translational in that way or just because he saw patients that he thought that way. I think probably one of the one of the you know differentiating features of doing research at place like the clinic. And there's been any good examples of this act team is that you get to take what you're learning in physician settings you'll see off and start doing research on yes certainly he He connected the two and did a lot of seminal work in boston. Ins and bone mineral density and one twenty five alpha hydroxy vitamin d. Just a bunch of stuff that that also affected much of his practice to. Yeah so you're surrounded by growing up for sure. And what about siblings. Did you have siblings or have a younger sister to younger. Is she. In medicine at all home. She's a smart kettering and down she's bad. And what about your mother. Was she also in the sciences. At all or yeah looks like my mom was trained in economics. Actually and was. I actually stayed at home with us for the most part when we were younger. And then i started working in development so She does a lot with foundation and helping to raise funds for males. It's a big male family sister roster basically male clinic. They used to be an ibm plant there. That was that was of impor- But that's sort of wound down over time. So i've been if you bet if you survey roster now by.

neal kumar boston california brady minnesota andrew lo Hogan Today rochester less than sixty seventy thousa bridge bio over thirty years one two Half rochester minnesota almost three hundred fifty mil four thirty day stanford five
"neal kumar" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

08:31 min | 4 months ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"Infection. So it's not that it's an elevated heart rate. Dr rate variability is merely the time between heart beats which should vary quite a bit right and then it can be used as a measure not only of your overall fitness or your some some of these apps college readiness but it's also a measure of how will your immune system is working. It's a it's a big set of opportunities. i think in december maybe it might have been even earlier that there was a academic paper released about. How a about billion ai. Model that can detect difference between A regular cough and coded cops And the idea of. I need got right now actually. Can we get the also again. Wouldn't that be interesting given that. There's so much people who are doing commerce that are having conversations through a digital medium to begin with. What if there were a plug in In skype a plug in through all these different apps just direct message to you. Here's an here's where you can get tested. This has not been peer reviewed. Perhaps yeah so. There's a lot of research on this the the way the mount sinai did it. They did not do it. With help of apple they just had A few hundred of their employees where apple watches and analyze the data. This is one of the golden dreams of collect of all these devices collecting so much data and the that data being able to be anonymous and opt into Artificial intelligence machine learning research studies to try to see if there is key if if there is a correlation that correlation and causation. Sodas thing if we can find with a large enough sample thing people of whom this sort of an aberration has been detected later on diagnosed with this disease. That's a very very dangerous road to go down. But that's always been the dream that not that I'm my my disease has been detected because i'm close to death. My my symptoms are now so bad. That is unquestionable but the diagnosis but that there is an indication that you're going to develop this disease in the next year or two or that you're at the first The starting line this disease and early treatment can possibly prolong or even save your life. That's if there's one thing that will get people to hand handover personal data to a faceless mega corporation it's the idea of you see this watch it will. It will prevent you from dying. Get fifty three just like your aunts and uncles tend to do. Yeah unfortunately there isn't yet an apt to do this. On any device stanford used fitbit's apple watches and others. Carmen watches found that. Eighty one percent of corona virus positive participants experienced change in their resting heart rates up to nine and a half days prior to the onset of symptoms and extremely elevated heart. Rate was indicative of symptom onset. Basically these symptoms that that we don't you know that we are not normally monitoring so these early symptoms go ahead. I'm sorry no no not at all. sorry. I got my. Timing's with with this guy delay but it makes sense when you look at tim. Cook statement about we. Long history apple will be best remembered for their contribution to healthcare. Because once all this stuff is in place and we've handled all of the pesky interpersonal communications and video game needs. We start really focusing on how those sensors can be better more personally and closer deployed and not to be negative about it but as where surpassing like. I think we're close to half a bill. What is it half a million deaths in north american. Our some ridiculous number That sort of stuff will be critically important because one hundred years even short between pandemics but there are a lot of things that are going on in our ability. Like andy said to detect those things even if they're not lethal but he but if they're just slightly if they make you live on comfortably for thirty years if we can fix that sort of stuff like if the apple watch or the pit can say the way you're walking right now is going to lead to hip problems when you're in your sixties and it's really easy to fix now we're going to have you on a walking program. That sort of stuff will will really change a lot of lives. yes and it's it's it's tricky part of a comprehensive health management system inside the entire country if we have the ability that everybody had everybody who needed access to an inexpensive form of healthcare not invasive surgery but hey this looks kind of odd. I would like to get this checked out if that were an easy hundred bucks or easy fifty bucks for anybody in this country And we were having. We had enough medical infrastructure to support it. That would save lots of lives without this comprehensive sort of idea. We can't have wealthy people who can afford a three or four hundred dollar watches. Every time that they've got the they're watching. Hey here's Here is an alert that precaut- maybe you wanna get your your lungs check for something and it's based on not necessarily voodoo signs but stuff that it has by no means been proven as this is an important enough signal that yes we need you to a that. Yes you should Put some demands upon the limited medical resources of your community. Get this checked out. We can't have thousands and thousands of people coming in on the off chance that this indicator is an indicator of something and that this that attract from doctor can actually get something done. Where we're we've seen not what happens when we a lot of us never really thought about the idea of our medical being stretch. Stretch past the limit. And we're seeing this even one almost a full calendar year after the declaration of a of a pandemic there are still er room. They're still mass general hospital A doctor they're just tweeted last week and really just went right into my heart saying that we don't have any. We don't have any beds. And i see you. We don't have any beds hospital. We don't have any beds and emergency. We have no place to deal with anybody right now and thick because our patients. Just keep coming in and coming in so this is this is part of the conversation. That is wonderful to have this. This demonstration of and because of the irregularity detected in a heartbeat were able to detect this person's a possibility of having a stroke the next year we can't have thousands and tens of thousands of people who are functionally very very healthy coming in for expensive and really really pro protracted attests That and it makes it more difficult for someone who is having legitimate breathing problems from getting to see a doctor and getting the attention that he or she needs. Anti nocco w. g. b. h. boston rene ritchie From youtube fan of youtube fame. Pretty pictures are next. Let's see here's The came out today. The new shot on iphone. Twelve portraits cityscapes. The night sky and more. Oh these are beautiful shots. I always feel bad when i see these. Because i can't get these quality shots so here's one thing we talked about this. During the apple event last september is our. Our people allowed us external lighting with these shots. Are they doing elaborate lighting setups With these shots or the apple events that straight from camera they you deliberately because they never a couple of vendors caught severely faking that kind of stuff and nobody ever wants to and that sort of a situation so they make really sure that straight from camera this stuff. Though i think the the the to be captured with the iphone these are these are not apple. Artists are blue posted these images publicly. But we don't know is if the in this picture which is beautiful From kuwait guy Shepherds i guess sitting at a fire. There's beautiful night sky or know there might be another light in that fire or layoff. Also one thing i found out because people complained and i had to look into it. Is that these photos. Don't say where they're from. They say where the photos or the photographer lives kuwait. That's kuwait either So that's where abdulah shoji who took the picture. We don't know where the picture is Here is one from Neal kumar who is in the united states. I don't know where this looks like. It might be philadelphia. I'm not sure But that's a pretty pretty picture of puddle in some row houses You know these. Are i guess. The point is these are as good as professional pictures taken with five thousand dollar dsl ours. there's no no way to look at this and say oh no. This is one from an iphone mini. Which is kinda cool..

Neal kumar north american thirty years last week december apple thousands next year iphone fitbit united states three iphone mini youtube one hundred years philadelphia today last september fifty three hundred bucks
"neal kumar" Discussed on Hard Factor

Hard Factor

07:22 min | 9 months ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Hard Factor

"Well, the the the. Thank you. there. Is it an archipelago. It's not an archipelago, but it has a few small islands next to it. The big ones are kind of like. The Big island pop yet but it's kind of like a board board type thing around it but the the big island. In the Indian Ocean of well kept secret it's a paradise for tourist similar to French Polynesia. And Yeah. It's actually really famous for its underwater waterfall, which is just as beautiful allusion. Like Well Cup wonders the world where it looks like. There's a water fall rolling from the shore into the ocean deeper into the ocean of this never ending thing, and it's really just sand rolling off of. The cliff edge. But because it's so the water. So clear it looks like there's just this waterfall right off the edge of this beautiful island. Well, guess what on July twenty fifth Japanese bulk carrier and the WOK Wakashio broke apart into pieces on a reef near the coastal regions of marshes more specifically at point, Sanni, which is known known sanctuary for rare. Wildlife. Like the rarest in the world. So. I think Exxon, Valdez, a little smaller but in a worst spot. Over two, hundred, thousand gallons. Over twenty. Two hundred thousand gallons of oil already spilled into the lagoon creating an oil slick that could be seen from space endangering quarrels, fish, and other marine life. No that's. Really really. A good time right now you got you got oil spills. You can see from space and you got smoke clouds from fires. You can see from space it's just not. Uc Bad things from space. I found out about this place, which is literally one of the most beautiful places on earth and it now it's not. The oil also got another small island, ill, all grits, which is a nature reserve that contains some of the rare species in the world as well. So people aren't even really on there. That's like the little island in the side that had. Rare birds and plants that oil got their team of experts from Japan traveled to Mauritius to help with the cleanup, which is the least they could do along with thousands of local volunteers and they've got a lot of the oil out but not all that including half of the tanker, which is still stuck in a reef and guys WanNa hear how it happened. Yes means. Negligence of mayor about this captain, you're right beef. Fifty eight-year-old captain of the oil tanker Sue Neal Kumar Nanda. Soir has been arrested and charged with endangering safe navigation. There are two conflicting reports coming out of how it happened and both sound like they probably are true like they don't need to be one or the other I think both probably happened one is he threw himself a birthday party, the data crash, which I'm sure everyone got hammered at, and the second is that he was trying to get close to the shore to get Wi fi hit the reef. Zooming probably to order strippers and booze. These men that's been Valdez I was kicking back on some cold ones on the ship not good for the captain. It all guys This Jack Ass literally crashed in oil tanker into one verse Premier Rare and beautiful environmentally protected marine ecosystems like a bull in a China shop. Not Good. Alex, you can donate by the way to. I'll spell it M. A. U. R. I. T.. I. A. N. Dash Wildlife Dot, org slash donate because they need. They need some help. So, this guy just got hammered and then crashed his oil and then destroyed intellect the gardens of Babylon like until like the most beautiful fucking place on earth just. Took A it. Yeah. Do they have I mean are they gonNA? Do they get to try this guy in the in the in this? Maurice Place? WHO's GONNA animals. Kangaroo court will there's no people there. There's thousands of volunteers but yeah, I mean like, yes, he's GonNa get in trouble, but the damage is done permanently to this beautiful place on earth. Sad. Pictures you should onto some some some better news cycle underwater waterfall. I've seen that on on on the TV it's all time. Yeah, it's. It's pronounced Mirisch lies. It was spectacular. Okay. All right. We'll you like to swim more good news for the marijuana community coming out of Colorado as the state has started operating their first weed vending machines in some of the dispensaries there so A company called ANA has rolled out these amazing machines that can hold over two thousand product. So not your normal vending machine, they can hold like oils and flower edibles, drinks, and are designed to serve the pothead who knows exactly what he or she wants and can use the machine without standing in line. So you know I'll those Pesky line, right? Right dispensary lines where the worst right? So really are the nothing worse. Okay. You guys like if you move to a league new customer Oh man the guy that needs to talk about every product with the bud tender like literally will be one of those at least one per visit to the display. The registers for minutes released like there's one thing depending on the size. Obviously, you've got bigger dispensaries but let's just say there's four workers that are actively helping people shop. They'll take up one of those four workers for twenty to thirty minutes to thirty easy and in the by like seventeen dollars worth of week. That guy every time I go to one of these states. Like an Englishman, create complaining about lines at the bar in the nineteen twenties like to an American. Shut the fuck up. It's Trying to deal with shady motherfucker. Your home all the time to sell you limited amounts of marijuana quantities right? That's very good point at least you're not inside the marine oil spill, but I don't want held up. At the fucking candies. He's making a strong comeback in the second show. Every solid point I'll just say you will be annoyed with it. It's like what you get used to take things for granted. We were talking about how we used to think ace ACL, and south by southwest annoying sometimes on the days go because you didn't because the fucking traffic would wouldn't you want that back now? It's. All relative, it's like when your favorite restaurant gets famous and everyone wants to go fuck and eat their. Frankly. It's tough. Yeah. Absolutely. Worst pretending to be friends with someone and having to. Hang out with. Them. For thirty forty minutes when you just WANNA buy their product so. It's the Madden Bro. Express. The scene for express you. The worst is when you'd have to play a game of Madden. When you go into by high school, we'd when you'd have to be hi Mrs so and so yeah, we're still friends I'm just giving you know we're still fans guys as you can imagine with Cova keeping people at home nothing to do with Toko up a little bit according to CNN article. Sales of medical and recreational cannabis in Colorado set records in May and June. According to state revenue data. So through the first half of two, thousand, twenty, Colorado Colorado weeds dispensary sales were nine hundred, seventy, eight, million dollars of flour edibles and.

Colorado marijuana Indian Ocean French Polynesia Exxon Sue Neal Kumar Nanda Maurice Place Kangaroo court Soir Valdez WOK Wakashio Wi Alex CNN cannabis Sanni
"neal kumar" Discussed on Cults

Cults

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Cults

"Rajneesh marked his survival of yet. Another seven year cycle by declaring that he was enlightened. Enlightenment means different things in different religions. But it generally marks a peaceful state of being where you have transcended the ordinary worries and concerns of day-to-day human life always in search of a path to a higher consciousness. He was enthralled during his college years. By the teachings of George Gergiev a Greek and Armenian spiritual philosopher. Girgis teachings claimed that most humans experience a disconnect between their emotions and bodies and therefore live their lives in a hypnotic state. However at this waking sleep as he called it could be overcome and transcended in order to achieve one's maximum potential of higher consciousness and inner growth roochnation regularly challenged as teachers and class constantly questioning the authority to a disruptive degree and he was finally asked to lead the school. He then continued his studies at D. N. Jane College also in Java Poor and earned a B A in philosophy from the school at the age of twenty four in nineteen fifty. Five at Diene. Jane College. He remained argumentative with his teachers so much so that they exempted him from coming to class so as not to disrupt the education of his peers. He only needed to attend tests. All of the arguing did get him somewhere. Though as he participated in the school's debate club and became the national debate champion immediately after he graduated from Dion Jane College he entered the University of saw Gar where he earned an m a in philosophy in nineteen fifty seven from there. He joined riper Sanskrit College as a lecturer according to a neal. Kumar my sore Nagaraj. Who's psychiatry work? Covers some of Rajini Shas philosophies the chancellor at riper Sanskrit worried that rush would be a negative influence on the students and a danger to their morality and character so Rajneesh was quickly asked to leave. Rush became a lecturer at Java. Poor University at Nineteen Sixty at the age of twenty nine. He was made a professor of philosophy. He started speaking at the annual survey Dharma Sam Lan or the meeting of all faiths held Java poor every year organized by the Jane Community This interfaith. Assembly offered a platform for followers from many different religious groups to discuss important issues in their communities and advocate for religious tolerance. This meeting still takes place to this day. In addition to teaching he took his lectures on the road with a tour throughout India. Calling himself a charter or spiritual leader. Among Jane's a charges are venerated leaders WHO GUIDE ENTIRE ORDERS OF MONKS. Rajneesh covered many religions and topics in his spiritual teachings the transcripts of his lectures produced over four hundred books of his musings on topics as wide ranging as Christianity and has it ism to yoga and Zen and even Sigmund Freud and Henry Ford he borrowed from many of these different philosophies marrying them together to create his own belief system. The main pillars of his teachings were nearly fully formed by the time he was thirty one in nineteen sixty two when he started opening camps where he led three to ten day meditations he became known for his teachings on dynamic. Meditation this was a practice. He developed himself which paired physical movement with extremely fast intense breathing meant to break through emotional blocks in the body followed by Cathartic rest period. It's possible that Rajneesh was influenced by an took inspiration from George virtuous teachings on sacred dance movements and meditation in Nineteen Sixty six. He gave up academic teaching at universities and dedicated his life to his spiritual teachings in his early lectures. He criticized socialism. Mahatma Gandhi and traditional religions anti gave strong endorsements of a Capitalist Society of Gandhi. He wants said quote. I had to decide to be against a man. I may have loved if he had not been against progress against prosperity against science against technology. In fact he was against almost everything for which I stand more technology and more science and more richness and affluence. I am not for poverty. He was I am not for primitiveness. He was but still whenever I see even a small ingredient of beauty. I appreciate it and quote. His philosophy about capitalism was later recorded and can be found in his book. Come come yet again. Come where he says quote. Capitalism is not an ideology is not imposed on the society. It is a natural growth. It is not like Communism. Or Fascism or socialism these ideologies have to be imposed capitalism is a state of freedom. That's exactly why I am in support of it. It allows you all kinds of freedoms communism. We'll give you only one ideology to believe in. There's no question of choice and quote here. We can see how his rebellious spirit and his resistance to imposed rules and regulations start to inform philosophies in nineteen sixty eight at the age of thirty seven. Rajneesh talks started to focus even more on the acceptance of sex and sexuality. These lectures were eventually published under the title from sex to super consciousness. Earning him the reputation and Indian media as sex guru. His teachings received a great deal of backlash from the scandalized community. It is worth noting that some Hindu teachings do acknowledge a relationship between sexual energy and a higher consciousness but Rajneesh is endorsement of free uninhibited sexual expression or free. Love left him at odds with his community in his lectures on the sacredness of sexuality. He claimed that it was a vital part of achieving spiritual growth and higher consciousness. He believed that religion and social norms restricted freedom of sexual expression by associating with shame and embarrassment he insisted that the secrecy and shame surrounding sex prevented children from getting the proper education. They needed to understand sex and their own desires. This viewpoint clashed with conservative. Hindu leaders who were upset over the public discussion of sexual matters that they felt should be discussed privately. He believed that. Many religions focused too much on the reward of the afterlife. Dismissing the beauty joys and sacredness that were right in front of them in life to rush niche. Love was the way to enlightenment. He believed that love could become trapped and unreachable inside of a person and could only be released through sexual expression of sex ended sacredness. He's said quote men's whole society is sick and wretched and if this cancer society is to be changed it is essential to accept that the energy of sex is divine that the attraction for sex is essentially religious and quote however his liberal ideas on sex and sexuality did not extend to the Lgbtq community or sex workers. He claimed that the war on sex caused people to develop what he believed. Were unhealthy coping mechanisms though. His teachings were controversial among traditionalists in India. His talks began to reach a wide audience between nineteen sixty six and nineteen sixty eight which peaked the interest of both the press and the public. He soon gained a following particularly among Westerners who were currently experiencing new freedoms brought on by their own cultural and sexual revolutions the sexual revolution which set Western culture ablaze between the nineteen sixties and nineteen eighties was marked by a rejection of gender roles and an increased acceptance of sexual expression it was a movement that aligned perfectly with Rajini Shas philosophical teachings in his book Zorba the Buddha Huby urban discusses the ways in which the formation of Raj Niches Movement conveniently coincided with second wave feminism Rajini believed in the superiority of women. He believed that their ability to have multiple orgasms was proof that they were in possession of a Greater Sexual Energy Rosny theorized that this greater power instilled a certain fear in men causing them to oppress and dominate women. For centuries Rajneesh believed he could offer women a path to freedom and enlightenment that no other feminist movement could he said quote my own vision. Is that the coming of age will be the age of woman. Man has tried for five thousand years and failed. It is enough now feminine. Energies have to be released. The freedom of women cannot come through stupid movements like women's liberation if we create a few women Buddha's in the world than women will be freed from all the chains and fetters and quote no doubt a very powerful an attractive message to send to the world of women who had just begun to taste the changes and freedoms of the feminist and sexual liberation movements. The West was quite alluring to rush. In addition to his interest in these liberation movements he was also a champion of capitalism. He didn't miss an opportunity to cash in on the Tumultuous Times at the end of the nineteen sixties he upgraded his title from our Chara to another honorific derived from Hindi or Sanskrit Languages Bhagwan meaning Lord. He established himself in Bombay where large audiences traveled from all over the world to attend his lectures. He held court among curious travelers and dedicated devotees alike who began their day with the rigorous process of dynamic meditation and then gathered for his lectures in the evening. We're starting to see rushes. Transformation into what sociologists referred to as a charismatic leader. This is a term that political economist and sociologist. Max vaber applied to many cult leaders. Vapors work in political sociology. Names three types of domination or authority charismatic traditional and legal authority by vapors definitions rational legal authority and traditional authority are more common and conventional rational legal authorities are legitimate ties by complex rules and regulated by Government Laws Traditional Authority refers to power that typically passes from one generation to the next charismatic leaders on the other hand are set apart and treated as though they have superhuman powers or qualities. This definitely applied to rush. Who claimed he was an enlightened being according to vaber quote the person in question gains legitimacy for leadership and followers accept their charismatic authority and quote. This started to play out right away during his time teaching in Bombay where he established headquarters from nineteen sixty nine to nineteen seventy four. While in Bombay Rajneesh surrounded himself with during followers who believed that his philosophy could save humankind from this philosophy. Rajneesh developed the idea of a Homo Novus or new man. According to his vision he wanted to create a new world. A new future where this new man could emerge this new man. According to his ideals would be beyond good and evil and free from the restrictions and obligations of society to become an enlightened elite. Rajneesh followers became known as sun-ja sense derived from the Sanskrit Sign Yossi meaning to abandon when they surrendered themselves to rush niche they abandoned their old selves including their names and instead took new names often given to them by Russia Nisha himself. In Bombay we begin to see two key elements of Russia's philosophy start to merge the first element is Rajini Shas great disdain for institutionalized authority and rules of society which he often rebelled against. The second element was Rajini. Shas desire to build a Buddha field or promised land where his new man could live peacefully. His devotees believed that Rajini alone was capable of delivering on this promise of salvation for all humankind. Vabres final qualification. That defines charismatic is the idea of a revolutionary force meant to quote result in a radical alteration of the central system of attitudes toward the world and quote Rajini Shas. Buddha field evoked these notions and promised an entirely new world. And Way.

Rajneesh Bombay George Gergiev India Bombay Rajneesh Buddha D. N. Jane College Jane College Sanskrit College Rajini Rush Girgis Diene Dion Jane College Mahatma Gandhi professor of philosophy Jane Community Jane lecturer
"neal kumar" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The first troops city addition is devoted to Chicago two hundred and sixty four rigorous by twenty seven emerging not twenty seven twenty six emerge for tires and one very stable. Tom made it was sitting here it is Chicago the week each I have seen in my lifetime all manner of really bad photographic books about Chicago where someone will come and it was a very good photographer and they'll take photos of the usual suspects and someone will write some you know cheesy cliche ridden as city of the big shoulders nonsense about the city I love this we'll show you a Chicago from view points artistic view points that you have never seen before you'll see the city I think. in a brand new and very very refreshing way when when my guests Tom mayday and Sam landers went out looking for photographers they went after young emerging photographers. because they will see a city in a different way than someone who has been looking at it and taking bribes Justin a enough for any bad reason taking things for granted they will see things in a new way one of the things we were impressed with with this group of photographers and their energy was to go out no matter if it's below zero no matter if it's snowing or raining or all kinds of conditions the for the fog is rolled in these guys are out and they're shooting and they're capturing and they're walking and exploring and it's just incredible what they were able to capture salmon I actually went out and tried it on a few a one rainy night I called up simply Sam let let's go out and try to to get some shots for the book and we realized. the these photographers have raised the bar our our idea you too old pros alike haven and it's cold out go back inside. two old birds are like wait a minute this is for young kids that's something that there there's something Hey did to that point and very refreshing about these images I'm and that that word sticks in my mind refreshing and it's just it's a bunch of young people looking at the city in artistically new way yes is that I I think that's really true and we really edited it and put the book together based on what we got even though we selected the photos there are several images of that cloud gate to being several images of Willis tower is several images of the Wrigley building yes you know what what's interesting there are pictures of the Willis tower for instance the first the first image in that chapter I have never seen the Willis tower from that so yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah and with that contrasts like Cameron Sears I am from right I hate that building how may I hate almost everything about it but seeing it here it made me like it a bit of me if it didn't make me fall in love with it I mean the loop in the river the river stuff is just is amazing to me Rick if you don't mind I'd love to just name some of Taj error because one of the really interesting things about meeting these photographers as they come from all walks of life we have a woman's Sonya slice who is scientist we have Neal Neal Kumar his entire portfolio on Instagram is our photos show with an iPhone and he's dermatologist. so we have cuckoo lose you've got Mike spot to the skateboarder from Milwaukee covering new ways to explore city for photography you've got met white to California native who works as a financial analyst for the passion for traveling photography Max Lightner yeah I'm patrons seventy three you can read about a but here here's one doesn't really strike me as far out with this guy be a great photographer originally from the Los Angeles area Nick Crawford now living in Chicago works as a technical recruiter. I'm like yeah go ahead. looks like for your phone the interesting thing is that because of the New World that is the internet you were able to discover and you guys know. a good photo when you see it we hope so yeah yeah no I think I might tell you you can buy you can go and easy way and easy way I'm sure this on Amazon but an easy way to with free to buy this book would be to go to trope T. R. O. P. E. dot com in you'll see some other stuff there too and you'll learn of the next edition the troops city additional London and then you will learn about the next one trump city addition Hong Kong and then Tokyo and and there are some new York huh in Paris and New York will be next. do you guys go to the cities and just like. regulation. yeah it's a good twenty thousand dollars. Tokyo at the finest hotel they have we're interviewing photographer. I can't tell you guys of you seem you know you know it's a precarious publishing environment but I you guys come to it was such vast experience in the business of photography and publishing and editing and are directing that if you guys can make it nobody. thank you. don't well to my coming from me so take that under serious advise whatever you please but the book is just beautiful and I think you know walking a bookstore that there still are books are walking a bookstore thumb through it and and it's it's astonishing that you guys were somehow able pull this off for forty dollars a copy which is not fun it's a beautiful beautiful book and it's up to you ladies and gentlemen your book buyers it's up to you thank you both Sam wonders and Tom made they used to work for Victor script us thank you for having us yeah we'll send you a copy of my full what I discovered about Victor in doing this long profile for the Tribune magazine and I don't know if this is an apocryphal story in Victor's going up and you're near north side and one day he's in lake shore park which is between Chicago Avenue Pearson on lake shore drive and he finds a brownie camera in the rain. and he's honest boy that he is he takes it inside and says I found this they said well if no one's come back to get it in two weeks you can have it that whether it's true or not I love the show story and Victor Victor says it's true so it's a great site stats are Victor script as he became a photographer Phyllis thank you so much for coming in and great success keep people up on what's going on with troops city thank you so much so much my pleasure my pleasure we'll take a little commercial break then we'll get some news and then we'll talk to a couple female novelists..

Victor Victor Chicago Tom New York Tokyo Tribune lake shore Amazon Sam lake shore park Hong Kong Phyllis London T. R. O. P. Paris twenty thousand dollars forty dollars two weeks one day
"neal kumar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:28 min | 2 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And health care with the emergence of new technologies and break through science today on technician health a new model for going after genetically driven diseases which affect a small number of patients find the scientist wherever they are and build small companies around them then chief correspondent Dr Daniel craft reviews progress in knowing the health status of our hearts it's not unusual for biotech companies to work on a number of diseases all at the same time usually they do that work under a single company and in one or at most two different locations bridge bio has a different model Neal Kumar is its CEO yeah well first of all thanks for having me on and as good players speak with you we have a slightly different model that allows us to go uniquely after some very small diseases and so I guess the whole point of any model is to say okay what signs do we find interesting in this case it's the science behind genetic disease and then how do we actually go after and I can't be by building a normal biotech because in all about tech as twenty twenty five people and labs and a whole bunch of fixed costs that they carry on and that's too expensive to go after patient population of a couple hundred patients let's say a couple thousand patients and so we have a model that effectively very Bly's lot of those fixed costs we have a central platform and then every time we find an interesting project we start a new company but that new company only has a few scientists that really understand that space within it and they can draw from DNA functions are generalized Andi functions from bridge about pharma and then came back when they're done so it had tends to lead to much more capital efficiency which then in turn allows us to go after small things and so we have bridge file that's the sort of the parent company yeah if you well that's right and every time you come up with something new new company that's right a company that bridge file has like okay hoodies pencils probably a little bigger than that we had an event on Sunday but but the science of course is at the core of each of these projects that's why I a diff different set of scientists have to be there give us some examples of that the genetically driven diseases you're working on yeah so I mean what we we think about these diseases and three different categories really the first on the classic inherited diseases like you hear about Tay Sachs or sickle cell we have a number of programs in these sorts of areas TT Armel doses garland syndrome you may not have heard of each one of these diseases there are twenty five million Americans so don't don't those are what we think allies mean daily and disease then there's a series of what are called germ line cancers there's also hair diseases or pediatric cancers which more people have heard of we break them out separately because there's a more of a wariness around pediatric cancer and then they're what we call somatic cancers which developed later in life these can be any sort of cancer a lot of what like Laakso pharmaceuticals and others are going after these are cancers that arise where there's a very clear genetic driver so what what sort of binds all of these programs together is that you can from mutation really precisely understand what's driving the disease so it's not like heart failure diabetes where there are a lot of different things going on there's the genetics there's your diet there's you know all sorts of different exacerbating factors these are very clearly quantitatively driven by the mutation and that's what we focus on I guess one of my questions is do you have them housed in different places them in the everybody has a different color name tag we only have a couple of scientists here in a couple of scientists there yeah so we we think a lot about okay who are the people that really need to be part of the company and it's usually the people that have one of two phenotypes one is that they really deeply understand the biology and typically those people are coming from an academic lab that I've been looking at disease acts for twenty years thirty years sometimes and so we go to where that those people are so we have subsidiaries in Memphis in Montreal in Paris and serves as co of course in Boston it's where the sciences it's where it's where those it's where the science of weather experts are and we try to set up around them and then the second type of person that's a really important to us are people that understand the clinical manifestations of disease and can help with development and so in many cases will locate around them especially if it's a later stage program so yeah well I mean we're basically geographically unconstrained and but but we've done a lot in our backyard Sam Cisco just because you know where they're it is a pretty large bio yeah right now here's another interesting note I expected when I read your bio to find a life scientists alive and science executive all your degrees are in chemical engineering what's up with that will get us to be worth of these appeals what's going on well you're an engineer so you see you know there's another I think that so I I actually entered come because you made a very interesting period of time because the traditional and maybe some of feathers and would kill me for saying this but I've my my perception was to traditional chemical engineering disciplines were dying like oil and gas plastics were all of us use the gal separations things like that there wasn't there's not a ton of research going on there a lot of the really important problems that are even solved so when I entered chemical engineering a lot of new research was going on in the fight by technology industry in fact a lot of the early folks associated with Genzyme engine and tag and you know the whole thing of manufacturing these New Testament allergies there were chemical engineers and a lot of the faculty at Stanford and MIT right trained were actually in biotech and in some of those early days so I did all my research at the corner of biology and chemical engineering and my PhD wasn't cancer signaling cell so it's kind of yeah come on hearings change life science know about that along exactly engineering building in life and I yes you know I mean I think there's a discipline now called a biological engineering that didn't exist when I was in school but it really is yeah it's at the core I mean it's it's at the corner of a lot of engineering disciplines of biology but certainly there some chemical engineering biology intersection there that we we lease so many times we forget that we've got you know okay all this organic matter and we need we look at our brain and then we have all the these electrical signals and we have we have a mystery in there in the site all of these things are working together yeah we have the broken up into separate silos yeah it's kind of interesting you say that because I mean for me engineering is sort of like this this way of simplifying very complex problems and there's no more complex a problem than a biology and then putting some quantitative real rules around it and so you know if you think about a cell for instance you think about it sitting in an extracellular mail milieu it's interrogating all that information then there all the signals going through the cell and then decides to do something like pulling for eight or my great or do something like that and you ask yourself okay so a biologist or reduction or a scientist will look to build up a set of data and understand how all those steps happen that's really hard and so an engineer kinda abstracts and says a little bit like okay you'd like there's a there's a queue there's a signal there's a response this is kind of what you know a lot about it and I tease been talking about and you put that all together and how do I model it and how do I start to get some predictive understanding of how this might change if a drug intervene door you know if I intervene at the at the output level and so that I think engineering is kinda uniquely suited to answer some of these questions not not not all of them but some of them you should work at NASA that's for the scientists and meet the engineers and they're not always I am I think it's really interesting because at the end of the day all of these challenges are going to be solved by humans and they have to be working in all different kinds of ways and have all different kinds of perspectives so that was what I was the first thing that attracted me to say Hey we don't talk to these bridge bio people and see how it they doing it is it working not working have you got to the point where any one of these efforts have been sold off for reach you know got registered or you all you pretty much earlier mid stage and all of them yeah so I think we have a guy to programs now and in or entering phase three clinical trials that we started pre clinically with so that's really exciting now yours yet yeah I you see in daylight yeah exactly so I mean we think about things in terms of you know our ultimate goal is to get products approved I wish that we we don't have any products approved yet but we start quite early and so I'm hopeful that over the course of the next decade will get a few products approved I can make a big difference in patients lives but but what happens if they get approved but have said little company then they beat out I think in the case where we can we would like to commercialize those products so you know this is very different again than some of the broad diseases that big pharma goes after there may only require a fifteen to twenty you know what we call medical science liaison sales force to get out there and commercializes products so yeah we're hopeful that we're creating an integrated by technology company here that can they can distribute the product patients you're going all the way tryin it I usually hear that answer email I'm very very interested here thank you for coming and I hope you come back and we'll see this again thank you so much nicer time Neal Kumar is the CEO of bridge bio more information is available at bridge bio dot com that's bridge B. R. I. D. G. E. bridge bio dot com today chief correspondent Dr Daniel craft talks about the health status of our hearts we're now able to no more than ever before I thought we would start with a start up that I know Daniel is advised in the past it's called Argyris martyrs is an interesting convergence company coming out of Stanford where it was founded by a radiologist and Stanford MBA and a couple other really bright folks too now look at this explosion of MRI data an MRI magnetic resonance imaging doesn't just look at the brain because look at many parts of body including the heart and it's becoming dynamic you don't just look at a slices of the heart and determine its shape we can see it in now in real time and fMRI SMR functional MRI and now the question was could you take that this massive data sets and changes every microsecond and start to understand in some cases the function of the heart and one important element for all of our hearts is what's called ejection fraction how much is our big left ventricle the big biggest chamber heart squeezing how much blood comes out of it with every heartbeat and for most of us who are pretty healthy it's it's a fifty to sixty percent every squeeze now how do we measure that we can do it fMRI actually see the your dynamic heart squeezing additionally to get your injection fraction would require a radiologist or cardiologists to little to go in there and measure with digital calipers today how much distance is changed and from that calculate your ejection fraction that took several minutes they could bill for that type of analysis but have a good business sure but artists was the first to pioneer this approach to do that with a I assistance and late in twenty seventeen there basically the first company that I'm aware of to get FDA clearance for a I assisted imaging system so now that you don't require a radiologist to do that in this case ejection fraction measurement but that can be done almost instantaneously while they're taking it you should know at the end of the picture if you will this is what the answer Haitian resident fMRI in we have not just actually indications about ejection fraction but learning about the valves and other flowing parts of the body could be a what we call an aneurysm they could be in their order or around the kidneys any other part of vasculature cannot be analyzed with fMRI and that with the lens of artificial intelligence assistance how was really quantify that and bring that information diagnostically to the commission almost immediately I would say that you could actually look at how your heart works right I've had my own fMRI the heart done I came out of the machine and ten minutes later I'm looking at my heart on the screen I can look at all of the numbers matches my injection fraction but what percentile I'm I have others my age and sex and height right similarly we seen fMRI be done or MRI in general of the brain I had my brain dead by MRI and the machine learning actually color coded the different components and I can look at the percentile size is my thalamus hypothalamus and might be nice to compare that to others but if I'm in a certain percentile it might mean I'm at risk of dementia and I might want to do something differently about the power of these new a I assisted diagnostic platforms is not to replace the radiologist but to help us green information more quickly and to connect the dots between.

scientist technician chief correspondent Dr Daniel sixty percent thirty years twenty years ten minutes
"neal kumar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Or situations bloomberg world headquarters i'm charlie pellett johnny i've is going to depart from apple and form an independent design company deutchebanks american armed defied predictions and past the federal reserve stress test handing the embattled german lender a rare victory as it struggles to turn around its business every other bank also cleared the annual exam j. p. morgan chase wells fargo citigroup goldman sachs bank of american morgan stanley all announcing share buybacks and a dividend boost after the bell nike posted its first ever ten billion dollar quarter in revenue but weaker than expected profit drag down shares in late trading stocks mixed dow jones industrial average lower today might ten points little change there the s. and p. five hundred index up eleven four tenths of one percent nasdaq up fifty seven up seven tenths i'm charlie come up that's a bloomberg business flash bloomberg best june grasso and ed baxter continues from the bloomberg interactive brokers studio this is bloomberg best it's been a rough you years for the u._s. value investors as the decade long market environment has favored large caps and mega tech's atlantic investment management founder alexander roper says that's all about to change thanks to a great rotation and trillions of private equity dollars looking for opportunity and june bloomberg's vonnie quinn spoke with rovers earlier today white paper recently about this great rotation that you see on the way you want in two thousand sixteen as well and i'm curious as to why you sink now while you're more convinced now that it's coming than you were three years ago two thousand sixteen goes right after the oil price collapsed and strengthened the dollar really call a lot of upheaval in the market in two thousand fifteen in early sixteen we thought that was an inflection point and indeed in value stocks for about a year and a half but with the advent of the tariff wars and brexit in particular not working out very well everybody resorted back to growth large-cap tech and story stocks and as we see early this year we have a lot of i._p._o.'s coming out with companies with great stories quite often money losing situations with and in the meantime if he's off the growth and tech stocks continued expense whereas huge valuation compression has been going on in the mid cap and the value stocks least we follow those time to put things in perspective is timing though isn't it because for example one of the arguments is that the fed has kept interest rates solo for so long that you know everything is distorted in the problem now is it looks like the fed is going to cause again in july so does that could pay little bit to the argument that now is the time to rotate i think the timing is an issue nineteen ninety nine in april by wall street journal reporter highlighting however value amazon ebay and america online were compared to paper stocks force cups in chemical stocks that was about a year early to suggest anybody spot on them just want to highlight the incredibly compelling opportunities created by this equity market dynamic the other part of the argument is that there's what about two and a half trillion dollars according to pre quin of private equity money out there sloshing around looking for homes looking for places to invest his part of your argument that that capital will go to work on some of these mid cap value it's very hard to do a hostile deal i think is rare but there's a lot of private equity dry powder on i think there's a hesitancy on behalf of corporations to do as well as private equity to do large deals going on but the whole holding back pending resolution of voice situation and brexit as well does your argument hold up no matter what the outcome is to the tariff discussions even if you get more tariffs on china even the tar for heats up on also on the brexit side of things if we get you know one or other outcome to break momentarily thing if the uncertainty continues you're going to see investors gravitates to large-cap tech domestic place primarily so it's in favor of what has been driving the market so i think we need some form of resolution on the front where are you active what companies are you active in holding tour an active discussions in a constructive way with management as we always have been for the thirty years we've done this we have been public with our activism on jilin oy this is the largest clash baltimore factor in the world in fact twenty five percent of all the glass bottles in the world made by one seventy seven plants that accompany shooting ultra cheap valuation of less than six times be and less than six hundred to die and we feel it by selling that u._p. division u._p._n. units that could generate about three three and a half billion dollars of cash that it can use to pay debt buy shares and at a reasonable valuation can have a double in the share price when you talk to the management of these companies this mid cap value companies that you say are really being overlooked and can get into what are they telling you are they waiting for the private equity store in this like very busy improving operations approving use of cash growing businesses show no del very hard work to do the best thing for companies and they're very frustrated any cases that to see the valuation so low in fact in last year alone we've seen peas in our universe go from ten to seven on average while the market is going to show does a valuation compassion that really reflects the uncertainty in the generally industrial global economy as a result of the tear fourche the companies that just you hold though for the most part is mechanical chemical huntsman on the tim can cause they're manufacturing economy based companies what about the idea that the u._s. is just migrating away from the manufacturing based base on that particularly if there is more of a trade war with china and so on these companies will find it very difficult to continue on u._s. is migrating away from any factoring manufacturing is is very important to the united states clearly old attention on the tech side we should not forget the technological obsolescence risk is a real big risk factor that should be taken into account when looking at this tech growth stock some of these are that you completely ignoring the technological relationships can hit them to mean companies we are in have been tested over time are very profitable and training very cheaply show people really shoot take a look at it at the end of the day we all fish when you buy a house car dishwasher you comparison shop you wanna make sure you get value i should just to investors do the same thing investment management founder alexander roper and coming up bridge bio pharma c._e._o. neal kumar this is bloomberg this is a bloomberg quick take context and background on issues of interest are focuses on the check protests against the nation's billionaire premier with bloomberg's peter laka the situation relate to policy michigan into the billionaire prime minister the police have recommended criminal charges against the prime minister andrei bubby and say companies illegally obtained about two million dollars of european union subsidies the background Bill and grew inside with each rally. The initial trigger was the naming of the new Justice minister who he's an ally of the prime minister. The argument. Allegations. rivals remains by far the most popular in opinion polls and he supported seems to like higher.

bloomberg prime minister Justice minister apple twenty five percent two million dollars ten billion dollar trillion dollars billion dollars thirty years one percent three years
"neal kumar" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"A few minutes? I'm Cody gov and I'm actually here today. You learn about new sustainability rules that could help us cut space debris why you shouldn't blow your nose. When you have a cold and why you unconsciously copy other people's mannerisms. Let's unconsciously copy, some curiosity. We've covered the problems with space junk on this show before, and today, we've got some good news, new rules about sustainability in space could help us cut space debris as reported by universe today. There are twenty thousand objects orbiting earth, that are larger than four inches or ten centimeters out of all of those objects only about ten percent of them are operating satellites. That means there are eighteen thousand pieces of junk out there and it's not just regular junk, it's very dangerous junk, even if you've got something the size of a cell phone flying around, it can do a ton of damage of its travelling at thousands of miles an hour. It's bad news. If something crashes into. One of those two thousand satellites up in orbit since they help us with things like navigation weather, forecasting, hurricane tracking communications and climate science. Fortunately, the space junk problem is being addressed by a new initiative led by the World Economic Forum global future council on space technologies. The council is spearheading a project to come up with what they call the space sustainability rating system or SR. It's basically a set of voluntary guidelines to help nations that are developing and launching satellites. Some countries already have laws in place to govern companies operating on their soil. But the SR is being set up as a global initiative, it's being worked on by a pretty diverse team, including members from the space enabled research group at the MIT media lab and members from the European Space Agency, a big part of their focus right now is to come up with guidelines for what happens after a satellite stops functioning for example. Hopefully, the SR can come up with a way to help satellite operators, set the altitude and the lifespan of a satellite. So. Doesn't just stay up in space forever. The group has just started working on the problem. But the clock is ticking, according to a press release from the team, working on this. There are a lot of countries working on new space programs. So it's important had the SR in place, as soon as possible still. It's good knowing that someone is taken the first step towards sustainability in space. After all, we've got a lot of universe to explore can't have our dirty laundry, getting in the way blowing your nose is a great cure for this nipples. But when you have a cold it turns out the blowing your nose is actually a bad idea. In fact, blowing your nose the wrong way could be a bad thing, anytime. So let's get into some nose blowing safety tips. Yeah, there's a phrase thought I'd say, we're all about safety here. Sure. According to at least one allergist blowing your nose with too much force can actually cause breakage of blood, vessels and undue stress. It can also force bacteria and other bad stuff back up into your sinuses, which could increase your risk of infection. Uk-us isn't even the real reason. Your nose feels stuffy, the stuffy sensation is a signal that the blood vessels in your nose or swollen. You do produce more mucus when you're sick but only a little more. And even if you blow some of it out on occasion, your body just replenishes. The disgusting supply even on a normal healthy. Your body makes enough mucus to fill a twenty ounce bottle growth. So yeah, you're not going to win that battle anyway. The real problem is the underlying sickness. You have typically the common cold sinusitis or hayfever mucus is a sideshow, and trying to blow it all out can cause more problems than it solves. So what should you do? Well, pulling your nose isn't forbidden. It may not be super helpful in the long term. But it can give you a brief respite from your symptoms. Just make sure to do it properly. That's according to Dr Neal, Kumar Lonnie, the chairman of the department of auto and Galeotti at the New York University Langone medical center. He told the New York. Times that you shouldn't blow to forcefully and that you should actually blow your nostrils one at a time blowing too hard has actually caused some real problems in rare, but documented cases over enthusiastic knows blowing his even led to Izhak injuries Asaf against ruptures and other medical issues. But with a safe knows bowing technique, and some decongestants you should stay decently comfortable through your nasal troubles. I think I just got.

European Space Agency Kumar Lonnie Cody gov New York University Langone me sinusitis New York MIT Asaf chairman Dr Neal Galeotti ten centimeters twenty ounce four inches ten percent
"neal kumar" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Gupta, and your book is entitled the apprentice of the billionaires apprentice would which would apply to Mr. up the wooden play. There was that you were soon. There was some greed or whatever is he in touch with his own feelings, and you buy that. I don't feel he's in touch with his own feeling that one of the things that during the interview is that what really stuck miss craw about my book with gestion. But he did what he did. Because of greed said we've always lived the low arming, we're quite fine. We're even okay today. But I don't think that necessarily the date, you know, the idea that he may have participated with Roger on because he was greedy, you know, he had he had stepped off the CEO chair at McKinsey, and and he had enough money could have retired happily as we discussed during my interview. But he chose to to look at other ventures. He chose to seek employment. Take a are. And and he actually disputes the figure that was that was bandied about in court that he was getting paid five million to work for take yards that it was less than a million. But, but whatever the number was is, you know, at at fifty something when he retired from the Tempe think it was enough he wanted more. And if it wasn't greedy in monetary terms. Maybe he was really for you know, being able to do more philanthropic -ly. You know, it's interesting one of the reasons rocked rotten got to the tension is that. Given a million dollars to to philanthropic venture that Gupta was was pursuing. And that really, you know, stood in his mind, and that was the beginning of their friendship. So I think there was the desire of wanting more. Whether it was, you know, wanting more for my family or wanting more to be, you know, recognize on the world stage is probably a topic for debate. But the, yeah, I do I don't find him credible on and you know, we should say starting to cry a lot of corporate C E O's try to go to these hedge fund K K R. Retired never seems to be enough. What what what they're making the the do you? Do you believe rush did rip off in this in the Voyager fund? That's certainly what Gupta maintains and there was some paperwork introduced bio, it shows that this investment in Voyageur had has gone, you know, kind of millions to two zero. And so I think it's I think it's quite plausible. Whether whether it's the reason that, you know, you know, go to was calling Raj that day, two different. I think is questionable and one of the things the positition us join the trial, but it to bigger Asli opposed. This idea that perhaps was was feeding lodge information. So he could get some of his money back. But this was something go to. No. Who's rabbi trae hand tree hen guy who apparently could maybe validated that rose was taken money out of your somehow? But that he suddenly didn't testify. That's right. This is someone who was a longtime friend goes, I believe he had rented a property at his Westport, Connecticut. Home an outside property, and he was someone book lawyers had engaged with early on. Because it was his talent was Robbie trae to account. I pointed out to death. That money being siphoned out of Voyager and Goodson. Our interview firmly believe that if the jury understood the timelines that in the spring of two thousand eight he started getting worried about it. And that. Climaxed in all of two thousand eight they would have been persuaded that the call on September the twenty third which is day the buffet investment food, Goldman that call they would have been convinced would have been was about about his money about his boy, a dramatic and just feels very strongly some way the feds thoughts to train on Stockton from testifying. And I have a tried over the years, very sexist later reach right Han or his warriors. To no avail. But that I did speak to read Brodsky is now of a lawyer gets done and was a prosecutor in the trial. And and he said, it's up to believe that, you know, we got to try on you know, he's delusional as he pointed out Flers put it put subpoenaed trae haunt. They wanted to. The what what what what is who sets of your of your book overall? You didn't being to it except to say that that he was he he just greed with this idea that he was motivated by greed. He even pointed to an extra, but I choke from a talk that he gave it Columbia University around two thousand three and this was just before he became friends with Margaretta, and he spoke about the war money in the more. You have the more you want big houses. And he he took me to task for for for taking that speech out of context. And he said I'd like to sit and watch that speech with you all three hours of it. And and I had watched all three hours of the speech, and it begins with a lot of his discussion of the the Indian scriptures. But I think one of the traits that I noticed about book to join our interview is that perhaps like many consultants, he's just a master compartment. Weiser. You know, you can be discussing traits lofty traits characteristics of Hinduism and at the same time taken in with the desire to have more money. They're not, you know, neutral, and you know, what's funny about that is made up to say way, you look guys. They have unbelievable compartmentalization which obviously gives them rationalization power. One more thing on him to more things on him one. Neal Kumar was a close MacKenzie colleague of his and he feels that he just ratted. Yeah. Kamara of course, exactly. The opposite of what threatening very quickly after he learned what the feds had against him a Neal was literally getting payments from Rajaratne that were routed in this is so delicious to his Indian housekeepers thanking out in in Delhi or Banglore, whereas whereas Gupta never got any payments. Once Kamar realize that the dimensions of the government's case, he decided to plead guilty, and certainly was star witness and watch trial and also was a witness in the Gupta trial, and has you know, this description of is life disgust when when? Kamar walks into what with his head, you know, lower than and the issue for deal with camman testimony is that it dated the dissatisfaction with Voyager investment it dated later than than it actually was according to go. So so he was he was very unhappy with Kamar who was obviously a very close associate and one would actually say that it's good to with Mars champion. Qamar would not have been what he is what he was at McKinsey had it not been focused so out very betrayed by. Sounds like a betrayal almost if you can do in about forty seconds. He talks about gates bilk in and these guys to see how this delusion that. All these guys we still going to come back, and you know, soci- cetera Akron, the fed on sure they'll gates, you know, would want me to be an adviser. This question, I have to decide whether I want to be in it, you know, one hundred percents because that's what they'll gates with with watt. And with milking talked about this conversation. They had he made it sound like it was very expansive conversation about what they what he could do for the mill's foundations. They'll can spoke came back and said, it was a ten minute conversation in the hallway. So I'll leave it to the reader to decide who's telling who's telling the truth. Which boy then runs just got out as well..

Gupta Robbie trae McKinsey Kamar Neal Kumar Voyager fund Roger Westport CEO Connecticut Tempe C E O Raj Goodson Akron rose Han Brodsky Goldman Voyageur
"neal kumar" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:24 min | 2 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The author of billionaires apprentice America to lead them before the galleon hedge fund. Part of your title was greed. I never had that as we talked about Raja Gupta, and your book is entitled the apprentice of the billionaires apprentice would which would apply to Mr. up the wouldn't play. There was that you were soom. There was some greed or whatever is he in touch with his own feelings, and you buy that. I don't feel he's in touch with his own failing at one of the things he said to me during the interview is that what really stuck miss craw about my book was the suggestion that he did. Because of greed said we've always lived the low army, quite fine. And we're even okay today. But I don't think that necessarily negates, you know, the idea that he may have participated with Roger on because he was greedy, you know, he had he had stepped off. The CEO chair at McKinsey, and and he had enough money. We could've retired happily as we discussed during my interview with him, but he chose to to look at other ventures. He chose to employment take a are. And and he actually disputes the bigger that was that was Andy about in court that he was getting paid five million to take that it was less than a million. But but wherever the number was is, you know, at fifty something when he retired from the Kinsey instinct, it was enough you wanted more. And if it wasn't greedy in monetary terms. Maybe he was really for you know, being able to do more philanthropic -ly. You know, it's interesting one of the reasons Raj rotten and got to the tension is that. Given a million dollars to to philanthropic venture that Gupta was was pursuing. And that really, you know, stood in his mind, and that was the beginning of their friendship. So I think there was this desire of wanting more. Whether it was, you know, wanting more for my family or wanting more to be, you know, recognize on the world stage is probably hit a topic for debate. But, but yeah, I do I don't find him credible on and you know, we should say that cried a lot of corporate C E O's try to go to these hedge fund KK are with when they retired never seems to be enough. What the what they're making the the do you? Do you believe rush did rip off in this in the Voyager fund? That's certainly what to maintains in there. Lesson paperwork introduced vile that shows that this investment in Voyager had has gone from tens million to two zero. And so I think it's I think it's quite plausible. Whether whether it's the reason that, you know, you know, go to was calling Raj that day different. I think it's questionable and one of the things the prosecution us during the trial, but it's to bigger Asli opposed. Was this idea that have the with feeding Raj information, so he could get some of his money back. But this was something that. No, who's Ravi trae Hanner tree hen guy who apparently could maybe validated that rose was taken money out of or somehow. But then he suddenly didn't testify. That's right. This is someone who was a longtime friend Phil says, I believe he had rented property at Gupta's, westward, Connecticut. Home an outside property, and he was someone that is more areas had engaged with early on. Because it was his account was Robbie trae hump to count. I pointed out to death. That money being siphoned out of Voyager and Gupta. Our interview firmly believe that if the jury understood the timelines that in the spring of two thousand eight he started getting worried about his, and that's why max in the fall of two thousand eight they would've been persuaded that the call on September twenty third which is the day the buffet investment by Goldman that call they would have been convinced would have been was about about his money about his wager money and just feels very strongly in some way, said dot TRAI on Stockton from testifying, and I have tried over the years very unsuccessful later reach right Han or his lawyers. No avail, but that I did speak to read Brodsky's now of lawyer gets done and with the prosecutor in the trial. And and he said, it's a belief that you know, we got to try on you know, he's delusional as he pointed out you could put subpoenaed trae Han. They want to. The what what what what is who sets of your of your book overall? He didn't be to it except to say that that he was he he just greed with the scientists that he was motivated by greed. He even pointed to an extra that I took from a talk that he gave it Columbia University around two thousand three and this was just before he became friends as much rotten him. And he spoke about the war money in the more. You have the more you want big houses. And he he took me to task for for for taking that speech out of context. And he said I'd like to sit and watch that speech with you all three hours of it. And and I had watched all three hours of the speech, and it begins with a lot of his discussion the the Indian scriptures. But I think one of the traits that I noticed about book during our interview is that perhaps like many consultants, he's just a master compartment. Weiser. You know, you can be discussing traits lofty traits characteristics of Hinduism and at the same time taken in with the desire to have more money. They're not, you know, neutral, and you know, what's funny about that is made up is the same way. You look guys. They have unbelievable compartmentalization which obviously gives them rationalization power. Thank. One more thing on him to more things on him one. Neal Kumar was a close McKinsey colleague of his and he feels that he just ratted. Yeah. You know, Kamar, of course, did exactly the opposite of what runs rotten very quickly after he learned what the feds had against him. Neal was was literally getting payments from Rajaratne that were routed in this is so delicious his Indian housekeeper thank out in in Delhi or Banglore, whereas whereas Gupta never got any payments. Once Kamar realize that the dimensions that the government's case he decided to to please feel free and certainly was star witness and watch trial and also was a witness in the Gupta trial, and has you know, this description is life discussed when when. Camara walks into what room with his with his head, you know, lower and the issue for there with Kamar testimonies that it dated the dissatisfaction with the Voyager investment dated later than than it actually was according to so so he was he was very unhappy with Kamar who was obviously a very close associate and one would actually say that goes to with Mars champion Qamar would not have been what he is what he was at McKinsey had it not been for his so out very betrayed by. So like a betrayal almost if you can do about forty seconds. He talks about gates Milkin. And these guys to see have this delusion that all these guys we still going to want him to come back, and you know, socio cetera. Yes. And he said, I'm sure Bill Gates. You know would want me to be an adviser. This question, I have to decide whether I want to be in, you know, one hundred percent because that's what they'll gates would would want and with Milken he talked about this conversation. They had he made it sound like it was very extensive conversation about what they what he could do for the Milton foundations can spokes came back and said, it was a ten minute conversation in the hallway. So I'll leave it to the reader to decide who's telling who's telling the truth or final bad. Boy, then runs got out as well. Jim..

Raja Gupta Raj Kamar Voyager McKinsey trae Han Voyager fund Robbie trae Bill Gates America Neal Kumar Connecticut Roger CEO Andy Milken C E O rose Brodsky Phil
"neal kumar" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:32 min | 2 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Hedge fund part of your title was greed. I never had that as we talked about Raja Gupta, and your book is entitled the apprentice of the billionaires apprentice would which would applied to Mr. Gupta wouldn't play their wish that you were soon. There was some greed or whatever is he in touch with his own feelings, and you buy that. I don't feel he's in touch with his own failings that one of the things he said to me during the interview is that really stuck his claw about my book with the suggestion that he did what he did because of greed. He said we've always lived the low army with quite fine. We're even okay today. But I don't think that necessarily the gates, you know, the idea that he may have participated with Roger rotten on because he was greedy, you know, he had he had stepped off. As a CEO chair at McKinsey. And and he had enough money could have retired happily as we discussed during my interview with it. But he chose to to look at other ventures. He chose to peak employment at take a are. And and he actually disputes the bigger that was that was Andy about in court that he was getting paid five million toward for take that it was less than a million. But, but whatever the number one is, you know, at at fifty something when he retired from Kinsey instinct, it was enough you wanted more. And if it wasn't greedy in monetary terms. Maybe he would really for for you know, being able to do more philanthropic -ly. You know, it's interesting one of the reasons why Rodman got to the tension is that. He had given a million dollars to to philanthropic venture that Gupta was was pursuing. And that really, you know, stood in his mind, and that was the beginning of their friendship. So I think there was this desire of wanting more. Whether it was, you know, wanting more for my family or wanting more to be, you know, recognize on the world stage is probably hit a topic for debate. But, but yeah, I do I don't find him credible on and you know, we should say that starting to cried a lot of corporate C E O's tried to go to these hedge fund KKR when they retired never seems to be enough. What the what they're making the the do you? Do you believe rush did rip off? In this in the Voyager fund. That's certainly what to maintain their their lesson paperwork introduced vile that shows the disinvestment in Voyager had has gone from tens of millions to two zero. And so I think it's I think it's quite plausible. Whether whether it's the reason that, you know, you know, go to was calling Raj that day two different thing. I think is is questionable and one of the things the prosecution us during the trial that that Gupta bigger Asli opposed. Was this idea that perhaps the was feeding lodge information? So he could get some of his money back. But this was something that goes to. No. Who's this? Rabbi trae Hanner tree Han guy who apparently could've maybe validated. That rush was taken money out of wager somehow, but he suddenly didn't testify. That's right. This is someone who was a longtime friend is still goes, I believe he had rented a property at this westward, Connecticut. Home an outside property, and he was someone that book more areas had invas- with early on. Because it was his talent was Robbie trae Hans count. I pointed out to the tests that money was being siphoned out of Voyager and Gupta. And our interview firmly believe that if the jury understood the timelines that in the spring of two thousand eight he started getting worried about his and that climaxed in the fall of two. Eight they would have been persuaded that the call on September the twenty third which is a day the buffet investment by Goldman that called they would have been convinced would have been at was about about his money. Not is the way your money and just feel very strongly that some way the feds thought to train on stopped him from testifying, and I have tried over the years very unsexy later reach right Han or his lawyers. To no avail. But that I did speak to read Brodsky's is now a lawyer gets done and was a prosecutor in the trial. And and he said, it's the belief that you know, we got to try on you know, like he's delusional as he pointed out, you could it could have subpoenaed trae Han. They want to. The what what what what is who sets of your of your book overall? Is he he didn't be to it except to say that that he was he he disagreed with this idea that he was motivated by greed. He even pointed to an extra that, I took from a talk that he gave it Columbia University around two thousand three and this was just before he became friends with Raj rotten him, and he spoke about the war money in the more. You have the more you want big houses. And he he took me to task for for for taking that speech out of context. And he said I'd like to sit and watch that speech with you all three hours of it. And and I had watched all three hours of the speech, and it begins with a lot of his discussion the the Indian scriptures. But I think one of the traits that I noticed about book did during our interview is that perhaps like many consultants. He's just a master compartment. Weiser. You know, you can be discussing traits lofty traits characteristics of Hinduism and at the same time taken in with the desire to have more money. They're not, you know, neutral, and you know, what's funny about that is made up is the same way. You look guys. They have unbelievable compartmentalization which obviously gives them rationalization power. Right. Oh, one more thing on him to more things on one Neal Kumar was a close McKinsey colleague of his and he feels that he just ratted. Yeah. You know, an L, Kamara, of course, did exactly the opposite of what runs running very quickly after he learned what the feds had against him a Neal was was literally getting payments from Rajaratne that will routed in this is so delicious to his Indian housekeeper thank count in in Delhi or Banglore, whereas whereas Gupta never got any payments. Once Kamar realize that the dimensions of the government's case, he decided to to plead guilty, and certainly was a star witness and watch trial and also was a witness in the Gupta trial and Gupta. Has you know this description is wife disgust when when? On the old Kamar walks into what room with his head, you know, lower than and the issue for the with commodities testimony is that it's it dated the dissatisfaction with the Voyager investment, it dated it later than than it actually was according to go. So so he was he was very unhappy with Tamar who was obviously a very close associate and one would actually say that it's good to with Mars champion from our would not have been what he is what he was at McKinsey had it not been COPA. So those out very betrayed by. Sounds like a betrayal almost if you can do in about forty seconds. He talks about gates Milkin. And these guys does he have this delusion that all these guys who still going to want him to come back, and you know, sociology cetera. Yes. And he he said, yeah, I'm sure Bill Gates. You know would want me to be an adviser. This question, I have to decide whether I wanna be in, you know, one hundred percent because that's what Bill Gates would would want and with Milkin. He talked about this conversation. They had he made it sound like it was a very expansive conversation about what they what he could do for the militants allegations. Milkins folks came back and said, it was a ten minute conversation in the hallway. So I'll I'll leave it to the reader to decide who's telling who's telling the truth. Or final segment, but which the bad boy of Enron just got out as well. Did you see the recess talk which will believe talk radio stations around the country, biz talk radio dot com. Find the station closest team was tea or archive of podcasts and four listen to the internet will be back with either Audubon right up to this..

Raja Gupta McKinsey Voyager trae Han Bill Gates Raj Rabbi trae Hanner Milkin Neal Kumar Robbie trae Hans Voyager fund Roger CEO Connecticut Kamar Kinsey Rodman Andy C E O KKR
"neal kumar" Discussed on Cults

Cults

06:14 min | 3 years ago

"neal kumar" Discussed on Cults

"Let's take a moment to share something. We love at park. Cast Vanessa brought me some leftovers from dinner last night, and I wish you could all taste how delicious this is. It's a yellow squash, flat bread, complete with Chile, Honey, garnish. Thanks to hellofresh is simple. Recipes outlined on pictured step by step instruction cards. I feel confident in my cooking, the one pot recipes are my favorite. They make for an easy dinner at an even easier cleanup and with three plans to choose from including classic veggie and family, there's recipes for everyone to enjoy. I love that hellofresh only uses fresh responsibly sourced ingredients, so I can be sure I'm feeding my family, the best meals possible. The ingredients are delivered right to my door and recyclable insulated packaging. So I can spend less time grocery shopping and more time doing the things I love for thirty dollars off your first week of hellofresh, visit hellofresh dot com and enter the. Code cults thirty. That's hellofresh dot com. Offer code cults thirty for thirty dollars off your first week of hellofresh. The best way to bring out your inner chef is by listening to a great playlist while you cook when I'm ready to start cooking. I love to listen to the cooking with classic rock or cooking with jazz playlists on Amazon music. Amazon music is the simplest way to listen to the music. You love discover millions of songs including today's hottest new releases and thousands of curated playlists and stations across all your devices just by asking your Alexa enabled devices. There are no ads, no limits and no interruptions. It's easy to find music for any activity like pop music for spring cleaning, or if you're playing a song you enjoy and want to hear more like it simply say Alexa, play more like this. Engaging with music has never been more natural. Simple and fun. New customers start your thirty day free trial at Amazon music dot com. That's Amazon, music dot com. To start your thirty day trial. Free renews automatically. Cancels anytime. Now, let's get back to the story. At the age of nineteen around nineteen fifty. One bug one Shri Raj niche entertained Carney college in Java poor, about ninety miles from his parents home on March twenty. First nineteen. Fifty three at the age of twenty one rajini marked his survival of yet another seven year cycle by declaring that he was enlightened. Enlightenment means different things in different religions, but it generally marks a peaceful state of being where you have transcended the ordinary worries and concerns of day to day human life. Always in search of a path to a higher consciousness. He was enthralled during his college years by the teachings of George Gergiev a Greek and Armenian. Spiritual philosopher Girgis teachings claimed that most humans experience a disconnect between their emotions and bodies and therefore live their lives in a hypnotic state. However, this way. King sleep as he called it could be overcome and transcended in order to achieve one's maximum potential of higher consciousness and inner growth. Rudge niche regularly challenged as teachers in class constantly questioning their authority to a disruptive degree. And he was finally asked to lead the school. He then continued his studies at D N Jane college also in Java poor and earned a BA in philosophy from the school at the age of twenty four in nineteen fifty five at D N Jane college. He remained argumentative with his teachers so much so that they exempted him from coming to class. So as not to disrupt the education of his peers, he only needed to attend tests. All of the arguing did get him somewhere though. As he participated in the school's debate club and became the national debate champion immediately after he graduated from Dion Jane college, he entered the university of saga or he earned an M a in. Lhasa fee in nineteen fifty seven. From there, he joined riper percents, quit college as a lecturer according to a Neal Kumar. My sore Nagaraj who psychiatry work covers some of rajini Shas philosophies. The chancellor at riper sanskrit, worried that rush would be a negative influence on the students and a danger to their morality and character. So rush niche was quickly asked to leave. Rush niche, became a lecturer at Java poor university at a nineteen sixty at the age of twenty nine. He was made a professor of philosophy. He started speaking at the annual survey Dharma Sam LAN or the meeting of all faiths held at Joppa poor every year organized by the Jane community. This interfaith assembly offered a platform for followers from many different religious groups to discuss important issues in their communities and advocate for religious tolerance. This meeting still takes place to this day. In addition to teaching. He took his lectures on the road with a tour throughout India, calling himself a chara or spiritual leader among Jane's. A charges are venerated leaders who guide entire orders of monks Rajneesh covered many religions and topics in his spiritual teachings. The transcripts of his lectures produced over four hundred books of his musings on topics as wide ranging as Christianity and Hassett ISM to yoga and zen, and even Sigmund Freud and Henry Ford. He borrowed from many of these different philosophies marrying them together to create his own belief system. The main pillars of his teachings were nearly fully formed by the time. He was thirty one in nineteen sixty two when he started opening camps where he led three to ten day meditations, he became known for his teachings on dynamic meditation. This

Amazon Alexa D N Jane college lecturer Dion Jane college Chile hellofresh Vanessa Jane monks Rajneesh India Hassett ISM George Gergiev Shri Raj Sigmund Freud Jane community Rudge Girgis Nagaraj