30 Burst results for "Nco"

Goya In Three Boycotts

Latino USA

06:10 min | 2 months ago

Goya In Three Boycotts

"Goya is a giant in the united states. Food industry today. The company is worth over one billion dollars and employs over four thousand people in dozens of factories throughout the country and abroad. It's also a staple in latino homes across the us. Pino is a huge part of goya's consumer base after goya foods. Ceo robert hunan away spoke in the white house rose garden last summer. Producer governor elevator be realized. She had a lot of questions about the brand receiving. All of this attention gabardine started digging into goya itself. The family behind the brand and some of the past controversies that the company has weathered through governors reporting. She discovered a common theme repeating itself over the years. Something bigger than any single news. Headline goya is more than pantry. Staples and spices to its customers. Specifically it's latino customers for many that the united latina's goya is like a badge of identity. So that's a pretty tall order for a company a gabby and welcome to the show. Hi maria so tell us what happened that you were like I need to spend some more time thinking about goya food products and that this led you down a rabbit hole so yeah before the boycott i had no idea who the union-wide family was. I grew up with goya beans but didn't know or never really thought about how. This company became a symbol of latino identity in the us. Clearly it wasn't about how much people love their beans adobo. It was something much deeper than that. Goya evoke emotions for many latinos and in researching goya. I found three separate boycotts spanning decades. Were goya's carefully crafted. Image as a symbol of latino identity was thrown into question. One in miami. One in new york and puerto rico and the other one from the summer and together. They helped not so rosy story about this powerful company. But before i jump in. It's important to understand. The history of the brand in how the unanimous family used their immigrant background to craft their business image. Okay so we know that. Goya was founded in the nineteen thirties. By on prudence your own anway and his wife catalina and don't pull. The nco was actually a merchant from spain right. He arrived in puerto rico from spain and nineteen o two then moved to the united states and started a small business in new york city importing goods from spain. That business eventually became goya foods rubber yunan way goya's currency. Eeo often tells his grandfather's story he mistakes from home and he. He had an idea that other immigrants also mistake from home done. Prudencio started importing goods like olive oil and other hand fish products to his shop on the lower east side serving the spanish emigrant community but then ends up being really Latino brand for the entire population. I mean it grows and this is their primary. Customers are latinos and latinas. So tell us the story of how don't do the answer becomes so successful in expanding this business after world war two. Us factory owners took advantage of the depression in puerto rico to outsource cheap labor from the island and in the span of just one year the puerto rican population in new york city nearly quadrupled from thirteen thousand to over fifty thousand people. I spoke with puerto rican food historian professor crews miguel ortiz quadra. About how you non capitalized on this. Migration wave to grow his business. The political and economical racial love voting Rico in the nineteen forties. These open a huge door Success of goya foods huntington bank element with Habits was historic. Make no mistake immigrant himself or not. I know that this big i migrated would throw with. Its foot my maurice food memories. I mean that's a great concept right this notion of you know eating rice and beans as a kid or or you know making fresh tamales over the holidays with your family. I mean there is this thing memories and we all have them yeah. It's this idea. That food is personal. Professor ortiz quadra often refers to this term food or palate memories. I coined the term in his book eating puerto rico and he uses this concept to describe the intimate bond with food formed by cultural and historical practices. So this idea that the food we eat reflects our values choices and culture and its central and understanding. Goya's rise so more. Puerto ricans moved into new york city and there was the experience of racism and xenophobia. That a lot of outside communities experience puerto ricans are not immigrants right because they're just moving from one part of the united states to another part of the united states but as it was in new york city that wasn't welcoming to many puerto ricans that increases the need for food to be a place where you find solace and comfort right exactly for this. Oh so important. If can't trace you back to your homeland the To the homeland and to the foot try and so forth in the diaspora done prudencio. Continue to build goya. The city's growing emigrant community from latin america. He knew that capitalizing on food memories was a powerful business strategy.

Goya Ceo Robert Hunan White House Rose Garden United Latina United States Puerto Rico Spain Pino Goya Foods Prudencio New York City Staples Miguel Ortiz Quadra NCO Maria Goya Foods Huntington Bank
2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:03 min | 3 months ago

2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

"Let's let's talk business. We want to talk a little bit about this report. That deloitte has released the twenty twenty one global marketing trends report. What drove the report in went into it. Well this is our second annual report. But this one was really characterized by the challenges of twenty twenty and that level of uncertainty that we're seeing has really impacted all of us in some way myself my mom of three old trends and well. I thought i was a master at balancing working kids. I've learned a whole new set of work from home. Sales gotta really speedy mute. Button trigger finger pilot fisher price toys under my desk that bear testimony and this year. We really use the study to kind of help explorer and break down some of that uncertainty. We use subject matter expertise. We voices smithfield and two overarching surveys. From consumers up twenty five hundred and executives up just about four hundred of them to help break down that uncertainty in the report a believe it's unified seven trends overall and you go In detail on each of them. But can you tell me kinda just at a high level. Were the the major trends seven themselves are purpose agility human experience trust participation fusion and talent and i think in general agility trust talent participation are fairly straightforward largely those companies without. Do you trust them to do with the say they're gonna do. They have the talent to do it. Do they nibble participation with their stakeholders in the customers. The ones i usually get questions about not understanding are the other three so purpose and that's a company that knows what they exist and therefore can make choices a little bit more rapidly. That sense of purpose helps them particularly in times of uncertainty. Actually because they can they can make tough decisions right away. The second human experience and i often get asked. Hey so white you just call that. What is call it. A spur ends called employee experience. I'm sure we'll talk about this. But the reason we call it human experiences because you don't wake up as customer employees. You wake up as a human being. And if we want to elevate experience we have to understand you as a human and then fusion of course which is that art of bringing together new business partnerships early in the report. You identify this drop in confidence across the c. suite. And just curious. What do you feel drove that drop and this is the second time i've seen this question i guess from deloitte is working with the loye. The cmo team within delay and the cmo club on some prior research. We looked at confidence. Drop or confidence levels. I should say of cmo's in general and while this most recent snapshot shows the drop in confidence. I'm kind of pleased that cmo's aren't last on the list now. A small bright spot in the foreseeable ceelo's but tell us a little bit about this dropping confidence. Well at the start of our chat. I talked about this notion of uncertainty that feeling and basically the research suggests that c. suites are humans to and no exception to that rule so on a percentage basis. Cmos aren't last but they are second to last Within a percentage point of and you actually see the biggest declines with. Cio's an nco's. And i think really what you're seeing is that lots of executives have gone into survival mode and you see them by the way prioritizing things like improved efficiency and productivity over more human centric initiatives in that that instinct is is very common but unfortunately it does run counter to some consumer expectations. When we did this research. We learned that as times. Get tougher consumers. Expect more connection. Not less said consumers are really looking for companies to step up and you have c. suite executives who are uncertain and lacking confidence today. And not really sure the world is heading and it's making it very difficult environment. Operate them in these uncertain times to us over over used phrase currently but one of the other two data points stuck out. I think is a sign of the times potentially i'm gonna stay kotei stats and then we can discuss what we think they mean but fifty eight percent of respondents could recall at least one brand that quickly pivoted to better respond to their needs and eighty two percent said this led to them doing more business with that brand. Seems that these factors kind of together talk about one the agility that you've you mentioned before is one of the trends to this human experience component like are we actually delivering what people really want and value and purpose. I think alignment potentially of those two things like what's going on in the world and what do people really need am i. Do you think. I'm interpreting that right just based on the data and what the trends that you're seeing i do although. I think i'd argue that. The each of the trends has an impact there. If you think about an organization's ability to co create with people so fusion for example if your co creating with people rapidly you're able to respond to create address needs more rapidly if you're encouraging participation from your customers than your doing a good job or hopefully a better job at least of hearing what it is. They need to be able to adopt if customers trust. You more likely to tell you what they need a believe you when it comes out and then of course talent is critical. All these things without talent. You can't do any of them

Deloitte Cmo Club Fisher Price CIO
"nco" Discussed on Southern Tomfoolery Plays

Southern Tomfoolery Plays

05:06 min | 4 months ago

"nco" Discussed on Southern Tomfoolery Plays

"So that brings me to my next point though i was going to ask. There were several cool fights in this dungeon. The mining robot being a standout shadow baby at the end being a standout and adamant. I already talked a little bit about the shadow baby which has a name that i've already forgotten velva torvalds. Yeah it's a type of creature and this was can't tour variation right so we already talked a little bit about the that. The unleashed spirit of garden. Nco which was actually technically drop. But that wasn't all the fights that we're in the mind. But i was gonna ask. What were your favorite fights in the mind mining robot and the ghost hunting robot with my favorite for sure i'm gonna say mining robot yeah mining robot was there. Is there a name other than mining. Robot missed the part. Where i said. Don't that's what it is. It's it was a mining robot that's just mining robot. What what was so interesting about the mining robot was limitations that it It ended the party. You know with a various Reductions that were were put there. But i've always been a an avid fan of the whole limitations earth creativity. You know. I think we were able to try to establish what was effective versus what was not effective and i remember like trying to think of like okay. Well let's look at cerny like design flaws. Is there any kind of like Engineering checks or something like to check the stability of the rocks. you know they. Can we get this to where it's much more manageable. Can i use my door winstone. This thing was even operating absolutely. It's been there for a while right like the. Yeah right so you member win. You heard the door close on you like we came in the mind. That was the shadow baby. Close the door and tracked you through the entire dungeon and then he got you while.

Nco cerny
"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:37 min | 4 months ago

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"That this decade gets progressively worse in terms of the intensity of low intensity conflict even though things seem fairly peaceful right now. They're number triggers out there in the future that could blow this wide open. I do think the country is kind of a powder keg way but we have heard observe. We can come back and we can. Actually we look at the evidence. We can actually provide the the evidence in the data to support these conclusions. And so i guess that's really kind of where we differ from a blogger out there who who's telling people that the there's going to be a civil war. I'm really my response is that it's probably already started. We'll probably look back in twenty years and say well two thousand sixteen is is probably where this thing started will sam We want to thank you for joining us today. Here on soffer. We really appreciate your time and your service to the government. Then what you're doing now for the people that are out there. Tell our listeners where they can sign up To take some of your courses that are out there and where they can find you on the different parts of social media. Well thanks for having me. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to talk about the stuff. My website is forward. Observer dot com. I'll be publishing training schedule for two thousand and twenty one. You're shortly so if you get on our our email list. Then i'm i'll just blast out my twenty twenty one training schedule and.

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Podcast here. We're talking with sam culver. We're talking about some interesting in a little bit alarming stuff. That's going on in the united states. Right now sam. You know where you know you were talking about. How some of these groups are getting involved in organized and the regional. How can some people are average american. I guess you can say who's not trained like yourself. You know come to recognize and maybe report some of the stuff. They're saying what's going on. Well yeah. I'm a big advocate on intelligence collection at all levels. I mean in the army said every soldier is a sensor and in your community. I i'm very interested in my level of preparedness so every member of my community is a sensor one way that that more people can kind of get involved and maintain some situational awareness on this. I mean obviously they can subscribe to. What do we can't cover everything we can't we can't be in the weeds in every locale so one way or simply just get online or google search or some of these groups and you can monitor them yourself in the local area. What we specialize is putting the puzzle pieces together and kind of explaining the so. What also the what's next for some of these groups but that's probably the best way that more people can get involved in kind of stay aware of what what their local groups are doing. You know you talked about on your on a podcast. How there's different levels of where you can see things from a strategic or tactical level and Maybe some of our listeners. Out there Can you talk them. Through some of the more tactical level You know indicators. They might see in their communities. That could give them some pause. Sure well one thing. I would begin to look at is radical revolutionary political groups or rallies. So there's a couple of websites you can go to meet up dot com or some of these things will be posted on facebook. And if you just look at political rallies or anything like that and you start digging into. Who's organizing it and which organization Which organizations are involved will give you a little better idea about what groups may be in your area but you know if there are if there are revolutionary socialist groups radical groups Even some of these fascist groups have some level of local a local presence and sometimes it stuff's on social media. So that's i would say that's a very good starting point to get the kind of the tactical level view of your area. Now that's not going to give you everything and you know it. At a certain level i actually would advise for just for the interest of general preparedness Know to an area in include these groups didn't really dig into who is actually in your area because what happens. Is you know a lot of times. People think well this is in portland in seattle and it may be on the other side of their town where it may be the next big city away. There.

sam culver united states google army portland seattle
"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

06:36 min | 4 months ago

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"The lead up to the civil war. The civil rights era those were the main three tectonic shifts and two out of those three resulted in an armed conflict Even though i would say the civil rights era was is a good example of low intensity conflict as well. So i think at a minimum. We're going to. We've already kind of relived. The scale of violence that we saw in the civil rights era. Although i will say with one caveat and there's a great book called days of rage br- by brian burrow and he talks about in in the first eighteen months of nineteen seventy one and nineteen seventy two. There were over twenty five hundred domestic bombings inside the united states. That's according to fbi data. Don't we obviously haven't gotten to that level of intensity yet but who knows you know. It's two thousand and twenty. I would not be surprised. If godzilla popped up in the gulf of mexico and burnt down half new orleans tomorrow. You know with all the rain new orleans it's getting they might welcomed godzilla right point now. You know it's This was a very tumultuous year and you know between the covid. George floyd the That whole situation with george floyd going viral. Really since i wanna say it was about mid may that that happened and then things just kept getting worse and worse especially out west. We were seeing things out in oregon and You know in other places you talked about. There might be one kind of partake type of incident. Do you think the national election could could have been that type of thing absolutely yet. My most the most dangerous course of action. Md co number one was the effects of a trump victory in november december. Whenever it may have eventually been litigated out. But yeah i mean we saw we. Were you know we wanted her lot of these subversive radical and revolutionary groups and. I'm sure lots of folks in the audience solve very similar things that these people are. They really were planning for mass mobilization protests in something like a terrier square or a euro may don where they tried to eject president trump if he were be reelected so i think that was kind of the most immediate trigger that i was concerned about the the follow on effects if that happened in today. That hasn't happened. So we're kind of We've shifted into looking okay. Well what are some post-election triggers that happen if not the general election itself and you know I i noticed in your writing you talked about is not just fi right groups this far left groups as well and these people are getting quite organized aren't they. They are yeah they really are so. If a back in two thousand eighteen. I started looking for you know in the army and i guess probably the marine corps and maybe other places. You know steve you now. We know combat there's combat arms and there's combat support and there's combat service support classes. And you know you have the infantry out in the field will. They can't produce their own food their own water. They can't create their own ammunition. They can't fix their own trucks. They can't do all these things so they have to have personnel to you know to help keep those operations going and we have seen absolutely on the left. I won't say on the left on the far left the radical and revolutionary groups. They absolutely have been building their own support and service support classes. We're talking about things about or examples intelligence and support medical sport logistics transportation. You know the kind of the traditional support roles that the army has and they've been building that and i'll tell you they have done more. I started tracking these groups back in two thousand sixteen. They have increased capability more over the past five months than they have over the past four years. And they're to the point where you actually start looking at the indicators of armed political violence and they have most of them that that's the scary part is we're used to. I guess you could say looking through the lens of working overseas and we've all dealt with insurgencies different phases of career in different. I guess you could say levels but we're not used to seeing that on our own shores. Aren't we luckily that. Yes historically that has been the case with you. Know with a few instances and you know and again. This is not to say that. Hey some nationwide insurgencies is gonna kick off tomorrow. You look at these groups and actually are small geographically limited to areas like portland and seattle. So it's not like they're in central nebraska. You know any any large numbers but yeah so you know one of the one of the hallmarks of low-intensity conflict is it's often region often local or regional and that comes directly from the army's doctrine. So it's kind of in keeping with low intensity conflict. These things really are regionalized mainly to to urban environments in big metro areas. Okay we're gonna get more to that in a second but first we have to take a short rate. Have any of you our listeners. Out there and readers of safra dot com. If you ever search for something online that you really didn't want others known about i know most of you are probably thinking why don't you just use incognito mode but you know let me tell you some incognito mode doesn't hide your activity it doesn't matter what mode you use or how many times you clear your browsing history. Your internet service for breida can still see every single website you've ever visited. That's why when we're at home..

army george floyd brian burrow fbi godzilla united states Md oregon safra dot mexico president breida steve portland marine corps nebraska seattle
Jake Wood of Team Rubicon Talks About His Latest Book "Once a Warrior"

Dose of Leadership

04:52 min | 5 months ago

Jake Wood of Team Rubicon Talks About His Latest Book "Once a Warrior"

"Would team rubicon. Welcome a dose of leadership my friend. Yeah thank you for having me on. Obviously i love having primaries here. Mix conversation really easy. I know this is going to be a good one. But man So i followed you ever since team. Rubicon kindergarten Our mutual friend pot. And you know he was involved with guys and he told me all about you. And i've been meaning to have on you for for years and i got sidetracked and you get new book. Said gosh dang. I gotta get you out here so get while i'm excited to join it's It seems like a great time to beyond the shadows of veterans day and the book coming out this week. it's no time like the present absolutely and Happy belated marine corps. Birthday by the way. Thank you two hundred forty five years young man. Oh kin well the the new book coming out once a warrior is out and highlight your story of going to iraq and then coming back and team rubicon reason why i love this book so much i love what you do is one thing i talk about on the show lot is and i think our our main obligation the only obligation where we're here is to make the place better than we found it in that seems to be something you've dove into. You came back from iraq and trying to figure out what your purpose was right in and it's like embrace this mission of trying to make the place better than you found it. How does that resonate when you hear me say that. Yeah i mean. I think there's an element of truth to that. I think there have been a couple of points in my life where you know. I thought i was at this decision. Point where i was either to pursue a life of service. Or i was going to go to do something like on wall street. You know and the first time that i hit that juncture was when i was graduating college in ultimately i decided to go join. The marine corps. Wasn't ready to go. Where a suit. And the second time was when i got out of the marine corps. I thought okay. Well you served a lot. I just got back from iraq afghanistan. i feel like. I've done my part time to go. You'll make some money. Or you know where suit and in then i kind of stumbled into team rubicon and in clearly over the last decade having been one to wear too many suits one thing. I'm curious when you were playing football. Wisconsin Right was it. Wisconsin did get that right. Yeah yeah and obviously the ward kicked off eleven had happened. You decided to go and list which. I highly commendable. But why didn't you consider becoming an officer just out of curiosity. You know there were there. Were a couple of things that lead into that I was the practical. So i i did start speaking this officer selection officers about perhaps going in as an officer and you know bear in mind like you said i played football right so i i. I started exploring this right after my final game which was on january. First two thousand five and i was an offensive tackle for wisconsin. So you can imagine. I'm six foot six two hundred ninety pounds and So i meet this captain marine captain and i tell him think i wanna be an option. He looks me up and down. I don't fit the bill or hate him. Officers are trimmed trim guys and gals right and he asked me goes you know. How fast can you run three miles. And i kind of shorted got pretty mean you know. I haven't run three miles in five years But i can tell you what my forty are dash. Time is any said what you've got to be able to run in eighteen minutes. If you want to be an officer. I said okay. Well that's that's pretty aggressive but there. If he told me i needed to do when he was. You've got to be able to do twenty pull ups to. That's that's not a problem. And then he asked me the the real question he goes. You know you play football. You have any injuries you having surgeries as well. Yeah i mean. I had my shoulder. Reconstructed is my foot reconstructed. I dislocated my other shoulder. And he just shook his head and he said you know what. You're a lot of paperwork kid. I got people lined up outside my door. Join you know to go see us right now and he never called me back. Wow a yeah. But then that was coupled with us some conversations. I was happened with with some veterans. That i knew who are coming back from iraq and afghanistan and they said you know jake if you really are looking to get into the fight in. You're looking to lead people. Their perspective was that this was a squad. War know that the company and platoon maneuver warfare was over and that this was really a squad based warrants. They said you go. Be a non commissioned officer. Be corporal or sergeant in. You'll get all the leadership that you want in. So i took that advice to heart. I i stopped trying to get that guy to call me back in. I got what i wished for. I came an nco. And i led marines and combat.

Marine Corps Gosh Dang Iraq Wisconsin Football Afghanistan Ward Jake
Tesla Rivals are Moving Into High Gear -- and Going Public

Business Wars Daily

05:29 min | 8 months ago

Tesla Rivals are Moving Into High Gear -- and Going Public

"From wondering I'm Elaine Appleton grant and this is business words daily on this Wednesday August Nineteenth David Brown's on vacation. Tesla has long had an image of being in both good and less good ways without comparison. CEO? Elon Musk stands out for his big vision and sometimes quirky behavior, and until now anyway, Tesla's all electric vehicles have stood head and shoulders above the competition coming from traditional automakers. Competition what competition I can almost imagine musk saying. Oh, but there is plenty coming tesla shares soared two, hundred, fifty percent this year. The company is now the most valuable automaker in the world according to. CNN. That's because Tesla which went public ten years ago is finally profitable. Tesla had a record twenty nineteen in posted its first annual profit last year despite the pandemic it's been profitable this year as well and that kind of performance and the stock market's reward for it is convincing more and more electric vehicle makers to go public and to try to woo customers away from Tesla last week, Ohio Electric Startup, Lordstown Motors Corporation, or L. M. C. said, it plans to go public by the end of the year. It's ticker symbol ride. If the deal goes through, the company will be valued at close to one point five, billion dollars. So who is Lordstown Motors to burst on the scene this way? L. LLC is a spinoff of another electric truckmaker called Workhorse. GROUP LORDS DOWN CEO Steve Burns is the former CEO of workhorse with LLC Burns resurrecting a project that we're course didn't have the money to do the company plans to release an all electric full-size pickup truck the Lordstown endurance in the second half of twenty twenty one that's according to journalist Alan. Adler, writing for trade publication freight waves. The truck will have a range of about two hundred fifty miles on a charge the same as Tesla's sci-fi looking cyber truck it'll toes seventy five hundred pounds alums. He says again, just like the chuck, the endurance will start at fifty two thousand dollars a good deal more than the cyber forty thousand dollar base price. But UNLIKE TESLA LLC plans to sell the endurance to commercial customers buying fleets of trucks since revealing the prototype on June twenty-fifth Ellen Mc says it's received more than twenty seven, thousand pre orders. That's one point four, billion dollars worth of trucks. NCO Burns says its first years worth of trucks are now sold out. That is if it can raise the money, it needs to actually make them l.. AMC. Bought the Lordstown Ohio GM plant that shutdown last year when GM killed the last Chevy Cruz that six million square foot plant needs retooling, which is costly MC plans to raise about six hundred and seventy five million dollars through its IPO. That boatload of cash could help it come through on its boast to be first to market among a group of EV pickup truck competitors in addition to Tesla that group includes Ford GM Nikola and Arabian a company backed by Ford and Amazon. So, here's the obvious L.. He doesn't yet have a product just a prototype if you're wondering how the young startup can go public without a product you should be. L. EMC is one of a handful of electric vehicle makers employing what's called a reverse merger that means the company that plans to make a product like LLC hooks up with the so-called blank check business. It's also called a special purpose acquisition company. SPAC. Is doing the reverse merger with a blank check company called Diamond Peak Holdings. Diamond peak is already publicly traded that means when the merger occurs. LLC. MC becomes public sort of like easing into a coat someone else has been wearing. This back door IPO method is easier for companies to do. They don't have to produce expensive roadshow's. Also, avoid a great deal of financial scrutiny by the SEC. One of the most famous reverse murders was Richard Branson's space company Virgin Galactic, Holdings and Fantasy Sports Company draftkings went public in a three billion dollar reverse merger. Last year according to the A. Times. The number of reverse mergers hit a record high last year. That's because the IPO market was volatile and high profile IPO's like Uber Fared. Poorly. It ain't cheap to build a new car company but Tesla's successes inspiring other entrepreneurs to try and they need oodles of money that helps to explain why another electric truckmaker nickel motors used a reverse merger to go public in June and vehicle-maker. FISKER has a reverse merger in the works. The is green truckmakers may see these back door IPO's as the speediest way to raise the cash needed to fight he'll in musk and rapidly launched their new products. Tesla's promising to deliver the cyber took by late twenty, twenty one which means that the deadline to beat yes. It may be tough to knock Tesla on it's pedestal, but LLC and a raft arrivals are sure going to try.

Tesla Tesla Llc Elon Musk Ellen Mc CEO GM Ohio Adler Diamond Peak Holdings Lordstown Motors Elaine Appleton Nco Burns CNN Llc Burns Lordstown Motors Corporation Steve Burns David Brown L. Llc AMC
"nco" Discussed on Borne the Battle

Borne the Battle

03:57 min | 9 months ago

"nco" Discussed on Borne the Battle

"What's the worst second happy you know? You're in two years and you can get out with your college money, or you could just reenlist, and so I was attracted to the army mainly. Because the commitment was half of the other branches because again, I I knew nothing about the military's icicle kit. Gay! Those are really rare to see nowadays and I. Don't know if they still offer them. I know. I said it was a marine, corps did it for like a year or two, and then they they they. They cut the program, but either. Give me either a best friend or your or your greatest mentor. POI-. There are many many to pick from. So that's good and one of the greatest things I got out of the military is the camaraderie. I kind of Feel for civilians who've never had that experience so for example. I have friends fellow paratroopers I was in with. Twenty five years ago and we still keep in touch. We haven't seen each other physically in twenty five years, but those are the type of relationships. If if any of them showed up at my door and said hey dude. I need a place to crash for a couple of weeks. He would be welcome in. My home would be his home. It's just great. And the NCO's and the officers I had. Really really good people. So It's very difficult. To! Pick. Might as well be. Impossible..

NCO army
Democratic Party postpones presidential nominating convention

Jeff Wagner

06:33 min | 1 year ago

Democratic Party postpones presidential nominating convention

"Is that the Democratic National Convention schedule for mid July in Milwaukee has been not cancelled but postponed until the week of August seventeenth Milwaukee mayor Tom Barrett who's been of course one of the the leading driving forces behind try to get the convention to Milwaukee he's going to be addressing what this means Erekle step back at the NCO he Tom Barrett's get ready to speak but it's not he's not quite set yet well if they're allowing everyone to either this is the new normal now where we have these zoom meetings and everything so they're allowing everyone to get to the place he is currently sitting in his living room I can see him looking at his phone but he has not yet spoken yet a lot of questions about what's going to happen here Jeff it sounds like a ccording to the DNC statement from earlier today they will have the Wisconsin center district they will have hotels available they will have the Fiserv form to use but still a lot of questions and a lot of fluidity as to whether or not all of that is open we shall see well well yeah and then then of course there's there's the practical situations of what what about people's psyches I mean as as I was talking about your typically delegates pay their own way so my my guess is you have a lot of the people who are potential delegates party activists who have been caught up in again everything that's going on in the economy R. okay got it here we go here comes the mayor yeah it's a convention that was originally scheduled for July thirteenth through the sixteenth as we move to the week of August seventeenth I consider this extremely good news and I think it's a sign of how sensitive the Democratic National Committee is to that health needs not only of our of our residents but the health needs of people throughout this nation I think we all recognize that increasingly it looks more and more difficult for us to host this convention during the week of July thirteenth through the sixteenth but in my conversations that I've had with the comfort with the delegation and with that outcome convention organizers excel as well as my can conversations with chairman Tom Perez it was always clear to me that they are committed to nominating the next democratic presidential nominee here in the city market and I think that this announcement today underscores their commitment to doing that I think it's also extremely important because at a time where we are navigating the most tumultuous public health issue we have faced in our lifetime increasingly one of the most precarious economic situations we are in bed hopefully and I say this with a great deal of hope that by mid August that this will serve as a very very important shot in the arm for our local businesses so that they can X. expect to have visitors here how many visitors we don't know how many days the convention we don't know but I think what really allow this to happen again was a recognition by the Democratic National Committee and time president Joe somebody said particular it was very very important to remain committed to Wisconsin to be remain committed to Milwaukee and because they know we've got a lot of work say no that this is something it's important to us I would say this at the local level as excited as we have been we continue to be very excited about hosting this convention over the last month month and a half our city resources and I think IT resources throughout this community have been committed to dealing with the cold with nineteen crisis and become current economic crisis that it's developing in other words it's exciting is we've been about the convention it immediately got moved to the back burner but it never got taken off I never got taken off the stole and it's gonna remain on the back burner in terms of what we're doing right now in trying to address the public health crisis and deal with the economic crisis but by having this additional month of breathing room we are hoping that this will allow us then to pivot once we're moving out of these turbulent waters and use this as a very very important shot the iris I set that up to moving the community forward so again I've had conversations with German president conversations with Joe Solmonese with right elbow moderates in the host committee and I know that they've reached our device reform to this concert center district to others in the community to make sure availability it was something that we can work with and everyone we've talked to has been very very accommodating I'm very thankful for that obviously they're going to have to be somebody just listener being made along the way but this is a challenging time and I think what you saw here was a a commitment to the process of commitment to the community and a commitment to public health and I'm happy about all three of those very very much so there's any questions I'm happy at Juventus mayor Barrett holding his briefing from his living room to all the news agencies there yes as you heard it there Jeff the death of Democratic National Convention will now be held on August seventeenth in Milwaukee August seventeenth one month back from when it originally was supposed to be in July here in the city but you know in Iraq I think interestingly the word that the mayor used that I think people need to be aware of the issues fluid it is a under understandably it's a fluid sort of situation and I think what you're going to see S. time with what this was was an opportunity to to buy time to figure out you know where we are and but my guess is my guess is there's been no commitment at this point in time you know no certainty as to what exactly is it going to look like and I think that's a reasonable position we just you know who who knows exactly where we're going to be it two months from now but it is interesting to me that we're seeing so many of these dominoes already fall over for events in June and now July and now we know we're we're getting into August to me this makes eminent sense you hope that they're able to pull off something like this because again it's gonna be huge economic shot in the arm to Milwaukee and we're going to need an economic shot in the arm all ages they I mean they're still so many questions regarding the security the hotels the venues the entertainment the number of people in the the number of media that will be allowed to come in for this I mean we're talking about hotels in medicine and in Illinois some of these folks of that that's going to be a huge adjustment and I mean I assume that a lot of those hotels there's weddings generally in August the state state fair ends August sixteenth this is supposed to start the seventeenth so we are very very

Milwaukee Tom Barrett
Untame The Companies: Untamed Voices and Mental Health

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:55 min | 1 year ago

Untame The Companies: Untamed Voices and Mental Health

"Talking about mental illness. I think one being an entrepreneur. It's not talked about enough. I think it's a it's a really isolating profession whether you are someone that's running a big company or someone that's just starting off. There's a lot of loneliness and isolation and I don't think it's talked about enough in the tech industry the rates of depression and anxiety that go on in and something that carly and I talk about a lot. We've both struggle with anxiety. I think that I've also found a way to make it a positive and I feel like that is something that not enough people talked about. How have you and it seems like you have taken your addiction struggles and turn it into something that I think one has helped other people but also seems to be a part of you that you view as a positive because you get to share it. Yeah I do. I don't view it as a positive just because I get to share it to help other people like that's one of the reasons but I actually view as a real positive in my life and I think it's because you know what I've learned through my recovery is that I've always been the same person since I was born right. I've always been a person with deep deep sensitivity and you know what I would call deep sensitivity sometimes leads to self-medication. My problem was not that I drink too much. My problem was that I was anxious and depressed and I was using the alcohol to fix that and it was less helpful than one might hope. But here's what I've learned looking back at myself so when I was around ten years old. It's actually when we start to internalize social programming right. That's when we get tamed. When we have our wild self and then the outside world starts telling us who we should be and when we can't match that shame starts in the split starts so what I was heard from culture and from family and from everywhere was that it was too much and so I started numbing myself with food and booze. I don't anymore I was ever too much right. I think that I was a deeply sensitive. Human being and the really cool thing now is to look back at myself. Nco The sensitivity. That led me to numbing and lead to addiction is the exact same sensitivity that I- channel now that makes me really really freaking good writer and the fire I call it my fire my therapists call it anxiety so whatever but the fire inside me the anxiety that led me to end leads me to be kind of a fearful person sometimes is the exact same fire that I- channel to be a really effective activist. So I've never changed. The only time I changed really was when I tried to snuff myself out with all of the food and the booze. There was never anything wrong with me. I was born with the exact constitution. The exact gifts the exact challenges that I needed to get the exact done. The exact work done on this earth. We are traveling all the time for work. One thing that we are really obsessed with is thinking through what we put on our skin when we are flying when we are travelling when we are on the road in so many places. It's really important that we keep ourselves healthy and we've started to think about. What does that actually mean regarding the products that we use on a daily basis as also because skin just looks really bad when we travel so he loves products. That ARE CLEAN. Because we like to know. Now what's in them and we don't want to actually have to sacrifice the quality which I think is a big misnomer. Yeah I think about clean beauty. And that's something that we've really started to investigate in so lucky for all of us. This march for is raising the expectation. On what clean can be yes. They have some amazing brands that are clean. Thoughtfully made and some of our favorites are bite. Ilia Kaas our Ms Beauty Tower Twenty eight and artsy so the products are packed. With good for you ingredients. They look good and they make you look good good. It's great that one of our favorite store or Sephora is focused on clean beauty. We really appreciate that. I think that we are part of a generation. That's really thinking about what's going into the things we use every single day and it's great that we can get all the products that we really love without the ingredients that no one needs exactly so time for you to get the best in clean makeup at Sephora online and store right now look for the green seal to know which products are clean at Sephora certified. I want to talk about this idea of living an untamed life. You've talked so much about in the recovery circles and even in the mental institution. How refreshing it is when you hear people speak from an honest place and I think today especially in this age of social media. That's really tough. What do you think happens? When people start leading with their honest selves and also. How do you give people advice to do that? When they are working in more of a corporate environment where they're showing up in places every day where that is not like. I love hearing you speak. I also think about my friends that are working in law firms if they showed up being like. I'm going to live my untamed life. I can picture the arrows and I think we all struggle with how to exist within a society that has these expectations and also want to live in a freer way. It's big question. Is You know maybe in a corporate setting you wouldn't stand up and say I'm GonNa live my untamed life. Like maybe but what? What being untamed is is simply. It's every time there's a moment of conflict right so say you're sitting around a table in a corporate setting and someone says something that You know has like a hint of a whiff of racism and misogyny or homophobia in it right. We all know that we all know that when that happens and you know the split comes when your team self on the outside is like don't say anything. Don't say anything this will pass this will pass and your untamed self on the inside is like a new to say something. I need to say something now. What I know about corporations as the corporations are just groups of people right so the most important thing about a corporation is that it's twofold one is how we work together and to how we make space for every single individual to bring her full self so actually corporations are creating culture. There's no more important place for people to start bringing their entire individual self to the table and actually have space and have the safety and have the freedom to use their untamed voice tables because that is how culture changes status quo always stays the same if everyone at the table especially the marginalized groups continues to keep their untamed voice. Quiet I think one of the major problems in our culture corporations world is this idea of tribalism which is that we have this one group of people and we all must think the same way and we all must believe the same things and if we step out of line we will be tribal shamed and that. I think are moving away from that kind of group being an acceptable way of creating community. I think what we have to do. Incorporations in churches and institutions in political groups in families in relationships is create room where people who have differing ideas different voices different experiences can bring the full selves to the table and know that they will be both held by the group and free to bring in different self to the table so there is no more important place for people to begin to start using their untamed voices than

Sephora Carly Ms Beauty Tower Writer Ilia Kaas
Voice Security in Healthcare with Nate Treloar

Inside VOICE

13:23 min | 1 year ago

Voice Security in Healthcare with Nate Treloar

"Didn't talk today a lot on security and how do you make sure things are private and secure and how do patients of things are insecure. So one we're in healthcare so this is a particularly sensitive domain when it comes to privacy and security both from the point of view the kind of information that you might want to exchange with a voice assistant but also just because of regulatory requirements and in the US HICFA that sets the tone for how people think about these things Voice the main concerns of voice are that one. It's new so it hasn't been a lot of thought up until recently put into. How do you view voice assistance? From the point of view. Privacy and security and candidly. I think it's the case that a lot of the providers that are in the space. The big is some Amazon. Google sort of backed into an understanding of how important ensuring privacy and security of these new experiences is to consumers generally but especially in healthcare. The second thing is that it's an always on always listening. Device in the main concerns generally not just in healthcare around voice. Assistance have been is eavesdropping on me. Is it listening? What's it doing with the data once it? Has IT And their real legitimate concerns about this because we've all had the experience where you're smart speaker wakes up when you didn't expect it to and the and even though you'll hear this from the big players that the wake were whatever you say to wake up the device whether it's hey google or hey Siri or Alexa is is the only thing that's really listening for out of the gate and but once that week where it has been expressed then it's listening for the next command right so if it's waking up on its own because some ambient sound. Is it picking up other things that I might be saying unintentionally for for its ears? If you will and so. Those are legitimate concerns because we know that that has happened. A another variation of the concern. Is that the big guys are and have told you know the the the world that they are using the the audio that's coming across on these devices to tune the natural language recognition model just a way of saying that they need to make it work better so the way they do that is They listen to anonymous recordings of what people are saying to their devices. Some subset of all the requests that come in and they ensure that it's accurately recognizing and so human listens to it and says. Oh what did Alexa thing they were saying? And what were they actually saying in? Can we tune and refine the machine learning so? It doesn't make a mistake next time that's happening. It's been happening for years really for decades. That's how this technology works but the fact when that became public that was happening created a bit of an uproar Amazon's listening to what we're saying and then humans are hearing what we're saying even those anonymous. You don't know who was saying the fact that there was people doing that created a stir all this sort of comes to a head right in in particularly healthcare. There's legitimate concerns that an always on always listening voice powered virtual system might be violating privacy and security restrictions and requirements. So what's happening one? Is the big guys are making announcements and doing things that are going to make it A tighter ship. If you will from privacy and security point of view in the case of Amazon they have put out a lot of information about how the individual users of these consumer devices like Amazon Echos can take control of what's actually being shared up to and including deleting their history up to including turning off that review option where it might be possible that they are spoken audio goes to a human for the the review process likewise Google and Siri. They've kind of backed into making sure that they're doing the right. Things Amazon among all of them have gone. What step further in the healthcare domain where they've introduced A HIP eligible version of Alexa. Which for a healthcare systems. Anybody in the space means that Amazon's willing to ensure that the data is secure and private encryption. Everything that's going up into the Amazon cloud in the Alexa environment but also willing to sign an agreement. What's called the business associates agreement in the hip of an APP. That says we will commit to doing these things to ensure the privacy and security of data. That's running through our system and that was required. It really required for many healthcare applications for clinical information being exchanged the still a lot of work to do and lots unfolding even to this day. There's plenty more to do if a brand or company has hiring an agency to build a skill that's four. Alexa does the fact that it's an Alexis skill. Make it more secure. It kind of includes a security things. You're talking about or does that agency needs to have its own security measures when it's building skills will. It's helpful. It's helpful to have obviously the knowledge about how to properly secure voice application. It's like any other digital application. If you build a mobile APP YOU WANNA make sure you tested for security loopholes. Invoice applicants are not any different in that respect. What makes them different is? How do you authenticate a user right so of carries launching an out? You're launching an application. How do we know this person speaking is indeed carry and not somebody else trying to spoof you and So authentication are you who you say you are. is part of what needs to be implemented in any voice skill an Amazon providing all the other guys provide some capabilities in that area. But the expertise for how to do that how to do it. Efficiently multi factor authentication. All those things needs to be a discipline that an agency understands and then you know sinking in connecting with a a source of authorisation. So they are who they say they. Are We've authenticate them? But do they have the rights to access some feature function on the Alexis skill or voice skill based on some authorization control? And that's another thing you have to figure out so Amazon. Offers something called account linking which allows you to link some back end system which may say all right? They're trying to access some medical record Based on who they are they can access this medical record but not these other ones or some subset of some source and that those two things authentication authorization to be built into the solution. Now you and your company orbiter have been working with the Mayo Clinic. Can you talk about what you've done with them? And what the results been GonNa talk about. What public so we we help them develop their initial foray into voice which is a first aid skill though was published Initially to Amazon Alexa and then subsequently to Google assistant even in a chat Bot form and we worked with them to help convert their existing digital content into a voice. Ready form as sounds mundane but it's It's a very important thing to solve and not just with Mayo Clinic. But anybody WHO's trying to get into a voice if they have an existing digital experience like a website or mobile APP with content. And They WanNa take that content clinically vetted healthcare related content and convert it into voice. Ready form it's a process it requires technology requires curation acquires. You know medical expertise and vetting. Because you don't just take a two pages of texts that describe the symptoms of diabetes and put it into an Alexa skills not that simple And nor do you just say I'm GonNa just ingest this and let the AI. Engine figure out how to serve it up into a voice. Application requires a clinically reviewed process so That's a bulk of what we've been doing with the Mayo Clinic since we first engaged us to help them through that process and so can you share with us any results. I mean are people. Do you find that people are using the voice application more to access that information. Did they find it helpful? Anything you could share with. Do you find it helpful. I'm an award-winning voice. Skill male won award. They're very proud of and But they're also very pragmatic about it. It's an IT's a voice application for answering questions about first-aid outweigh treat a sunburn. What do I do if I got a spider bite? So it's not like I'll pick one. It's not like the jeopardy game where you're gonNA play it every day or it's got this addictive quality to it. It's a it's an experiment and delivering voice content healthcare continental voice first world and the other thing that the Amazon or the. Excuse me the Mayo team done. Is they've taken that same. Sort of voice. I voice ready content and publish it out to Amazon as what's called. First Party content so you can ask enough questions in depending on the question will come back and say well. According to the Mayo Clinic the answered question is this right So there's a multi step process. I'm from the Mayo Clinic. The measure of success is is clinically dead high value content available through this next generation digital channel voice and. I'm happy to say with the work that they've done with our help. It is and there's a lot more to do even they're not just With what Mayo has because they have literally mountains of content but a lot of other organizations that. We're working with are keen to do this as well. Do you find that since with voice has been around now for a few years. It's growing bigger. Do you find that a lot. More people in the medical space are more open to using voice and understand what it is or is that still a struggle. It depends on who you're talking with I'll say that the clinicians doctors at these major systems they're all over it and in fact It's been almost a problem for some of these systems that you know the the major healthcare systems have almost had to say hold on. Hold on we understand that you want on Alexa device in the ambulance. But we got to think this through right. What are the security implications? How do we do data integration? How's it part of our larger digital strategy so The interest is very very high and in those organizations where the clinicians the doctors have a lot of power. There are things happening and a lot of pilots but we're also being pretty sensitive to the CIO's at these M- in NCO's major systems recognized that you kind of have to crawl before you walk and run and so we're working very collaboratively to making sure that we've checked the right boxes on the security and privacy side. We check the right boxes on an enterprise scale ability size we'd were. It's not in our interest to help them roll out a whole bunch of point solutions. That aren't really secure aren't really integrated with the rest of their digital infrastructure. So we're we're an enterprise solution provider and so we're trying to be very thoughtful on that front. And why personally did you get more into the healthcare space within voice? Okay Stop. I asked this question a lot. I think it's very missy where people have come from. And what gravitates them to a particular section of the? Yeah well so. The backstory is orbits been around for not quite five years when we started. The company actually had a different business a different area of focus. Technology guys first and foremost and Even though we said on day one we want to go after high value problems. Important PROBLEMS WANNA fall in love with the problem before we fall in love with our cool technology. What happened is we built a pretty compelling platform for digital health and the Amazon technology and other technologies voice. We're really starting to make their way into the consumer world and among the leadership team at orbit we had gone on bought these devices right and my personal experience was taking that an Amazon Echo. I version into a friend of my parents of vision impaired guy named Arthur and saying Arthur. Just try this for two weeks and let me know how it goes. After two weeks I came back to see him and he said this is changed my life and was an epiphany really because I thought this is real. This has the potential to transform people's lives. How do we make the scale? And so that's how we got into doing. That's the passion that drives what we're doing and the stories that come from our just very satisfying.

Amazon Alexa Google Mayo Clinic United States Sunburn Diabetes Arthur CIO AI NCO Siri
Decade in Review: Tech and the Corner Office

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:59 min | 1 year ago

Decade in Review: Tech and the Corner Office

"John is you wrote in your piece a decade ago. The world was waiting for the other shoe to drop. We had just experienced the financial crisis of two thousand eight and we were just getting back on our feet as an economy. What did the job of CEO look like back then? Yeah I think there was a lot more concern concern about just the general fragility of the economy. Could we trust regulators. Could we trust interest rates. Setters could we trust the SORTA heard of the fabric of what was holding together the global economy with what was going on the EU. There was general distrust of all of that ten years ago. I mean you didn't know if we were going to go through a double dip. Recession financial crisis had been just so traumatic and it did touch every industry that took several years to really emerged. Emerged from that with the sense of okay. This economies rolling we can begin to invest again begin to hire again and begin to think about innovation in leaps and bounds. mm several years versus just trying to make incremental innovation so investment started to roll sometime well after the financial crisis but yes definitely the beginning of the decade was was a given worrisome time for NCO energy industry. Well let's breakdown sort of piece by piece. The technological factors that have driven some of the intense change. We've seen in the corner corner office. First and foremost probably social media in two thousand nine. It was in its earliest stages. How is social media change? What we expect from CEOS? Yeah I don't I think we necessarily expect them all to be tweeting and on facebook and Instagram as much as we expect them to be responsive to how small and how fast the world has gotten with its response to crisis or trends or what's popular anything from the most recent examples with Peleton the exercise company and some of their ads. That didn't go over too well to earlier. This year with Boeing Definitely got into some real hot water with some of the technologies on on their planes and some of the fatalities that were related to not having everything in order there and then in front of that you had a lot of. CEO's being and pulled into a tumultuous time with the president of the United States who likes to tweet obviously and that creates a whole nother layer of communication and skill. Oh that the CEO didn't have to have you know five six seven ten years ago Slight miscalculation in the way the company presents itself on social doesn't communicate fast enough can lead to a barrage of criticism not just newspapers in in in in the marketplace but just in general arena of Public Opinion Union because it's all become so condensed on social media. Social media's also heightened this expectation of corporate social responsibility it allows companies to engage more directly with their customers customers and it pushes. CEO's to be Social Justice Warriors. Who have been some of the winners and losers in this arena? Yeah I think by all means in any company that has a strong front on issues like climate change gender equality issues. That are not always gonNA make a big difference in the ledger in in the dollars and cents but issues that are really near and dear to a particular millennials who are our shopping much more with their hearts than just their wallops these days. They're making decisions based on companies. They believe in you know one of the one of the interesting test. Cases Has Been Nike Shoe Company. That is ubiquitous that has been built on the strength of its affiliation with athletes in performance and recently they've had to make some tough decisions and this is obviously around on Colin Kaepernick An NFL player. WHO's not even playing anymore? But it's associated with the brand almost as much these days Michael Jordan not quite but He's on a level that very few athletes have been affiliated with Nike in the past. And that's because they've stood behind him. They've advertised in his favor. They've said that the steps that he took when he was on the football field kneeling the national anthem basically equating that to courageous I step on his part now. Recently the companies had to be very mindful of the the fact that not everybody clearly likes kneeling during the national anthem. They have a broad customer base and they need to be able to play in both the arena of understanding the sensitivity of of the part of its firebase. That doesn't agree with that. But the fact that most of its most loyal and passionate buyers will back Colin Kaepernick and so they've had to make business decisions that you know sometimes isolating ostracized. Part of. It's it's it's buyer base in order to continue to the edgy and continue to be progressive and continue to look like it's on the social edge versus being behind some of these issues so recently with a with a tennis shoe that Colin Kaepernick thought was offensive. The betsy rush you they. They had to pull that from the market again. I think it was about fearing backlash on social media. It wasn't worried necessarily worry about getting hit with boycotts and things like that. I mean social media is so powerful right now and. CEO's are are clearly very aware that they can be criticized heavily in a heartbeat. I'm talking with John. Stole of the Wall Street Journal Moving on here John. There's also a different kind of pressure. The rise of the Fang companies facebook Apple Amazon Netflix. Google the five most popular tech stocks out there. They've developed lt normal power. Can you tell us about their influence on business decisions. Yeah I think it's fascinating to talk about the in the in the context of the last decade or decade. Plus if you think think about ten twelve years these companies not apple necessarily but Amazon for sure facebook Netflix spotify. You go down the list of major her tech disruptors major tech companies which almost every customer now interacts with ten twelve years ago these companies were in their infancy. We didn't know the kind of influence they were going to have on marketplace or even a technology much less overall American life. Today they're ubiquitous. Everybody has netflix. Everybody streams their music. rarely early. Do you see physical copies of movies. And CDs and items like that. And meanwhile there's an increasing number of people shopping online through Amazon or now through their competitors every CEO has had to respond faster than they ever thought they would to these disruptive forces I had a session with number of CEO's last this week in Washington where some of these companies have very little technology built into the way that they do business they make nuts and bolts or which it's washing machines and things like that they aren't high tech features but they realize that it might be in the way that they talk to customers. It might be in the way. They manage their supply. Chains Fang. These facebook Amazon Apple Apple Netflix. Google had changed the way that just central businesses done. And I'll just give you a quick example if you think about Amazon and what we know them for which is an online bookseller now and online good seller their money machine is cloud computing and that is a completely different animal than what we associated Amazon with fifteen fifteen years ago but they've just changed the way that we store data and we moved at and Microsoft and IBM old blue chips have had to catch up. So you see this every day. Every every headline in the Wall Street Journal it seems that these companies are influencing the day to day business decisions across industries and across the company. What about artificial intelligence the mechanization tation of basic tasks? That's beginning to change. The makeup of the workforce as employers our companies had to adapt. Yeah this is. This is the megatrend to watch. I think for one employment base. The workforce is getting older. People are are waiting longer to get into the workforce because they're going to college longer. What have you and so the the basic complexion of who will worker is and what their skill set is what their mentality is is changing in walks artificial intelligence? We are not new to the story of automation. The Nineteen Eighty S and nineteen ninety S. A lot about the robot plants and making sure that you had as many robots as prudent to take out a lot of the human capital and increase efficiency. Now we're in an age when you know again much like the conversation that we're having about Amazon or facebook and they're they're they're wide influence over business artificial intelligence and the ability liberty to manipulate collect and analyze and apply data to the basic business operations of what you do it's table stakes if you're not using data whether it's customer data or logistics data or employees data your going to be caught short against competitors who are probably more nimble. They may not have as much capital but they're able to use artificial intelligible use the machine learning to create a better mousetrap. Now on the employment side I think this is about making workers better. I've done a lot of work on talking with employment economists who see a changing but not necessarily a shrinking workforce United States and if people are going to get older they're gonNA need more automated tasks if workers are are in general older if the workforce is more fifty five twenty five. You're GONNA need tasks where computers are really assisting in aiding being and keeping the momentum going where the people are further removed from education or further removed from their early even their prime years. You're going to see artificial intelligence. It's come in and do a big job there today. I think we're still in the early innings the very early innings of this. We hear a lot about automation in like an Amazon logistics. Six warehouse. Where you hear a lot about automation at Tesla? I've been to the Tesla plant. There are still thousands of people working and that doesn't mean that they're going to be replaced but the ability to efficiently recently moved products through a production system or through a supply chain. I think this is going to be over the next ten years. We're going to be having a conversation. Twenty thirty about rapid development and and major development. That's happened in that area over the decade to come John. It used to be that. CEO's could set a five year plan and work toward that goal with new technology advancing so quickly quickly in the public essentially reacting in real time through. Social media is a five year plan really possible anymore. It doesn't feel like it is and I think I think there's a couple of things that CEO's have told me Whether it's ingenuity ran Pepsi for many years or even Carlson running Houdini a small manufacturer of clothing and I talked to folks who are in the financial industry and a couple of do things are changing the ability to really look out five years because you had this kind of expectation on. CEO's many years ago to set out that five year plan then go meet them it could that'd be profit it could be revenue goals. EPS Return on capital investment. And that stuff. That pressure doesn't go away but it is becoming more difficult in one of the factors that is making it more difficult. Is this rapid change in technology. You really don't know what's going to happen in twenty twenty in terms of the rate of advancement and the size of innovation vacation. So Yeah I think ubiquitously I've got CEO saying it is very difficult to look one year out much less five. It doesn't take the pressure off. And they have to do it. But but boy you better be ready to rip those plans be Nimble and be responsive to consumer who are seemingly constantly demanding faster and better productivity out of their companies. This I guess this is related from where you sit right now. What do you expect that the biggest challenges will be for CEOS going into the next decade nature is for CEO's? I used to say talent there. Always is this concern about particularly with companies. That have big workforce's are they going to be able to staff them with types of people both in the C. Suite and white collar level and the blue collar level with folks that can come up with new ideas and execute on new ideas below. That is going to be the thing that we talk about with trying to resolve uncertainty. Uncertainty doesn't go away but with these inputs of of trade wars and sort of this regulatory guessing guessing game. That's going on. Those are things that will eventually become industry changes and so the companies that actually begin to adopt adopt new strategies new ideas new products companies. That we don't even know about today could be the next Amazon's the next facebook's next next one to ten I know Wall Street Journal reporter. John Stole John. Thanks a

CEO Amazon Facebook John Wall Street Journal Colin Kaepernick Google United States Netflix Nike Shoe Company EU Boeing Tesla Michael Jordan
Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

CNBC's Fast Money

07:09 min | 1 year ago

Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

"Eight. Melissa Larry Page stepping down as alphabet. CEO Sundar Pichai become CEO of both Google and alphabet in terms of the day to day. Unlikely to see major changes. Which is why you may not be seeing a lot of change in alphabet so that stock after hours now under the Google umbrella remember Pichai ran the establish businesses advertising cloud android software devices and he has been NCO since August of two thousand fifteen and since then alphabet sock has certainly sword relative to the broader markets but it has underperformed? It's big cap tech peers. Here's now since the company's financial restructuring remember split from into alphabet and Google alphabet became the place where the company's moon shop projects objects have lived. That includes waymo driving cars to drones Internet balloons and it's healthcare projects so perhaps guys the question now is what happens to those. Money losing initiatives will we see more financial disciplined under Chai and CFO. Ruth poor at who comes from Wall Street and has been known for more financial disciplined as page steps down. And does he also step away from those moon shots as well. That division again loses a lot of money and those traditional businesses like advertising pay for them. Melissa our ideas your thank you your Bosa been treating over this news up when it broke. I don't know half an hour ago or so. Karen what do you what do you make of this. I well I think it. It shouldn't be a huge change. I mean this is a very big my largest position actually. I've not really concerned about this. I do think due to talked about maybe more financial all of discipline I think we started to see this when they brought in report which already goes back for years and then we wanted to see more clarity and so they they they split into two and then we actually wanted to see a little movement on the balance sheet and they addressed it they could have done a lot more but they start to address it so I think they're doing all the right things just shows how important having a good succession plan is. There's still get to something like Tesla you think What is the succession plan? But I think they've done a very good job as investor. I feel like this is going to be not very much of a change. I think five years ago seven years ago. I think this is a much bigger deal. I think it's actually on the margin positive thing I think. Sometimes you need need a fresh set of eyes to current point report came in this stock. Thirteen fourteen fifteen stock meandered for long time. She came in. I think the stock was either side of six hundred dollars ars. It's never looked back for all. The reasons cited financial fiscal responsibility. And I think a new set of eyes is probably good thing them walking away. I don't think it's negative. I think of anything that's positive. Seventeen percent EPS growth traits twenty three times. Forward earnings seeming. Listen I know. It's not a blockbuster overstock but you look at it. Slow and steady wins the race for Google and I think we were with a whisper of all time highs. We actually might be making all time highs. We speak caresource. You're a couple of great points on twitter as she normally does on that Pichai was already in charge of Google Youtube for some time That page and brain have been sort of a wall with their own interests and they also still control the company. I mean to factor through through their stock. It's a dual class structure. So they still have control effectively. The company great points and it makes you wonder whether some of this has evolved out of the politics that the companies facing certainly there are headwinds on the regulatory side. There's enormous I tell. went to their core business and talked about that. I mean the control of costs whether it's through the tack costs or the cat backs. These are things that in. The last quarter of investors have become quite quite comfortable with what the company's been doing if anything that the secular businesses alive and well Google cloud is growing is going to be a major business. You worry about the regulatory maybe this is the guy you know. Maybe this guy to take them out of the limelight because they are the founders. They are the icons they are are. They are major major players in the politics of Silicon Valley. And what goes on beyond there and I think maybe this changes the tax a little bit and maybe this as the CEO position this opens up the opportunity to really go into a whole focus of where they really are because they are spending money in certain places. They're not everybody's always all that excited about so the reality is are they going to be spending more and putting more into you cloud. I think that is where they need to go. And I think they're moving in that direction I think they got the right. CEO and when you talk about financially fiscally their spending habits and everything. That's something. I think that much ruth might be able to step up now and really put in more dividend. Well Yeah it all this talk about free cash flow with just about every big company that we talk about on this desk all the time. And what are they doing with that and obviously a lot of acquisitions over time I'm all that type of thing but yes something like that Mel which I think would make a lot of sense. Look at how well that's worked for the apples of the world Microsoft's of the world forever. I mean that's something they should do. I have a question Russian now that are we going to many questions at many points in time. One particular question at this moment in time and that would be are we gonNA look back at this change angel leadership and think this was to alphabet what Saltine Adela was to Microsoft. I I don't think so why I I don't think Google needs to do what Microsoft needed to do and again there was already some momentum behind that change it Microsoft but Microsoft move to the public cloud everything that they've done to compete but maybe wrestles some of this away from Amazon and Google. I think has been well On. Its Way as we've all talked about towards this transformation it seems like it but I don't think it's the same thing I don't don't think so either because of the fact where has he come from versus where Saatchi and Adela was at Microsoft. And let's not forget. Google is a fine company alphabet to find company. Microsoft soft was not and they needed somebody that's going to transform from where they were to where they are now they hired the right guy. I think this gentleman now can step in there. He and report together can build this into a much bigger company and a lot of ways focused on cloud but that won't be the only focus they still have all these other areas all these other verticals that they bring in money Thinking the regulatory weight off the back of the company. I mean really unleash some bill that would be great. I don't think you're GONNA get for a while. I think to your point that those those two could potentially Them stepping back could ease things a little bit. Every they didn't show up. They chose not to go to Congress. I see if you know now. Now that it's up to them whether or not they would send someone but I mean. Just look at the France you know what started our tariff tax write was the digital digital tax here. So it's not a lot of clarity for a while. That's why the stock isn't higher. It's a piece point I wanNA say. It was flattering Microsoft. There wasn't doing particularly early. Well I mean it was sorta treading water with the broader market. He walks into stock. Is probably you know better than I. The stock is probably more than doubled under his leadership which is pretty significant if we have a conversation about. IBM Six months. We're GONNA have that same conversation if this is a watershed moment but with that said Piper Jaffray just in the shade today. Fifteen hundred dollars price target as did city city. Fifteen hundred dollars price target. You know I think on the margins. This is a positive thing. The regulatory aspects these two guys stepping down I think if nothing else probably alleviates Some of the pressure. Not all of it so I think if you're looking for reason if you need one more reason to buy the stock I think this is good

Google Microsoft Ceo Sundar Pichai Melissa Larry Page CEO Ruth Chai Piper Jaffray CFO IBM Saltine Adela Twitter Karen Tesla Silicon Valley France Congress
Living in a System That's Not Design to Suit the Human Spirit

Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

09:08 min | 1 year ago

Living in a System That's Not Design to Suit the Human Spirit

"Just recently posted the the deep deep deep outlook event L. phone it makes a ton of sense so I'm going to try to take that deep outlook information mission and how to work with it without going too far into our heads are too far into the details of all it you know this you know I've talked a lot about obviously the community video felt appropriate I said I feel like we have been we have been metaphorically going into into the soil in plowing through the soil this month and setting new seeds of intention making sure that we're getting all of that dirty shitty REU program stuff out or make sense I think it will make sense you know if we think about the human brain there's all these different parts talk about the peace of our brain that is deeply rooted and unconscious it's giving us a ground to walk on and also is providing the oxygen for us to breathe NCO to all of the things right the earth is providing that that's moving through our body decomposing all going back into the earth and it re it recycles been a gardener if you've ever put your hands in the soil the further down you go the colder darker gets the Self I'm much more mature moon I'm more into the actual plant ending the chemistry behind soil and then how to put the seat into it to make a really really kissed yield for their crop rate so if they're going to decide Liam Leafy Green Kale and try to understand how to grow really beautiful plant you have to really and we know that lose lots of reasons I've been hearing more and more is people is they've actually someone has a lawsuit out against round and because our soil poison so you might grow lettuce came from and if the soil itself is poisoned rid of the soil and start over you have to add different elements you have to completely transform the soil two thousand nineteen but also this is kind of the point of twenty twenty but the western Culture Western mind has been rooted in a poisonous have been sick for the human psyche in the human spirit feel like they're mentally ill is that they're living in a system that's not designed to suit the human will that was contaminated is still contaminated with controlled they become sick. L. Mentally ill and physically ill and spiritually what people don't even stop to think why do we have seven days is why the seven days why why are there not fourteen days or I want our clock system starts at midnight the beginning of the day starts in the Middle Right Not Egyptians goddesses and not you know Mayan and once you really get into mythology in particular Damian Egypt and so on and so forth but the Roman stories came when we can our nation of the story we could even take that further you know we're gonNA name cars mercury we're going to name cars Saturn which is Cronos in Greek

Egypt Saturn Seven Days Fourteen Days
Learning Leadership During Combat

The Strategerist

08:14 min | 1 year ago

Learning Leadership During Combat

"Your career general pay started really in the Vietnam War a long time ago what did you lead people into combat in Vietnam long before you're you're a four star general and before you were Joint Chiefs of staff what what did you first learn about yourself when you started leading people I bet I think what I learned and I hope it has stuck with me is that any of us who are privileged to lead where where the incumbent or not not really understand that we're we're we're not worthy of the opportunity and I don't mean that in a overly self effacing way I mean that the young men and women especially in our armed forces in combat who willing to sacrifice themselves for our country deserve to have the best leader in leaders taken possibly have and I think for any of us to have the Hubris to believe that you're actually a good leader is a step too far I would I hope I learned was to have some humility about the opportunities to lead and to understand that the day I think I'm a good leader I'm not in the as you come to work every day believing that I owe more than I can ever be pay and I need to strive to be the best leader I can be that day that's a great point a great lead into to what we want to talk about which is I think the trajectory of leadership where experience uh-huh in combat and in this enterprise that we've chosen to be a part of being the Marine Corps time and time again your face with leadership challenges how much harder was it to be reflective leader of humility as you became became more senior along the way and really an enterprise leader as well all the way to your chairmanship The difficulties in managing now the entire enterprise and all of the minefield you had to maneuver in and amongst DC how did that change over time yeah you know Matt I think that having been in combat as a second lieutenant those are the most difficult decisions I've made those decisions that when you made them you knew that the young man in that case in my case all young men in the young men who were executed my orders was second lieutenant had a high likelihood of being injured or killed the decisions I made ah later on in life the recommendations I made his chairman for example yes they were more more weight he had very direct impact on the troops in the field but they might decisions in DC my recommendation DC did not have the exact same direct impact that might who says as a second lieutenant did so in in one way the decisions as a general were easier to make than decisions as a second lieutenant because of the immediate profound impact of the decision of the moment that makes sense does Sir and I could I wanNA take us back to the beginning and I don't think we've ever chatted about this as Naval Academy Grad what made you choose the Marine Corps in the first place hey listen I would I went to the nuclear submarines you want farm in you wanted to be in submarines so I went to naval academy and took the entire new power engineering program and then Sir dip it Asli Between my seniors or take Kademi he's a new Missile Boat came into the waters near the academy it was a weekend and they said anybody who wants to go out on board was welcome to so I'll say hey this is great again on a launch I go back to get on board the on the sub and you could as long ladder to get down to the the basically the quarter deck on a submarine and what I got down by the time I got down and I stood there I mean the folks can't see This rumor in right now but the truth probably twelve by eighteen this room is bigger than the spot I can't aim to the submarine and I didn't notice the time but I'm I'm a little bit claustrophobic you only get me in an Mr machine to give me some value those are fun now so so I certainly say oh my gosh this is small this is a horrible so I mean God bless guys and gals who who can do summaries I physically couldn't all respect him because you're there a long time months three months six months so I could add that thing as fast she says I couldn't get up to the fresh okay what's Plan B immediately regret this decision but it was perfect because I believe there's a god God lab him out find out that design intervention SORTA looking around Now what and the war was going on in Vietnam and I I really like toward I saw in the marine officers of the academy and I didn't know if I could be marine but I knew I wanted to try so I made a decision a couple months after final year at school began to become a marine we all have those memories of milestone moments are trajectories marines and somewhere you were humbled and inspired along the way and sometimes that's three your first interaction with a very powerful staff NCO do you have any stories or memories of your first interactions with the staff sergeants in Gonese that alongside the NGOs are the backbone of our Marine Corps. Yeah absolutely fact that the most vivid memory my very first was sergeant if I started to his filling the role of my platoon sergeant so I go to the non I join up with tune in in doing the Ted offensive with sixty eight I'd get to my platoon and you know you when your brand new you want that you're not better than anybody else you know that you're not that you're willing to do whatever it is it really is required so I got to my platoon him we were we were joining a railroad bridge over the Perfume River in way city and my platoon I got there was filling sandbags sooner the strengthened position and I figured okay I'll show them on that above doing manual labor so I go out I start filling sandbags and SORTA Zachary who said I started feeling a status orange job says he lieutenant can I talk to you I said sure sure so he pulls his says Sir we don't we don't need you filling sandbags we're going to hit again tonight like we have every night we need you doing what the officer supposed to do we need to flynn how're you undefended he's GonNa get medevacs how you're GonNa get artillery support how you're GONNA get air support we need you to do what you were trained to do we can fill sandbags I thanked him and then I took a private moments with cheese and on the job listening today how screwed everything up but there does come a point in time where I know you recognize his mad whereas an officer you finally are you get the comfort level too to tell staff NCO no to Andrew or even better tighten them up when he needs to tighten up because he stepped on your toes and that comes along the way for you how it happened with our company gunnery sergeant great great cutty while you're in Vietnam but he had he had he was telling my platoon sergeant to do things that were my responsibility to tell them to do so I got Holy Guardian had had a discussion with me when I walked away from that when I walked away in that meeting actually confrontation I I felt like okay I've ever okay I'm an officer yeah the the self confidence to tell a gun you know get outta my way

Officer Vietnam Perfume River TED SIR Zachary Flynn Andrew Three Months Six Months
Why Gary Vaynerchuk Is Investing in Text Marketing

The GaryVee Audio Experience

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Why Gary Vaynerchuk Is Investing in Text Marketing

"Outage shop and he is chairman of nursing ex- NCO Intermedia. I thank you for being with travel so basically I I was looking at your twitter account today and notice a you mentioning an update on Wine Tax Tom yes curious about what that is and that's a really good. Adage doesn't right very observant. I believe the text is a very important emerging marketing platform for all all of us. I think for the last decade plus we humans have not let brands and companies into our tax. We let them into email. They ruined windows and we've been very cautious over the last year. I've noticed that more people are open to giving their phone number to be marketed to to be sold to and and so about two to three months ago for my dad's business I started. Something called blind taxed sedan. You GotTa do this. I helped him architect at the team. Bilton and it's a deal of the day on text and it's going super. Well and it's really led me to believe that twenty twenty twenty twenty one is going to be a year where brands are not only. GonNa sell on text but if you're watching five hundred brand the kind of content that you put out on facebook or twitter or youtube the ability now delivered at in text form and having having customers be okay with that and actually want it as long as you do a good job in giving them good value is going to become a big topic in these falls and twenty four months after I like doing things early so that I have something to say in twenty four months instead of guessing

Twitter Nursing Ex- Nco Intermedia Bilton Chairman Facebook Youtube Twenty Four Months Three Months
"nco" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"nco" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Or call one eight NCO crews improves line three ships registry. Bahamas in USA. Restrictions apply. If you've been injured in an accident choosing the right attorney is critical to the law firm with the experience and success that will help you get the best possible result injured called the Barnes firm now eight hundred eight million the attorneys at the Barnes firm are ready to help twenty four seven. If you've been injured called the Barnes for now. It's Los Angeles. Attorney responsible. Such a beautiful little puppy. I mean, the walk around the block and neighbors always say her hair, so beautiful healthy, and shiny and glossy. D? I N O V, I T dot com. Fatty acids omega threes and sixes are great for healthy skin and soft shiny coats. I would really recommend people starting their puppies on a four. They get into what I would call the misery index that skin bad ears bad breath, because if they're getting all their vitamins micronutrients microbials from the beginning, then you're not going to run into the problems associated with the allergies. Grass pollen dust Sturt. Sleaze picks you name it and the itching and shedding down the road, vitamins and enzymes replace the nutrients cooked out of most commercial dog foods dying for life. This is Ed Lucas ethic and Cindy, Lucas AVIC, inviting you and your pets tonight. Eight one thousand V I T dot com. If you're dealing with utter agony frustration of chronic knee pain, and you don't want that knee replacement surgery for fear of a lengthy and complicated recovery time, and the pain and the physical therapy afterwards. Let me tell you about Nanno knee really changing people's lives in a big way. The doctors at Nando knee are experts at one thing and that's knee replacement surgery. Three D modeling allows for less invasive procedures with minimal pain and downtime. You're walking thirty minutes after the procedure. Go home as early as one hour after the procedure because this is out patient surgery. And most patients don't need.

knee pain attorney Barnes Lucas AVIC NCO Bahamas Ed Lucas Los Angeles Nando Nanno USA. Cindy thirty minutes one hour
"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"This was two thousand five. Yeah. So two thousand funny you think about that. Now, if that's that culture, and that attitude they just happened to bump into you at that school. So at that particular time in that particular unit and under your command, nobody else there had to do those types of things none of the other droves Arden's that were under a different command. We're going to that same type of training, you know. And when I went through it. It was a an armor eh drill. Sergeant. You know, they they all came when you went through that these drilling. Truckers would want to be more inclined to be the camp Rogers type of drill instructor to infuse that type of knowledge into those young individuals. So that they understand the importance of paying attention and learning within this OC training because you're not going to be in a train environment. When you leave. Here's the real thing. Right. And now goes back to like the fifty calories and the two four eight those are mounted those are mounted weapons their own vehicles. It's very important that these privates. Learn how to do that they might not go and be fifty cower to forty gunner at their unit. But when something goes bad, and they have to jump up in the turret know how to do it. That's right. We owe to them for that. Yeah. And. Met a little resistance. But, but it was a I think at the end it was both a rewarding assignment, especially going into something and having opinion of something because this is the time when sodas were joining all different backgrounds. You know, some had masters degrees. Some had GED's some the s fab was lowered enough now that they could get you name it. They had a reason that they were coming in. But I think data the day a lot of them came in because you know, after nine eleven and these guys were one to join and they were wanted to be a part of something. And so I would talk to guys before the, you know, in the beginning of the course, and it'd be like, you know, how many you guys re raise your hand, if if your parents, and or your wife, you know, supported your joining the military, and there wasn't many really, and but you could see just that short nine week period. The transformation of how a guy got off that bus and how he marched on the parade field. And when the families came to see it was like, oh, yeah. I mean, it was it changed. Now. You get it up all of those guys coming in will, you know, again. Sometimes, you know, they're cooter doesn't know something unless you tell them, you know, I think, you know, they're kind of the pressure is on them. They don't want to you know, most most recruiters better on their for their first time or not really very few volunteer for it. They're out there. They're not appreciated. You know, the guy that's out there in that nonmilitary town that's trying to recruit people. And by the way, we've got the this is when was the conflicts we're still in the news. You know, nightly news was Afghanistan and Iraq, you know, everything was on. So now, you're trying to convince those guys. And you had to be careful with that. Because as you got in there to you only have nine weeks to train them. But you don't know what you're getting. I you don't know what kind of medications they stopped taking prior to coming into the military. Yeah. So. Crazy part about the we had one guy. He was Ozias. He was OCS candidate. And he was three hundred. Plus, I mean, he's extended scale it basic training. He was phenomenal shape. He was you know, thirty nine at a forty for VRM and just top candidate to be one of the leader the honor graduate. Of course, we're finished up all our training. All we're doing is cleaning TA fifty including weapons and just you know, prepa getting ready for graduation. He drops over twenty eight years old as a heart attack in the company training area. In turns out, they we were able to rush him and get him there. Get them to the hospital. Have I see you up there and see him. Man. You know, what's gone, and he was like, well, I stopped taking my heart medicine because I couldn't take it while I was in the army..

Ozias Arden Rogers army instructor nonmilitary Afghanistan Iraq twenty eight years fifty calories nine weeks nine week
"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"And so usually they get you see the lieutenants would rogue are s on their raking dirt and stuff like that. We had Ellen. Oh that was like, hey, you know, looking you can go out and find you a job. And so I knew I still knew people from out there. So that's when I went out there and said, hey, can I yeah, he needed Lieutenant? I'm available. I can do this. So I did I did that what I found with. That is exactly when I left there. It hadn't changed meeting. You have platoon trainers. And you have those guys, but they're not instructors and they wanna be instructors. And it's like you got to let the it's as the officer. It's like you got to let the let the NCO's that instructors. They you know, it's like you don't want to Lieutenant drill. Sergeant. You don't wanna captain drills? I it's it's their job. It's what they do. But they're trying to command. That's basically nothing but NCO's, right, right? I mean, it should be almost like the third I d level in some ways. But. Shaking your head. No, no. It's not that way. You would think in a unit like that. It would be. But it's not you'd have guys. Hey, call them up. We got PT. Yeah. I can't find my dog. Okay. Well, when you find your dog you come to work. So this is fourth RTD. These are like cadre three days later. Hey, man. You got I told you I can't find my dog. That's right. True story. Oh god. So he's basically just out of pocket for three or four days looking for his for his dog. And that was okay. Yeah. So what about the trainees we're going to well? Well, this was the in between the Browns. Okay. But you know, what I found what I found is, you know, even going back to be knocking a knock, and you know, that kind of environment is the worst group of privates is a group of hills. Yeah. You know, it's like so when I came back to bending after degree completion. And I in processed the captain's list hasn't come out yet. So I'm technically I'm signing into bending as just a first Lieutenant we ought to be a first Lieutenant promote -able to be able to go to the captains career course. So and it's coming out anytime. No, I know it's coming out anytime. Well, while I'm in processing, it doesn't come out. So they assign me to San hill up to a trainee. And so I go up there. And I'm thinking, I don't know what I'm gonna do appear. I mean, it's like drill sergeants. This is this and and so. Meet the brigade commander, and he's like where are you coming from told him, and he's like, oh, so you've been getting over for a while might well, sometimes you're getting over and sometimes you're not getting over. And he said well, do you want to be here? I was like we'll not really not really. So I'd rather be back on the other hill leading troops. He's like perfect how I'm gonna make you a company commander, and you're going to go down to this here. And so so now, then he didn't tell me. Oh, by the way. Congratulations. Your, you know, your first Lieutenant promote -able like literally the day. So I went over there and mitt the battalion commander, and he had a lot of energy. And he was he was phenomenal. And but now you're almost in the same boat because now you're not just in charge of NCO's. But the trainees is. Well, right. So you have you have the OSA, which is the infantry guys at this time, they didn't have to armory or so still th infantry. So you have a fourteen week at training that are than there. The Llosa had a basic the BBC TB, which these are the guys that come through the nine weeks basic training, and then they ship off to AIT. So you're getting the sixty eight whiskeys and all the all the ones that don't have a. Oh, sit along with you would get OCS guys coming off the street. The Heather degrees that did their board. There would call them what they call it the college up..

NCO trainee commander Ellen Browns OSA RTD officer San hill mitt fourteen week nine weeks three days four days
"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"I mean over time your body adjusted that that's that's not that's not a problem. And even back going back. You know, almost twenty five years. I can remember almost every day of bending somewhat of desert mountains was probably the challenging because it seemed like every time you were walking you'll going up, and when it gets when it's dark there. It's dark. Yeah. It's it's. And by the time, you've got the Florida. I don't think I remember anything about that. That was the last base. That's just a complete blur. I remember. They we bust down there. Because they'll at the time they weren't doing airborne operation down there because they were doing it in the during the T ex we bust down there which was good because you've got some sleep. Did the the initial classes the snake class? Remember that because I don't really can't for snakes. But the field to have X next thing. I remember is getting the counseling saying, hey, you've graduated here. You're you've met the you've met the standard and you're going to to graduate. That's it's about as what I remember of. Which is the thing that you're most looking forward to. Yes. To getting that information. Right. So you probably slept well on the bus ride home. Yes. It was active any I should say. But it was you know, like, I said it was challenged. It was more challenging for your. You're you're challenging your sleep. Deprivation you'll are. Your food. But again over time your body just to it. Now, one of the things that I have. And I think it was the worst time. Phased to go was when I went to ranger school. It was like right after thanksgiving that year. So we did basically binning phase. And then they do the exodus will everybody all the trade schools shut down for two and a half weeks and everybody goes on. Oh, yeah. So okay. Yeah. So it's great. Hey, look, I got this look forward to. But then like your last I dunno week of leave. You're not doing because you think I got to go back to this school. Right. We reviewed it just went through in the mindset, they to read, you know, you're just your mind to get back through. So I would I wouldn't recommend that time. Yeah. Well, you got the chance to eat though. Right. You did. But you know, I think during those phases in and I found this out later to jump ahead. But as an instructor. You could find the what the quality of the class was going to be by the time of year. Yeah. And I say that for two full one you've got the weather and that plays a part of that. And then you've got to the second part is the ones who are the fives the sixes two captains that are coming back through it. Again, they kind of pick their time because it's going to be not hot when it's going to be. So usually around April after the best rent soon as the best ranger was over. And that class was picking up that was usually a pretty good class because you had a lot more senior personnel that we're going through. The course when you got to the wintertime on the dead summertime not so much because. The season guy says I don't wanna go during that time because it's going to be cold. And it's going to be miserable. The ones that don't have the options are the ones that just graduated. I o b c are going to see. The young specialists. That's at that's in regiment. They didn't those guys. So you just don't have the experience. Right. Those guys their courses. The course, but as far as evaluating in grading patrols. You would see a huge difference of of that. It's two things one whether inexperience played a part of that. Yeah. So let's jump ahead. Because after Hawaii you spent time over there you came back to Benning at that time frame. And did you get the assignment? Did you ask for I actually got a when my three years was finished in Hawaii? They got a water to go to the ranger training brigade's at the time. I didn't know where. Yes, he didn't know fourth fifth. I didn't know which one it was while I was the experience different in terms of what you you saw as a student and what they were now teaching peo- wise. What was it different? I'm because I mean, you know, what I've heard a lot especially..

Benning Hawaii Florida instructor twenty five years three years
"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"nco" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"Good thing about this whole podcast or this show. Is that jeeze man, we've known each other for ever? And like we were talking about yesterday. It's been a long time. We won't talk about how long it's been. Actually, I want to get into a little bit of your background and your military career. You I came into the army and were was your four to word, your I it was a four door to was a cohort assignment. So is that what it was? It was one of the plan type of thing. Or is it the the whole battalion? Okay. So you go through OSA the whole thing that hope so all of alpha company in one nineteen went to alpha company and in fort Ord and Bravo company, so everything the whole battalion went I just know that I didn't know that y'all start on the same day and all had the same ATS dates. You didn't you didn't. Well, they don't do that any longer night because. Yeah. So that was almost like an experiment thing that they were doing in that timeframe they were taking the whole unit and and putting them through that type of thing. So you guys knew one another. I mean, you you get. Through the good and the bad and everything to basic training in through. Oh, set bright. So you knew the duds were who the good guys were wasn't like you get a chance to leave them and go find some new fresh guys right up later on. I was talking to our first sergeant that was at fort Ord with us. And I asked him about how that was. And he was like the good side of the was if you're the company commander of the first sergeant that we're no Barrick lawyers in the what it could tell you because everybody knew the same thing. The downside was everybody had the same beta ranked? So if there was a waiver to PFC, you know, that was a board if there was a waiver to four and that was a board. There was no. Thanks guys show up now that they're easy to privates. First guy comes up. Well, here's a PFC you. Yeah. So also what about the NCO's? I mean, they weren't your drill sergeants that then all of a sudden, no they weren't. They basically it was basically a stand up not a stand of comfort, but they were a skeleton with just NCO's. Yeah. And so you had all the platoon leaders, the Exo the company commander in the first sergeant and a platoon size all get so wouldn't like stripes, and we'll all of a sudden the drill sergeant becomes you know, we didn't have that would actually when we were in basic training. The insoles came down to four bending to observe our training that we were doing. Okay. And so they got to move to platoon. Sergeant I end the first company commander talk to us. And so that was that was unique. So yeah. So the first started let me see if I got this, right? The first ardent platoon sergeants dune leaders, I I mean, and, you know, squad leaders all those types of things were all NCO's that were just in a standby as kind of a skeletal crew of leadership waiting for you guys to graduate. Oh, sit and get up there right because their previous cohort had ended. So they had about a two or three month break before we were to arrive. So because everybody had the same ATS date. Yeah. So the core was a it was seventeen weeks. They consider for the the OSA training and travel to to the unit in three years in the in the unit. So how long were you guys supposed to be together at fort Ord? I mean was there guarantee? E two years three years. We did two years. Yeah. They are. And then the minus two HAC. The alphabrain VO Charlie hall got an airplane and went to Korea, and we were a unit over there. So our third year was in Korea now, so we went to Gaza it went from August second of nineteen Eighty-eight until September ninth of nineteen Ninety-one. They were all in the same..

fort Ord NCO commander Korea Gaza Charlie hall Barrick three years two years seventeen weeks three month
"nco" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"nco" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Got some little Fakty facts for you every day have Fakty bad. Yeah. Well, that means sometimes there two or some days are made up. We'll see what happens today today is CD player day who's got one of those anymore. I you. In my car. Why? No, I'm thinking about the standalone, I do too. I have a CD boombox, and I see stereo on tried to give it away. And I said sometimes I can't think of the song for Alexa, and I need to just press shuffle. There you go. Sometimes that gal just can't you're so right about that. You can't always think of it. But it's also international raccoon appreciation day. I hope to MPR raccoon book is selling. If you're suffering from symphonies. Yeah. What do you think you're suffering from? Dining probably something from smell. Well here. It is. It's a neurological condition that can cause a person to see smell and taste music. Oh, what song would you wanna smell and taste for the rest of your life, California, San what's that? Riviera's has it. Quick the gear daddies they had played it. Yeah. Just like such a fun song. And it does make me think of doing kitty dances with my dad at the NCO club. Because my dad was one of the cool dad's swimming, the hitchhiker like those were such hard things to learn how to do we would dance with right? Anyway, you know, this song if you hear it. Suffer.

NCO club Alexa Riviera California
"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Guys that but all of the all of the junior nco zone team retired officers of the the let's see junior or second junior man on her team was bill fruity who's our junior medic and food had been the honor graduate of his medical course and then they came to elkins and they made him an armor because too many medics so he was on a graduate of that course and when he retired he was a full colonel in the air force surgeon and he started out in the army but they needed surgeon so bad that the surgeons could never go to necessary school so you're christians were being promoted over them so he just changed the air force where they promptly gave him an eagle so you know these were really extraordinary people and we had a great team and we had some good breaks we've been for one thing we was third team in in that area so you know it was pretty well we we had a pretty good info on it and then i had the good fortune to hire a great quote interpreter unquote philippe drouin the cowboy and dan ford wrote the book incident muck loss from which the movie go tell the spartans was made read that what writing a book about cowboy now it'll be up hey because he was just amazing and i spent oh maybe four months trying to put together an intelligence knit and then i one day i had this opinion the lightbulb went on over my head i yelled at cab i said hey phil arsim spies.

elkins army spartans dan ford phil arsim four months one day
"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Folks followed vietnam nco's getting orders drill sergeant school so now it's it's happening again it'd be a huge mistake the squander the experience that these guys have that they've developed throughout the course of the war whether downsize in the military and then as downsizing in general they still need drill sergeants still need people there's the demand for the state side is you know less so that is that's what's gonna be happening hopefully after drill sergeant school if after doing a stint as drill sergeant that he'll come back into the program but a commanding officer says he was shocked at one of his guys came down on orders drill sergeant school odd yeah i hope that's not the case yeah so i think special operations this time around this downsize in the military will stay pretty good you you know know this because of the type of limited warfare that's going on out there a place for special operations in today's world and there's a lot of public and congressional support i think for special operations yeah the conventional side of the house is gonna suffer yes yeah yeah that's unfortunate i think you're absolutely right well i guess that's all i can think of right and like i said you really were one of the favorite guests of our audience the first time you were on and they were demanding that we do apart too so this is a real treat for them and a real honored abby on.

vietnam nco officer abby
NASCAR - 2018 Kevin Harvick wins Phoenix ISM Raceway third straight Cup series race sends a message to 'all you haters'

America's Truckin' Network

01:57 min | 3 years ago

NASCAR - 2018 Kevin Harvick wins Phoenix ISM Raceway third straight Cup series race sends a message to 'all you haters'

"Kevin harvick grace to his third straight nascar cup series victory on sunday holding off kyle busch whereas record extending ninth career win at ism brace we in phoenix coming off victories at atlanta in las vegas harvard got in front of bush on the last series of pitstops on the mileoval harvick took the lead for good with twenty two laps to go the winner on egmore and radio yeah definitely was a it was a battle today a lot of fundraising with with kyle and danny and chase therefore the way in an in our car just kept getting better look like kyle started to get loose out the corner the nine was definitely to lose as we got towards the end of the race kyle busch wild up second through much of the race today i actually thought we had a chance to outrace a and beat them you know there with the eleven when the eleven was kind of holding up the four i had an opportunity to get to his outside and make a threeway battle for the lead and take the lead before he get before the forgot clear of traffic in you know wants to four gets clear traffic and he's in his own air there's there's heartbeat that guy chase elliott denny hambledon polesitter martin treu ex junior rounded out the top five sunday in nascar race in phoenix the rest of the top ten included clint bowyer aragon merola daniel swore as eric jones and kurt busch also sunday sebastian board a one of the variety indycar series season opener the firestone grand prix of saint petersburg a victory handed to him when alexander rossi and rookie robber wickens crash with two laps to go or day running third takes over the lead when onto the win talked about it on abc tv is one is emotional messages went to overcome a few bumps in roles than of all fire and if you broken bones to come back in this victory circle and couldn't be any happier for the whole a del cohen racing bassar sullivan and nco master and and everybody on board an older boys and mean that they work so hard it's it's a tiny group you know the oregon entails often who didn't enough the fastest car today but with consistency and which is you know we pulled it together we're going to get.

Kevin Harvick ABC Firestone Grand Prix Of Saint Kurt Busch Clint Bowyer Chase Danny Harvard Nascar Kyle Busch Oregon Alexander Rossi Eric Jones Daniel Bush Las Vegas Atlanta Phoenix
"nco" Discussed on First and Last

First and Last

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"nco" Discussed on First and Last

"It it was so very long for seoul a multitude of reasons i wish is ea players with exercise that power by boycotting the ncaa tournament and again is absolutely right and the fact that that power we talk about this all the time with the pros in the nfl the best power that the players have is their ability to strike their ability to remove the product from the field that makes everyone so much money and the nco boy players could do this in march madness and boycotting finalfour weekend my god what a coup that would be but in the nfl the difficulty always is you're asking a lot of guys the media the bell curve in that league to boycott missed games and potentially missed entire season in careers that are short were they may never be able to recoup the funds that they lose and now in the unsuitable way you're talking about kids doing that who may only have one chance at this kind of success who don't have any of the players at the top end of it will be here through the striker way we always talk about with the marquee players in the nfl being able to withstand this financially there are no players in the nc aa that can withstand missing out on that opportunity and the other thing it ignores the fact that there is a void of leadership at the top who amongst the players is going to be the one to stand up and rally everyone to get all parties involved on this in a way that possible that's the biggest area that the instability of loses out on because you're asking a bunch of kids that are constantly put down and told their voice doesn't matter in these situations to all the.

seoul nfl ncaa nco nc
"nco" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"nco" Discussed on WTVN

"Learn more about their desk active workspace solutions at dera desk dot com slash radio that's d a r i desk dot com slash radio those flailed preview the year's newest recreational watercraft adverse 60second any will indian like boat show marked second third and fourth stop by india lake morita spend a day marina ed buds marie for the best deals next weekend only free parking refreshments and door prizes too she would office with her with a bullet ranch the bullet ranches a ten thousand square foot gun shop and shooting range offering extensive inventory in selection in pittsburgh host revolvers rifles shotguns at automatic firearms the bullet branch offers a variety of training classes along with ohio concealed handguns certification it also features stand seventy five foot indoor shooting lanes certified for all types of firearms up to fifty cow as well as ten outdoor archery lengths visit the bullet ranch dot com for more info goukouni life threatening physical national council room aging and talk to your doctor or pharmacist about from foxing option for people sixty five and older nco way dot org slash flew again that's nco aid dot org slash juice headlines and where columbus comes to talk news news radio 610 wtvn yet in troy jack the email during the break very predictable mr limbaugh how dare you how dare you exhibit searched in sensitivity during this intense grief how dare you and you see my friends yet another point as illustrated one cannot challenge the governing emotions of the moment.

pittsburgh ohio columbus mr limbaugh seventy five foot 60second
"nco" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"nco" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Statement from there but they need not have been an isolated nco so i think more obvious and more news is going to bombing out about this for sure today why you know i don't know if it's because we work at an embassy and other people have had contact or whatever of it's just people talking but the rumors and rumors and rumors and rumors and some of the people bringing that up to me now and twitter or some yeah hey will i had heard this i had heard that you know i was it i don't know you know what are known as it's impossible so certainly there's that cloud of suspicion that's been around there although i've never heard anything that was nonconsensual um but there are a lot of those rumors perhaps that's what mbc as saying this now you know beat they were in the same building maybe they heard these things now you have a credible allegation and and that's uh i think two things head to be in play here that led to him being fired so fast one there must be stuff there that nbc knows about his uncomfortable about and the second is remember how poorly they handle the brian williams situation that driver ever to resolve it looks like to me like nbc wasn't about to let that play out the same way again on having pretty quick indeed it did that is vince for tronto news about your money brad alan with the wtmj drake associates market update the dow jones industrial average in sp 500 greece alltime highs today as investors bet the us economy's momentum would continue the dow jumped up one hundred and three points reaching an alltime high the sp 500 was down point zero four percent after hitting a record high earlier but a race those gains as a decline in tech stocks offset a strong performance from the financial sector and the nasdaq composite was down one point two seven percent.

nbc vince brad alan dow jones dow twitter brian williams wtmj drake associates us nasdaq two seven percent zero four percent
"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"nco" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"The a hazing incident badly is pretty common among your job from e three d e four in the marine corps lease lancecorporal to corporal so when you become that you know that nco that e four ray it's a huge like huge debt as maria uh you're actually like going from basically do a mike really liking swab in floors a and do it my ghetto doing crap work to also be in chargeable putin like like the jump is like overnight right so that the ritual when you become a nco in the marine corps you get the blood stripe down your blue pants is about an inch wide striped iran's doubt the the outer seem the parents in the blood stripe is osce it it symbolizes demolished you've got the bail meal here's the battle of palta pack on might be i was i was thinking bella what it's not bella it might have been but i think we're going to get riders on the nco soared okay all your point beyond blast we'll get cross for this split up here is that i bail us out alright on his phone right now but just you know it's i love the karate of that job because just like you're saying i remember getting like the the in seals were telling me in the only people decade hayes you are a people at that rag or greater right an hazy i'm saying is that tradition where i was getting hackel there told i knew the details gated promoted like delayed dwyer.

mike putin iran nco dwyer marine corps