35 Burst results for "Nausea"

Montana’s Blackfeet Tribe Provides COVID-19 Vaccinations at Border Crossing

Native America Calling

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Montana’s Blackfeet Tribe Provides COVID-19 Vaccinations at Border Crossing

"Within days montana's first confirmed covid. Nineteen case black feet nation declared a state of emergency and closed down. Now it's leading the way in vaccinations empire part of this two part story. Yellowstone public radio's caitlyn nicholas reports on how the tribe was successful quickly. Its vaccination effort a ninety five percent. Vaccination rate is much higher than the rest of the country. Several factors made this possible. Vaccines are coming to black feet. Nation from two sources black feats travel health department receives allotments through montana's health department while the to indian health service units on the reservation receive another allocation from the federal government but brittany racine a registered nurse at the tribal health improvement program says the played an important role as well as the fact that everyone in black feet nation was personally impacted by covid nineteen. We're such a small community and so when we would have a death we were all really impacted by it. That had a lot to do with people wanting to get vaccinated so they wouldn't lose a family member are they wouldn't put people at risk. Since march fifteenth twenty twenty black feet nation has lost forty eight tribal members dacoven nineteen rail grant is the nursing instructor black feet community college on a windy day in the feet tribal health departments. Rv mobile clinic. She's supervising nursing students distributing vaccine's grant says the vaccine rollout order was also important frontline workers and healthcare grocery stores and other high contact jobs for vaccinated. I followed by elders. I think that was really encouraging for people who didn't want to because the elders got it i. We also look to them for our guidance. They got it so that guided the younger generation to have a little more. Trust a little more willingness. Even though they were very scared grant says many were worried about the side effects of the vaccine which can include. Fever nausea and body aches. She says elders also needed to confront traumatic past experiences to get the vaccine

Yellowstone Public Radio Caitlyn Nicholas Montana Brittany Racine Tribal Health Improvement Prog Federal Government Fever Nausea Grant
Johnson

Clark Howard

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Johnson

"Site. site. Noonan Noonan primary primary care care doctor doctor Cecil Cecil Bennett Bennett says says Unless patients are having allergic reactions, like rashes or shortness of breath, he can't understand halting vaccinations. This is where again the United States of America. We expect everything to be perfect, Bennett tells WSB, nausea, dizziness or aches and pains are normal. You could take Goody's headache powder and have side effects. There's no perfect medications. No perfect. Vaccine and a handful of individuals out of hundreds. It's not a good reason to close on the side, but those are manageable side effects, he says. The vaccine benefits outweigh the risks of temporary discomfort. Veronica Waters 95.5 WSB, Florida congressman Matt Gates, making his first public appearance since her health at House Ethics Committee began an investigation into

Noonan Noonan Cecil Cecil Bennett Bennett Allergic Reactions United States Of America Dizziness Goody Bennett Nausea Headache Veronica Waters Matt Gates Florida House Ethics Committee
Jordanian prince claims he's been placed under house arrest

On the Media

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Jordanian prince claims he's been placed under house arrest

"In Jordan has issued a statement saying that Prince Hamzah, the half brother of King Abdullah, and the former Crown prince has been asked to stop any actions targeting the country's security and stability while the number of officials have been arrested, our Arab affairs editor, Sebastian Nausea, reports A statement by the Jordanian military said that a former minister, a member of the royal family, and a number of other unnamed officials have been detained. It said that it was part of an ongoing security investigation. As part of this Prince Hans. I was told to hold any actions that might affect Jordan's stability that the military denied reports that have been appearing on other media outlets that Prince Hamzah had himself been arrested. Which is triggered speculation that there may have bean on attempted coup. The events is so far officially confirmed our, however shocking enough in Jordan, where such high level arrests a rare Germany's

Prince Hamzah Sebastian Nausea Jordanian Military King Abdullah Jordan Crown Prince Prince Hans Germany
High-Profile Figures In Jordan Arrested For 'Security Reasons'

On the Media

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

High-Profile Figures In Jordan Arrested For 'Security Reasons'

"Has issued a statement saying that Prince Hamzah, the half brother of King Abdullah, and the former Crown prince has been asked to stop any actions targeting the country's security and stability while the number of officials have been arrested, our Arab affairs editor, Sebastian Nausea, reports A statement by the Jordanian military said that a former minister, a member of the royal family, and a number of other unnamed officials have been detained. It said that it was part of an ongoing security investigation. As part of this Prince Hans. I was told to hold any actions that might affect Jordan's stability that the military denied reports that have been appearing on other media outlets that Prince Hamzah had himself been arrested. Which is triggered speculation that there may have bean on attempted coup. The events is so far officially confirmed our, however shocking enough in Jordan, where such high level arrests a rare Germany's president, Frank

Prince Hamzah Sebastian Nausea Jordanian Military King Abdullah Crown Prince Prince Hans Jordan Germany Frank
Samantha Yap - YAP Global - Blockchain PR

Bitcoin Radio

06:17 min | 3 months ago

Samantha Yap - YAP Global - Blockchain PR

"You started in two thousand. Seventeen with an icu. Boom and. I'm sure that the media's all over that at the now Especially with this latest bull run I'm sure that the everyone wants to hear about it. Know about it. Your stories us as a very exciting time. But i feel like with a two thousand seventeen. Ico boom it was a lot of excitement. And then everyone was interested was on the front page mainstream media then like the bubble burst and all the mainstream all right this is just a fad and they forgot about it and then now we're seeing with this latest bull. Run this excitement again so on one is there any hesitancy on the on the part of the mainstream media their little. Wary that okay. Is this just another bubble. Are they kind of scared to lean into it of a skeptical or are they excited about it like like we are. I am so that there was talk last week. Sorry i'm not sure his co. out but there was talk of how it's not as knowing it's not as noisy and bitcoin eighteen k and even just as we speak right now. Nineteen a It's been quieter like quieter than than before Perhaps the all time high had Had already been nineteen case. It's not like new news so probably a waiting until like we're all waiting until it hits twenty k. And then anything else. The twenty k. Will be like the old time high right. Because that's we're at the way media works in you know. In general journalism is like image not new. It's like just you know it's it's not like a gonna make headlines yet I think this time round. I think from from the lot like from two thousand seventeen in early twenty eighteen it's the regulators that kind of Yeah they were kind of clamping down on ice ios. The in the us sc was like kind of clamping down on on on activity in this space. And i think that that added contributed to the negative stigma. That ice us in crypto had But i think like the company's the innovation in this space like the fact that they're still companies being built with the technology on the technology Shows that like it's a real industry is not just a bubble like it's that they're they're still companies that are building today So i think this time around. It's more of like. I think when we hit twenty k. That's when people will start paying more attention and Yeah i end this time round. It's because within the industry. We kind of know what this means but to the outsiders still they're kind of yet has hit twenty k. As i think they just let's hope let's hope that they don't realize a little longer so i could afford to buy bitcoin event. Let everyone on the party. But it's kinda crazy because you know like you mentioned to. Someone was teaching you all about it and i know when i first got into the industry. It's a lot to learn. And i wonder you know as someone who's trying to pr for a specific project company. I it has to know what laura blockchain and then they have to know what. Bitcoin is and then because before even trying to sell your product. Your product is predicated on the success and instability of this underlining new technology new concert new currency so when you're actually do pr for for a project. Or how important is it to know tied in attach. Bitcoin to in or any crypto. Like how hard is it to explain the technology or know you. Just tell cool story how this is going to make it like that. Yeah that's a really good question. And i think the knowledge gap because the nausea is wives with like newcomers encrypted but the knowledge gap is getting wider. The industry gets so like bitcoin is what like twelve years old now and i think yeah like going. It's very important to enter. The space right. Now is still early to still understand the basic so to actually still go back and read the bitcoin white paper any new a team member. That joins my team. I make them read the bitcoin whitepaper. There's also this other university called the university of recosia maybe University has a program to but they had this like introduction to digital currencies. Course like. I always encourage my team to do that too. I think it's very important when you're communicating What your company does like. Especially even this year with defy exploding. There's a whole other level of complexity to even talk about decentralization. You need to go back to the basics But then there's the other argument where like soon. We want these applications to be easy like these web three point applications to be as easy as web two ones but at and just like how. Today we don't need to know what goes on behind google and internet like we don't need to know the basics. I think with crypto. They're still Like fundamental points like the fact that it is decentralized the fact that when you own your on a cold storage while like what that means how you store that like there is more responsibility for the holder of cryptocurrency. 'cause it's not like you know it's not like he can like i know this coin base where you know they have your password and everything off my possible but you know people still need to know that if you have like a cold storage wallet your or bitcoin it and you forget your password or you. Forget your pin. There is no bank. there is no one that can help retrieve that for you. Like new are responsible for that. I think we need to still remind people that like. That's how you interact with crypto today.

Bitcoin Laura Blockchain University Of Recosia Maybe Un Nausea United States Google
Post-Pandemic Cities Might Actually Want Airbnb Around

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:58 min | 3 months ago

Post-Pandemic Cities Might Actually Want Airbnb Around

"Has been a roller coaster year for a lot of businesses. Few more nausea inducing than airbnb. The company saw an eighty percent drop in business. Last spring is the pandemic hit. It laid off a quarter of its employees raised. Two billion dollars in private funding hurried the heck up and introduced online experiences like virtual cooking classes to try to make any money at all but by december airbnb had recovered enough for a blockbuster. Ipo and a profitable third quarter now. The companies facing the return of its core business plus. It's pre existing challenges like being blamed for housing shortages and new ones like whether to house rioters planning to storm the us capitol. Brian jesse is the ceo of airbnb in the wake of the january. Six insurrection in washington. Dc thought occurred to us and the thought was. Where are these people staying. And the next thought occurred us weight. People are gonna come back to dc and we said we're going to cancel all reservations for the weekend gration dc. That i think we learned the lesson a longtime ago that we have to take more responsibility because our product is in the real world and that's led to us having agreements with more than thousand cities around the world. I want to ask you about that. Actually because that is been that was sort of the other bubbling thing with airbnb. Is this relationship with cities and weather. Airbnb is partly to blame for the lack of affordable rentals as you sort of prepare for that part of the business to come back in force. How view rethought your relationships with cities and housing. I think kobe allowed everyone to take a breather. Think we got a bit of a reset and the relationship with some cities city started approaching us. Some actually said they wanted to get more demand because they said we have major budget shortfalls. Now we have major tourism shortfalls. So you think it's the kind of reset where cities were like. Oh we need you as opposed to you erin. Pnb have to do more to deal with the question of how things play. maybe not. They need us but they say oh. Maybe we can work together. I feel very optimistic about our ability. Have great relationships to cities. And i think the other thing that's going to happen travel. People aren't just going to travel the same fifty cities anymore. And that has had a way of redistributing travel to more communities because primarily. A lot of the conflicts are too many people one place at the same time. You've also said that you think this idea of digital nomads could be big people booking longer term stays do you think that could improve relationships with cities and neighborhoods too because people are not coming and going so quickly. Yeah i mean. I think the other trend is our businesses becoming less transient monthly. Rentals is one of the fastest growing parts of our business. But but i think the other shift is stays are going to be longer. And i think there's going to be this blurring of the line between traveling and living. It means that people a lot of people saying that they don't live anyone place anymore or they used to be. You live on place and you go one or two nights for a business meeting and like one or two weeks vacation now a world where you work from home means the world you can work from any home and so i think you're seeing people where i think i think three day weekends. We'll be every weekend for a lot of people. i think. Some people will take five day weekends. I think significantly more people will live in a different house over the summer than the house. They currently live in where they use in the same house. I think it'd be very normal for people to go to a different house for the summer. I mean it just makes by the way total sense. Why one would do that. And if you could say well how do they ford it where they can rent their house and they're gone so you can net it out. So these are things are going to happen but you're going to also have people. They're just purely nomadic. Maybe not people families but retirees and an empty nesters or you know young people single people people who like can move. I mean i always had a dream of like what. If i could go to like you know a different city every month in live there. This would be super interesting. Think about all the people you would meet all the connections you'd have By the way in this new world you can still stay connected. All the people used to know. So i think this is where travelers going. Travelling living blurring together

Airbnb Brian Jesse Nausea Kobe Washington Erin United States Ford
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

WSJ The Future of Everything

13:28 min | 3 months ago

How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

"Depression. It can be a difficult mental illness to pin down. It can feel different for everyone and even those who struggle with it can have trouble identifying bought. It is a mostly came to understood that. I had depression through talking with my friends for the longest time. I kind of system that everyone felt this way. Like weird just like general malays for this twenty nine year old. Depression surfaced about six years ago and began as a feeling of being disconnected with the world. I didn't want to eat because they didn't feel like i deserve to eat. I don't know. I didn't hang out with friends because i didn't feel like i deserve to see my friends. I didn't feel like i should be punishing them by talking to them seeing them. This person uses they them pronouns. They're a maryland resident and work as a software tester. They sought help for their depression. Trying numerous types of treatments may visited a bunch of different mental health professionals and tried different types of arby's In different types of medication but it always kinda felt like things were getting worse and worse and a current really find someone who has really helped me understand what was going on like. I still didn't even believe that. I had depression. All the while the depression advanced it felt like being alive and lake wanting to die rolling constantly fighting over like the resources in my mind then. Their health insurance lapsed in two thousand eighteen making the situation worse a surprise solution appeared while they were scrolling on social media and a posting from johns hopkins university researchers and then one day i was kind of like clicking through facebook and i actually found this ad four like this little simon. Study silla simon. That's the psychedelic drug found in magic mushrooms. And i thought it was fake remarks. I didn't expect there to be you know like a a legitimate study showing up on like facebook ad but they had no insurance basically they were out of options so they called wanted to have hope again from the wall street journal. This is the future of everything. I'm janet babbling today on the podcast. How the hallucinogenic compounds silla zyban once associated with nine hundred sixty s drug culture is making a comeback and giving people suffering from depression and other mental illnesses. Hope for this twenty nine year old study participant. Depression was not something that happened in their family. My family's from the caribbean and lived in america probably for about lake in years. We came here in ninety nine. It's kind of interesting because where from like a place that doesn't really view mental health. The that like america's mental health. It took me a while to realize that. I was having mental health problems that i was kind of experiencing depression. Depression affects a staggering number of people hundreds of millions worldwide according to a study published in the peer reviewed journal the lancet in two thousand eighteen. The pandemic didn't make things any easier. Last june about a third of people who responded to web based surveys said they suffered from symptoms of depression or anxiety disorder. Those results were published by the centers for disease control and prevention the protocol for treating these conditions hasn't changed much in the past few years. What we've been using is typically one of two things either a medication that people take every day or we have psychotherapy dr. Alan davis is clinical psychologist and an assistant professor at the ohio state university. He's also an adjunct assistant. Professor at johns hopkins university. A lot of people will improve with either medication or therapy or both to basically have both have a better chance but it doesn't work for everyone. Some studies report between ten and thirty. Five percent of patients suffer from treatment resistant. Depression and davis is that similar to what he's found in his own practice working with veterans suffering from substance abuse trauma and other mental health issues. So he began looking for alternative treatments present and welcome to psychedelic science. Two thousand and thirteen in twenty thirteen davis attended a science conference and came across a study exploring the use of silla. Sivan a chemical compound found in specific varieties of mushrooms to treat cancer patients with mental health conditions. The compounds documented facts include feelings of heightened awareness ecstasy visions and changes in the perception of reality for researchers say one of the most useful qualities is its ability to dissolve the ego to allow a user to observe oneself from the outside in the study of cancer patients. The drug was able to alleviate some of the anxiety and depression that can be associated with having a life threatening illness. I was just inspired by that word. I thought gosh this really could have a strong impact in the areas that i'm working with veterans and with others davis became part of a team of researchers at johns hopkins university that put together a randomized clinical trial. Twenty four participants. They were administered. Silla sivan with talk therapy to treat their depression. Enrollment for the trial took place in two thousand seventeen and twenty nineteen and the results were analyzed in two thousand twenty. Most of them had had chronic depression meaning decades of experiencing depression though not some had had it for shorter amount of time but this study was a weightless control trials so some people came in and started treatment right away. Others had to wait eight weeks before starting treatment so we had a comparison group. The study subjects received an extensive intake examined questionnaire to confirm. They were suffering from symptoms of depression. Participants were screened for schizophrenia. And drug use as these conditions can interfere with suicide and treatment. The big worry many people have about psychedelics is what's often referred to as a bad trip. Mary negative hallucinations. That can be scary and this is kind of trip that can go bad. Martissant received hefty doses of these drugs. The doses are based on weight and they vary slightly but patients receive around twenty milligrams in the first session a bit more in the second session to minimize the risk of a negative experience. Davis says researchers focused on controlling. What's called and setting. They work ahead of time to ensure the volunteers current mood and surroundings while taking the drugs. Remain as calm and comfortable as possible and so we spend about eight to ten hours with people before they ever get the drug talking about what the effects are talking about. What may or may not happen when they have this experience and that's why we have to train professionals there with them not only to prepare them for that but to help them through the experience when it happens because a lot of people have anxiety coming into the session. The person we spoke to the twenty nine year old participated in davis study group in august of two thousand eighteen. They had no prior experience with psychedelic drugs and didn't know watch expect basically went in kind of blindly. I don't have any other options. So that's kind of my thought process at the time was just basically kind of sticking anything to the wall and hoping it would work after fasting the previous night the treatment can cause nausea. They were placed in a small tranquil room fitted with a comfy couch. The whole room was a really really cool in very comforting because like they had like these statues like imagery in their end like. I think one of the muslim dowa tibetan model. I wanna say this and like there was like this nice lamp. It's off this really. Soft light psychedelic assisted. Therapy participants are encouraged to bring in objects from home to make them feel more comfortable. Some bring in ten bears pictures of family. The twenty nine year old brought a lightness of an ancient sumerian goddess. Soon nana once they were settled in the room. They were given two pills in a wooden cop the therapists top that the sivan would take fifteen to thirty minutes to start working. In the interim they were told to put on ice shades and headphones. That would play a selection of music they choose from classical tibetan chanting african drumming and modern music too. Once the drug fact the participants says the first session became a kaleidoscope of mental images and sensations. I remember being in lake. Felt like mount olympus the fall of the gods like oval the clouds and suffering them. And then one of my god's up to me and she gave me a key fell through the clouds. And i felt all the way down through the earth and i ended up in hell which is really strange because they don't remember being scared even though i was in hell and i remember asking like hey you know why am i hair And it was like haiti's leading me through hell kind of just like showing me around for life this very cold and desolate last. He was like of course. This is where you would come like. This is where you've made your home. The self revelations continued throughout this long session and turned intensely personal. I remember like hearing like the beats. Come on and i felt myself in like this place like all of my ancestors were and i was really close to my grandfather when i was a kid. And he died. Probably around when i was like four and i saw him kind of materialize And he walked towards the youth like these. She'll bananas which is what he's doing her then he handed one to me and i always kind of was afraid that if he was alive he would be disappointed in me and i remember asking him you know. When am i supposed to do like if my family like my parents and lake my siblings can accept me and he said that he'll always be there for me and my ancestors will always be there for me and i like that scene just like it. Metsu in mental to me after about seven hours than drugs started to wear off when it was over. You know you're still kind of like feeling it but just not as intensely so just basically like this really happy kind of floaty failing and we couldn't drive so like i had to have a sister pick me up. They ended the experience hungry and exhausted as for the depression not much appeared to have changed then. They tried the silla sivan trip once more this time with the stronger dose and after that these say they experienced to palpable shift. It felt like i was back into the world again like i was in reality. A lot of people said that not only was there. Depression differently felt like they had come out of dark hole that they've been in for years but a lot of people regardless of whether they're depression was gone or or reduced said that there was something really meaningful different about how they view their life initial results for the study reviewing outcomes from up to a month after the sessions were completed found that silla sivan plus therapy was more than four times more effective than other treatments. Such as medication alone at one week. Fifty eight percent of the sample were in complete remission from depression that actually lasted up to four weeks. After fifty four percent of people were in complete remission and were now studying those same people up to twelve months after to see how long that remission lasted the rest of the participants in the study. Were not in remission they were still experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms researchers have yet to publish the results of longer term outcomes for all the participants their condition up to a year after treatment and this was a small study. Just twenty four people. Some scientists remain skeptical of this kind of treatment not just of silla simon. But of the validity of the data an outcomes for all studies involving psychoactive substances

Depression Johns Hopkins University Silla Simon Silla Zyban Peer Reviewed Journal Centers For Disease Control An Davis Substance Abuse Trauma Silla Sivan Arby Facebook Martissant Alan Davis America Sivan The Wall Street Journal Anxiety Disorder
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 4 months ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
What To Do When a Patient Feels Worse on an Antidepressant

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | 4 months ago

What To Do When a Patient Feels Worse on an Antidepressant

"When a patient says they feel worse on an antidepressant. The first thing to do is to rule out physical side effects like nausea fatigue and insomnia one to pay attention to is academia as patients might have difficulty describing this inner sense of restlessness which is more often associated with anti psychotics but academia can occur on antidepressants as well particularly serota. Energetic ones and agatha can cause anxiety insomnia even suicide -ality so it might be the reason that they're mood is worse on an antidepressant dot in how concert energetic antidepressants calls academia. I thought it was caused. By dopamine blockade it is thought that the inhibitory effects of serotonin have indirect effects on the dopamine system and that it can lead to dopamine antagonism there in the stratum another side effect. that's related to academia. You might see on sarah. Synergetic antidepressants is restless. Legs syndrome which is almost like academia night. If that happens you could add gabba. Penton or pramod. Pack saul both of which treat restless legs in academia and both of which have psychiatric benefits gabba. Penton helps sleep an anxiety and promo pack saul helps depression but another option would be the switch to be appropriate wellbutrin in a randomized controlled. Trial bupropion treated restless leg syndrome. Even when it was dosed in the morning perhaps through its dopaminergic

Nausea Fatigue Serota Insomnia Legs Syndrome Penton Pramod Sarah Academia Depression
What To Do When a Patient Gets Worse on an Antidepressant

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | 4 months ago

What To Do When a Patient Gets Worse on an Antidepressant

"When a patient says they feel worse on an antidepressant. The first thing to do is to rule out physical side effects like nausea fatigue and insomnia one to pay attention to is academia as patients might have difficulty describing this inner sense of restlessness which is more often associated with anti psychotics but academia can occur on antidepressants as well particularly serota. Energetic ones and agatha can cause anxiety insomnia even suicide -ality so it might be the reason that they're mood is worse on an antidepressant dot in how concert energetic antidepressants calls academia. I thought it was caused. By dopamine blockade it is thought that the inhibitory effects of serotonin have indirect effects on the dopamine system and that it can lead to dopamine antagonism there in the stratum another side effect. that's related to academia. You might see on sarah. Synergetic antidepressants is restless. Legs syndrome which is almost like academia night. If that happens you could add gabba. Penton or pramod. Pack saul both of which treat restless legs in academia and both of which have psychiatric benefits gabba. Penton helps sleep an anxiety and promo pack saul helps depression but another option would be the switch to be appropriate wellbutrin in a randomized controlled. Trial bupropion treated restless leg syndrome. Even when it was dosed in the morning perhaps

Nausea Fatigue Serota Insomnia Legs Syndrome Penton Pramod Sarah Academia Depression
Clinicians fear NFL's concussion settlement program protocols discriminate against Black players

Nightline

05:46 min | 4 months ago

Clinicians fear NFL's concussion settlement program protocols discriminate against Black players

"Tonight. Just days away for football's biggest night. The abc news investigation shining a different light on the nfl to black former players. Showing the league accusing it of racial discrimination in concussion related settlements revealing stunning allegations in their first tv interview. Here's abc's ryan smith. Stop your yes we all did. This is the morning routine for former. Nfl defensive lineman keven. Henry crippled with pain from his time playing in the league. My wife used a waste meal. Then when i wake up Usually throbbing so she'll she'll massage me for about an hour. Sometimes i stumble war. I made them fall. Henry and his wife pam say life has become a constant struggle marked by depression. Memory loss and bellsa bangor all symptoms associated with dementia related illnesses which henry believes stem from repeated blows to the head. Football doesn't give you an expiration date. You just expire both ankles. Both knees both elbows both rhys. All my fingers been broken. I've had ten concussions or more. I've had lee seventeen surgeries seventeen. And i'm still getting them. Did you feel like you had some sort of impairment from playing football. I'm not myself. i'm not myself. Henry was further devastated after his claim for compensation to the nfl's settlement program was denied it now for the first time on camera with abc news henry and another former player nausea davenport are talking about their lawsuit accusing the nfl of avoiding paying head injury claims based on a formula that discriminates on race that formula assumes that black players started a lower cognitive level than white players. Critics say the practice widely known as race. Norman makes it harder for black players to qualify for compensation the league caused the lawsuit entirely misguided. I just want to be looked at the same way as a white guy. We bust chops together bro. It wasn't white or black team. We lost together. We won together for henry growing up in small town mississippi. The nfl was his ticket to success after attending mississippi state university he was drafted in nineteen ninety-three by the pittsburgh. What was it like the play in the nfl. It was hard man. i ain't even lie. It was easier to get there in the state there. You have to do whatever it takes to stay healthy and still nephew henry in there for the injured ray sales. That's a good clean. Henry played for eight seasons making fourteen career sacks even going on to play in super bowl thirty but at the age of thirty three. The bright lights of the stadium and the roar of the crowds came to an end and like many other former players. Henry struggled in retirement. Battling what he suspected where the long term effects of the concussions. He sustained on the field. I get a lot of headaches every morning. I have a headache is just a number of things. Man that that that A player goes through man after football. Football this is not fun is not fun. Who live by it's horrible. It's just sad to see. Is his breaks my heart. It really does unable to work and concerned about his family's financial future henry and his wife turn to the landmark two thousand thirteen nfl concussion settlement program which paid eligible former nfl players suffering from the lingering effects of multiple head injuries. In two thousand seventeen. Henry went into get a battery of tests to measure as cognitive functioning assessing language learning. And memory this doctor said that he believes there there is something going on and he was gonna turn report in. He was saying in so many words like his life. There is something wrong. A doctor determined that henry was suffering from cognitive decline consistent with mild dementia. And it's part of the process submitted a claim to a settlement administrator. What was the result of the claiming file. I was denied. The administrator rejected. Henry's claim questioning whether his performance on the tests were valid and asserting that the doctor quote used inappropriate norms. Henry's docker did not use that race warming adjustment. we're to function in our daily lives like normal human beings without any disruption and not become conceited. For two years later henry says with health worsening. He went in for another evaluation with a neuropsychologist. This clinician used that. Nfl recommended formula. That took into account among other things. Henry's and this time. The neuropsychologist found that henry didn't qualify at all. Every time the ball snapped is a car crash for me. And there's no white black thing and that they'll hit me less because on black or hard because i'm black. It's the same thing

NFL Henry Lineman Keven Abc News Football Ryan Smith Rhys PAM Dementia ABC Mississippi State University Headaches Nausea Depression LEE Norman Mississippi Pittsburgh
11 soldiers sick after drinking antifreeze chemical, Army says

Fork Report

00:26 sec | 5 months ago

11 soldiers sick after drinking antifreeze chemical, Army says

"Army soldiers in Texas have gotten sick after they accidentally drank a chemical found in antifreeze. Army officials say the mix up happened after a field. Training exercise. Initial reports indicate soldiers consumed the substance thinking they were drinking an alcoholic beverage. All of the soldiers were taken to the hospital to are in serious condition. The ethylene glycol the soldiers drank, can cause headaches, nausea and organ failure.

Army Texas Headaches Nausea
Fresh Clean Air

Innovation Now

01:09 min | 5 months ago

Fresh Clean Air

"Of the byproducts of racing is combustion fumes that can cause blue like symptoms including severe headaches nausea and dizziness. These maladies are a problem for anyone at any time but pose particular hazards on a racetrack when cars are moving at high speeds working with nasa racing engineers adapted a space technology originally designed for an atmospheric satellite project to create a filter that removes ninety nine percent of all airborne particles providing drivers with fresh. Clean air the compact lightweight filter is part of a compound system to remove noxious gases and other materials from the air. The driver breeds wind tunnel experts at nasa's langley research center then helped engineers develop a mechanism to deliver the cooled. Filtered air directly to a port in the driver's helmet the cleaner air virtually eliminates the carbon monoxide poisoning. The drivers refer to as getting gassed and without the prolonged co exposure. This nasa spinoff helps protect racecar drivers from at least one of headache for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet.

Headaches Nausea Nasa Dizziness Langley Research Center Headache Jennifer Poet
Notre Dame Ranks in Top 5 College Football Programs

The Audible with Feldman And Mandel

05:06 min | 6 months ago

Notre Dame Ranks in Top 5 College Football Programs

"I watched the clips of brian. Kelly press conference and he looked like he was exact exasperated. And i don't know if you're a notre dame fan. How do you feel about this. Because he's i mean he's a really really good coach. We do these top. Twenty five lists every year and brian. Kelly definitely should be in the top five and they have really good players. But i don't know and he's right alabama's done this to almost everybody. They actually didn't do it. The florida but you know was there were still you know it's like we'll see if ohio state gets closer. So let's let's fill people in on the quotes if they didn't see them after the game not surprisingly. Maybe he was surprised. I don't know he was asked a lot about. How does the here how frustrating the question was how frustrated is. How frustrating is it to get to a playoff again lose by this margin the margin not the issue. Losing his losing. I don't know really. What the inferences. This football team battled and they made more plays they being alabama made a few more. Plays on the perimeter. I'm not sure really what the question is when you lose football games you know. There's a few more plays jeff to make. We had the opportunity. You watch the game. I watched the game So everybody needs to continue to carry this narrative that not not good enough. Look at the scores of the games. The albums played all year. And i think when you start changing the narrative little bit then somebody asks as you look at it. You feel like the program has gotten a lot closer. What's the next step. You feel like you guys could take need to take i. I don't really wanna continue to go down this path. We're going to keep getting here okay. And we're gonna keep banging at it and you guys watched the game in you. They had the college football player of the year. Who made some dynamic place. We battled. We were right there. So we're going to keep getting back here. And i'm sorry i don't like it or the national media doesn't like it but we're going to go back to work we're gonna keep recruiting. We're going to put ourselves back in this position again I mean i know. He's got to defend the program. And you know what's he going to say like. Oh yeah we're we're we've got a ways to go But you're right like if you're ordering fan who who still believes deep down the program. That should win the national championship. How do you feel about your coach. Basically coming on saying he's basically trying to say yeah. We don't have a devante smith. We don't have nausea harris. But we were good enough that like if we caught them on the day we could one maybe is that is that we took from it. Yeah and i'm thinking about it. It's like this notre dame team. And i would say it from the last from the jalen smith Ronnie stanley era up. So whatever it is i guess. Maybe it's the last five or six years they've had like some special athletes right. I mean ronnie stanley elite talent offensive lineman jalen field. Jalen fields. Jalen was is home. Ultra talented linebacker. They've had Kyle hamilton is as athletic as any any safety. The country i mean they have some of these guys will fuller was as fast and dynamic as any receiver just about. I mean it's not like they haven't kyran williams of big time running back they just don't have quite enough of them right. I mean like they don't have any of them. It's not like you know. The the line from joey galloway said like northwestern's a bunch of reese davis's you know the inference there is like notre dame has has some guys who would play anywhere and they've always had a bunch of good offensive linemen. They have good tight ends. I don't think they're light years away from having like a team that could win a national title. I mean they're they're a top five team. It's just you know. I don't know like like maybe this is a better way to frame it. Like if they were playing ohio state they have somehow gotten by alabama. I mean Let's take alabama out of the equation if they were playing ohio state and somehow it was a two three game. Let's say let's say that it was just a playoff game but it wasn't. You know as the i. I could see Notre dame beating ohio state. Even after what. I just saw from ohio state alpha. If justin feels plays away did tonight. I couldn't but like i don't think it's out of the realm of possibility like i think there are. You know i watched their. I think notre dame's better team than georgia. I think not notre dame honesty's a better team than florida now. It's easy to say that after you've seen some of these teams get exposed some but lake and those teams. Those teams have played with alabama on a given night right. So i just don't think they have as much margin for error right

Alabama Kelly Football Brian Ohio Jalen Smith Ronnie Stanley Jalen Field Jalen Fields Kyle Hamilton Kyran Williams Florida Reese Davis Jeff Jalen Joey Galloway Harris Smith Fuller
How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

BrainStuff

05:28 min | 6 months ago

How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

"In the nineteen forties. America was under a constant threat from polio. A disease that had a then unknown cause and devastating effects especially in children. It spread quickly through unclean water and unwashed hands leading to symptoms like nausea fatigue. Fever and a stiffening of the body summers especially saw surges infections particularly around swimming holes leading to post polio paralysis and in some cases death on average thirty five thousand people were disabled each year. According to the centers for disease control and prevention president franklin delano roosevelt was among the most notable people to get the condition putting a face to a still uncertain disease. A vaccine was desperately needed as scientists learned about the transmission process including the fact that anyone could be a carrier in the next few years rival scientists jonas and albert sabin worked with teams in their labs on two completely different vaccines. Sabin worked on an oral vaccine. While sulk created an injectable vaccine that using a kill version of polio in the book polio and american story. David m ocean ski writes about the urgency of work. During the time quote. I talk there was reason to hurry the year. Nineteen fifty two was the worst polio year. On record with more than fifty seven thousand cases nationwide the headlines screamed of plague season and polio time. Twenty one thousand victims suffered permanent paralysis and about three thousand died from the very beginning of the polio epidemic. Monkeys were considered to be essential for research before human trials could take place becoming the unsung heroes of the fight to defeat the disease was through animal research that scientists i discovered that there were three strains of the deadly disease. The monkeys were purchased at a high cost from india and the philippines and shipped to the united states. Many died in transit so the national foundation for infantile paralysis now known as the march of dimes began overseeing their import in nineteen forty nine. A foundation established a special facility known as ot farms and rural south carolina to process the monkeys arriving from abroad oak tree farms operated in the picnic colony a beaufort county in coastal south carolina. Originally called the prichard bill primate center. The forty acre or sixteen hectare tract of land along. The river was called by local newspapers. The ellis island for thousands of monkeys from india naturalist john. Hamlet had the job of finding a space for the primate center. That was both connected to deep water ports and airports but also remote enough for neighbors the area he chose closely approximated the natural habitats of the monkeys with its abundance of shady long leaf pines and a mild climate. The monkeys were originally brought into savannah. Georgia one of the region's biggest ports and taken by truck the thirty odd miles or fifty some kilometers to the farm. When air travel became more popular they were flown by a london and new york before travelling by train to the low country. Once they arrived at the farm veterinarians treated the two thousand or so recess and sign a mogus monkeys before clearing them for transport to research facilities around the country. The monkeys spent twenty one days. Getting acclimated and eating a special diet was scientists carefully monitoring their status many went to sell nukes facility in pittsburg and sabin in ann arbor where they were given vaccines to test the vaccine. Strength against the three strains of poliovirus a few locals were aware of the research that was going on at the farm. Despite rumors of people encountering the animals we were unable to discover any opposition to the research facility perhaps because it was not well known and also because opposition to using animals and testing was not very common at the time in the united states. The movement against animal testing didn't pick up steam until around nineteen eighty in any case. The farms purpose wasn't permanent. Once sox polio vaccine was deemed a success and released to the public in nineteen fifty-five the work of qatif arms was no longer necessary and the facility closed in nineteen fifty-nine saban's oral vaccine came into use in nineteen sixty one the foundation that had established the facility. Its attention to reducing premature births. The monkeys found new homes and labs across the country. According to a former employee named louise crawford things at the farm were left just as they were including the monkey cages. A caretaker kept the grass and plant life at bay. The lab was locked up ready for someone new to take on the important task of preparing monkeys for research but that day never came in nineteen eighty the land and its contents were sold to development group. The lab equipment was donated to a local school science department while a farmer claimed the former monkey cages for his own animals. Today acreage along. The river is mostly residential and privately owned thanks to south and saban's vaccines polio cases of plummeted from three hundred and fifty thousand nine. Nineteen eighty eight to just twenty two in two thousand seventeen

Polio Nausea Fatigue Polio Paralysis Centers For Disease Control An Albert Sabin David M Ocean Ski National Foundation For Infant Prichard Bill Primate Center Franklin Delano Roosevelt United States Sabin South Carolina Jonas Fever India Beaufort County Paralysis Swimming
Native veterinarians

Native America Calling

05:23 min | 6 months ago

Native veterinarians

"This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining us live from my homeland of sheer doing via skype and people are often inspired to pursue veterinary medicine because of their love for animals but being a veterinarian is much more than just caring for adorable puppies and kittens. it involves years of schooling in the sciences. Today we're looking into what it's like being a native veterinarian. Some vets work with house. Pets like dogs. Cats birds bets also work with livestock. And they're also in an important part of reducing outta control cat in dog populations in and around native communities our guests on the show today. We'll tell you there's a need for more native veterinarians and technicians and we'll hear more from them about their passion to serve their native communities by working with animals. And you can join us to. Do you have questions about what it takes to become a veterinarian. Are there enough that veterinary clinics in your community. Tell us about it at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and right now we're going to start off in crown point new mexico. We have dr germain day. She is a director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program at the navajo technical university and she is today and is our pleasure to have her here. dr day. Welcome to native america calling and feel free to further. Introduce yourself good morning yet. And this is dr germain day. I would like to introduce myself in The net I am of the touch. Eat ni clan kiani buses. Chain a she does she say they. She doesn't let my pledge there. You said nausea that nasha so to translate that to english. I just said that my Clan is touchy knee. Which is the red running into the water. People claiming i am born and for the towering house clan. My grandfather's late grandfather's clan is salt people clan and my paternal Grandfather's clan is start of the ridge street people clan. I am from coyote canyon new mexico which is on the eastern side of the navajo nation and i Attended the colorado state university in fort collins. Colorado i graduated. I graduated from school in two thousand one. I've been in practice since two thousand one. So it's been about twenty years when i first Graduated vet school. I went into private practice Mixed animal practice where. I worked on small animals and large animals. In some exotics. I worked in the The gallup new mexico and the say benito area initially then moved on to Grants to a clinic and grants. Then i Did some relief work in georgia. Texas california before returning to new mexico worked in albuquerque For a little bit for a few years before i returned to the navajo nation. I started at navajo technical university in two thousand nine as the director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program. And i've been here ever since. Wow and there's been quite a journey to to those different places but what was it that drew you to this profession. Why did you want to pursue a veterinary career swell. So i as. I grew up on a a ranch. I was exposed to Large animals my family owned cattle horses. Sheep goats and I just enjoyed and enjoyed being around animals. I brody horses With my sister brother and cousins starting at the age of about three and Just spent a lot of time outdoors with animals then later as a preteen and teenager. I did some volunteer work at the local veterinary clinic in gallup and really enjoyed that work then as i moved into Graduated from high school and went on into college. I had a professor. That thought i should go to medical school but i realized at that point that i really wanted to go into veterinary medicine and

Dr Germain Tara Gatewood Navajo Technical University New Mexico Veterinary Teaching Hospital Dr Day Coyote Canyon America Skype Colorado State University Nausea Veterinary Teaching Hospital A Fort Collins Colorado Albuquerque Georgia Texas California Brody
Mystery illness puts hundreds in the hospital in southern India

Todd Schnitt

01:16 min | 6 months ago

Mystery illness puts hundreds in the hospital in southern India

"Person has died and over 200 others? Have been put into the hospital. Some kind of a mystery illness is occurring in The southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. This illness was first discovered over the weekend. And the patients there are complaining. Of nausea, anxiety, loss of consciousness. In a 45 year old man who was taken to the hospital and he was experiencing something that was described as almost like. Five epileptic seizure. Yeah, he has something like epilepsy. That was what he described and he also suffered from nausea. He died. And the health officials in India trying to figure out what's going on is the last I saw this was as of Early this morning. In the a time that over 200 people were affected by this mystery illness, so oh, my God, I hope it's nothing Serious. Obviously

Nausea Andhra Pradesh Epilepsy India
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 9 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"nausea" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"nausea" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Dot Com slash coverted nineteen. All right we're back now I think this is a good place to start discussing the fact that are widely acknowledged inherent difficulties with doing rigorous scientific experiments on the effects of psychedelics, and so one of these problems is the problem with Placebo Control now normally when you WanNa test and see if a new drug works, you need to do a placebo controlled test you have to. To do this. If you want to sort out specific pharmacological efficacy versus the placebo effect, you know the effect that sometimes people who were given a treatment, even if the treatment doesn't have active ingredients, just the fact that they think they're being treated appears to cause a feeling that their condition has improved. They'll report less fewer negative symptoms or something like that, so yeah imagine. Imagine you give a hundred people, a new anti nausea drug, and then fifty of them report their nausea going away, was it because the compound in the pill relieves nausea, fifty percent of the time, or could much or all of that response just be due to the placebo effect..

nausea
"nausea" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"nausea" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"You rebound from those because I think you are you had a you know from my perspective you had a fairly good size us sotherly dip and then you had a pretty tremendous recovery yeah how did you orchestrate all that well first of all everybody at freighter was was unbelievable arm died the care that I was given is second to none I mean if if that was the that was a huge part of it they understood what I was going through and like you said is out of surgery on it I was doing great got right up started walking I've talked I was walking the hallways of which depict hunt it was a little crazy but that's kind of how I've always been I've been I I've always been kind of a guy and delete stay in shape he try to eat right so coming into this I had a little advantage on with being somewhat in shape you had thirty seven years old and so that helped but it still hit me pretty hard right after surgery there I had some stomach problems I could keeping the food down and the nausea medicine wasn't working and you guys devised a plan for me to come in and get fluids every morning and the nurse that helped me she was just just the St and that got me through it took I think about three or four weeks of that and I started building back up start coming back and once I felt my feet up underneath me and that's all it took and I was I was off and running you know well so that was so thrilled you're doing so well right now thank you Dr yeah and thanks for coming on the show today thank you for all of you thanks to all of you really a great session on the word on medicine will be right back sometimes.

nausea
"nausea" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"But if you're really gas your accuracy cousin your cognitive function and a tunnel vision is going to go away. You can train that though he had some burpee and hit a free throw poof. Yeah. Stuff like that. Yeah, exactly after it come holler. Yeah, I need a little boost and help right now. Oko nausea, say like in a corporate setting like if you wrote a train like an office or something I think doing stuff like that would be huge. Yeah. That'd be the one in last time that they bring me back if I did what I write. Yeah. Nobody else crate just thinking ever come back, whether it be to team building. But if we did it here. I mean, I just, I think everyone's got upset at me said, but, like, yeah, like dude kettlebells swings. And then some kind of small minor thing. I think it would really like would really help. Yeah. It's it's actually is good for team building on because you know when you do stuff as a team. And you smoke a team everyone gets tunnel vision and they forget about the team. And if the if you can just make it about the team and not about you, that tunnel vision goes away, you know, what's also amazing. When you do stuff like that, as you get to see they'll be someone the group because it's not it's not just strength or muscle related. There'll be someone to group or you go holy shit. I didn't know they had that in them and. Be somebody you've totally didn't expect but they're, they're whooping some ass. You know, or it will be the opposite like shit like. This guy's the one that quit right? Yeah. I would have thought he was the one the strongest one but you really learn about a lot about it was a good thing. Yeah. Yeah. Putting my hands or feet in the ice bucket. Like. I probably won't do so great. I'll try we'll try anything before that happens..

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"nausea" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Forever35

"It's always in there. I set reminders for my phone. So I know like I've reminder half an hour before thing and ten minutes before saying, that's good. I need to do that. And and like everything is in there. And that has been really helpful because I find that when stuff does for whatever reason doesn't make it in there. I I forget about it. But if it's in there, it's it's fine. Can I ask you if you do this because I just started doing something that I am pretty excited about that's helps me cut a stay organized? Which is I put all my pills into a weekly organizer that? I'm just leaving by my bed. I put my vitamins, my fish oil Prozac, I have gone back and forth on pill. Organizers I use them a lot when I was like deepen IVF and taking a ton of good Gillian. I don't use them anymore. Because I have a pretty set rhythm for taking my pills. Now like at night. I take my vitamins at night now. So I take my vitamins, my just my anti nausea medication. I take my prenatal 's I now take Gumy's instead of the hills. I know I'm like can I eat this whole bottle. And then in the morning, I just take dyke GIS and Wellbutrin. And I I set an alarm now for my afternoon. I just because I was forgetting it. And then at like five o'clock, I was like why do I feel like why is there a pit in my stomach? Oh, I forgot to take my anti nausea meds. And then any in them when I wake up in the middle of the night. I have to take my thyroid minutes. So I don't think a pillar geyser like for all. I just have to take stuff. It's such different time. He's like five Oregon. Yes. So I just kind of it's like right before you go to bed, right? When I wake up at two o'clock. I have the alarm and then sometime in the middle of the night when I wake up, I just lean overtake us Synthroid, very impressed that you remember to do that. Thanks, so, but yeah. And like when I go on vacation or away use the pill have recommended one. Yes. I had. So have you been doing blessing? You you know, I've been doing pretty well not gonna lie. You've got that second trimester good, vibration. I haven't thrown up in two weeks. Oh my gosh. That's amazing. I'm eating normally like I have my appetite back, and I'm eating normal food, which is like amazing. My pooping has gone so much better. I love when poops go back to normal. I don't have that. I don't have that taste in my mouth from eating carbs all the time. I think you know, sidebar I think I feel like I heard from a listener or saw in Facebook or something someone was like. I don't know they thought that by my saying, I was I didn't like eating carbs all the time that I was talking about gaining weight. But it wasn't about gaining weight. It was about f- just feeling yucky from eating so many carbs because I I was eating no protein. I was just eating carbs. And I had this kind of yucky taste in my mouth. I know the time, I know the taste we him. Yeah. So that was really what I was talking about. And now kinda back to normal. I feel like I'm actually crave protein now. So it's a whole new day. Wow. I've also been seeing friends that's great. Yeah. Which is really nice like some people that I just hadn't seen in a couple of months because I pretty much fell off the face of the earth. And only saw you. I've been seeing people again. And so that feels really good to just like catch up with people. I also have a cousin because technically she's my second. Cousin our moms or cousins. And she is a freshman at USC. Oh, hello. And I've I've probably met her like once or twice when you know when she was like eight or something like our moms close, but she grew up in Boston. And I just don't really know her. But we were in touch and we decided to get together. So I took her out to lunch, and she's like the sweetest person who is also like really earnest about saving the world, and she's a vegan. And she's in the sustainability. She's she's studying sustainability and she's in the green business club..

nausea Gillian Boston Facebook USC Gumy Oregon ten minutes two weeks
"nausea" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Right everybody prepare yourself for a collective jazz snap because what you're about to hear is is perfect for the nausea pretentious applause of the progressive crowd so here we go it's centers around a an artwork a piece of art beautiful art titled flag number two german artist smeared with black paint when the engraving of a striped sock now according to the artist to this represents a new symbolic meaning in the light of recent imprisonment of the immigrant children at the border oh gosh i've seen this art it was hanging on a flag pole in the university of kansas i believe it was just it's beautiful i mean it looks like somebody just slap some black paint on a flag but that's what it is no no no the german born artists also reminds us let's not forget that we all came from somewhere and the only been we're only recent occupants of this country native cultures new to take care of this continent much better for thousands of years before us oh did they is about time for our differences to unite us rather than to divide us you know i love being lectured bye bye by german because they're always so inclusive when they talked to me about you know hey let's make sure that we're not rounding people up i listened to the germans now this is a an art project sponsored by the creative time project the art project is part of a larger series called pledges of allegiance in which each artist's designs a flag that points to an issue the artist is passionate about because they believe that issue is worth fighting for and it speaks to how we might move forward here's my favorite word collectively oh that is great and you couldn't have found anything else to put it on except an american flag that's that's an interesting choice now most of the other flags have clouds or the blank canvas i like that one is just white it's called laziness god slogans like horror film called western civilization and don't worry be angry it's all a beautiful beautiful art project that you're probably paying for if you if you have kids in university the flag is a collage of an american flag one of my dripped paintings and resembles the contours of the united states i've seen in no it doesn't i divided the shape of the country into two for the flag represents and is designed to reflect a deeply polarized country in which president has openly bragged about harassing women and is withdrawing from the kyoto protocol is if those two things aren't is equally bad as much as we may not like it or agree with it this artist is protesting peacefully now this is the thing they they they absolutely have a right to express their anger and their opinions with their freedom of speech we don't have to like it we don't have to condone it i don't even have to call it art but we're shooting ourselves in the foot if we don't at least respect the right to freedom of speech i'm just tired of paying for it and i'm also tired of hearing from people who say you can't it's cinco de mayo oh my goodness we have to expel these kids who were wearing an american flag t shirt and then you can do whatever you want to the american flag and running up the flagpole at a university these are the same people who throw a tantrum anytime someone orders chicken sandwich from chick fillet but in the end let's just remember we're the ones that actually get the chicken sandwiches they don't have they don't get anything one problem with the flag and that is the display at a public university i just want the left to imagine now i know you don't hear now starting to back away from the first amendment because the first amendment is being used against you no the only reason the first amendment is being used quote against you is because the only speech that needs protecting is the.

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"nausea" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"H a omega three is very important in helping women carry to term and in helping women build if you will a very strong nervous system a very sharp and active brain and very sharp vision in her baby while maintaining her own dha levels to reduce the likelihood of post pardon depression so nutritional status is critically important during pregnancy and and vitamin ds just in that group of nutrients that we want to pay attention to now something that happens on holiday weekends when we have cookouts and maybe we have a tendency to overeat is we may we may end up with an upset stomach and this ties to the pregnancy story because that's something that happens in pregnancy to nausea and very upset stomach well there are foods that are great for an upset stomach and i thought i would talk about that a little bit as we move through this beautiful long weekend ginger top of my list ginger relieves nausea and vomiting and you can grated raw into salads or whisk it into vinaigrette grated ginger you can steep grated ginger in hot water for ginger tea you can take ginger supplement if you don't like that very distinctive flavor of ginger carlson has ginger all which is a very concentrated ginger one little tiny soft gels equivalent to twelve hundred milligrams of ginger powder women that have morning sickness it's kind of nausea and vomiting that occurs during pregnancy taking one of those little ginger capsules daily is associated with five times less nausea ditto for people undergoing chemotherapy and even motion sickness so upset stomach ginger is one of those foods.

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"nausea" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"I had had and i had gone to the doctor about this on so many occasions i'll tell you the way i described i described it as low grade nausea just it's just a low grade nausea was always there well when i stopped going to starbucks it went away i discovered it was a starbucks coffee that was what was giving me the stomach problems and i've been going to starbucks you know practically every day for i don't know how many years it wasn't until i got away from this funny how you don't i guess you know somebody that's a third party they can sort of look at what you're doing but for some reason we can't look at what we're doing and then figured out it's like with sinus stuff you'll have sinus well have you thought that it might be its own but you can get a third party like a doctor we'll saying you know have you have you thought about that for instance i'll give you another for instance on this i started having brain fades i was telling johnny but this time i was having brain faith i mean i would just sit here and just have a complete vaporlock that's what our frontier used to call them but i mean his was you know when you couldn't remember something mine would be like i would be talking you on and it happened a couple of times on the radio and that's why i had to go to the doctor get checked down i would be sitting here talking you and then i would just i mean just lock up and i was telling the doctor i said i would see the word what and didn't know what that was and it would be just for you know i say that split second would be for several seconds i would be looking at something that i was going to relate to you and i have a word it was completely common and i would go i don't recognize that word and i would just freak out and then i would just i couldn't speak so i didn't tell johnny mathis until after went to the doctor because i wanna freak anybody out because you know you never know what it's going to be and so i i went to the doctor and where he's checking everything i.

nausea starbucks sinus johnny mathis
"nausea" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"L look to the show oh oh yeah yeah anyway what kind of programs got you to where you are oh why don't you come down to two penn kerr's approach nausea right down your throat whoa i think we need to take off let's talk like that when i was twelve joe you're describes joe you talk big and then when it's put up with shut up time is joe said now take wolf tickets curtis curtis i'm gonna have to break you gel up i'm gonna have to find a bodyguard to break you joe up it's one eight hundred eight four eight nine two nia cops are hosting meetings in local neighborhoods to find out what it's gonna take to make us off feel safer they want to know what we think so what probably help is having policing neighborhoods be the same inserted communities for awhile i think would help us feel more like okay we know this officer you know there's some sort of connection there's a communication acknowledgement of one each other ashes people go to build a block dot nyc to find the meeting in your neighborhood paid for by the new york city police foundation with zillow you're not just looking for a house you're looking for the kitchen where you'll bake your baby's smash cake.

penn kerr nausea joe officer dot nyc zillow new york city police
"nausea" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Is making it and so there's more of the protein that would cause women to feel nauseous okay so we talked about what happens when you give this protein to people maybe you're going to inhibit their appetite what if you take it away somehow down do some kind of treatment that makes it go away are you going to help women with morning sickness or you're going to help people who have other problems with nausea it potentially could help women with morning sickness it also potentially is helping people right now with cancer who suffer the same kinds of symptoms having severe nausea and vomiting and loss of appetite okay ronnie thanks so much thank you okay dave so you're here just to share what else is on the site this week can you tell us some of the news yes so we've got a story about whether table salt can help us cool the planet also just how accurate are required warning systems and is there a way to make them more accurate for science and set our policy blog we've got a utah air pollution mystery and also and update on chimpanzee retirement the place has been pretty slow and we'll be checking to see if it's speeding up again getting chimpanzees out of research facilities and into sanctuaries so be sure check out all these stories on the site banks dave baser stay tuned for tracy bedrosian she talks about the effect of maternal care on praying sell genomes in young mice.

nausea tracy ronnie utah dave baser
"nausea" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Yeah definitely what did we know about the genetics of morning sickness before this if my mom was morning sick am i going to be morning sick that kind of thing there was a little bit known about whether or not morning sickness was hereditary but this is really the first study to show a genetic link with an identifiable molecule so previous work by this lead researcher showed that if your sister had it you had a seventeen fold increase in also having severe form of morning sickness so this is a genus study chino mm wide association study this new study and so they needed lots of genomes in order to figure out what changes hell they're different between people with or without us so where did they get these genomes from pregnant women who submitted samples to twenty three and me they had about thirteen hundred participants who had the severe for of nausea vomiting associated with pregnancy and fifteen thousand didn't have any nausea vomiting okay was were able to find you said they found a protein did they find specific genes that were linked with us so they found to los i in the genome that are associated to different genes one of them is called gdf fifteen and that one had the highest significance for being associated with the severe form of morning sickness and the other one was also highly implicated it's called iggy f b p seven so they found these low side what what do we know about what these genes do are they in coding proteins or are they doing something else.

researcher nausea los i
"nausea" Discussed on DLC

DLC

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on DLC

"Intimately familiar with in this sounds trite or or just it sounds cliche but like playing it in vr i felt like i was playing these courses for the first time again it was awesome you sat down after me and you're not as big of a wipeout fan but i you're vr fan how it how to feel yeah i i was very impressed with that as well i mean it's thrilling you do have that sense of insane speed that wipe out his known for and being inside the cockpit is even more thrilling because you know you feel like you're plummeting down those those traction defying gravity and going you know in insane insane speeds going off the track which i did a lot because i'm terrible at wipe out is harrowing it's like you feel like you are plummeting off the earth it is it is terrifying media i didn't it didn't mess with me in any way but it it was just like oh god of dum dum gonna die but you're right that when you pop out of the cockpit mode which i foolishly did a few times to try it that is when i did feel a little nausea it was it did it i wasn't nauseated at at any point inside the coptic mode as crazy as i god is wild and i had heard turn all the safe stuff off for me to see 'cause you're like you cannot challenged me let's be honest christmas jeff you mr vr you.

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"nausea" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

Money Radio 1200AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

"But back or you off pain or nausea and because of that a lot of doctors uh you know sometimes they delve into that so if you feel like your doctor isn't taking new seriously kenyan because sometimes doctors i hate to say it i mean supposed to them are very very good but some will ignore some symptoms that are atypical on women that is that is very through of the other things to people get all excited about the cholesterol numbers over sixty five cholesterols brains food cholesterols not that important there are other things too much more important and significant but they've made is so important to people sometimes the medicines she take could be worse than what you have underlying it like i'm not a big fan of law the statin drugs it hasn't been proven to be that effective on preventing heart attack and stroke well i think if you have you know by feeling on the data if you are a diabetic uh if you've had a heart attack or you've had a pro i think the data is pretty good if you are just taking it for primary prevention it is not as good and so uh i think that that is those groups that i'm in favor of it but the problem is that many people can't tolerate the medication as you're bringing up ticket muscle pain they get uh crammed afraid canada fossil ransom as so that the problem which the medications we have today that were once drugs for all for people who take for inflammation has over a hundred markers on cancer is to mark very cheap goods we'll be right back with dr does the real yep quit.

nausea canada
"nausea" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"Leader on neuroblastoma for kids on now oh he is i mean that's a get his or his research alone has like brought this trasco so because but um and he was there i lend hella yeah and i mean but yeah so uh get reaction to the not yet it he had he had a reaction kill but even dr stars at a couldn't we couldn't figure out what was going on how we were just there was a giant rush and blisters covering his entire backing him yeah it was unreal and we are just like what's going on no one can figure it out but yet even through all that like the kid was smiling like being sued three yeah he's he's pretty epic for sure and uh but he has incredible yeah i need to not even like to just like yeah handle his limp in the beginning and not not complain and just that's he's a fighter for astrom lee inspiring totally but yeah chemo so hard on your body as you know and so like we've been trying to feed him like as much as possible and like i'm sure you know like just the nausea that you feel i don't know if you if they give you so friend for nausea or anything like that i that i had some medicine i that sounds familiar right yeah they give you the medicine for the nausea because like foods that he used to love like the hill like everything take i grabbed year he just is the same thing with him he can't hear thing was like really bitter that's right yeah i don't know if it tastes but he can't tell me the tastes bitter but like yeah that he loves like you just nothing case guide that's right yeah so what is the power.

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"nausea" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on WLAC

"The fog not much great very very very large along with that okay well when when you're having that sort of the issue especially with the nausea this associated with it then i would have her go and have your hormones checked out as she had done recently as far as blood where it goes your ago okay yeah that's that's too long i would i would stay on top of this special with these kind of symptoms alistair on top of that about every six months so however have all the different ormuz checked as far as her estrogen there's three of them so don't just let them check one estrogen there's actually three of them they'll need to check progesterone and i would actually have her thyroid levels check all the way around there in at the different forces a hormone the tsa each and every than they would normally shack sounds to me like she's got a little bit of issue wither hormones that's causing this and it's very common there is a substance called black coal harsh very good for helping to vows southie male hormones and win there's nausea associated around missile cycle and the symptoms that she's deal with especially like you said she's already pursuing an already healthy lifestyle for for the body to digest and process he can definitely do do that but i would stay away from from the cows no jerry as of right now and make sure stays away from wheat products anything with grain as in it breads pastas cereals crackers in the like stay off of that for about six to eight weeks and see how she does through a couple of our cycle so i guess about eight weeks and see how she goes through to recycles just by avoiding those two foods and but the black really really great i would increase cod liver oil because the omega3 fatty acids oda these two tables spain's for day to make sure she's getting everything she needs on that end but the nausea ginger extract and ginger root wayne she gets nauseous that should help out and when she each ser meals especially around.

progesterone fatty acids jerry spain nausea eight weeks six months
"nausea" Discussed on Techstination

Techstination

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Techstination

"Congress early going to help you with your just go sir ship we don't have any notion sense of nausea vomiting morning sickness anything that causes nausea vomiting in that in that arena i actually virtual reality gaming is a whole new area for us throats in a lot of people of trouble were through with vr yet so in talking to some let's actually sell the headsets actually one third of the headsets or return because people get some sort of a reality simulation thickness so this is something if they're thinking purchasing or they have a propensity poor motion thickness were probably not that thickness feeling on they might be interested in purchasing relief plan so they can stay in the game longer and they can enhance their gaming skills cool the website of germany's relief brand dot com christine former smith thank you for talking with us thank you so much thanks for sapping by now this we've been telling you about the great productivity great people achieve grain for years and the lined up just keeps getting better the c c wifi radio was a personal favorite that let you tune in to radio stations from all around the world via the internet more than sixteen thousand at all when the weather turns nasty the c c lantern will light the way with led bulbs and never run out of power you can charge it up for many usb source for the twelve old suckered your car or you can simply grabbed the hand crank on top and wind need an even more powerful solution the c c led spot xb runs on standard batteries and puts out nearly the equivalent of a one hundred what lightbulb you'll find those bright ideas and a lot more to like by clicking on the linked to seek rain at text the nation dot com put in the code text a nation for free flashlight with your order seek rain they've been making customers loyal for decades.

nausea Congress virtual reality germany
"nausea" Discussed on Techstination

Techstination

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on Techstination

"Welcome to textile nation were speaking with chris team found smith director of national accounts at a company called relief ban thanks for joining us kirsty thanks for having me for this you really fat has nothing to do with music i don't know now it's with the helps you with your nausea and your rushing and your vomiting of that so is caused by any sort of motion sickness morning sickness so playing strains automobiles a vertigo it's a it's a device you wear on your wrist that helps you with the helps you combat that nausea and vomiting matching prescribed this forces looks kind of like a watch yes it's actually a cluster medical device that was our ecs for years or bringing over the counter for the consumer now you wear it on the underside of your risk and it stimulates your piece six pressurepoint in your risk it travel sentencing no third attack naughty called neuro modulation with a late stimulation says the signal up your medium nerve into your high medicore shen of your brain where it sends a signal downstairs demings says don't get it and it works we'll go through the work with seasickness crew these thickness on any sort of car sick here in the back seat or some people even get thicken the front safercar it helps you put it on in its at what's great about it he turn it on when you need it any turn it off when you don't so if you don't need it you think either is not drew its drug free so you don't have been jess anything in your body.

nausea vertigo chris smith director of national accounts seasickness
"nausea" Discussed on ESPORTS

ESPORTS

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"nausea" Discussed on ESPORTS

"He when it franchises the stakes the having nausea spot while it is better longevity wise for you had to have a sponsor that doesn't fiorella gatien it also means if you're not the winning team you don't get as much money so like you obviously won't your team to win so you get higher sponsorship pays and things like that like you you know good example is recently the cavaliers shoulder there were earth sold their dirty spot on the chest to good year for the winged foot right and and darren revolt tweeted that the only person the only team that he expects to sell higher forest golden state warriors and that's because they're so good like that's because they're so public facing in end obviously bandwagoning is a big part of that so i think that um i think the the concern for mediocrity is a little bit over a loan the ads overblown um because i think that it will become the point where like you make the most money if you're the best he won't let me play devil's advocate for a second because i don't think that's necessarily my biggest concern my biggest concern is actually what becomes of the secondary league now that we have franchise teams in the lcs so basically this gives teams in the professional league chelsea us or the l p l or whatever incentive to basically pluck these really talented players from these lowertier teams and that essentially prevents them from ever getting until leak which is kind of a concern of mine because you can just treat the secondary league as a farm at for talon which is i don't think if you're looking at all.

nausea cavaliers darren