30 Burst results for "Nature Medicine"

COVID-19 Long Haulers Get Specialized Help

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 11 months ago

COVID-19 Long Haulers Get Specialized Help

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it. It's yet another burden added to the healthy body. that's already hurting people. In the

Acute Infection Cohen Fatigue Bergen Melville Newsome Norway Tanya Siam Washington NIH
New Data Released on Long Covid

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 11 months ago

New Data Released on Long Covid

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it.

Acute Infection Cohen Fatigue Bergen Melville Newsome Norway Tanya Siam Washington NIH
Long-haul Covid patients can experience 'waves of symptoms,' early research suggests

The Von Haessler Doctrine

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Long-haul Covid patients can experience 'waves of symptoms,' early research suggests

"They'll be policed. A new study this morning suggest Corona virus symptoms felt in the first week of infection, maybe a predictor of how long those symptoms will last patients with Kovar 19, who felt more than five symptoms. And their first week of illness were more likely to become a so called covert long hauler that, according to a new study in the journal Nature Medicine, the five symptoms experienced in the first week that were most predictive of becoming a long hauler, Fatigue, headache, horse voice, muscle pain and difficulty breathing about 13% of patients are

Kovar Journal Nature Medicine Headache
"nature medicine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Moved expedite approval of a coronavirus relief package comes as lawmakers prepare for the second impeachment trial of former President Trump, which begins tomorrow. Trump's legal team, meanwhile, is calling the upcoming Senate impeachment trial of the former president Political theater As NPR's barber Sprint explains. Trump's lawyers are urging senators to dismiss the charges. Trump's legal team submitted a brief that claims Trump's trial, which begins on Tuesday, is unconstitutional. His lawyers argue the Senate doesn't have the authority to try a former president. Ah claim constitutional experts disagree with House impeachment managers say Trump was directly responsible for the January 6th attack on the U. S Capitol by a group of his supporters. They say he should be convicted and barred from holding future federal office. Trump is expected to be acquitted in his trial because Democrats would need 17 Republicans to join them in voting yes to convict Trump In a previous vote on the constitutionality of the trial on Lee, five, Republicans broke with their GOP colleagues to support moving forward with the process. Corbisprint. NPR NEWS Washington, A laboratory reported suggesting the fines are covert 19 vaccine may still be effective against the variant of the Corona virus circulating in South Africa. Here's NPR's Joe Palka, the new variant seems to be more infectious than the original coronavirus that started infecting people around the world a year ago. And there's been concerned that existing vaccines might not work against it. Those concerns were heightened by a report that the vaccine made by AstraZeneca doesn't appear very effective against the variant. A study in the journal Nature Medicine by scientists that visor and their academic colleagues shows that the Fizer vaccine does appear to work. The conclusion is based on a laboratory analysis of blood drawn from 20 volunteers who had received the Fizer vaccine, although follow up studies will be needed to confirm this. Joe Palka. NPR NEWS electric vehicle maker. Tesla's confirming it's invested more than a billion dollars in the cyber currency Bitcoin automaker confirming it will accept accept the digital currency is payment for its electric vehicles in the future. On Wall Street. The Dow was up 237 points. The NASDAQ rose 131 points. This is NPR. This is W when my C in New York I'm Shawn.

Trump NPR Joe Palka president Senate Republicans AstraZeneca Nature Medicine Tesla New York U. S Capitol Sprint South Africa Washington Lee GOP
"nature medicine" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Authorization in the U. S. Michael Kastner reports. The FDA says the vaccine data appeared to show that people given the first dose of the vaccine did receive some protection. FDA added that the vaccine was highly effective when two doses were administered. No particular safety concerns were detected either flu shots, We could be looking forward to one and done New York City vaccine researcher says it may soon be possible to immunize people against all strains of flu with the universal vaccine Doctor Florian Kraemer at the Icon School of Medicine at Mount Sinai says his face one study shows a strong immune response. Kraemer study, which appears in the journal Nature Medicine, suggests the annual flu shot could become obsolete if this vaccine does well in late stage, clinical trials. Health updates. Early. Kessler, NBC News radio, I heard radio goes one on one with Luke Bryan to talk about how he really grew into loving music. My ninth and 10th grade year I played baseball and I was a pretty good athlete. But I hit my growth spurt and I grew like weirdly and I lost all my coordination. I couldn't run and I had, like my knees were all Buggered up. So so then you know, I kind of started my band and my my. What's interesting is my 12th grade year of high school. I just decided to rehearse for a one act play. And that was my only year that I truly Truly got involved with drama. But I'm actually glad that happen because it did kind of it took me off the path of not being that it actually looks. It.

Doctor Florian Kraemer FDA flu Luke Bryan Nature Medicine U. S. Michael Kastner Icon School of Medicine Mount Sinai New York City Kessler researcher NBC News
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more Brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe unrelenting depression, the world was slow. And gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus of the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior, He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced. On average. There was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Severe Unrelenting Depression Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe, unrelenting depression. The world was slow and gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus at the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior. He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced On average, there was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

"On frontline healthcare workers the physical impacts of. This virus have been devastated. I myself this help have held the hand of dying patients Cried oh for their families that they can't see i've taken care of co workers as they fight for their lives on later as the head of the minnesota nurses association broke down. President elect biden also wiped away a tear promising personal protective equipment and paying sick leave for frontline workers. He said the trump administration's refusal to acknowledge the outcome of the election was preventing his transition team from accessing critical data of the us outbreak. And could slow the distribution of vaccines in two thousand one. There's a whole lot of things that are just we just don't have available to us which is made available soon. We're going to be behind by weeks months being able to put together the whole the all the whole boat. Whatever he says the word whole all i can think is load. Yeah and The origin of the virus now. Apparently the official story is in question once again as very analogous to the climate gates scandal which you recall was a bunch of emails that show that researchers were Changing end values and jack up numbers jacking up the numbers. So this is flinders. University professor nikolai petrovsky. Who has reviewed these These emails about the gain of function and the wuhan lab and i believe someone published in the lancet in a letter. And i'm not exactly sure maybe we'll get more information from the clip but he is reviewed this and seems like The wet market. That story is falling apart. Sciences all about truth transparency. And unfortunately we don't see any of that reflected in these emails. You know we have a situation with a serious pandemic in fact whol at that time were refusing to too cold for the pandemic and we have a group of scientists vice at a particular institute who exactly are implicated at least seen very similar gain of function. Research to balk may have created a virus. Likely seeking to to really. I guess i'm coaching. Save the raiders of these journals This is a a letter. That's not come from an individual or seeing l'institut about the emails clearly indicate the designed kabul that op inside. This is coming from just a group of scientists from around the world when that was not in fact the case so so on scientific principles you know. It really doesn't stand up hope. One day we get to the bottom of we discussed this on this show in great months once ago. Yes months and months and months ago. Including the would i discovered to be the chimera genesis of the noah. Didn't come from a lab which was a letter to the editor in one. One of nature's due to the nature nature medicine one of those. I haven't documented. i should write it up. I don't know why haven't but this is bullcrap. It's obviously this lab created and it was ended differentiate nobel prize winning madison guys set out said betas nobel prize medicine guy nobel prize. Medicine got now. I do one too funny clip okay. This is democracy is the lawsuit is the titles lawsuit now. There is a bit of humor in here. Is like a gallows humor or the kind of thing that if you ever actually worked in a factory floor and anything that Couldn't kill you. What working class people do this this this she brings it out but she brings up in a typical arrogant disgusting way as a these people. You'll hear it. In the end. We can talk about it for a second and waterloo iowa. A wrongful death lawsuit accuses this tyson foods of willful and wanton disregard for workplace safety at pork slaughterhouse. That led to over a thousand workplace infections and at least five deaths the family of meatpacker fernandez who died of covid nineteen april twentieth alleges in an amended lawsuit that quote plant manager. Tom hart organiz a cash. Bion with tackle betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager. How many plant employees with test positive for covid nineteen well. Of course we have that going on alot of apprehensible. Oh my goodness real purdy there on the floor of democracy now so these guys at this at this this supervised the supervisors doesn't mean that it makes it sound like they're the corporate shareholders or something. We're talking about the foreman. Yeah the guy tae game. We'll faster over there slowing down the line. Those dog is a high end supervisors away. She puts it. Of course they would put together a deadpool. Hello what you do what you do. Because it's like what else you got to do. What else can we bet on this week. They did like the bet they can't. There's no football basketball season's over you can't put those together something. I thought was hilarious personal and when she was upset about some more news you can use that will not be revealed to you through the traditional new world order channels on november eleventh. The a portuguese court ruled it unlawful to quarantine people based on a pcr test which is not even a test The court stated the test reliability depends on the number of cycles used and the viral load present. Hello no agenda show for about a month citing jaafar at all twenty twenty. The court concludes that quote if somebody is tested by. Pcr's positive when a threshold of thirty five cycles or higher is used as is the rule in most laboratories in europe and the us the probability that said person is is less than three percent and the probability that said infection is a false positive is ninety seven percent the court further notes psycho threshold used for the pcr tests currently being made in portugal. He's unknown so at least there's people talking about it now. Where was this portugal portugal. Portugal appeals court. What was the source the source onto. Good this is a utica. Feel portugal's that country. Nobody wants to talk decriminalized all drugs and everything went through the floor in terms of overdoses. And everything like that. Yeah did is no. She don't talk about that. Yeah it's a very common sense Country yes in.

portugal nobel prize nature nature medicine minnesota nurses association us nikolai petrovsky tyson foods President biden wuhan kabul official professor utica iowa meatpacker fernandez europe Bion editor
"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

"On frontline healthcare workers the physical impacts of this virus have been devastated myself. This help have held the hand of dying patients. cried. Oh for their family that they can't see i've taken care of co workers as they fight for their lives on later as the head of the minnesota nurses association broke down. President elect biden also wiped away a tear promising personal protective equipment and paying sick leave for frontline workers. He said the trump administration's refusal to acknowledge the outcome of the election was preventing his transition team from accessing critical data of the us outbreak. And could slow the distribution of vaccines in two thousand one. There's a whole lot of things that are just we just don't have available to us which is made available soon. We're going to be behind by weeks months being able to put together the whole the all the whole boat. Whatever he says the word whole all i can think is load. Yeah and The origin of the virus now. Apparently the official story is in question once again as very analogous to the climate gates scandal which you recall was a bunch of emails that show that researchers were Changing end values and jack up numbers jacking up the numbers. So this is flinders. University professor nikolai petrovsky. Who has reviewed these These emails about the gain of function and the wuhan lab and i believe someone published in the lancet in a letter. And i'm not exactly sure maybe we'll get more information from the clip but he is reviewed this and seems like The wet market. That story is falling apart. Sciences all about truth transparency. And unfortunately we don't see any of that reflected in these emails. You know we have a situation with a serious pan-demic in fact whol at that time were refusing to too cold for the pandemic and we have a group of scientists vice at a particular institute who exactly are implicated at least seen very similar gain of function research to balk may have created a virus. Likely seeking to to really. I guess i'm culturally to save. the raiders of these journals This is a a letter. That's not come from an individual or seeing l'institut about the emails clearly indicate the designed kabul that op inside. This is coming from just a group of scientists from around the world when that was not in fact the case so so on scientific principles you know. It really doesn't stand up. Hope one day we we get to the bottom of. We discussed this on this show in great months once ago. Yes months and months and months ago including the would i discovered to be the chimera genesis of the noah. Didn't come from a lab which was a letter to the editor in one. One of nature's due to the nature nature medicine one of those. I haven't documented should write it up. I don't know why haven't but this is bullcrap. It's obviously this lab created and it was ended differentiate nobel prize winning madison guys. Set out said betas. Please welcome nobel prize medicine guy nobel prize. Medicine got now. I do one too funny clip. Okay this is. Democracy is the lawsuit is the titles lawsuit now. There is a bit of humor in here. Is like a gallows humor or the kind of thing that if you ever actually worked in a factory floor and anything that Couldn't kill you. What working class people do this this this she brings it out but she brings up in a typical arrogant disgusting way as a these people. You'll hear it. In the end. We can talk about it for a second and waterloo iowa. A wrongful death lawsuit accuses this tyson foods of willful and wanton disregard for workplace safety at pork slaughterhouse. That led to over a thousand workplace infections and at least five deaths the family of meatpacker fernandez who died of covid nineteen april twentieth alleges in an amended lawsuit that quote plant manager. Tom hart organiz a cash. Bion winner-take-all betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager. How many plant employees with test positive for covid nineteen. Well of course we have that going on hello of apprehensible. Oh my goodness real purdy there on the floor of democracy now so these guys at this at this this supervised the supervisors doesn't mean that it makes it sound like they're the corporate shareholders or something. We're talking about the foreman. Yeah the guy tae game. We'll faster over there slowing down the line. Those dog is a high end supervisors away. She puts it. Of course they would put together a deadpool. Hello what you do what you do. Because it's like what else you got to do. What else can we bet on this week. They did like the bet they can't. There's no football basketball season's over you can't put those together something. I thought was hilarious personal and when she was upset about some more news you can use that will not be revealed to you through the traditional new world order channels on november eleventh. The a portuguese court ruled it unlawful to quarantine people based on a pcr test which is not even a test The court stated the test reliability depends on the number of cycles used and the viral load present. Hello no agenda show for about a month citing jaafar at all twenty twenty. The court concludes that quote if somebody is tested by. Pcr's positive when a threshold of thirty five cycles or higher is used as is the rule in most laboratories in europe and the us the probability that said person is infected is less than three percent and the probability that said infection is a false positive is ninety seven percent the court further notes psycho threshold used for the pcr tests currently being made in portugal. He's unknown so at least there's people talking about it now. Where was this portugal portugal. Portugal appeals court. What was the source the source onto. Good this is a utica. Feel portugal's a country. Nobody wants to talk decriminalized all drugs and everything went through the floor in terms of overdoses. And everything like that. Yeah did is no. She don't talk about that. Yeah it's a very common sense Country yes in.

portugal nobel prize nature nature medicine minnesota nurses association us nikolai petrovsky tyson foods President biden wuhan kabul official professor utica iowa meatpacker fernandez europe editor Tom hart
"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

"On frontline healthcare workers the physical impacts of. This virus have been devastated. I myself this help have held the hand of dying patients Cried oh for their families that they can't see i've taken care of co workers as they fight for their lives on later as the head of the minnesota nurses association broke down. President elect biden also wiped away a tear promising personal protective equipment and paying sick leave for frontline workers. He said the trump administration's refusal to acknowledge the outcome of the election was preventing his transition team from accessing critical data of the us outbreak. And could slow the distribution of vaccines in two thousand one. There's a whole lot of things that are just we just don't have available to us which is made available soon. We're going to be behind by weeks months being able to put together the whole the old alone vote. Whatever he says the word whole all i can think is load. Yeah and The origin of the virus now. Apparently the official story is in question once again as very analogous to the climate gates scandal which you recall was a bunch of emails that show that researchers were Changing end values and jack up numbers jacking up the numbers. So this is flinders. University professor nikolai petrovsky. Who has reviewed these These emails about the gain of function and the wuhan lab and i believe someone published in the lancet in a letter. And i'm not exactly sure maybe we'll get more information from the clip but he is reviewed this and seems like The wet market. That story is falling apart. Sciences all about truth transparency. And unfortunately we don't see any of that reflected in these emails. You know we have a situation with a serious pandemic in fact whol at that time were refusing to too cold for the pandemic And and we have a group of scientists vice at a particular institute who exactly are implicated at least seen very similar gain of function research to balk may have created a virus. Likely seeking to to really. I guess i'm coaching Lead the raiders of these journals This is a a letter. That's not come from an individual or seeing l'institut about the emails clearly indicate the designed kabul that op inside. This is coming from just a group of scientists from around the world when that was not in fact the case so so on scientific principles you know. It really doesn't stand up hope. One day we get to the bottom of we discussed this on this show in great months once ago. Yes months and months and months ago. Including the would i discovered to be the chimera genesis of the noah. Didn't come from a lab which was a letter to the editor in one. One of nature's due to the nature nature medicine. One of those. I haven't documented should write it up. I don't know why haven't but this is bullcrap. It's obviously this lab created and it was ended differentiate nobel prize winning madison guys set out said betas please welcome nobel prize. Medicine guy nobel prize. Medicine got now. I do one too funny clip. Okay this is. Democracy is the lawsuit is the titles lawsuit now. There is a bit of humor in here. Is like a gallows humor or the kind of thing that if you ever actually worked in a factory floor and anything that Couldn't kill you. What working class people do this this this she brings it out but she brings up in a typical arrogant disgusting. Way is a these people. you'll hear it. In the end. We can talk about it for a second and waterloo iowa. A wrongful death lawsuit accuses. This tyson foods of willful and wanton disregard for workplace safety at pork slaughterhouse that led to over a thousand workplace infections and at least five deaths the family of meatpacker fernandez who died of covid nineteen april twentieth alleges in an amended lawsuit that quote plant manager. Tom hart organiz a cash. Bion winner-take-all betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager. How many plant employees with test positive for covid nineteen. Well of course we have that going on hello of apprehensible. Oh my goodness real purdy there on the floor of democracy now so these guys at this. At this this supervised the supervisors. It makes it sound like they're the corporate shareholders or something. We're talking about the foreman. Yeah the guy tae game move faster over there slowing down the line. Those dog is a high end. Supervisors away she puts it. Of course they would put together a deadpool. Hello what you do what you do. Because it's like what else you got to do. What else can we bet on this week. They did like the bet they can't. There's no football basketball season's over you can't put those together something. I thought was hilarious personal and when she was upset about some more news you can use that will not be revealed to you through the traditional new world order channels on november eleventh. The a portuguese court ruled it unlawful to quarantine people based on a pcr test which is not even a test The court stated the test reliability depends on the number of cycles used and the viral load present. Hello no agenda show for about a month citing jaafar at all twenty twenty. The court concludes that quote if somebody is tested by. Pcr's positive when a threshold of thirty five cycles or higher is used as is the rule in most laboratories in europe and the us the probability that said person is infected is less than three percent and the probability that said infection is a false positive is ninety seven percent the court further notes psycho threshold used for the pcr tests currently being made in portugal. He's unknown at least there's people talking about it now. Where was this portugal portugal. Portugal appeals court. What was the source the source onto. Good this is a utica. Feel portugal's country. Nobody wants to talk to decriminalized all drugs and everything went through the floor in terms of overdoses and everything like that. Yeah did we're no she. Don't talk about that. Yeah it's a very common sense Country yes in.

portugal nobel prize nature nature medicine us minnesota nurses association nikolai petrovsky President biden raiders tyson foods wuhan kabul official professor utica iowa europe editor Tom hart
"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

"On frontline healthcare workers the physical impacts of. This virus have been devastated. I myself this help have held the hand of dying patients Cried oh for their families that they can't see i've taken care of co workers as they fight for their lives on later as the head of the minnesota nurses association broke down. President elect biden also wiped away a tear promising personal protective equipment and paying sick leave for frontline workers. He said the trump administration's refusal to acknowledge the outcome of the election was preventing his transition team from accessing critical data of the us outbreak. And could slow the distribution of vaccines in two thousand one. There's a whole lot of things that are just we just don't have available to us which is made available soon. We're going to be behind by weeks months being able to put together the whole the old alone vote. Whatever he says the word whole all i can think is load. Yeah and The origin of the virus. Apparently the official story is in question once again as very analogous to the climate gates scandal which you recall was a bunch of emails that show that researchers were Changing end values and jack up numbers jacking up the numbers. So this is flinders. University professor nikolai petrovsky. Who has reviewed these These emails about the gain of function and the wuhan lab and i believe someone published in the lancet in a letter. And i'm not exactly sure maybe we'll get more information from the clip but he is reviewed this and seems like The wet market. That story is falling apart. Sciences all about truth transparency. And unfortunately we don't see any of that reflected in these emails. You know we have a situation with a serious pandemic in fact whol at that time were refusing to too cold for the pandemic And and we have a group of scientists vice at a particular institute who exactly are implicated at least seen very similar gain of function research to balk may have created a virus. Likely seeking to to really. I guess i'm coaching. Save the raiders of these journals This is a a letter. That's not come from an individual or seeing l'institut about the emails clearly indicate the designed kabul that op inside. This is coming from just a group of scientists from around the world when that was not in fact the case so so on scientific principles you know. It really doesn't stand up. Hope one day we we get to the bottom of. We discussed this on this show in great months once ago. Yes months and months and months ago including the would i discovered to be the chimeras genesis of the noah. Didn't come from a lab which was a letter to the editor in one. One of nature's due to the nature nature medicine one of those. I haven't documented. i should write it up. I don't know why haven't but this is bullcrap. It's obviously this lab created and it was ended differentiate nobel prize winning madison guys set out said betas nobel prize medicine guy nobel prize. Medicine got now. I do one too funny clip okay. This is democracy is the lawsuit is the titles lawsuit now. There is a bit of humor in here. Is like a gallows humor or the kind of thing that if you ever actually worked in a factory floor and anything that Couldn't kill you. What working class people do this this this she brings it out but she brings up in a typical arrogant disgusting. Way is a these people. you'll hear it. In the end. We can talk about it for a second and waterloo iowa. A wrongful death lawsuit accuses. This tyson foods of willful and wanton disregard for workplace safety at pork slaughterhouse that led to over a thousand workplace infections and at least five deaths the family of meatpacker fernandez who died of covid nineteen april twentieth alleges in an amended lawsuit that quote plant manager. Tom hart organiz a cash. Bion winner-take-all betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager. How many plant employees with test positive for covid nineteen well. Of course we have that going on alot of apprehensible. Oh my goodness. I'm sure they talk real purdy there on the floor of democracy now so these guys at this at this this supervised the supervisors doesn't mean that it makes it sound like they're the corporate shareholders or something. We're talking about the foreman. Yeah the guy tae game move faster over there slowing down the line. Those dog is a high end. Supervisors away she puts it. Of course they would put together a deadpool. Hello what you do what you do. Because it's like what else you got to do. What else can we bet on this week. They did like the bet they can't. There's no football basketball season's over you can't put those together something. I thought was hilarious personal and when she was upset about some more news you can use that will not be revealed to you through the traditional new world order channels on november eleventh. The a portuguese court ruled it unlawful to quarantine people based on a pcr test which is not even a test The court stated the test reliability depends on the number of cycles used and the viral load present. Hello no agenda show for about a month citing jaafar at all twenty twenty. The court concludes that quote if somebody is tested by. Pcr's positive when a threshold of thirty five cycles or higher is used as is the rule in most laboratories in europe and the us the probability that said person is infected is less than three percent and the probability that said infection is a false positive is ninety seven percent the court further notes psycho threshold used for the pcr tests currently being made in portugal. He's unknown so at least there's people talking about it now. Where was this portugal portugal. Portugal appeals court. What was the source the source onto. Good this is a utica. Feel portugal's a country. Nobody wants to talk to decriminalized all drugs and everything went through the floor in terms of overdoses and everything like that. Yeah did is no she. Don't talk about that. Yeah it's a very common sense Country yes in.

portugal nobel prize nature nature medicine minnesota nurses association us nikolai petrovsky President biden tyson foods wuhan kabul official professor utica iowa europe editor Tom hart foreman
"nature medicine" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Be direct. About 30 years. Richard just looks journal Nature Medicine, published a study back about 23rd and made this absolutely ridiculous claim. By simply wearing mascot. Higher rates, Americans could prevent as many as 130,000 covert 19 deaths. By the end of next February. That study. Published in Nature Medicine. Relied solely on data from the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics Evaluation. I, eh, Jimmy. That's the same group that's been providing all these stats about the number of people are going to get covert, and they're going to die. And, you know, we're gonna have millions of people die. That same group. But here's where the fear factor comes in. Without anybody ever questioning that study. More than 100 news outlets. Spouted out those findings. The price for not wearing masks, perhaps 130,000 lives. That was the headline in The New York Times. Doctor found she came in Said the same thing. Ultimately We find out That That statistic is based on Incorrect data. But much like If you're looking for the correction in the newspaper or on the television or on the radio, where the news report says X And then they suddenly realized, well, ex isn't true. And you keep looking for the correction because somehow it might affect you. You never find it unless you turn to page a 38. It's down there in the corner, and it just says We screwed up. Never tell you why or anything else. The Jimmy modelers findings. Contained an error, according to the Wall Street Journal that even minimal scrutiny should have cut Projected number of lives saved in the implied case for a mask mandate were based on a faulty statistic. Using a month old survey. The modular, so remember, this is all this isn't anything that's the actual data. This is nothing. This is the same as global warming, climate change, global cooling whatever you want to call it. Call base for models. No, really world data. Just we're going to take whatever temperatures we confined and selectively put those into a computer model and then spit out that we're all going to burn to hell if we don't get rid of hydrocarbons. Or the same thing's happening with Colbert. Just nobody wants to admit it. Nobody wants to talk about it. And so were led down this primrose path that somehow if we don't wear masks were going to kill 130,000 more Americans. Then, when you started digging into it, you find out. Wait a minute, one. That's just a model. I feel like anything you know the old thing about computers, garbage in garbage out. The same thing is true with a computer model garbage in garbage out. It's exactly what they did. Using a month old survey, the University of Washington modelers assumed erroneously that US mask adoption rate stood it only 49% as of the end of September. And so therefore we had all this room to increase mask usage. Now, you may think Trended state. I had a jump ahead of me that I'm about to say well, but actually, the mask usage is greater. And so co Vered. Is going down. Actually, that's half right. Actually, we find that mask use each in this country. Is that 95 Somewhere between 85 95%. According to more recent survey findings, America's mask adoption rate has hovered around at least 80% since the summer. Well, she's a mom. Think about that. So if we're if we're If the model predicting these 130,000 lives would be saved was based on 49%. Utilization of masked by the population, but the real number somewhere between 85 95%. That number would go down right? So When you're told that by wearing a mask, you're going to save 130,000 lives that is statistically incorrect. But let's take it out further, which is what most people fail to do. And it's certainly what most every news organization in the country fails to do because it doesn't fit the narrative of keeping you scared. And that's what we have to do. We've got to keep you scared. Because if mask usage, for example, is somewhere between 85 95% How do you then statistically account for the spike in covert cases, Not infections cases that you're now seeing reported everywhere in the news. I thought the mask Was our condom to stop the spread of this disease. I thought it was the it was the in dollar bill. You know, intuitively that it's not You may not want to admit it, but you know that it's not true. You know, That is not true, because well, for example, the Colorado High School Athletic Association is talking about. You know, we're going to go ahead with the championships will have people in the stadiums were going to do that. But you know if you're going to have Thanksgiving You know, like in California. Well, one person has to dip out the stuffing, and one person has to carve the turkey and somebody has to dip the cranberry sauce. And somebody else has to dip the gravy. Somebody has to pass the rolls. I mean, it's insane. Oh, and and by the way, if you have if you're like me And you have a wife, A son and a daughter and grandkids will you only have one of those over So I gotta pick my favorite grandchild. Form a favorite.

Nature Medicine US Wall Street Journal Richard Jimmy University of Washington Insti Vered Colorado High School Athletic Colbert America California The New York Times University of Washington
"nature medicine" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on WTOP

"30. Follow up to the revelation that anti government paramilitary groups were plotting not only to kidnap Michigan's governor, but also Virginia Governor Ralph Northam. Both governors were mentioned during a June meeting on in Ohio of extremists from several states. So how do these meetings of domestic extremist groups happen? A former undercover agent talks the double D T o p. National security correspondent Jane Greene, the way it works is the leader of one extremist group invites others to meet in a particular location. Typically that location Woz space down the circumstances. Those circumstances, According to my German, a former FBI agent has spent more than a year undercover in white supremacist groups were not terribly complicated. Somebody had access to a particular than you somebody who knew somebody because all of these groups have difficulty finding a venue. The big meeting would break up into smaller meetings where ideas were hatched ideas that were often divorced from reality kidnapping the president of United States. With a group of 12 people. G Green Tea Opie News. Some new research finds nations that shut down early over the covert 19 pandemic avoided large numbers of additional deaths. In a study in the journal Nature Medicine, scientists looked at the number of weekly deaths and 19 European nations, New Zealand and Australia, comparing how many would have died between mid February to May. If there were no pandemic. The study found that 38% more people died in Spain then would have been expected without call that 19. There was significant excess deaths in Italy in Scotland as well, while some nations had no large changes, and Bulgaria actually saw decrease, Alison Keys, CBS News It's 2 37. Warm days.

Governor Ralph Northam Jane Greene Ohio Michigan Virginia FBI Nature Medicine Spain Alison Keys kidnapping CBS United States New Zealand president Bulgaria Italy Scotland Australia
Using marijuana in pregnancy may heighten baby's risk of autism

Business Rockstars

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Using marijuana in pregnancy may heighten baby's risk of autism

"Use and pregnant women and autism in their babies as we hear from use radios John Hunt the risk of autism may be greater in babies born to women who use marijuana during pregnancy, according to a new study published in Nature Medicine. In analysis of data for more than 500,000 Canadian mothers and their Children, researchers found a 50% increase in autism spectrum disorder in kids whose mother used cannabis while pregnant. Well, it's known that substance used in pregnant women can affect a fetus is neuro development. The question of whether cannabis use is a risk factor in autism has not been thoroughly investigated until now, according to Johns Hopkins University. The Children were followed for an average of seven years during which 7125 Children were diagnosed with autism Spectrum disorder. President Trump now wants to delay the G seven

Cannabis Johns Hopkins University Nature Medicine John Hunt Marijuana Donald Trump President Trump
Coronavirus symptom checker app predicts infections with nearly 80% accuracy

Clark Howard

02:07 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus symptom checker app predicts infections with nearly 80% accuracy

"There there is something very promising that is working very well in tests here in the United States and also in Great Britain there is an app that is fascinating because it allows scientists to track coronavirus faster than public health authorities can do so and it is so simple it's amazing I've been using this app there is extensive write up in the journal nature medicine which is an offshoot I guess of nature anyway in this app Falam vet it was able to predict whether somebody was going to develop coronavirus with eighty percent accuracy it's unreal how successful it's been they've also been able to figure out who is the likeliest individual to what are the likeliest symptoms an individual will have leading end to having coronavirus yeah we've heard over the minds about the dry cough and all that that didn't even make the top things that they found that people self report they've had who later turned out to have it and didn't number one predictor loss of taste and smell by far followed by extreme fatigue and extreme muscle pain this app is all self reported stuff I mean you don't have to do it at all it's something you can do and it's something that I have been thrilled to use my wife has downloaded as well and go to the apple store or the Google play store and download the covert symptoms study that's believe it or not the name of the

United States Britain Nature Medicine Falam Dry Cough Google
"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on No Agenda

"Yeah the FBI busted in so one of the things. I ran into stores. I'm still concerned about this I did a little research going to get it out of the way before we go into the further to the next segment so I started doing some research on because I'm concerned about this main. The lab or not made in the lab. The lab were not made in the lab. And why is make such a big deal of a big not made in a lab? So what if it was made in the lab? You mean the virus that Caro- virus Chinese lab which funded by the US government. Do we funded him to three point. Two million bucks foul cheese the one who push. He's the one who got the money over to the Wuhan lab to develop enhanced. Ppe's right in is a potential pandemic pathogen. And they're being invented there invented. There are a lot of these are illegal to do in this country even though they've relaxed the rules so I started looking into. What the Hell was the The causal why wise it. Why does everyone say for example? Hurry screen of Austin says this debunked because he gets paid to say that is debunked. So I said okay where get debunked debunked it so I ran into a lot of pieces that were just bogus poorly written planted articles. Many coming out of Indiana running than being pointed to buy Yahoo News. For example knowing WHO's gritting founded the set I found by found the next US I found a point of debunk. Aw Okay let me guess alternate knowing that when be it has to be a good sources. Nature Medicine magazine. Nature has another magazine called Nature Medicine. Very famous peer-reviewed. Good article how this nature dot Com right. Yeah it'd be a nature dot com. Yeah so so. In March of March seventeenth to twenty twenty issue. There's this thing posted the proximal origin of SARS Cova too so to This was cited by the New York. Times an article that was cited by PBS. The next day every major newspaper the United States ran. The debunk debunk. Because of this particular piece but what was this piece well I have a copy here it. It was run under correspondents. It was a letter to the editor by Christian Anderson or guy named Rambo. These guys are scattered all over the World Christians in southern California this is. This is some random expert who wrote a letter to the editor on these are not Rando. Expertise are famous virologists in K. scattered around the world They wrote a letter. To the editor strategically scattered yes strategically scattered. And there's articles all over the world about this calling it an article calling it a research paper. It was eight letter to the editor that looked a lot like a research paper but it was still to the editor letter to the editor showed up in the correspondence section and they went on and on and on with a very long right up with charts and graphs and stuff like this. This is the nut graph here that it was not a peer reviewed anything. It was a murder to the letter to the editor. I mean everybody. Rounded result was an article or as something or other and it was. This is the thing that note. Not One of these not the New York Times Washington Post Not People. Nobody ever said it was a letter to the editor but I have right here a letter to the okay. Let me use read one paragraph to this letter to the editor. It's a great catch. I thought so but thank you thus this is just amongst all arguing bus the high let me get. The right lasts for this way. Do you need your highest entity. Binding of the SARS COV to spike protein to human ace to which they were talking about right. He's South Korea the ace to most most likely the result of natural selection on a human like ace to by the way. I should mention these guys cannot and nobody can find an animal that has this virus in it. No THEY KEEP. Russ trying to tell us to. Yeah monkey natural selection on a human or humanlike ace to that permits another optimal binding solution to arise. This is ace. This is strong evidence that SARS Cov to is not the product of purposeful manipulation. Okay let's look at that sentence. The wording this is strong evidence. I'll go back to the previous phrasing. The strong evidence is this phrase as to is most likely the result. It's like you goal from the word most likely to strong evidence within two sentences. The strong evidence is something that was stated as most likely this is horsh it and the mainstream media the next day ran this as Gospel and that was the debunking all in.

editor South Korea United States Nature Medicine FBI Nature Medicine magazine New York Wuhan Indiana New York Times Yahoo California Austin murder Russ Christian Anderson Rambo
"nature medicine" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Ten minutes newsradio six ten W. I. O. D. thank you if you have a wonderful weather channel meteorologist is race Beijing coming right a good morning Jimmy address north of lake Okeechobee some showers thunder showers start to get going check the rate does go up this afternoon that'll be one of the changes will get sector to be captured not quite as hot as yesterday's record tying ninety three degrees today probably in the upper eighties might get ninety close to the time that rain starts tonight any showers thunderstorms led early but will scattered showers and thunderstorms around again tomorrow tomorrow's chance is that about sixty percent eighty six they will go back in the low nineties over the weekend Saturday looks like a catcher's showers and thunderstorms but right now going with a dry forecast you meet for Sunday so we took a look at the heat on the ninety degree heat for a couple days and come back for the weekend and Monday Monday we could actually get into the middle nineties no boys all right another hot few days thanks I will talk to you next RC that it's a lot of new program others a new about the claims that below are infectious two to three days before they start showing symptoms of the virus which really is a problem this is published in the journal nature medicine so that it said that the highest viral load in the store tribes happen when they start getting symptoms but they're they're two to three days before that means that contract tracing they're doing they're going to have to readjust that to basically back time it when someone does show symptoms and that's a problem for scientists and for all of us.

W. I. O. D. Beijing nature medicine Jimmy lake Okeechobee
"nature medicine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on KOMO

"Dot com but instead he shuts down a conspiracy theory about coronavirus gaining traction online conspiracy theories claiming covert nineteen was engineered in a lab as part of a biological attack on the United States that doesn't jibe with the evidence and analysis first published in the scientific journal nature medicine including that the novel coronavirus is not a human creation because it does not share any previously used virus backbone the researchers say covert nineteen is ninety six percent identical to a corona virus found in bats but the mutation that made it so infectious is been seen as naturally occurring in other coronaviruses Dave Packer ABC news NBA basketball's been on hold for two weeks there's still no clear answers to when we'll see it again but when players do return they're likely to face a different reality there will be no roar of the crowd to drown out the sounds of bouncing basketballs and squeaks of athletic shoes when games resume says ESPN's Brian Windhorst at least in the short term it's going to be an empty arenas or even anti aircraft hangars when they put down the court and it's probably going to be in a centralized location the players can be sequestered not being in as close touch with players to train normal slow their conditioning to get into shape to return as ABC chucks Iverson with lots of focus on toilet paper sales at large stores a Walmart Springfield Missouri the toilet paper aisle was where a woman gave birth a labor nurse you happen to be in the store helped baby and mother are doing well this is ABC news balance of nature spirits and veggies right Hey I don't want to really be without it because I haven't really been sick in two years I used to get something bronchitis laryngitis hold something at least one I haven't had any self that's going to last you know it's pretty amazing right now balance of nature is offering thirty five percent off on any new preferred order go to balance of nature dot com and use discount code fruits Brian Clark ABC news the west.

United States nature medicine ESPN Brian Windhorst ABC Iverson Missouri bronchitis Dave Packer NBA Walmart Brian Clark
Conspiracy theories and myths about the coronavirus, debunked

Mac and Gaydos

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Conspiracy theories and myths about the coronavirus, debunked

"News a new study shuts down a conspiracy theory about the novel coronavirus gaining traction online conspiracy theories claiming covert nineteen was engineered in a lab as part of a biological attack on the United States that doesn't jibe with the evidence and analysis first published in the scientific journal nature medicine including that the novel coronavirus is not a human creation because it does not share any previously used virus backbone the researchers say covert nineteen is ninety six percent identical to a corona virus found in bats but the mutation that made it so infectious is been seen as naturally occurring in other

United States Nature Medicine
Jake Goldenfein on Google Scholar

Good Code

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Jake Goldenfein on Google Scholar

"Our guest today is Jack Golden Fine. He's a post doctoral fellow slow at the digital life initiative and he's originally from Melbourne Australia. He's research looks law in Computational Society including including the impact of platforms on user behavior. He's most recent piece of research. Looks at Google scholar. A relatively new free web search engine that indexes scholarly work in which has quickly become central to academic life just like other Google services have in other disciplines. I sat down with him just before the holidays and I began by asking him to explain what Google scholar is for the non scholars among us. And why it's become so important Horton. In recent years Google Scola emerged in two thousand and full when it was first launched it was just an academic search. Such engines are just like Google that ordinary such engine accepted return. Scholarly results how it defines something as scholarly has always been a little a bit vague. And maybe we'll talk more about why the Vagary of that is a bit problematic but the idea was it would return results that were relevant for scholars. Looking King Faculty make work since then. It's had a few more features added that perhaps beyond set actually more important or have had a bigger effect on the academic field in two thousand and six you able to stop saying citation counts associated with particular scholarly documents and then three years later. Two two thousand eleven google Google scholar launched sort of citation platform and what they did was give each racer. A profile like scholar profile filed outlined oleo publications and the citation counts of those publications calculations of academic quality or the quality of eraser. Sure premised on the amount of citations their publications getting over particular number of us. Silly amount the number of times other researchers will quote from your research search in their own research. Exactly it's the number of times that An article a document that you ride is referred to by other researches. It's pretty new right. You said it it started in two thousand and four so less than I mean a little over ten years. How how big is it now in the field? It do every researchers look at it when they're working on a new topic or so I would say. Almost every researcher would be familiar with it when Dougal scholars such sort of emerged on the sane librarians. This who Training young racers will always telling them be very wary of this because we sort of don't understand how it works as well as we understand. How other academic search search engines wet? It's also interesting. Because most academic search engines are quite disciplinary specific and they all they return results to a particular the corpus or repertoire of journals whereas Google scholar is disciplined agnostic a returns results across disciplines irritations results from academic journals but also other kinds of publications and whereas in traditional academic search engines. You have quite a lot of control over. What what you're searching for in Google scholar you have relatively limited control you can you can constrain the dates? But that's kind of more or less it. So it's always occupied had a bit of a funny position in research toolkit but it's increasingly a used because we're getting a lot more sort of disciplinary environments where people are interested in finding out information outside of their discipline and so google scholar becomes sort of fest port of coal in that kind of instance. But the thing that we're finding is maybe the big use of Google scholar is it's it's citation counting function it's bibliometric function on because what Google Scuola represents his really the easiest way to say. How many citations a particular research has received how come like what? Where did you get those metrics before? and and why were they less easy to find. People who are metrics have been around for a long time in the fifties those information scientists named using Garfield field. Who developed this process of citation analysis? Way You could effectively automate the organization. That is the indexing of scholarly work Iraq by its references so libraries with struggling with how to organize exploding amount of scientific and scholarly literature. And they will. Also you're thinking about how to to use computers to do that. The problem with during that is the sort of need to figure out a way to define the subject matter of of a publication in a way that a computer can understand and Eugene Garfield came up with a really clever way of doing that which is to look at references. Organiz it by the references rather than the actual actual content. This idea was really successful. It was really useful research tool but it also became clear quite early on that counting. Citations could give you a really Sort of rough guide to the quality of work because it gave you a measure of its reception in the field. It didn't tell you how people were trading but a told you people were rating in had some some sort of visibility. So through the sixties and seventies this eventually turned into a commercial product and in the nineties that was purchased by Thomson Reuters Webb of science over the last couple of decades has been probably the primary tool to get metric information but it's number one. The product was General Impact Factor in journal impact factor measured the number of citations to articles in particular journal. Over set a number of years. This citation analysis was used primarily for evaluating the quality of channels rather than the quality of individual researches now individual researchers started added to organize their own sort of scholarly prestige around the prestigious journal. Yeah so if you publish a nature medicine for example for a doctor it's not the same mm-hmm as in a local journal. That might be great but less has left citations nationally. Exactly so what we see during the seventies eighties nineties his citation starting to do lots of interesting things. We started to see journals effectively set their price according to the number of citations that were getting individual scholars. Who now were in this more competitive scully? Well because you know in the second half of the twentieth century the number of scholars in Christ raced dramatically along with massive increases in funding to. There's a lot more research is. There's a lot more research. Things are getting more competitive. The Prestige of your journal Becomes go away to sort of define your position in a market

Google Jack Golden Doctoral Fellow Computational Society Garfield Field Eugene Garfield Melbourne Australia Horton Researcher Scola Iraq Scully Nature Medicine Dougal Thomson Reuters Webb
During Brain Surgery, This AI Can Diagnose a Tumor in 2 Minutes

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

During Brain Surgery, This AI Can Diagnose a Tumor in 2 Minutes

"New research says artificial intelligence can diagnose brain tumors during surgery in less than two and a half minutes the research published in nature medicine leverages the power of artificial intelligence with an advanced optical imaging system to accurately diagnose tumors while the patient is still on the operating table tests found that the Hey I made slightly more accurate diagnoses than human pathologists did and in just minutes rather than the half hour the

Nature Medicine
Elite Runners' Microbes Make Mice Mightier

60-Second Science

03:26 min | 3 years ago

Elite Runners' Microbes Make Mice Mightier

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin the microbes in our intestines. Help keep us healthy strengthening our immune systems, and promoting metabolism, but they may also give us a leg up when it comes to moving our legs up and down again, rabidly and repeatedly. Because a new study finds that mice that are fed bacteria isolated from elite athletes. Log more time on the treadmill than other mice that are treated only to 'Bacterial found in yogurt the results appear in the journal nature medicine Alexander caustic microbiologist at Harvard, Medical School was initially interested in hell, the gut microbes of people with diabetes might differ from folks without the condition. The idea being that tweaking the microbiome might help to treat the disease, but the question of enhancing overall health and fitness can also come from the other direction. But here, the question was more. What's unique in the microbiome with someone who is? Supremely healthy? And can we use that feature of the microbiome to transfer into other people to potentially make them healthier and handy window into the gut is poop so caustic, and his crew asked fifteen runners, who completed the Boston marathon in twenty fifteen to provide daily stool samples from a week before the race to a week after they also collected samples from ten people who were decidedly more sedentary and they tell you the bacteria present in each? And when we looked at this data, there was one thing that really jumped out at us, and it was this genus of bacteria that isn't, so, well, studied vinyl, we found that it was very significantly higher in abundance in the gut after the marathon, but not only that it was found much more frequently in elite marathon, ROY. Owners than in the general population to see whether this microbe might provide the athletes with any benefit the gave some to mice, and then let the little rodents run and they found that the mice loaded with via nila spent more time on the treadmill than those that got lactobacillus and this was an increase of thirteen percent. I think any endurance athlete Ernie athlete in general. We'll tell you that thirteen percent increase is pretty significant. Now the interesting thing about viola is that they thrive on lactate, which is a chemical produced by fatigued, muscle, the bacteria, consume lactate and converted into a fatty acid called proprio Nate, then mice that were treated to proprio Nate, which was delivered via teeny tiny Animas to mimic. It's released by gut bacteria. Similarly extended their treadmill time. And so this creates a kind of positive feedback loop and helps us to understand why vinyl might be enriched in elite athletes. And I. Place, exercise produces lactate, which feeds by Annella by Annella produces proprio Nate, which somehow promotes endurance, at least in treadmill trotting mice, which means that, gut microbes may hold the secret to extending that workout without getting hooked. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Nature Medicine Alexander Boston Nila Harvard Viola Medical School Thirteen Percent Sixty Seconds
"nature medicine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on KOMO

"The life of a researcher. So it's fairly easy to understand why Dr Xu crop. Metallica is on one of life's highs this week. His job was to offer some perspective on the process of editing genes, as a way to prevent disease and that perspective was published this week in nature medicine, people think that shouldn't be doing genetic diseases using genetic tools that we use today, revelations of the world's first gene, edited babies in China last year led to calls. For more. Story on all research along these lines. He says the research can help though it can lead to the prevention of inherited disease. They have thirty eight but the complete dancing is fitness therapy will be would mean to deliver divisions. Vo quite some time yet as proud as he is of the perspectives trying to offer the researcher is beaming for a second reason, not only did he get published. But this work was completed with the help of his seventeen year old son. Paul was definitely learning curve, China understand all this complex scientific terminology as Paul was interning for his dad this year, and actually helped write this paper he decided to, to give an mkx wa because he can it. So Mike in, in the writing. So at age seventeen he's published in a medical journal, has part of a dad and son research team. In case you're wondering policy hit it off to Stanford study medicine next year. Point, the things allow like I made this announce this paper. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. Proud Papa old on the family, there, WalMart, speaking of education, hopes to make the grade with some of its youngest employee's, we have the story now from ABC's. Daria Albinger, WalMart's expanding its debt free college benefits to employees who are in high school. It's going to offer free college SAT and ACT prep courses as well as several free, general education courses through an educational startup. The retail giant says it's necessary as it competes with other major employers in a competitive job market, WalMart, estimates about twenty five thousand of its employees are under the age of eighteen. Daria Albinger, ABC news. If you're looking for quick at now, as we believe free-range living is good for hens and kids alike. Let's listen in tire floor is hot lava that will definitely catch on fire, the couch, save the beanbag..

WalMart Daria Albinger researcher China Mike nature medicine Paul Metallica ABC KOMO Papa old Brian Calvert seventeen year
Google, AI And Lung Cancer discussed on Joel Riley

Joel Riley

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

Google, AI And Lung Cancer discussed on Joel Riley

"Minutes. If you're looking for a second opinion, especially on medical stuff, yada. Ask Google, the tech company along with northwestern medicine developed AI artificial intelligence, a model that detects lung cancer from screenings now, less you Papu this, the AI outperform, six human radiologists five five percent. And the AI. Eleven percent less likely to produce false positives that according to research published in the journal nature, medicine today, trials and testing continue Google plans to make a available through its Google cloud healthcare, API. So,

Google AI Lung Cancer Five Five Percent Eleven Percent
"nature medicine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

05:27 min | 3 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"With us on your ride home. If you're just listening at home, our top stories, a suspect is under arrest in connection with the shooting of a grandmother from Mana pan Senator Ed Markey has a proposal to make gas pipelines safer. Guilty pleas from publicity Huffman and several other wealthy parents in the college admission scam and four Americans are killed in a road time bombing attack in Afghanistan, the Taliban claiming responsibility back to the measles. Case of the measles is now diagnosed in a patient in Dartmouth. The Hawthorne medical associates healthcare facility has written to all reason. Patients and the mass department of public health notifying them of the diagnosis of measles last week, the CDC again, urging anyone who believes they might have been exposed to measles to call their doctor just don't show up in the waiting room because then you infect everybody else across the nation. Measles cases are on the rise more on that tonight from reporters of Rena cupid. The US is on track to surpass the current record six hundred sixty seven cases back in two thousand fourteen right now the number of cases, jump from three hundred eighty seven to four hundred sixty five. In the first week of April and the disease has now spread to nineteen states. The CDC's Dr Nancy missile heads that are getting infected by measles or getting it because they're traveling abroad. Or they're exposed to people who have traveled abroad, these is endemic in many countries of the United States. The majority of people who got measles were unvaccinated Sabrina cubit for CBS news, Atlanta, curing cancer is the holy grail. And now an experimental cancer. Vaccine is showing promise a study out today in the journal nature medicine says that were promising results in the test on a small clinical trial of patients with lymphoma at New York's Mount Sinai hospital the treatment is referred to as a vaccine because it causes a person's immune system to fight the disease, but it is not preventive like the flu shot. The new trial will continue to test on patients with lymphoma as well as those with breast and headed neck cancer. There will have to be larger trials before even going before the food and Drug administration for review and telemedicine. We've heard a lot about it lately. The benefits it's easy. You just call your doctor, and they're they're on the cell phone. You don't have to drive. It's also very helpful for underserved rural areas to have medical access, but there's a fly in the moment of telemedicine as we hear from ABC's. Jim Ryan, telemedicine is the cost and time saving practice of doctors visiting patients via computer or smartphone. But researchers have found that young children seen by a physician remotely are much more likely to be prescribed antibiotics, even if anti-biotics are not indicated as the appropriate treatment that could lead to kids becoming immune to add -biotics at best or developing severe allergic reactions at worst the American Academy of pediatrics has previously raised concerns about using telemedicine in diagnosing kids illnesses, Jim Ryan, ABC news. A teenager who got addicted to nicotine in high school is now leading the push to raise the minimum age for buying tobacco and vape products medical consultant for CBS news. Dr Tara knew Rula with more. Matt Murphy, kicked his habit nine months ago and has become an anti nicotine advocate himself. His biggest message to teens thinking vaping is ways to prevent that. In his to stop. If you never dig yourself a hole. He never have to climb out of the hole. Just don't they'll start digging jewel which makes up about seventy five percent of the e cigarette market. It tells CBS news it's strongly supports raising the buying age for tobacco in vaping products to twenty one and hundreds of towns and cities have already done so including nine states, including Massachusetts raising that legal age to buy tobacco to twenty one. And just last week a Republican congressman from Alabama introduced a Bill to make twenty one the legal age to buy tobacco. Across the nation. A new kind of business park is coming to Auburn. Maine, and it's quite green Atlantic cannabis collective and partners are developing thirty two acres of land to create that states first cannabis business park in California, the grapes could soon have some company in wine country sonoma's valley growers will hear this week about the proper pairing of wine with we'd former winemaker turn cannabis farmer will also map out the best farming methods for growing both marijuana and wine grapes, marijuana sales in Colorado, a going towards anti bullying programs in that state Parkview elementary in a rural part of Colorado just received more than one hundred thousand dollars from cannabis sale taxes student khloe Fernandez spoke was CBS's berry Peterson. She says she learned how to stand up to a bully from the schools new anti bullying class to the boy, Tom to stop or. We're going to tell them, and we're going to stop it ourself. Then what happened? They never touched or did anything to park again. Scurry click going to the bullying because I'd my the friends that came with me to towns here in Massachusetts are also benefiting benefiting from cannabis companies the city of north Hampton most recently got a check for more than seven hundred and thirty.

CBS cannabis Measles United States CDC nicotine Massachusetts Ed Markey Dartmouth Taliban food and Drug administration Jim Ryan lymphoma Senator Huffman ABC nature medicine Afghanistan Rena cupid
"nature medicine" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The entirety of my career. I have fought against the powerful powerful people powerful corporations. I will never stop fighting that good fight. I am highly competent that when all of the evidence is laid bare in connection with these cases when it is all known when due process occurs that I will be fully exonerated Justice will be done that was Michael Abernathy. Now new research has cast doubt on the traditional rather dispiriting belief that we are born with all the brain cells. We will ever have researchers at the university of MADRID Spain of found that people keep making new brain cells throughout their lives. The team says the number of fresh cells tails off with age and falls dramatically in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, or health and science correspondent, James Gallagher reports were you ever told you were born with all. The brain cells you'll ever have. Well, this study looks at fifty eight people's brains with the oldest of venerable ninety seven years old. The scientists found new cells forming in all the brains. They were looking specifically at the hippocampus is part of the brain involved in memory and emotion, and the beat you need to remember where you park the car. The study of nature medicine showed neurogenesis as it's called slows gradually with age the research team suspect that new brain cells will form for as long as we keep learning and as far as the brains concerned every experience in every second of our lives is something new to learn. So we may never stop making new brain cells. But it's a different story without Seimas. Even in the earliest stage of the disease. There was a dramatic reduction in the creation of new brain cells the team of the university of Madrid hold their findings will give them new clues to help tackle the disease. That was James Gallagher reporting, and it brings this edition to distribution of the BBC World Service in the US is supported by Kronos, offering cloud based workforce management solutions designed to help organizations of all types and sizes reduce labor cost improve workforce productivity and minimise compliance risk kronoScom workforce innovation networks and by Magoche online.

James Gallagher university of MADRID Spain Alzheimer's disease university of Madrid nature medicine Michael Abernathy Seimas Justice US BBC World Service Kronos Magoche ninety seven years
"nature medicine" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"So so we very much worked in reverse where we followed our patients, and now we know which of the lesions developed into a cancer which disappeared, and then we've gone back and got those biopsies out of the freezer, and then we look at the DNA and Aren AM proteins to Sipho which of those are. Abnormals in the people that eventually formed cancer and with what degree of accuracy, can you make those predictions really pretty good. So ninety percent accurate. What have you learned about? How these cancers? Do. I'm progress of why they happened in the first place. Yes. So that's that's going to be the real challenge because the the amount of data that we've produced an now published in our in our paper this week in nature medicine is enormous. And that she is going to take us and many groups around the world now to dissect out, which pause ways genes, we think the most important so that we can in the future perhaps develop a therapy or treatment to target these abnormal pathways. Let's hope so some Danes there on the city has just been published in nature medicine now time because at the start of the some of us might some resolutions that we were going to be a bit more active certainly needs to be because according to one stuff. See the average. Brit spends more than eighteen years of their adult life, literally sitting on the backside, but why is being sedentary so bad is he clock has been investigating? James Brown kinda hit the nail on the head get up off of that thing when it comes to Senator behavior getting up from that thing, whether it's a chest. So for any other of your favorite seats for that fact is good for you general moving or walking. We'll do the trick century James Brown style. I guess you could say don't till you feel better. And even if.

nature medicine James Brown Senator eighteen years ninety percent
"nature medicine" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"A peer reviewed study on their technology in nature medicine. You know, at CS, we ran into several companies who were like we can figure out what kind of skin you have based on this photo of you kind of go like, okay, I'm either into this or not. But something like this is is. It's like magic to me. The fact that you could look at a photo and be able to help diagnose somebody who might have a medical condition. Well, some medical conditions. If you think about them are obvious through facial recognition something like down syndrome has has a pattern that that. Even the layman can say, okay. I can I can see that. I can see why why that exists so going from there. I think the way this works. Apparently is they chop up the facial images into a bunch of different little pieces, basically, and then they analyze them. And it's the typical machine learning system of saying. All right. Well, let's let's actually go ahead and. And look at whether these little markers that we note match the ones that we've been told are actually markers of this. And that's how machine learning works. It keeps going through that and keeps going through that until till it gets really good at it is a beautiful concept because people are constantly being misdiagnosed for things, especially when it's a hidden a condition that you can't necessarily that you have to go into a doctor and described to them they can't necessarily see it straight at your face. So having something that could use technology to be able to help determine what the issue is can can really really help a lot of people not get misdiagnosed in the future. And a lot of these Doug knows tools. Our assistant tools, we're not saying we replace doctors. But again, this can can tell a doctor..

Doug
"nature medicine" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

MedTech Talk Podcast

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"nature medicine" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

"The company was founded in two thousand nine what what happened before that. That's right. So this technology actually came out at the university of Minnesota. The two inventors were Doris Taylor. And Harold dot was actually endorsed Taylor's lab at that point. And they were really trying to look at this notion of regenerative. Medicine in this notion of how do you create viable tissue in what regenerative medicine is really about is is how do we move from treating diseases to now curing diseases and in what they were. Specifically looking at is as we discussed before the body creates these proteins gaffe alled, and and how do you how can you take advantage of up to that point? People have tried to take advantage of that. And they use a process called immersion. Deceleration? That's where you take tissue. You'd put it in a deceleration solution in it would essentially diffused from the outside end. So it kind of diffuse him, but it limited to really thin substrates have just a couple couple millimeters thick what Doris and Harold decided to do as what if we went from the inside out. So what if we used a vascular her and a cavity to profuse detergent in try to dissolve that Celio material? Could we keep the perfect scaffold in place? And what they found is they were successful in that really launched tissue engineering from these south straits to something that was clinically relevant something that could start to hold that promise to really solve this large on med clinical need. So they published on that in nature medicine in two thousand eight and that's where they actually took a hard out of a rat. Profusion decelerating it put it in a bio reactor, and what a bio reactor is is just kind of a fancy word for a sterile environment where you can control the inputs and outputs of it. And they perfumed at pumped a mild solution through at a cell culture solution through it to keep the cells alive seated it with cardio Myocytes, our heart cells in eight days later started beaten, again, this really shocked the whole tissue engineering field because as I mentioned, it took something from thin substrates or thin sheets to suddenly whole organs demonstrated. The ability of put cells Bank in there and get some level of function. Backout? So we license that technology in two thousand nine spun out mural matrix from the university of Minnesota and have been raising funds and advancing the technology towards the clinic ever since I mean, what is the origin of the name euro metrics. Yeah, interesting story there. So the inventor, Doris Taylor her favorite painters Moreau. So when we when we first were in discussions with her and kind of looking at. You know, what a good name would be. She wanted something that kind of had that abstract feel and something that was different in revolutionary, and that's how we came up with Miro or Miro and then added matrix. And as as it would be to found later Moreau are Miro is Latin for wonder as well. So we kind of has to meets both from that, you know, the painter standpoint, but also that Latin so if you think about Miro or wonder matrix, you know, it's really about the power of the matrix that were able to harness to be able to create these regenerative medicine solutions is your approach to superiority, mud be more effective than efforts to to grow these organisms grow these tissues using obviously very Burs attempts to do that. I mean, I could see the benefits of working with organ that's already created. But then you get into supply and things like that. But what is your what is your advantage in versus other regenerative medicine companies? Chair share? If you really look at the space, I'll tell you. There's two other kind of viable technologies that have really looked at how do we solve this need? And I think it's healthy for the field that there's so many people looking at this because it is a huge unmet need the first is three D printing. So we hear a lot about three d printing, I think it has a lot of appeal in the sense of of how the technology can be used and utilize that visualization, but you know, the challenges is that when we talk about decelerating a whole organ, if we break that down there's over one hundred different proteins at existence the Oregon itself, so one is spatially how'd you print those in the appropriate spatial orientation?.

Doris Taylor Miro university of Minnesota nature medicine Harold dot Oregon Moreau eight days
Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer

Pat Thurston

02:34 min | 4 years ago

Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer

"And not be lonely as long as you have a social network that you're connecting with this case it's like yeah you need to be connecting with other uman beings you men's connect with one another important that's what the data says all right so go ahead do that connect with another person by the way speaking of connecting with another person you know we we talked about like gene editing brat help cure diseases and that kind of stuff crisper gene editor you've heard me say that before right well you know how i always talk about the idea that we move way too fast with new technology because new technology has called and by the way politicians do this everybody else says yeah unintended consequences right unintended crisper jeanette her check out these two new studies that the crisper caz nine gene editing as apparently potentially causing cancer that's right two new studies published today are warning i saw this stat news the studies published in nature medicine scientists found that sells whose genomes were successfully edited by crisper this potential to cede tumors inside a patient that's right so chris byrd cells can be a ticking time bomb according to researchers from both well these are separate reasons research studies by the way one is sweden's karolinska institute and the other was the gigantic drug coming novartis crisper is already apparently there was a claim in two thousand seventeen that it caused guy high numbers of off target effects that was retracted in march there was a report of human immunity to cows nine that was currently solvable but experts are apparently taking this new cancer risk finding very seriously the ceo of crisper therapeutic samco carney told stat the results are quote plausible plausible plausibility standard we although they likely only apply to one of the ways that chris genomes replacing disease causing dna with healthy versions and not to the other simply where they excised dna but he said quote it's something we need to pay attention to especially as crisper expands more diseases we need to do the work and make sure edited cells return to patients don't become cancerous yeah you cared disease now i have a giant tumor and i die from that that seems like a problematic outcome doesn't it.

Editor Cancer Nature Medicine Karolinska Institute CEO Carney Chris Byrd Sweden