30 Burst results for "Nature Conservancy"

"nature conservancy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:07 min | 5 d ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Of that. How does that impact the work of the Nature Conservancy in Florida? Sure, well, the Florida Wildlife Corridor Act was unanimously passed by the Florida Legislature, both the House and the Senate and signed by the governor. And what this act does is recognize the importance of connected landscapes or wildlife habitat here in the state of Florida. The Wildlife quarter Act also dedicates funding. For the next year, although it's a significant flood of money that may take a bit longer to spend. I know there is a time frame that the money has to be spent in. But not only does it recognizing law the importance of these connected landscapes and provides resources for organizations like the Nature Conservancy to move forward to protect the last connecting pieces. For these corridors in the state of Florida. Finally, Lindsey, are there any key points to the act and or the work of the nature Conservancy that I haven't asked you about? And we need to bring out right now. Well, I appreciate that question. The Nature Conservancy is working really hard in the state of Florida and recognizes the importance of, uh of managing growth. And development in a way that is compatible with connecting our wildlife habitat and now is is really a critical time. We continue to grow, and that's not going to change in the foreseeable future. So the big question is, how do we grow in a manner that makes for really vibrant? And livable communities for people but also protect habitat so that our wildlife can have vibrant and livable communities as well. Well, thank you. I appreciate talking to you today. It's nice talking to you, too. Thank you. Lindsey Stevens directs the land protection program for the Nature Conservancy in Florida. I'm Beth Peril with Dane. We stir communications director for the Orange County clerk of courts. They We may have some good news for some of our listeners right now because you want to tell us about some money. That some people may have waiting for them. So tell us about the unclaimed checks. Yeah. Money money? Yeah, buddy here that money. That's all you have to say. And people like what? Now they're paying attention. When we say money here at the Orange County clerk of courts. What we specifically mean is there are people out there that have unclaimed checks, so that means that this was a check that was sent out from our organization. Mailed out and never cashed. And so there's reasons possibly that you miss getting that check recipient moved away. We didn't get a forwarding address. They put the check away forgot about it. All sorts of reasons, and we do this every year that we put out this list and it's on our website where you can go check and.

Lindsey Stevens Beth Peril Florida Wildlife Corridor Act Florida Lindsey Senate Florida Legislature today Wildlife quarter Act both next year Orange County Nature Conservancy House Conservancy Dane
Pandemic-Hit Oyster Farmers Turn to Conservation to Survive

Howie Carr

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Pandemic-Hit Oyster Farmers Turn to Conservation to Survive

"Olds. When the pandemic hit, oyster farmers found, the restaurant says sold their bivalves had largely closed. Many face economic ruin until a conservation group along with two federal agencies offered to buy up millions of oysters in New England, the mid Atlantic and Washington state as part of a program to restore shellfish reach that 20 locations. The Nature Conservancy is spending $2 million over two years to buy more than five million oysters for restoration efforts. The oyster reefs provide critical habitat for fish and help protect shorelines from erosion. Oysters filter of pollutants in excess nutrients from

Mid Atlantic New England Nature Conservancy Washington
Leadership academy to teach Phoenix residents how to reduce urban heat

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Leadership academy to teach Phoenix residents how to reduce urban heat

"The temperature and phoenix arizona often exceeds one hundred and ten degrees fahrenheit and as the climate warms. The number of hot days is on the rise. It not only impacts our health our safety but also our comfort and our economic development in the phoenix metro area. That's diana bermudez. The nature conservancy in arizona. She says that at times certain phoenix neighborhoods are up to thirteen degrees hotter than others these neighborhoods hotter neighborhoods are also the ones that have the highest child poverty and they have the lowest percentage of tree canopy cover planting trees and vegetation can reduce the heat but bermudez says residents are often unaware of these solutions or how to advocate for them so this spring the nature conservancy is helping launch an online urban heat leadership academy the classes will be taught in both english and spanish participants will learn about strategies for community organizing and reducing urban heat things like advocacy facilitation communication storytelling. The goal is to prepare people to launch tree plantings and other green projects in their own communities so their neighborhood stay cooler as the climate warms.

Phoenix Diana Bermudez Arizona Bermudez
"nature conservancy" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:47 min | 7 months ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Actually accounting for those carbon credits. And in two cases that Bloomberg cited the Nature Conservancy is selling carbon credits on force. That are not in danger at all of being cut down there already secured. One of them, in fact, is owned by the Nature Conservancy. So the nature Conservancy put together a perspective to talk about how these lands these force. In this case, we're going to be potentially endangered through clear cutting and mass destruction. And sold the credits to save these forests. To black rock and others. In fact, the Nature Conservancy in one case only very force that they claim was in danger. Being cooking. Another force belongs to a conservation group. Already belongs to a conservation group and is in no danger of being cut. So I think this has happened in that This is the nation period if you will of how we're going to see carbon credits trained Valued and traded and how corporations all looking to wear the white hat and what is unquestionably the coming of a huge environmental movement from which a lot of good will come from. We're gonna need some way to make sure that all this is actually what it says. It's going to be and that the charge to go and get a lot of money. Does not come in front of the ability to actually deliver goods on the ground. That will be the challenge that we're going to face. And so that brings me back to where I started with theater. Roosevelt's a man in the arena if we want to engage Make sure things have done correctly and to make sure that hunting and fishing opportunities aren't diminished to make sure that whether you're boating or hiking or biking or mountain climbing whatever you're doing. That you have a voice. We to borrow Roosevelt sprays. We need to be in the arena. We need Be there when the decisions are made, and not standby, criticized them afterwards. So as I go to a break here, my thought on 2021 We're gonna have a lot of opportunity to engage. It's gonna be a tremendous amount of money coming the way of conservation. How it's spent could be largely up to us if we choose to engage. But if it ends up in a lot of its misspent and I'll get to the land and water Conservation fund another day. We have no one to blame but ourselves because we stood by and watched it happen. I'll be back in just a moment with more on the great outdoors..

Nature Conservancy Bloomberg Roosevelt
Farmers Are Warming Up To The Fight Against Climate Change

Marketplace

03:32 min | 8 months ago

Farmers Are Warming Up To The Fight Against Climate Change

"Conservative farmers who have blocked climate legislation in the past, both groups are calling for policies to help farmers fight climate change through financial incentives, not regulation. NPR's Dan Charles has more It was 2009. When the American Farm Bureau Federation declared war on climate legislation, and Ana Unwra Cohen was a staffer in Congress. We were right in the thick of working on the first comprehensive climate build of passage Chamber of Congress, the law would have limited greenhouse emissions using a method called cap and trade. But the farm Bureau, a lobbying powerhouse, said the cap part would drive up costs and put farmers out of business. Don't cap our future, I think was their slogan, and they had those on caps. That people were wearing up on on Capitol Hill, and they succeeded. The legislation died this week. The head of the farm bureau, Zippy DeVol, struck a different tone. We're gonna have a real common sense science based discussion about how we protect the climate. And our farmers want to be part of that he was announcing a new food and agriculture climate alliance. It includes other farm groups. Also big environmental organizations like the Nature Conservancy, where people Elias is director of agriculture it feels like in the past. 18 months, The conversation has just really shifted. The shift is happening for a couple of reasons. Many food companies have promised to reduce their greenhouse emissions. And they're pushing for changes on the farm, sometimes paying for the changes. And Barb Glen, who CEO of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture, says it's partly just what farmers are experiencing everyone in this unique coalition. Understands and is witnessing the changing of the climate, and we all want to be involved In impacting this. The new alliance is proposing dozens of policy changes that encourage farmers to install equipment that captures methane, the powerful greenhouse gas from Cal manure or farm in a way that builds healthier carbon rich soil, actually removing carbon from the air. Farmers would get paid to do this, maybe by the government, maybe by private companies that want to offset or cancel out some of their own carbon emissions by paying for greenhouse gas reductions somewhere else. Some environmentalists who are not part of this alliance, like Jason Davidson at Friends of the Earth are dead set against some of those ideas. There's a heavy reliance on voluntary market based solutions. But those carbon offsets that farmers might sell just allow polluters somewhere to keep polluting, he says. Also, it could be hard to measure what some of these farming methods actually accomplish. MEREDITH Niles, specialist on farming and the environment of the University of Vermont, says scientists are working on that measurement problem. And the fact that farm groups are finally talking about reducing their own greenhouse emissions, she says, is a big step forward. A lot of farmers didn't want to speak about it because it might mean potential regulation. They're fine with incentives, though. And there are signs that the incoming Biden administration is thinking the same way. The leader of the Biden transition team for the U. S. Department of Agriculture recently called on the USDA to set up a so called carbon bank. It would pay farmers to fight climate change. Dan Charles NPR news 2020 has been ah lot and among the many things that

American Farm Bureau Federatio Dan Charles Ana Unwra Cohen Zippy Devol Congress Barb Glen National Association Of State Cal Manure NPR Nature Conservancy Elias Jason Davidson Meredith Niles University Of Vermont Government Biden Usda Carbon Bank
Farmers Are Warming Up To The Fight Against Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:32 min | 9 months ago

Farmers Are Warming Up To The Fight Against Climate Change

"An unusual came together on climate. This week environmentalists and bedrock conservative farmers. Who have blocked climate legislation in the past. Both groups are calling for policies to help farmers fight climate change through financial incentives. Not regulation and peers to insurance has more. It was two thousand nine when the american farm bureau federation declared war on climate legislation and unan rococo. It was a staffer in congress. We were right in the thick of working on the first comprehensive climate bill passed the chamber of congress the law would have limited greenhouse emissions using a method called cap and trade but the farm a lobbying powerhouse said the cap part would drive up costs and put farmers out of business. Don't cap our future. I think was their slogan and and they had those on cats that people were wearing up on on capitol hill and they succeeded. The legislation died this week. The head of the farm bureau zippy divall struck a different tone. We're going to have a real common sense. Science based discussion about how we pretend to climate and our farmers won't be part of that. He was announcing a new food and agriculture climate alliance. It includes other farm groups also big environmental organizations like the nature conservancy where people. Elias is director of agriculture. It feels like in the past eighteen months. The conversation has just really shifted. The shift is happening for a couple of reasons. Many food companies have promised to reduce their greenhouse emissions and. They're pushing for changes on the farm sometimes paying for the changes and barb glenn who ceo of the national association of state departments of agriculture says. It's partly just what farmers are experiencing everyone in this unique coalition understands and is Witnessing the changing of the climate and we all want to be involved in impacting it. The new alliance is proposing dozens of policy changes. They encourage farmers to install equipment that captures methane a powerful greenhouse gas from cow manure or farm in a way that bills healthier carbon rich soil actually removing carbon from the air. Farmers would get paid to do this. Maybe by the government maybe by private companies that want offset or cancel out some of their own carbon emissions by paying for greenhouse gas reduction. Somewhere else some environmentalists who are not part of this alliance like jason davidson. At friends of the earth are dead set against some of those ideas. There's a heavy reliance on voluntary market based solutions but those carbon offsets that farmers might sell just allow polluters. Somewhere to keep polluting. He says also it can be hard to measure what some of these farming methods actually accomplish meredith niles a specialist on farming and the environment at the university of vermont says scientists are working on that measurement problem and the fact that farm groups are finally talking about reducing their own greenhouse emissions. She says is a big step forward. A lot of farmers didn't want to speak about it because it might need a potential regulation. They're fine with incentives. Though and there are signs that the incoming biden administration's thinking the same way the leader of the biden transition team for the us department of agriculture recently called on the usda to set up a so-called carbon bank. It would pay farmers to fight climate. Change dan charles npr

Chamber Of Congress Zippy Divall American Farm Bureau Federatio Barb Glenn National Association Of State Elias Jason Davidson Congress Meredith Niles University Of Vermont Government Biden Us Department Of Agriculture Carbon Bank Dan Charles Npr
'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 11 months ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

Backer NPR GOP President Trump Bob English Nature Conservancy Jeff Brady Alaska Republican National Convention San National Park American Conservation Coalitio O'brien South Carolina
Spatial Conversations

A VerySpatial Podcast

06:32 min | 1 year ago

Spatial Conversations

"So we're happy to be joined today by Brendan Collins and Pablo Puentes of make path. Thanks for joining us today is. Yeah thanks. And you. So, let's start off with the the really broad question of what is make path. Path is a spatial data science. Shop we focus a lot on open source tools, and we bring our passion from various domains. To gs and we aim to build. Inclusive communities around you as tools, and specifically we have a project X. Ray spatial, which focused on roster based spatial analysis, we combine a rationalization pipeline with a set of universal functions which apply an. To Rosser data and also are named in ways that Gif professionals recognize things like surface analysis tools slow hill shade, aspect on these are the names of these tools in the s domain that people recognize. And we offer those tools As a python based library that anybody can access read the source code to and contribute to. We we take open source tools, and we help solve our clients problems by applying open source to their their specific domains. These these domains are very diverse working in areas from healthcare to environmental conservation. Finance Natural Resource Management. We know that geography and the science of of place is very important, too. Many domains and we find ourselves learning about these different domains as we apply open source geospatial tools to their challenges. We we basically bill. We love building open source, really powerful tools, and then if we have clients are like. Hey, what else can we do with these tools? Can you help us apply these really complex problems and what he help? So, how'd you guys come together as? Building this new path path. That was that was bad, wasn't it? Sorry. That's okay well. It's all good. We'll take it. So I WanNa talk about what you've been doing before and how we can. Yeah so I got involved in GSA in the mid to thousands being the S. lab manager for the Center for Sustainable, development, which is a kind of environmental science group in Central America. Working a lot with agriculture. And then moved on to work. As part of the team at the Nature Conservancy looking at site selection for projects in the red area red in this context is reduction in emissions from deforestation and I. Ever Dacian where Zeh countries that have high carbon output can find carbon credits in developing nations to incentivize them to protect vertically sensitive ecosystems, tropical forest is a great example of that, so a lot of these projects occur in in the main tropical forest areas of Brazil Democratic Republic of Congo Indonesia the top three countries for tropical forest. So using I was using DIS to help. Do Site selection to maximize dollars spent? Two or environmental protection through the conservancy We Pablo night. Live in Austin We started to connect in the music scene. Both of us are musicians songwriters. We go out and play open open mics and so that's how can Pablo and I met, but then we quickly realized that we had a lot in common apart from our music background, and over the years as we would spend time together and hard about things it just made sense to get together in work together as a 'cause. We were hitting the same problems, but Pablo represented us. More! Experience on what it is to create a company and create a culture and I represented a bit more of the technical side, and so we were good partners in kind of coming together, 'cause we represent those different areas. in filming kind of some of some of the. The rounding out the breath of our skills, really we we both. We both think we are easy to find and the other one is a really great fun. So I came out about I came out of Stanford about ten years ago, started a company So I had a lot of experience. Products Scaling a company and I. Really liked. What Brennan was doing and we teamed up and I bring a lot of experience again with the company building with a product design had to think about about by these projects and I've always had an interest I don't have a detectable background in jazz. She fired his. I've always had an interest in it. My Dad was a biologist and we would always go on these. I've been looking at maps since I was five, and and we'd go on walks in the new-look onto poverty maps and understanding vegetation maps so I guess I've been training for this for a long time without even knowing but done now. It's a little bit of my. Time and I love it the physical world and data to to solve problems in the s really exciting to work together and. We've been applying for some of these tools and really really interesting ways, and I'd love for brethren. Talk with it. This is a blog. A very big piece we're working on. That's coming out on the next, Tuesday! And it's A. It's a real world application vary timely of these told rags, these tools, a really cool powerful but the story of Man on the Moon is man on the moon, not N-, not necessarily rocket as cool as. Cool as Mathis, the the real story. Is that the the the the impact that has the? and Ny Brandon. If you WANNA, talk a little bit about the story that were published using the x Ray, spatial tools and data Cheddar I think that's That's a great example of some of the things that we do.

Pablo Puentes X. Ray Spatial Brendan Collins Nature Conservancy NY Rosser Indonesia Stanford RAY MAN Mathis Austin GSA Brazil Democratic Republic S. Lab Manager Brennan Central America Center For Sustainable
Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

All Things Considered

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

"Coal fired power plants are being closed across the country in the arid west those plants use a lot of the region's scarce water supplies now with closure dates approaching communities are having sometimes contentious debates about how this newly freed up water should be used from K. U. N. C. and Colorado Luke Runyon reports it's snowing in downtown Craig Colorado when Jennifer Holloway walks into the local bookstore she runs the city's chamber of commerce and access the start of twenty twenty has been full of mixed emotions it's been hard to face the fact that okay we are needed in January Craig's dominant employer the company operating the nearby coal plant and mine confirmed the rumors it will shut down by twenty thirty because we've been providing electricity for millions of other people and that is a source of pride at first people worried about the loss of jobs at the plant now they wonder what's gonna happen to the sizeable amount of water it uses it's ten times more than all of Craig's nearly nine thousand residents use there is some discussion on this in the community and people have different views but my personal view is that that water needs to be safeguarded for long term environmental usage because Holloway says a healthy environment means a healthy local economy across the west more than thirty five coal plants have either closed recently or are slated for closure in the next fifteen years when you look at a typical call facility it uses an enormous volume of water between highly is CEO of tri state generation and transmission which operates Craig's plant coal plant closures will free up more than two million acre feet of water in western states about as much as the Phoenix metro area uses in a year and the fact that that will be liberated and available for other uses going to be significant significant because in this part of the country it's unheard of for large amounts of water to suddenly become available highly says tri state is already receiving calls from buyers interested in Craig's water drawn from the Yampa river part of the drought plagued Colorado River basin this is a big opportunity to you know make the other decisions more wisely cook Tricia I'm John researched coal plants in their water rights in a grad school project for the nature Conservancy it's one of a few environmental groups interested in buying water from plants slated for closure in Wyoming New Mexico and Arizona and keeping it in reverse it all comes down to who can negotiate with these clients owners and we can make it better claim or make a better

Colorado Arizona Wyoming Yampa River Phoenix CEO Twenty Twenty Luke Runyon K. U. N. C. New Mexico Nature Conservancy John Tricia Colorado River Basin Jennifer Holloway Craig Colorado
Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

Environment: NPR

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Closing Of Coal Power Plants Means Debates On What To Do With The Water They Used

"Coal fired power. Plants are being closed across the country. In the arid West. Those plants use a lot of the region scarce water supplies now with closure dates approaching communities or having sometimes contentious debates about how this newly freed up. Water should be used from K. Unc in Colorado Luke Runyan reports it snowing in downtown Craig Colorado when Jennifer Holloway walks into the local bookstore. She runs the city's Chamber of Commerce and says the start of twenty twenty has been full of mixed emotions. It's been hard to face the fact that okay we are needed in January Craig's dominant employer the company operating the nearby. Coal Plant and mine confirmed the rumors. It will shut down by twenty thirty because we've been providing electricity for millions of other people and that is a source of pride at first people worried about the loss of jobs at the plant. Now they wonder. What's going to happen to the sizable amount of water? It uses its ten times more than all of Craig's nearly nine thousand residents us. There is some discussion on this in the community and people have different views but my personal view is that that water needs to be safeguarded for long term environmental usage because Holloway says a healthy environment means a healthy local economy across the West than thirty five. Coal plants have either closed recently or are slated for closure in the next fifteen years when you look at a typical coal facility. It uses an enormous volume of water. Dwayne highly CEO of tristate generation and transmission which operates Craig's plant coal plant. Closures will free up more than two million acre feet of water in Western states about as much as the Phoenix Metro area uses in a year. And the fact that will be liberated and available for other reuse is going to be significant significant because in this part of the country. It's unheard of for large amounts of water to suddenly become available. Highly says tristate is already receiving calls from buyers interested in Craig's water drawn from the Yampa river part of the drought plagued Colorado River basin. This Chris big opportunity to make the decisions. More wisely Cook Chechen. John researched coal plants in their water rights in a Grad School project for the Nature Conservancy. It's one of a few environmental groups. Interested in buying water from plants slated for closure in Wyoming New Mexico and Arizona and keeping it in rivers. It all comes down to who can negotiate with these plans owners than look who can make it better claim or make a better offer but with no large scale regulated market for water rights in the Colorado River Basin. It's hard to say exactly how much money it's worth. People like. Megan Veenstra would like to see water from the Craig plant stay. Local place painted. She and her husband run good vibes river gear. Rafts lifejackets all kinds of stuff just to get you out on the water. And she says Craig is starting to make a transition that other communities in the West over the last century have gone through from mining to recreation based economies. It's been a boom and bust town for a long time as time to just kind of get away from that and we just a steady growing town plenty of other growing. Western cities have the means to pay top dollar for the Craig Plants Water but moving it from one place to another is in some cases physically or legally impossible and you can count on locals to put up a fight to hold onto it for NPR news. I'm Luke Runyan in Craig Colorado.

Craig Colorado River Basin Craig Colorado Luke Runyan Jennifer Holloway Colorado Yampa River Megan Veenstra NPR Phoenix Metro Cook Chechen Tristate Chamber Of Commerce Dwayne CEO
Cancun businesses insure a coral reef

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Cancun businesses insure a coral reef

"Insurance is one way to protect something of value. Oh you such as a car or a home and now businesses in Cancun. Mexico have insured at Coral Reef. The Coral Reef actually reduces the risk of storm impact impact on the hotels and resorts in Cancun Dave Jones's with the nature conservancy and is the former insurance commissioner of California. He says a healthy coral reef can reduce ninety seven percent of a wave's energy as it barrels toward land so having a healthy coral reef makes a big difference in terms of whether the Hurricane Peter Storm is GonNa Destroy Your community or not but a reef can also be damaged by a strong storm which puts communities at greater risk in the future so in the Mexican the state of King Tana row coastal property owners pay a fee that helps fund and insurance policy for the nearby reef and beaches with a storm of a certain magnitude hits. The policy pays out the money will be used by local residents trained to remove debris that could cause further damage reattach coral pizzas and set up nurseries where corals else can regrow. Jones says. It's a way to pay for the restoration of an ecosystem that can in turn. Protect people. From the intensifying effects of global warming

Cancun Dave Jones King Tana Row Nature Conservancy Mexico Hurricane Peter Commissioner California
"nature conservancy" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Nature Conservancy the green room tax abatement offers an opportunity for landowners to install green room which will in turn help make our city more flood resistant more heat resistant and more biodiverse she says putting a green roof on a building can be expensive but the tax abatement can help defray the cost of installation and maintenance Max on those sick cream rules not only absorb storm water they also had insulating properties that increase of buildings energy efficiency and cut down on heating and cooling costs green groups do show a return on investment over time so if that investment is made there are certainly benefits to the property owner she adds that the increased energy efficiency also helps reduce carbon emissions there are other environmentally beneficial rules free since like solar panel installations are reflective coatings and actual points out that having a green roof doesn't rule out other options if you combine a green roof with solar you can get the benefit to the green room and the solar panels will run more efficiently because of the cooling benefits of the green room she says the next step will be for the city to determine which neighborhoods will be eligible for the new hire green roof tax abatements for public news service I'm Andrea Sears the autopsy of disgraced pad a file and financier Jeffrey up steam says his neck had broken bones consistent with hanging or strangulation one particular broken bone is more commonly associated with strangulation than hanging raising questions for some abstain was on suicide watch after it was found on the floor of his cell with bruises on his neck July twenty third by August he was returned to a small shoe special housing unit cell able to meet with his lawyers for up to twelve hours a day the sixty six year old Epting was awaiting trial on charges of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls when he died in the shoo unit are chronically overcrowded understaffed lock up within a lock up those held some of the world's most notorious terrorists drug lords sex traffickers and swindlers staffing shortages are so severe that correctional officers often work so many overtime shifts in a row they don't even go home and employees who have other jobs in the jail are often pulled in to do the work of guards of the guards responsible for abstain on the night of his apparent suicide one was working a fifth straight day of overtime and another was on mandatory overtime federal investigators are looking into whether the guards were sleeping on the job and falsifying log entries to show they check on inmates every half hour is required in the mean time the warden has been removed and two guards have been placed on leave it's not known exactly how many inmates have taken their own lives over the years at the facility but according to the federal bureau of prisons one hundred and twenty four killed themselves in the agency's prisons and jails between the fiscal years twenty ten and twenty sixteen a lawyer for patriot prayer leader Joey Gibson says he's been charged with rioting in connection to a mayday incident in Portland Oregon The Oregonian reports the leader of the Washington state based far right group told a radio show host that he was preparing to turn himself into authorities today Gibson contend that on the show that the charge is intended to prevent him from joining protest scheduled for Saturday the charge against Gibson comes after a lawsuit filed by the owner of an establishment called cider riot who contends Gibson and other right wing protesters arrived at his business on may first and fought with customers causing mayhem and physical injury to at least one person video shows people using chemical spray and several people fighting on Saturday far right and white supremacist groups from around the country are coming to rally in Portland where anti fascist militants promised to confront them the nineteen year old nursing student accused of opening fire at a San Diego area synagogue in April did not have a valid hunting license which is the only way someone under twenty one who wasn't in the military or law enforcement can legally buy a weapon under state law in California fish and wildlife department says John Ernest was issued a hunting license but it had not gone into effect yet it's unclear how he bought the gun authorities say Ernest opened fire on April twenty seventh at the Chabad of Paul way killing a sixty year old woman and injuring three others including the rabbi and an eight year old.

Nature Conservancy sixty six year nineteen year twelve hours eight year sixty year
"nature conservancy" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"World. Today is now directed by investors who are demanding climate. I made action of for a great majority of the U._S.. Corporate communities likewise interested in acting <hes> to head off the costs associated with climate change around fifty North Carolina business leaders are participating in today's discussion. The event was organized by <hes> the Nature Conservancy in North Carolina by Clifford. Thanks for wrapping up your week with Public News Service. We are member enlisted support it ever all line at Public Service Dot O._R._G.. Is the onion news network..

North Carolina Nature Conservancy
"nature conservancy" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"With attenuating <hes> floods into Houston in addition to protect an open space and while I've habitat and places that people can can go to get outside people hunt ducks. They're yeah yeah they're still do which is terrific you know and we you don't have the huge amounts snow geese that we used to have when I was there. Those ricefields in wetlands just absolutely covered with snow geese. WHO's one of them but even that was an anomaly though right well it was an anomaly because you know that Rice attracted them and and let me like the Air Yeah just a lot of yeah a lot of them but you know lots of ducks of all stripes you know we're here at the tip of the funnel on the central Flyway so we get lots of waterfowl waterfowl that that come through here and we spent a lot of time here at the agency work into conserve water fowl habitat and make sure we're doing our part along the alone the flyway and <hes> it so that Katy Perry provided a pretty unique point a little further inland from the coast but yeah those Big Fox's snow geese have kind of gone away? They seemed but a lot of moved over to Arkansas where you still have a lot of rush country yeah. We just don't have the numbers did you did you keep up as a hundred angler through all this yeah yeah no. I never lost that and you know that certainly was my immersion in the outdoors is loved up. You know hunt and fish growing up if I could die hunting. I've you know that'd be the happiest you know way to go. I think from perspective I just I just love that but I've always tried to make time before it. Now you know to be fair. You get a lot of folks at I love to hunt fish and so I want to go get have careers while I apologize or a game warden. It's it's not like you got a lot of copious free time to do all that yeah so people get kinda disabused of that notion. It's professional chop and you're going to have to make time just like anybody else to do. The thanks you love then he came here now. Then went to work for the conservancy and in so I was recruited <hes> go work for the Nature Conservancy in South Texas northern Mexico's project in the moderate Tomba Lupus and look at them Audrey in Texas <hes> looking out of a binational conservation survey ship strategy with and they wanted somebody that can relate well to landowners and would be comfortable time working northern Mexico's different time explained by national and so binational working into countries <hes> and so you know what's interesting about the Laguna Madre system you know the one of the five largest hyper saline super salty lagoons in the world you have it in south Texas basically from Corpus to Brownsville then you've got the Rio Grande and then you have the Mexican look into Modera- south of of that and they're both of them <hes> again super salty loaded with red fish and tryout and red headed ducks and Peregrine Falcons Kemp's Israeli sea turtles and Shor are waiting burge reddish eager. I mean it's just it's the amount of wildlife is is is stunning then in good shape on both sides of the border. You know there are there are there are differences. <hes> one of the things that I think has helped the Texas side quite a bit is the big expanse of ranch country undeveloped ranch country that borders the Laguna Madras talking about the King arranged the Kennedy ranch some of our state's most fabled in largest ranches in the fact which fairly like fairly attack ecosystems and in great shape and very actively manage those ranches for wildlife conservation and ranchland health and. So forth <hes> and so the lack of development <hes> along the Laguna Madre both <hes> largely on the mainland side because of the big ranches but then of course Badrul national seashore longest you know undeveloped stretch barrier island in the world old <hes> coupled with another big swath of protected land. That's part of the U._S.. Fish and Wildlife Service Laguna Scotia National Wildlife Refuge on South Padre Island means that you just don't have a lot of developmental pressures in the Laguna Madre until you get deep down into the into the Rio Grande Valley near the Mexico border. It's Oh Texas shot pretty good type. <hes> you know get into Mexico that that that system <hes> still biologically very very unique <hes> fish awfully hard.

Mexico Wildlife Service Laguna Scotia Texas Laguna Madre South Texas Laguna Madras Nature Conservancy Rice Houston Katy Perry Rio Grande Rio Grande Valley South Padre Island Arkansas Brownsville Kennedy ranch Modera Lupus burge
"nature conservancy" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on AP News

"The AP digital news network. People around the globe need to change their diet. According to a new study AP's Jackie Quinn reports the need to limit their intake of red meat and switch to a more plant based diet, which is better for humans and for the environment. Just one hamburger a week for eggs and seven servings of dairy the rest of the time people should be eating whole, grains, beans and vegetables, that's the recommendation from a panel of experts in nutrition agriculture and the environment who contributed to a report for the group eat, which is calling for a major food transformation by the year. Twenty fifty they say less meat will help improve people's health and the health of the planet by reducing greenhouse gases. That are linked to raising cattle. I'm Jacky Quin. Super bowl. Organizers look to one of Atlanta's very own AP music. Correspondent Margie zaraleta report. Gladys Knight will perform the national anthem before this year's big gale. Gladys. Knight says she's proud to use her voice to unite and represent the country in her hometown of Atlanta. She answered the NFL has recently announced a new social Justice program, and she's honored to be part of it in its inaugural year nights will sing the anthem before the Super Bowl and February third. Maroon five big BOI of Outkast and Travis Scott will do the halftime show. I'm Archie zaraleta? A new survey says coral reefs off Hawaii's big island are stabilizing nearly four years after the state's worst bleaching events the nature conservancy found that an.

Gladys Knight AP Atlanta Jacky Quin Archie zaraleta Margie zaraleta Jackie Quinn nature conservancy Outkast Travis Scott Hawaii NFL four years
Cover crops, trees key to fighting climate change

Climate Cast

06:30 min | 2 years ago

Cover crops, trees key to fighting climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America, NA member FDIC, Joe, what does your research tell you about the most effective natural climate solution natural Clements solutions are the protection restoration and improved management of natural and working lands, which includes forests grasslands wetlands and agriculture lands and in Minnesota one of the most effective natural climate solutions has to do with conservation agriculture which is practices like cover crops that help store carbon in our soil's. And what in Minnesota works best? Is it those cover crops is it reforestation what pulls the most carbon out of the atmosphere. Sure, there's no one silver bullet, there's perhaps a bunch of silver buckshot, if you will also cover crops take about a half a ton of carbon dioxide. Per acre out of the atmosphere every year, and there's over thirteen million acres of cropland in Minnesota that could be planted to cover crops and take that carbon out and stored in the soil. So this seems kind of like a no brainer. A win win for the atmosphere. How extensive are these natural climate solutions? And why aren't we using more of them? Yeah. There's a lot of things that can be done to increase investment in natural climate solutions. And that's part of why we wanted to do. This study was to draw attention to that in the case of reforestation, there's incentives that could be brought to have people be inspired to plant trees on places that have been deforested when it comes to cover crops. Farmers are excited about them because they build soil health. They can help increase the ability of soils to store water and make them more resilient to drought. But they can also store. Carbon. I'm suburban kid. Give me an example of a couple of different kinds of cover crops, one of the most common cover crops, his cereal rye. These are crops that are grown in the fall and the spring when the main crop is not growing. So that basically doubles the amount of time. You've got something green and growing on your crop field over the course of the year, and what needs to change for these practices to become more common in Minnesota and other places. Sure, there's some expense to farmers to buy that cover crop seed and planted and so some additional incentives may be needed. And I think it's well worth it because that helps all society controlled climate, and they also have benefits including improving water quality. When you talk to farmers, what kind of reaction, do you get about these types of solutions? The most recent cover crops survey shows that they're being increasingly adopted. So we're seeing increasing excitement among the farmers. We work with about cover crops are there policies and. Place that can better be employed to take advantage of these practices or are there specific policies against it recently. There was a barrier that's been removed. One of the ways that farmers benefit now is through crop insurance up cities through the farm Bill, and there were rules that made it harder to get that crop insurance. If you used cover crops, and those have been removed, so one of the things we can do is just kind of get out of our own way. And make sure we're promoting these conservation practices that had such strong benefits. Are you believe Minnesota has great potential for these natural climate solutions? Why while it's not just Minnesota. We looked at the whole country, and we looked at twenty one different kinds of natural climate solutions and one of the things I'm really excited about as they all have very strong co benefits. So for example, the reason that people might plant trees more trees in cities is not because they store carbon. But because people like living near trees. One of the reasons that people might invest more in fuel reduction treatments that can avoid catastrophic wildfires is because it can help protect homes and lives and improve air quality. So there are many reasons that we might want to invest more in nature what you mentioned cities what about urban reforestation? What does the optimal climate-friendly city? Look like, we didn't analysis that looked at the potential to increase the amount of street trees and park trees in cities around the US, and there's up to eight million more years of trees that could be planted in our cities alone, and what are those benefits other than as you mentioned? Right. Most of us like trees we like having them around while what's the benefits for cities to do that. Well, in addition to storing carbon they're at they produce shade they can help reduce a cooling costs in the summer and by sheltering from the wind. They can help reduce heating costs in the. Enter there's also increasing evidence that shows that there's psychological benefits of living near nature such as treason cities while they can also help minimize that urban heat island affect in in summer, especially what are the next steps for individuals, cities and state government on these natural climate solutions. There are a lot of steps that are being considered across the US by different states and that ranges from zoning laws that help have smart growth. So you reduce the amount of deforestation that's happening around some of our cities that are growing that includes the protection restoration of our coastal habitat, which not only stores more carbon but helps prevent buffer our coasts from damaging storms. So there's a wide range of practices that are being considered as an atmospheric scientist, I think of climate change from the atmosphere standpoint more often than. Not the atmosphere. Really doesn't care where the reductions in carbon are coming from or where the carbon getting pulled from the atmosphere is coming from how big picture how much percentage wise are we talking about with these natural climate solutions as an impact on carbon in the atmosphere. Yeah, we found that natural climate solutions can help fight climate change with a potential benefit equivalent to one fifth of our nation's current net. Emissions, and that's the same as if every car and truck in the country, stop polluting the climate. So there's a much bigger potential than most people realize Joe Fargo ni science director for the nature conservancies North American region. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Thanks so much for having me.

Minnesota Bank Of America Joe Fargo United States Fdic Clements Atmospheric Scientist Director Thirteen Million Acres One Fifth
A brief history of soy

Science Magazine Podcast

05:43 min | 2 years ago

A brief history of soy

"Of soy. I'm joined by Christine DuBois, and I'd like to start by saying that I've sort of intimate personal relationship with soy. I eat a lot of it as vegetarian, but I also grew up in rural Illinois surrounded by soybeans. That said I didn't know a lot about its history or the tremendous scope of its global impact. Until I read your book. Can you start giving us an overview of the breadth of what you cover. So my book, the story of soy might consider it, a biography of soy soy were a person this would be their biography starting from its early domestication moving through its use in Chinese and Japanese food ISM its development to use during various wars, including the rest of the Japanese war and World War Two. And then it's use in factory farming of Higgs and chickens primarily on through its genetic engineering. It's Houston biodiesel and its environmental effects as well. It's his it's affects on nutrition in the book, you take deep dives into different parts of soy's history in the role it played in wars societal development politics in the environment. If we go into any of those though, I think will lose the big picture. So can you summarize just how important this little bean is on a global scale? Soybeans are one of the most traded crops around the world. Most people have no idea how incredibly important this plant is because it is fed primarily to chickens pigs on large factory farms with relatively few employees. So most people especially people who live in cities are not aware of how in agricultural areas, particularly in north and South America. This crop is huge. It's hugely profitable. And it is hugely shaping our world. It was the first commercially really successful genetically engineered crops, and because it was so commercially successful. It has spurred the development of other genetically engineered crops. It is used in countless products with industrial products and many many food products, although in very small quantities. So it's everywhere in our environments, and it has everything to do with cutting edge science, and it is massively important to a Connie's and trade disputes slim pick up on that trade dispute item because a few weeks ago, the Washington Post had a really interesting piece on how North Dakota soy farmers were being especially hard hit by the tariffs implemented as part of this ongoing U S China trade war because they sell the vast majority of their crop to China. Do you see that that loss of access to US markets, whether it's temporary or long term is going to have a worldwide impact like will other countries start growing more soy in? What would that mean the way soy is being handled as a crop worldwide, especially in South America right now? And it's really a looming problem for Africa as well is often quite environmentally destructive. The only reason I'm not mentioned North America. Here is that we already destroyed the North American prairies longtime ago, even be sore Sawyer was planted there. So it's a done deal here in North America. But in South America, there's a lot of land that was still virgin wilderness that is being deforested or disadvantaged in order to grow soy because it is such a lucrative crop. And it's really a very very serious problem, particularly in places like Hera Guay, which have much less strict environmental regulation. And places like Brazil, which has increasingly strict environmental regulation to protect the Amazon, but which has their difficult problems of enforcement, Cargill and the nature. Conservancy have worked together to try to improve some of the systems for protecting the Amazon, but there's such a long way to go. And some of the things that are being done to assist. The soybean farmers of Brazil in particular, the completion of highway that cuts right through the Amazon is which is a national highway is really leading to deforestation along its borders within fifty miles of any major road. You get a lot of people coming in building all the things that would service the truck drivers. And then town spring up in then when towns spring up you have to have schools in hardware stores, and churches, and so forth and more and more gets built up along highway. So there's a very deep concern. And of course. The concern relates to how is all of this going to affect global warming and right now with what's going on with the United States trade war with China. We have slapped a twenty five percent tariffs on to our soit being exported to China, which is our largest fire. And so right now, the Chinese don't have a lot of options for making up that soy. But in the long run they are going to want to look for other suppliers that are not going to be slapping that tariff on them. And so they are investing as they already happened. But they're probably going to celebrate it now investing in more virgin lands in Africa and South America. But they're really doing a lot in Africa that are probably going to start being planted in soy. And so more wilderness are going to be destroyed and this is a very grave concern for climate change Christine. What her new book is the story of

Amazon South America Christine Dubois China Africa Brazil United States North America Illinois Hera Guay North Dakota Houston ISM Washington Post
"nature conservancy" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

"That's how we want our power delivered. You know, we composted as a family. I started riding my bike to work now as a New York City resident we don't even own a car anymore. So there are choices we make every single day that both effect. The amount of carbon pollution produce and also send market signals. And then the other thing folks can do is offset the emissions. They do have to one of the things I do at the end of every December. No usually on winter break the time between Christmas and New Year's off from work. I'll sit down and kind of do the estimate how many flights did we take this year on how many miles? Did we drive and I can do a calculation about? Okay. We produce this amount of carbon pollution. I'm going to offset that on behalf of the family through investing in tree planting. And so you can sign up the nature conservancy does this. There's Tera pass. There other ways that people can offset their individual families or their companies emissions. And then I think the fourth thing is no your risk. So here in New York, the nature conservancy created a website coastal resilient dot org. Where if you live in low lying coastal areas, you can go on this website and type in information about where you. Live and see what the level of threat is to wear you work where you live. You know, the New York Times recently had a story about a typing in your zip code, and what's the flooding risk there? So my mom and stepdad live on the Gulf Coast of Florida, and I typed in their address and sure enough it told me what I've been telling them for longtime. They're starting to see we'll call it like sunny day flooding sea level rise in their vicinity and the storms are only going to get bigger and more intense. And you know, the good news is they're not planning to stay there. Forever. Bobby about the time that it's going to get really really tough. They will have relocated inland. But I think being aware of the level of threat to your family to your business. That's something that people ought to do. And I think that helps trigger more action. Like, oh my goodness. This is real. I wanna play a part. Is there anything else that you want to add about either the IPC report just? The worker doing nature conservancy or anything off. I guess I just really liked to hone in on this part about the science is clear. Climate change is caused by us. The science debate is not going to get us to the solutions. It's really about connecting about the things that we care about connecting his people. And so the our safety our well-being equality of our neighborhoods. So am I the New York executive director of the nature conservancy willing to have a conversation where I know that the threat is climate change and discard that term in set it aside. Absolutely. Because I think this is about in our modern world with politics divisive. The way they are we need to set. Some of that aside to connect around the values around future generate. Nations about property rights about a connection nature, and maybe that's for some photographing in birdwatching for others might be hunting and fishing. But the this love of the outdoors that so many have when we can start having the conversation that way, and then recognizing the power of nature to help solve this that we don't have to separate ourselves from the coast with ten or fifteen foot high walls, but we can actually harness the power of nature in and enjoy the benefits. That's the world that I wanna live in in. What we realized is you gotta get going. That's the story. The IPC report. Let's get going now. All right. That was Emma Tirol's interview with Bill Felder, the New York executive director for the nature conservancy, you can learn more about bill's work and the work of the nature conservancy as well.

nature conservancy New York New York Times executive director Bill Felder IPC Gulf Coast Bobby Emma Tirol Florida fifteen foot
"nature conservancy" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

"And we partnered with global engineering firm, and we looked at three scenarios one was a green only so. Would be dunes. Berms wetlands mussel beds. Then we looked at a gray. Only like what would you do with gates in walls things like that? And then we looked at a hybrid approach lo and behold, the approach that made the most sense in terms of reduced risk from flooding, but also providing all kinds of other benefits, like clean, water aesthetics increased property value. Was this hybrid approach with nature in it as well where you had these natural features. So they're kind of like pop up walls that could be put up when there's a risk of storm coming in low lying areas and a gate at the canal tower beach, but the rest was really all about nature and the role that nature can play in this. So that was one big piece is let's harness nature, and you build a seawall or Seagate the minute. That's built it starts depreciating in value. So the natural assets their values enhanced of time, but. The other thing which is an uncomfortable subject, but the nature conservancy raise was we also need to be talking about getting people out of harm's way. There are people in places where they simply should not be in a sea level rising storm surge in world. And so, you know, there you can call retreat, you can call it manage retreat. I call it getting out of the way, but the idea at this point the programs are voluntary, but we've been working out on Staten Island with one of the most affected neighborhoods in hurricane sandy. Where people have said I've had enough the high affoil moon, high tide is flooding my neighborhood much less when you get a hurricane blowing through your it's time to move out. So we've been working with the state the city and now a federal program to buy people out scrape their homes and then restore park land and wetlands so not only are you getting people out of harm's way. But you're Hansen the natural infrastructure. The natural features between the ocean in the neighborhood. That's a little higher ground to better protect people in the future. So I would say this was a very important Finney that we all heard. There was kind of this discussion that we have to build our way to a solution. And I think today New York is more sophisticated about there's building in engineering, but there's also a big role for nature to play in this as well. And so for instance, when you kind of clear out an area, let Sam that Nyland. How exactly would you go about rejuvenating that area for its nature focuses? It depends on the place..

nature conservancy Seagate Staten Island Nyland Finney Sam Hansen New York
In Africa, climate challenges and opportunities

Climate Cast

04:36 min | 2 years ago

In Africa, climate challenges and opportunities

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC. Climate challenges and opportunities in Africa. I'm MPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter. This is climate cast. You know, it's fourteen thousand miles from Capetown South Africa to Minnesota but climate changes in sensitive climate zones. Like Africa can have a much wider impact. I talked about that with Matt Brown. He's the nature conservancies regional managing director for Africa. You know, a lot of the East African countries are seeing significant changes in the rainfall patterns, maybe as predicted to get quite drier. And there's a lot of food security issues and north and central Africa. So Africa's a big place Paul. There's fifty four countries over two thousand languages as you know. So it's a little bit of different shifts and impacts in different parts of the continent. So how do you decide which countries need the most resources we looked largely at where we can improve large intact systems that have the ability to be more resilient to climate change. And allow species to move and shift protection is has a higher return on investment than restoration. So a lot of our work is focused on. On finding intact ecosystems, and they all include people, of course. But finding ways to make sure that those systems persist over time like many journalists this year met we reported on Cape Town's, low reservoir levels earlier in the year. I'm curious about your perspective on how that played out this year. And as the rainy season finally arrived, similar to California. There's a lot of issue with agricultural offtake both for fruits as well as for vineyards. And then there's the consumption domestically the days euro proclamation in Cape Town brought a lot of awareness to water issues and water scarcity, but I think it helped create more willingness for behavior change, but the threat is still out there as it was yesterday. So we're we're moving out quickly to put better adaptation and better practices in place to try and secure water for the long term. And I asked this question to a lot of different people in a lot of different ways. But we're seeing climate change impact the hydrologic cycle where it's raining and how hard it's. Raining is shifting. How important is water in the work that you're doing water is critical in the work that we do. And so the changes in the hydrologic cycle as a result of warming. Global temperatures can be pretty catastrophic unless we are able to reduce that amount and manage the movement of wildlife access to water for people living in urban environments and have better buffer systems. I do feel like that there's a lot of positive interventions that we can pursue but the water cycle, and how hydrology is potentially going to be impacted is quite severe. If we just sit back and maintain a business as usual scenario, Matt Brown nature conservancy regional managing director for Africa. Thanks for sharing your perspective today. Thank you, all my name is Shannon Mortenson. And I am the city administrator for the city of Warren, which is in the northwest corner of the state population of sixteen hundred people for three years, we've traveled over Germany learn what they're doing for climate protection measures in the North Rhine-Westphalia state. And then they come over here. See what we're doing? You know, one of it uses low hanging fruit that we learned the first year we were in Germany was they don't have any paper products, plastic product styrofoam products. So when we came back to the city, all we removed all of that. So now just kind of started it, and then now we have a mandatory curbside recycling program, but are shining project right now is we are doing thermal imaging with drones with Northland college. Our plan is to take that data allow residents to come in and see where their energy losses. So they can do the energy upgrades. They need to their homes as long as they see a direct benefit. They are all on board. When we were in Germany, you know, they would always say five hundred years from thousand years from now they're not doing their energy transition right now because of the here and now it's for generations later. And I guess that's why I think that this is important. Also is I want my great great grandchildren to enjoy the same quality life in northwestern Minnesota that we have and in the whole country the whole world. And if it isn't that much of an effort to change our life is could make a difference for future generations. I don't know what's wrong with that. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton her.

Africa Germany Managing Director Bank Of America Chief Meteorologist Cape Town South Africa MPR Fdic Capetown Paul Hunter Minnesota Shannon Mortenson Nature Conservancy
Golden Eagles, FOX and NASA discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

12:05 min | 3 years ago

Golden Eagles, FOX and NASA discussed on Science Friday

"But first Thursday morning to astronauts on route to the international space station had to abort their launch after a booster rocket malfunction. The made an emergency descent back to earth and happy to report both are doing well both landing safely. Rachel feldman. Science editor at popular science is here to bring us up to date on the launch and other selected short subjects in science. Welcome back. Rachel, thanks for having me IRA anything more about what went wrong there. So we know that about two minutes into the launch. There was some kind of booster failure. And they had to undergo what's known. As a ballistic landing ballistics descent, which is so called because usually they make kind of a shallow angle as they come down to create a little bit of lift and take away some of the the the force on on the astronauts during landing, and this is where the rocket is really coming down more like projectile, and this has happened before. But only ever during landings, which of course, appears a lot less dramatic because they were supposed to come back down to the ground in the first place. So this is the first time they've ever had to make such an aborted landing during a launch and the Russian space agency that immediately they would begin investigating so far that that's all we know. While the good news about it. Is that it worked right, right? Right. And again, this is a rare. But the kind of thing that astronauts trained for all the time. So not something that happens a lot. But certainly one of the procedures that they are expected to occasionally encounter. So, you know, not something we want to have happen. But something that is certainly on the roster of things they have learned how to handle well with the Soyuz capsules being the only way for humans to reach the international space station, isn't this now a little bit of a problem. There's no other way to get up there. Right. So there are I believe three so us missions planned that are now kind of up in the air because the Russian species agency again is undertaking this investigation, and so it's possible. Some of those will be put on hold and even if they're not, you know, those two crew members who were counted on who are now on the ground instead of on ISS mean that there's there's probably going to be a gap in staffing. You know, we have. Three people on the space station right now. But they're scheduled to come back in December. Now, they could extend their stay a bit. But the so yes capsule they have up there. That's going to bring them home. I believe it's only it can only stay up there through sometime in January. So that's the longest they'll be able to stay before coming back down. And that means that the species and probably will be uncrowded for some amount of time. Which is something that we know should be possible. There are procedures in place for it. But I don't believe it's ever happened before. Interesting. I'd love to check on whether their experiments up there that method. Yeah. You put on hold or whatever, certainly, you know, every astronaut who goes up has a fully packed schedule of scientific experiments so NASA and the essay and the Russian space agency are certainly going to have to at least a rework schedules. And I know there are a few spacewalks. That are now up in the air so to speak so to speak. And other bad space news, the Hubble has problem this week to right, right? But again, not a totally pessimistic. Message from NASA on that. So the Hubble is twenty eight years old and has done fantastic work. And hopefully still has a lot of years left in it. But it certainly is not a new telescope and the gyroscopes that we use to keep it in position while it looks out and takes all these amazing images of space for us. One of them is malfunctioning it's been glitch in for about a year and the backup that was expected to replace it didn't quite act the way NASA wanted it to. So the telescope basically went to sleep on the fifth of October, which is just to say it's not a collecting new images right now. While NASA tries to workshop the problem. They are optimistic that it's they're going to figure it out. They're going to either get the gyroscope working or figure out a work around. For a way to position it. In. The meantime, they expect it to continue working into the twenty twenties and overlap with its replacement the James Webb space telescope, but what's interesting is that the the big problem is that it was designed to be fixed during shuttle missions, and we don't have a shuttle program anymore. So we're kind of running out of ways to fix the Hubble. So it does have an expiration date now. The detail. Let's move on. Some other news is really interesting, advance and reproductive medicine. If if you're a mouse. Yes. Great great news for mice. The Chinese Academy of science put out a paper showing that they were able to use embryonic stem cells, and gene editing to create mice from same sex parents which has been done before. But they used a slightly different method these this time and while the mice with two dads only lived about forty eight hours, the mice with two moms lived to adulthood and had babies of their own. So it's just kind of like another small step forward in this growing body of work. That's teaching us how mammalian reproduction works and how we might be able to alter it. That is a question about why it worked with the mice with two moms and not the two dads. Yeah. You know, I it's just considered more difficult to do it with two meal, sells it comes down to you. They're they're not quite parallel. I hear it referred to a lot. It's like zipping up the chromosomes, and there are certain genes that while both parents have them they're turned off in males and turned on females and vice versa. And so it's about you know, tweaking sex chromosomes so that they dip together properly. Finally, there's a study tip for students, especially kind of memory tell us about that. Yeah. So this really cool. Font called San's, forget it guy. And it's actually designed to be slightly more difficult to read than than most. It's like kind of tilted and broke in. And it's all about this principle called desirable difficulty, which is a phenomenon in learning where you need something to be difficult enough that it holds your interest. You know, that it doesn't bore the person trying to learn the information, but not so hard that it keeps them from retaining it. So the idea behind this font is that it kind of breaks these traditional design principles. So that it gets your attention and me helps you retain information a little bit better. So there's no published paper on it. Yeah. So he can't quite say how well it works. But it is a really intriguing idea. Always interesting. Have you Rachel? Science editor at popular science. And now it's time to check in on the state of science. This is WWE St Louis. Radio news local science stories of national significance. California's Channel Islands a cluster of aid islands off of the southern California. Coast have been compared to the Galapagos isolated islands with unique ecosystems home to some species found nowhere else and five in the Allens became a national park in the nineteen eighties before that they were home to ranching and farming and home to the shoe much people for thousands of years before that, but a cascade ecological problems threatened, the island's Lance Roscoe, news director here at KCRW is with me now to talk about efforts to protect and preserve the ecology there. And we're good to be with your IRA. So tell us about the logical problems a little bit of a history. This nothing new right? No. It's it's really interesting. It's sort of like CSI for biologists. We had this whole chain reaction of things. But as you mentioned, we had the ranchers moved in and they brought in cattle, sheep, and pigs and other non-nato. Things to the islands. But what happened was after World War Two DDT ended up in the ocean? The DD ended up in fish. Now. The reason this is significant is the bald eagles which are native to the islands. Eat these fish and built up to the point in the bald eagles that whenever they would nest the eggs would crack so they would basically limit sit in the exit would crack and the bald eagles came to the point of extinction. So they brought in the bald eagles for a captive breeding program. So that opens another door golden eagles, which don't live in the islands naturally said. Hey, this looks like a great place to live because our nemesis is gone now. So so golden eagles moved out into the islands. The golden eagles when they moved out there. Started to eat the feral pigs around there. Also, this rare species of FOX it's called the island FOX, it looks like a cat. It's a tiny little FOX, they're cute. They're adorable looking and the island FOX, very curious about people, but the island FOX doesn't have it in their DNA to be on the alert for the golden eagles. So the golden eagles basically started feasting on them push them to the point of extinction. So you had this whole chain-reaction biologists. Looked at this and said, okay, we need to grab what I foxes we have left. We need to bring them in for a captive breeding program to try to save them. And so so you had this whole cascade of events. And so the biologists had to figure out how these things were interrelated, and they started to fix them. And it's fascinating. So what what do you mean, they started to fix them? So what happened was they finally got enough of the bald eagles that they were able to reintroduce them to the islands than the golden eagles move into the islands. They get a trapping program. They relocated them to another part of California and into Nevada as well. And then the island Faulk. Is had gotten to the point where they could re release them onto the islands, and they've just been growing it, Tim Kuhnen who's the National Park Service biologists. I've talked for twenty years about this project. He said maybe in our lifetime. We could see the island FOX recover it happened in less than twenty years. It's remarkable biologists. Around the world, we ended this because humans were able to fix the problem. But wait, there's more there is more because because there's other non native eucalyptus trees, and there's aunts. Specifically Argentine ants which you find on Santa Cruz island. They went in. And they said, okay, we're gonna dust for these ants. We're going to get rid of these ants. But the problem is how do you know that you've gotten rid of all the ants? Okay. I'm sorry. Go ahead. A little Cup about that. Yes. Very very effective to the point that we cannot find any aunts with us in our human abilities. We plow over sixty thousand dollars, right? A plant where we think we did a really good job on the treatment. And we're bringing out this dog to try to verify our results to ensure that we can say, okay, we're done. We did their education. Now, that's Christina buzzer with the nature conservancy. So what they did is this group called working dogs for conservation in Montana train the dog specifically to find Argentine the only dog of its type in the world.

Golden Eagles FOX Nasa Rachel Feldman California Editor Santa Cruz Island James Webb Space Telescope Chinese Academy Of Science Channel Islands Nature Conservancy Christina Buzzer Montana Wwe St Louis CSI Galapagos Tim Kuhnen
"nature conservancy" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Oh we care about workforce development oh we care about systems change right oh we care about about carbon emissions reduced right if you're very clear on those things it's really helpful to the nonprofit because then that nonprofit can say you know what i can promise that or i can't promise that so i'm not gonna apply right that's i think really important to have clarity around those point yeah exactly exactly so let me ask you a couple questions about you what inspired you to study environmental science in the first place that seems to be where you started down this journey fit yeah yeah you know this is probably a longer story than there's time for it a podcast but i actually i went i went to i went to the university of of notre dame as a as an undergraduate and i ended up taking a semester off actually wasn't technically a semester off i i was able to to get credits through it for through the university of notre dame but i spent i spent a whole semester in washington dc and i ended up interning with the nature conservancy and working on the endangered species act that was when when the was going through one of the reauthorization and i just i i really i really enjoyed i really enjoyed being introduced to environmental issues and i've spent time with with family and friends in in colorado over the years and that just really increased my my love of the environment and they are and i ended up going to deciding when i was ready to to go to graduate school thinking that a program that really focused on on environmental policy and environmental science would be the right fit for me.

nature conservancy colorado washington
"nature conservancy" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"You see the nature conservancy works locally with communities businesses and people like you to preserve the most precious natural places around the world they protect the animals that live there the plants that grow there and even the water that way this beautiful place we'll be beautiful forever we'll make sure they're closing your eyes will never be the only way to get there i'm paul newman helped the nature conservancy save the last great places visit the nature conservancy at nature dot org that's nature dot the united nations security council today rejected a proposed resolution offered by russia to condemn the allied air strike on syrian targets last night some members of congress are weighing in now and whether president trump should have taken military action of this magnitude without congressional consent while many say he already has the authority he needs others like california democratic congressman john candy of the house armed services committee says the president should have asked i really believe that the president had come with a very straightforward requests for an authorization to use military force he would have had it in half a nanosecond the kentucky house has condemned republican governor matt bevins' comments that children were left vulnerable to sexual assault because schools were closed yesterday as teachers walked out to rally at the state capital the extraordinary review coming on today's final day of but legislative session oklahoma's governor continuing the state of emergency for fifty two of the states seventy seven counties because of the wildfires.

paul newman nature conservancy united nations security counci russia congress trump california john candy president matt bevins assault oklahoma congressman kentucky
"nature conservancy" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on KOMO

"And management of the nature conservancy explains why this work will be complex gaps of sunlight and there's different layers in the tree canopy and there's a lot of different species that create different habitat niches in the forest and there's a lot of under story diversity the work will be near the clearwater ho and cleats rivers which the nation had ho tribe rely on one goal of the work is to restore salmon spawning grounds who is kenny kenny he's well known homeless man in the u district but nobody knows his real identity without that he can't get the help he needs komo's matt markevic has the strange detail who is this man says his name is kitty says his last name is kitty born february twenty third nineteen seventy making him forty eight but people believe he's a lot older there's no police record no address no social security number but he's well known in the district for being homeless for decades this is where the majority of the stoop at the university christian church where they've been trying to help him he would talk with david says katie was fearful of help i was not leaving the snoopy was more sedentary and you could just see that less upkeep white hands so the staff called nine one one january it was bad he had frostbite so bad doctors amputated his feet and most of his fingers and now he lies in a bed at the university of washington medical center where he cannot leave until they know who he is and without an identity i can't do anything i can't get him medicaid i can't get him longterm care i can't get him out of the hospital he has stuck here until i'm able to identify who he is and get services and benefits turned on copeland is an attorney turn homeless advocate who helps the.

nature conservancy kenny kenny komo matt markevic kitty university christian church david katie copeland clearwater ho university of washington medic attorney
"nature conservancy" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on Science for the People

"As well so hammer to compare conservation international to the work of other large environmentallyfocussed ngos hottest competition international complement were of other ngos like wwf the nature conservancy or the wildlife conservation society i thought that our mission is so so ambitious that we can't do it alone but each abok each big ngo has it's all reached its own expertise its own approach on that worse contacts partnerships that are distinct and knee and and draw upon the experience of each a distant organization opt for conservation international i think our our presence uh are are bottle of a partnership and grant making on distinguishes loss odd end and gives us the opportunity to work on to have the flexibility to work on differently other large ngos by on i also think that are uh presence our country present on gives us the case steady the example the demonstrations and the knowledge to normal end end recommend how these programmes can be mainstreamed unskilled up around the world phil i'm sure conservation international has its own unique side of benefits in issues that come with being a large ngo by you've actually worked with small ngos in the past two could you described from perspective how a larger ngo functions differently from a smaller one a thinker come on large ngok respecting our at the week me have a lot of staff we have a lot of divisions in as an end at departments within the organisation so what can do a little bit challenging as is coordination an and on our our ensuring that were all and stuck with each other on to two to make sure that uh our work on science is linked to our work on policy arm is linked to our work with the corporate sector finance and ensuring that were all on a working towards the same goal and i think that's where having a bold like mine on i i sit within the strategy our team spirit ci arm and my job is will lead to to ensure that were uh as an institution working towards kirk coherent and uniform and consistent girl up on climate change particularly out and so i think that you need challenge on is just making sure that well coordinated.

nature conservancy kirk climate change coherent
"nature conservancy" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"We're going to like what would turn the band so that any hunter who goes to zimbabwe owes ambiance shoots and alvin and bring the iran they had into the country like why is that all of a sudden the thing to do and people really got upset about and not kind of change something at least for now there's been a reversal of that decision so that ministration is decided to like wait on that for a while so make your voices heard it's important that you make your voices heard and don'ts that this out are there any other resources that you would suggest people look to like seafood watch or any other websites where people could find simple things they might not think of like this lower shipping to make an impact i mean if it just assuming these people are busy professionals with high demands on their time we are suggest they look okay so a and and without being totally selfserving so i i will say exa my own organisation conservationorg decent website you'll find lots of ways in which you can be engaged the nature conservancy natureorg decent website lots of ways you can get engaged in burma defence spun they do a lotta great work particularly the united states around climate world we saw since stu gives you the macro picture they've great graphics rate info graphics gives you sort of the macro picture i did the series recently on fox acts with the university of california called climate labs which is just these eightminute very short digestible little videos on something like food waste slightly irreverent slightly counter intuitive simple ways in which you can i get engaged or make a change in your life you can have an impact and so we took a bunch of different topic.

iran united states food waste zimbabwe alvin nature conservancy burma fox university of california eightminute
"nature conservancy" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on WJR 760

"Have all the foundation i believe that it is critically important to be good environmental stewart and we have partnered with our navy nonprofit organization for the purpose of the preservation and protection of our michigan natural resource then twenty well well we have awarded more than a hundred importing environmental grant our which tober cooked at six million dollars to nonprofit organization throughout the so so then we had a wonderful our relationship with the nature conservancy who share strong interest in environmental stewardship in fact earlier this year as you are probably aware did he announced the carbon reduction plan on committing to reducing our carbon emissions eighty percent by 20 fit so we continue to work with they like the nature conservancy it has an excellent reputation and driving outcome that report arctic environmental health and over the years we've proven they have proven on our group to be too busy fantastic outcome that they generated we you have awarded wei awarded a million dollar grant in 2011 to the nature and because of this great relationship because of their performance we thought that to again award another one million dollar grant to the conservative think that here the foundation has been doing this sort of work for a long time now we have under mean and we have really work to aggressively support again does uh organizations both nonprofit organization that share our mission and our vision relative hit the critical importance of environmental stewardship so many many orders organisations alert and that we've had a great relationship with an accord as we're speaking nature conservancy we have we believe that is a great opportunity to make a difference this by the way uh grant made to the conservative they are.

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"nature conservancy" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on Warm Regards

"Really big thinker is ends and leaders and game changers and one of the one of the things i went to a lotta panels on gay dea of carbon taxes or carbon dividends because it's not something i know a ton about and there was this really interesting panel andium not sure fewer their uh on on the sadia of carbon dividends as a consensus climate solution and so it had uh you know marked her sack ted halsted nick schultz see you have like people from the nature conservancy and people from exxon mobil on the same panel coming to together to talk about this idea of new e essentially taking a carbon tax and then returning of the money from that tax back to the citizens directly rather than that when he going into the government it goes directly to citizens as a as a dividend which essentially makes it a universal minimum guaranteed income which is kind of cool and also than doesn't disproportionately hurt developing countries um uh with with the with sort of bye bye uh we know that with with the tax basically gum hurting development and so you know this tap seeing ideas like that i and i'm not an economist you know full disclaimer although i spent a couple of days you know chatting with some very nice economists hung a bus so i don't i don't know the feasibility of these kinds of ideas but the the ideas that something like a plan like that like a carbon dividend plan could be scalable so that if you're not reducing emissions by your target goals you can than increase the dividend until you hit those those targets and um i mean seeing those kinds of ideas come out of of corporations that i've spent my entire life being super skeptical of um was gave me a lot of pause and i'm still processing that entire experience um so i don't know i'd love to hear your thoughts to d on that.

nick schultz nature conservancy exxon mobil ted halsted
"nature conservancy" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on WJR 760

"Of the nature conservancy paul while that's a lot of stuff all important is all it's a it's a pleasure to serve well it's a pleasure to have you part of all of this an interview on our show and uh i i want to start by saying thank you on behalf of the kids in our foundation in our board to the michigan health the gamut fawn for your support in 2016 you approve the grant of eighty thousand dollars to support what we call the safe baby academy protecting your sleeping baby program which started just this year so thank you you're welcome and thank you for what you're doing in the community infant mortality is a concern in the city and in the region and what you're doing to deal with infant death syndrome by educating parents some sleep practice sweet practices very important we're talking to nolan findlay earlier he brought that up as as part of the one of the issues that the that is that our city faces so working together we can do a lot of good and so we appreciate your support and one of the things that i wanted you to spend a couple minutes on if you don't mind is is to the listeners who are not all that familiar with the michigan healthy down in fawn the mission of the organization yes the health endowment fund was created by state lock in two thousand thirteen when the blue cross blue she healed was reorganized into a nonprofit usual and as part of that legislation they made a commitment to fund the health endowment fund over nineteen year period for our mission is health and wellness focused on children and older adults in michigan where statebased and we are really working and all also reducing health care costs by preventative care identifying issues early on in a child's life screening not behaviors were screening early signs of chronic illness that allow you to intervene early and avoid going into a hospital in the first place and i mentioned earlier in the show and almost every show that the children's hospital michigan foundation now has five priorities not that we won't look at all things and and found other things but many of those priorities are preventitive keep yes it's out of the hospital and.

nolan findlay hospital michigan foundation nature conservancy michigan eighty thousand dollars nineteen year
"nature conservancy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:34 min | 5 years ago

"nature conservancy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Of life for all of us will never be the same what scientists haven't count him later days the power to win to work together to save the future of our natural and it's an happens he's if you are ready to make a difference that last to help protect nature and preserved line visit the nature conservancy and nature done today nature today but we'll talk about everything from follow through fielder much of a difference in your life whether your awfully for your starting of welcome to the show hall of awesome era again eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety run i i'm gary mcnamara the is there are only welcome and thanks for being here this morning i don't know what you're talking about you're talking about a girl you're not not enter the show meeting but during a commercial break earlier in the sean i'm like what do talking about wow i just look at the promo for that doctor phil lead you are that you were tell me about yeah is now ditty do the interview worse of coming up i don't know if it's air gap but i mean the good por for parts aired on all the entertainment shows and it's with shelly to vol the actress from the shining popeye all.

nature conservancy gary mcnamara air gap shelly