36 Burst results for "Natural Disasters"

How Are Your Kids & Teens Dealing With COVID?

The Gee and Ursula Show

05:47 min | 15 hrs ago

How Are Your Kids & Teens Dealing With COVID?

"How are your kids and teens faring during Cove it and what can we do to help Children and parents who are struggling? We want to talk with someone who knows And joining us now is Alex, smallest in A marriage and family therapist. Practice owner in university place. Good morning, Alex. Hi. How are you? Good. Thank you so much for joining us. So we know that this pandemic has taken such a huge toll in terms of the deaths and illnesses. We also know so many businesses and people in general are having a hard time staying afloat financially. We don't talk enough about what this pandemic is doing to our mental health in particular on Children. What are you seeing in your practice? So in my practice, I'm seeing a lot of increases in anxiety and kids well, and everyone to be honest, but in particular talking about kids and teens on increasing anxiety An increase in depression. There's been a lot more social isolation, obviously, so we're seeing the impact of that on kids and their mental health on dawn families as a whole as well. And so when you are seeing that, what kind of things can you tell your and I know you can't get too specific. But let's just talk in general. If we see what what are some of the signs first of all. That kids are struggling before they even get to, you know, not everyone can afford to have a therapist or go to a therapist or know that they're in trouble. What? What science should we be looking for in our kids? So I think that one of the things you think about is especially for younger kid of much younger kiddos is psychosomatic symptoms. Sometimes you'll see that in the form of headaches or stomachaches, also withdrawing from from typical activities. Obviously, we're not able to engage in all of our typical activities. But when you see your kid not enjoying your things that they used to enjoy that something that I've noticed a lot with kids as well. For example, a kiddo who No longer really wants to leave the house or feels anxious about pretty basic things, even just visiting the store. Those those are some of the things that I've noticed that I've seen some of the parents of my kids, but I work with notices well. One of the things that we talk about is how this pandemic is impacting people in different ways, sometimes is those who don't have the financial means and sometimes is those that do have the financial means. Talk to us about the kids that are having a hard time Is this and all over problem whether you're poor rich or anything, talk about that. Yeah, sure. So, um, so in lower FPs, the socioeconomic status families, Um, you're seeing a lot of basic needs not being met, and that's really concerning as well. Um, I mean a lot of kids on free lunch program. They're reduced breakfast programs. And so, um, School is not just being out of school is not just for academics. That's also a safe, warm place for kids to be right. To get their needs met, But even for other populations, like from the populations that I work with Kids you have educated or well resourced families. We're seeing life trajectories change in ways that are unimaginable right from strange marriages or financial struggles to even miss scholarship on differ. Teens, especially there's an increased rate of suicide, aladi and suicidal ideation as well. It's affecting kids across the board. Well, OK right now. I'm a parent at home. I have, um Ah young Child School age. Let's just say junior high who Is not able to be with their friends because of Cove it Theo. Only interaction they're having with their friends and or their teacher is through the computer on Zoom. What are some ideas that you can give us to maybe help our Children that are going through this right now, and that specific thing that are struggling, not seeing their friends. Personally. Sure. So. So this is this is more of a global trauma, right? And we know we know from the field unprecedented. We're not even familiar with the level of trauma that this has been from a global. We've had devastating wars We've had Natural disasters, But this feels like it reaches all different parts of the world, right. There's a study that came out that was from 46 different countries and all kids. They're reporting increases of Depression, anxiety and decreased well being. So then the question is is well, How do we keep those kids connected? Because we know while this pandemic is unprecedented, the research on trauma is not. We're familiar with charm, and we're familiar with what helped heal and that connection and relationships So in regards to parents. I think it's important for them to remember that that connection with their friends is paramount, especially for preteens and teenagers. S o to be able to encourage that as much as possible. I think that we're resilient of humans. I think that people forget that their kids are resilient. And so what? How do we? How do we build resilience? Well, we have to get creative right and Some of the innovative ways of connecting the technology has been really cool to see. So as a parent myself and to those who are parenting, even teens and preteens, I would say to you do your best to increase connection and relationships as much as possible. Um, you know, I've seen some really cool creative ways from doing like online together do tours because there's tons and tons of these across the country that have Webcams right now, or, you know, joining in with a family member doing free? You know, there's a freak, you know online. I've even had some of my family's was some of the preteen boys. Really enjoy doing an online game of like roadblocks or something right with their cool uncle of their fun, aunt or something, so any sort of connection like that? We know it's something that mediates trauma and the impact of trauma.

Alex Anxiety Depression Headaches Theo Cove
Fresh update on "natural disasters" discussed on Tom Sullivan

Tom Sullivan

01:02 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "natural disasters" discussed on Tom Sullivan

"What would you get in over the wires? This was a false alarm earlier today, but The state of Georgia has certified the election of President elect Joe Biden. Has won the state of Georgia. So that's been certified. And now that now that it starts o'clock For the Trump campaign. They have 48 business hours. Who asked for a recount. And that I believe that is one of those where they have to pay for like in Wisconsin, the Trump campaign. He's paying $3 million for two counties. In Wisconsin. I don't know which ones for sure, but I would guess Milwaukee and Madison. In any case in Georgia just starts the clock. Now they have. They have declared Joe Biden the winner and certified the hand recount which they are saying. That the difference was 0.0. I forget the number of the guy, you know that White here, guy. Gabriel. Somebody brother who's the spokesman for the election division there, said the difference was Don't know the word he used. But basically what didn't make any difference, and he gave that rattle off a number 0.0 something different. So, in other words, was almost identical to what the machine count was two weeks ago on Tuesday. So if the Trump campaign wants to have a recount of Georgia, they can. They can do that. We've got 48 business hours. That means Monday until sometime Tuesday. Then they have to say yes. We want a recount. And no, By the way, Here's our check. And then the recount. Well, then you got Thanksgiving. So that's gonna be a break in that so we may not if they do that, with don't know the outcome of that until obviously sometime in the first week of December. Earliest. 55295 66 100 Russell in Port ST Lucie. Hi, Russell. Doing time. How you doing? I'm doing great. What do you think it today? Well, I'm just kind of confused on this block down. Not that I don't understand what they're trying to do. But I'm wondering how often the government's gonna step in and try to keep everybody well. At the country's expensive for us. Here. Florida. I'm in Florida. We have not even caught up from the last block down. There's people gonna be losing their power. They rolled and rolled. It rolled him pretty soon. It's gonna catch up with everybody. How how are we have the country going to face that? The guy call yesterday who was a landlord? He said he hasn't been paid rent in months. And he I presume he owes the bank money for his forces building. This is sure the bank in fact, he is I'm curious. What? What Your answer is because You're in Florida. And you, you know, don't get hit every year. Thank God. But you guys have pretty nasty storms every so often And when you do All of us around the country pitch in whether we pitch in through the government through FEMA, or whether we give to the Red Cross or all that stuff we pitch in to help. Our fellow Americans in a time of a national disaster. Earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes floods Wait this year War. Well, morsel. Anything else I've seen this year. More charities are mailing for donations to me personally, then I've ever seen in the 30 years I've been here. And I got you think pandemics. Do you think pandemic spit on that list? We talk about natural disasters. I mean, the pandemic was pretty natural disaster kind of it is, but I don't. I don't think this is gonna be the last one. My father was a doctor, and he lived through the stands, flu and he lived to the avian flu. The swine flu all those. Yeah, it's one of Think little things is that we have the country. We're going to have to come up with someone dealing with it without punishing the population of the country. I don't know. What is it punishing? Or is it or is it that we do? I mean, this is what they're arguing about in Congress. And of course, they have to get political about it. And they try and put all kinds of You know, hanging make a decorated Christmas tree with all the little goodies if they want for some program that they've always wanted, and they pretend like they're helping out for covert if they would really help out for covert for it would great But I'll tell you what. I got some of it trapped. Maybe we can play some of it later, but Um Mnuchin. Is in the news and try free secretary because he was saying, We still have $500.

Georgia Joe Biden Florida Wisconsin Port St Lucie FLU Um Mnuchin Russell Milwaukee President Trump Fema Gabriel White Congress Red Cross Madison Secretary
Hurricane Iota batters Central America

The Takeaway

06:49 min | Last week

Hurricane Iota batters Central America

"Devastating devastating devastating devastating devastating devastating hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes have have have have have have pummeled pummeled pummeled pummeled pummeled pummeled Central America on November 3rd hurricane at the first struck Nicaragua and then made its way to Honduras and Guatemala. According to the Red Cross. More than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane. Then this week, another hurricane Hurricane iota made landfall in Central America delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in Central America, but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covert 19. Joining us now to talk about what's happening on the ground is Jeff EARNS two freelance journalist based in Honduras. Jeff Thanks for being with us For having me. So what are conditions on the ground in Honduras right now? Right now. Much of Honduras is underwater, particularly in the Northwest Sula Valley region, which is home to about two million people, and it's really the economic motor. Of the country, So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging it is. Given that roughly 40% of the GDP or more is produced in this region, but really after iota we have much more widespread damage. A lot across the whole country was a much larger storm. So just particular across the North Coast and and the West, there's still rising waters in some parts. We've lost a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure. There's many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck Nicaragua before going through Honduras and Guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries? With a to it was damaging. But it went through a pretty lowly populated area of Nicaragua. But iota was so much larger. That it really hit harder in Nicaragua, and even the winds were harder to sew. In Nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital, Managua. And south of it to Nicaragua's pretty devastated this 0.2. You've been reporting on this region in Honduras for awhile have how have the government's responded to efforts on the ground? The government's response has been heavily criticized ahead of eight actually scheduled this special holiday for that week week in in order order to to try try to to Remote Remote domestic domestic tourism tourism and and stimulate stimulate the the economy, economy, which which has has been been really really hit hit hard hard by by the the cove cove in in 19 19 pandemic, and there was a clear reticence by the government to Cancel that vacation, so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders, which led Tens of thousands of people in completely caught off guard being and then ended up getting trapped on the roof, some for as many as five days. And, of course, That led to two more deaths, which we really don't know how much yet because the water Has never been able to fully received from eight to before We got hit by iota, so there's really clear negligence by the government here and then in terms of responding They're completely overwhelmed by it. And they clearly unprepared and there's a real question of how they're spending. Their resource is the government just a year ago. Just from Israel. This Folks from war and yet their emergency response unit doesn't have the boats necessary to go to the healthy, strong currents that was seen from the footing in order to rescue people. Until the water gets down. The people are very upset, definitely more than ever with with the government and this could definitely lead to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability Could also sperm or migration out of the region. Is that right? Coming towards where? There That's the United States are moving towards Mexico or other places this people try to survive. Absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans that looks like they're planning for January, most of them whether or not that materializes. There's just no doubt we're going to see it another tick in migration over the next year, particularly As Kobe 19 travel Strick Shins are eased. I took so many people already. Particularly the young people who just see no opportunity. They have no work, and now they've lost everything. They really have nothing to lose, and they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help their families to rebuild and and recoup everything they've lost. United States government has limited at least one of the Trump administration migration from many of these countries. At the same time, it's asked many Central American countries to help it with its asylum policies. Has the U. S government sent any aid? To these countries as they struggled to deal with the blows from these hurricanes. The lack of leadership from the U. S. Following this crisis is really Shocking. There's been no word from the State Department or from the White House, other than U S aid, which is down here most recently after Iota they designated $17 million to the region. Half of which is going to Honduras and then Also the U. S. Military, based on here has been a source of rescue missions, which has definitely been very helpful. But $17 million We're talking about billions and billions of dollars in damage. And really in 1998 when Hurricane Mitch hit, which is the worst natural disaster in center America To date, it was US leadership that mobilized support from the global community. And that is completely lacking at this point. President elect Biden has expressed his concern and support for the region, so there's hope that when he takes office He will take up that traditional leadership role of the U. S. To help one of its neighbors will be watching to see how this pans out. Jeff earns two freelance reporter based in Honduras. Thanks for being with us and stay safe. Thanks for having me

Honduras Nicaragua Central America Hurricane Hurricane Northwest Sula Valley The North Coast Guatemala Jeff Red Cross Managua Hurricane Trump Administration West Strick U. S. Government Israel
What Should Small Businesses Do About Coronavirus?

The Small Business Radio Show

06:35 min | Last week

What Should Small Businesses Do About Coronavirus?

"What should small businesses do to take advantage of this time of year. Which is really important. Their overall sales. I think you hit the right point there as much as covid. We'll bring some challenges. This is always an important time of year for for small businesses Some small businesses may see after their sales come from right last know forty five days of the year. So the the things that i think about. Our inventories attended be maxed out at this time of year roles and staffing can be stretched. And and you know whether it's seasonal workers or have you people work overtime certainly here. In the northern part of the country winter weather arrives and that can Throw challenges in as well now. I know i agree. It definitely will be It will definitely be a transition so with all of these types of things. How can small business owners prepare. Well as always we recommend that Small businesses work with an independent agent to to help them because in every small business is unique even when they stay within the same industry. So things that you know we like to have businesses think about our our their basic insurance coverage so that when something does if something does go wrong that they're they're protected So an inventories are staying at the teams Making sure limits or adequate their coverage With these being some of the most important sales days of the year making sure their business income coverage that protects them throw unable to conduct their business mixture their limits are adequate There can be challenges From hiring seasonal workers so whether it's training these employees for workers compensation or Making sure that you you hire the right people not forgetting to do background checks and and the like and then sort of just thinking about all of the you know the christmas traffic that comes in and all of that. You know before you add kobe done. So let's talk about a few of those because you talk about business income coverage but my understanding is is that this is something would happen besides cove it like if there was a fire or another natural disaster. Spit your fire seems to be. The you know the most dramatic but you know water damage can be you know. Got a very common one. Whether it's a a pipe break on the street out in front of you. A neighbouring tenant as high frac- or an apartment above you has frac- there's all sorts of different things that can happen. And when when any of those things happen and they cause you to have to close your doors Hopefully not for long period but even just a few days at this critical time of the year Not only are you losing sales. You're losing your profits. You also mentioned season the workers. I think a lot of folks don't look as seasonal workers as being covered by workmen's compensation but they are right. They absolutely are whether you're Whether they're coming in as a volunteer all the way to somebody that's you know part time You know even even you know potentially companies on a staffing agency Were you hire them. You know honest you know as staff is a regular staff. Just for the next month and a half. They are covered by workers compensation which protects them. But it also means they affect your experience and your prints it. It's interesting to me because a lot of small business owners they hire sometimes even more than their regular year ran staff. But they don't take a look their workman's comp limits. Yeah so Limit limits with workers comp or so much of it is statutory but there is an employer's liability limit. Which really gets it. Whether you're running a safe workplace and so Independent agents and insurance companies typically recommend that Businesses carry a half a million dollars players liability or sometimes even a million coverage but that At this point has become again once you're working with an independent agent has become relatively standard. So what happens when you hire some of these people and of course many of them may not be at your office or retail location. What if they're working from home had he protect yourself there. Yeah well the cupboard. Whether they're doing work for you they're they're covered so It becomes important to set out some standards of you know if they're working at the computer making sure they have appropriate workspace We certainly see repetitive. Motion claims because somebody has not set there The the table a little bit too high for them and so the way. They're reaching for their keyboard put stress on their on their wrists as an example. So it's important that A business sets expectations For both their you know regular employees but there is an employee as well that they set up safe business practices to Allow them to do their job to do it. Safely and one of the business practices of course. Is this idea of cyber threats because we know that small businesses are really a target of that. It's a lot easier to protect yourself from cyber threats when you're using a computer in the office but what happens when people are using their home computer. It really does add an extra challenge because then sometimes the corporate firewalls and ask corporate. Antivirus software doesn't extend to a personal home computer. So you're now Creating a potential exposure For your company where somebody you can access your system through a less protected source so there are You know guidance that we would give and independent agents would give to make sure that people are have You know antivirus protection on their personal computers. They're following safe practices. Not opening emails from sources of that are unknown. Sort of those suspicious Emails that are out there It's very important. People update their passwords and make their passwords complex. Those are those are sort of the basic things that are there And and i. And i think back to sort of sort of one other which we may want to get into which is the importance of companies you know even keeping their firewalls their System safe with through patches

Small Business Saturday: How to Survive and Thrive in COVID Times

The Small Business Radio Show

03:24 min | Last week

Small Business Saturday: How to Survive and Thrive in COVID Times

"Small business. Saturday is quickly approaching. He'll probably look a little bit different than last year. Here with the vice and i take advantage of holiday. Season is chip haman. Who's the deputy president small commercial of the hanover. Insurance group chip. Welcome back to the show. Thank you. It's good to be here so everyone's excited about the holiday season but it's gonna be a little different than last year. I completely agree. Coach changes everything. So what should small businesses do to take advantage of this time of year. Which is really important. Their overall sales. I think you hit the right point there as much as covid. We'll bring some challenges. This is always an important time of year for for small businesses Some small businesses may see after their sales come from right last know forty five days of the year so the the things that i think about. Our inventories tend to be maxed out at this time of year roles and staffing can be stretched. And and you know whether it's seasonal workers or have you people work overtime certainly here. In the northern part of the country winter weather arrives and that can Throw challenges in as well now. I know i agree. It definitely will be It will definitely be a transition so with all of these types of things. How can small business owners prepare. Well as always we recommend that Small businesses work with an independent agent to to help them because in every small business is unique even when they stay within the same industry. So things that you know. We like to have businesses think about our our their basic insurance coverage so that when something does if something does go wrong that they're they're protected So an inventory bursting at the teams Making sure limits or adequate their coverage With these being some of the most important sales days the year share their business income coverage that protects them throw unable to conduct their business. mixture their limits are adequate There can be challenges From hiring seasonal workers so whether it's training these employees for workers compensation or Making sure that you you hire the right people not forgetting to do background checks and and the like and then sort of just thinking about all of the you know the christmas traffic that comes in and all of that. You know before you add kobe done. So let's talk about a few of those because you talk about business income coverage but my understanding is is that this is something would happen besides cove it like if there was a fire or another natural disaster. Spit fire seems to be. The you know the most dramatic but you know water damage can be you know. Got a very common one. Whether it's a a pipe break on the street out in front of you. A neighbouring tenant as high frac- or an apartment above you has frac- there's all sorts of different things that can happen. And when when any of those things happen and they cause you to have to close your doors Hopefully not for long period but even just a few days at this critical time of the year Not only are you losing sales. You're losing your profits.

Hanover
Iota still a threat after killing dozens in Central America

The Takeaway

07:16 min | Last week

Iota still a threat after killing dozens in Central America

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really After i iota we have much of a widespread damage Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more Migration out of the region is that right coming towards A whether that's the united states are moving towards mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans That looks like they're planning for january most of them Whether or not that materializes There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people Who just see no opportunity They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose And they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help to their families to rebuild and recoup everything. They've lost the united states government. has limited at least under the trump administration migration from many of these countries at the same time it's ass many central american countries to help it with its asylum policies Has the us. Government sent any aid to these countries as they struggle to deal with the blows from these hurricanes the lack of leadership from the us Following these crisis is really shocking. There's been no word from the state department or from the white house other than us aid which is down here. Most recently after i iota they designated seventeen million dollars through the region half of which is going to honduras and then also the. Us military base. Don't here has been a source of of rescue missions which has definitely been very helpful but seventeen million dollars when we're talking about billions and billions dollars damage and really in nine hundred ninety eight when hurricane mitch hit which was the worst natural disaster in central america to date it was. Us leadership that mobilized support from the global community and that is completely lacking at this point. president-elect biden has expressed is concerned and support for the region. So there's hope that when he takes office he will take that traditional leadership role of the. Us to help one of its neighbors. I'll be watching to see how this pans out.

Honduras Nicaragua Hurricane Bertha Hurricane Hurricane Jeff Ernst Northwest Soula Valley Pedro Soula United States Guatemala Red Cross Evita Managua Hurricane Jeff Trump Administration Missouri Israel
Its time to talk about voting technology. No, not that kind of voting.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:29 min | Last week

Its time to talk about voting technology. No, not that kind of voting.

"The pandemic has forced lawmakers around the world to get creative about passing legislation but in the us members of congress still have to show up to vote in person or have another member cast a proxy vote on their behalf but a report out last week by the house administration committee says congress could conduct remote voting if it wanted to securely and with existing technology beth. Simone novak studies the impact of technology on governing as a professor at new york. University's tannin school of engineering. She says remote voting is already happening in other countries and in several. Us states via apple or roll. Call by phone. You know when we have our voices or our faces that's the best form of authentication of who we are. It's no different in many ways as we've seen from all of us working online that we can simply of express our opinion out loud this on zoom the same way we do in real space. It's really not the technology so much. That's the issue at the technology exists for members of congress to securely vote remotely during the ongoing coronavirus epidemic and we've already seen lots of uses of zoom and other of videoconferencing technologies to allow for example committees to me and the business of lawmaking. Go on around the world to if the house administration committee says it safe and already available. Why the pushback. So we've seen over the course of the pandemic. there were a lot of people from both sides of the political aisle who were worried about turning congress into a museum but people felt that really. This went against tradition. This went against the way the people were used to doing things. Don't forget that from legislators used to doing business in the hallways and face to face doing zoom meeting or doing a webex or getting online to have a meeting that was completely new and in fact training was needed to get people used to the idea of having a committee meeting online then part of it. Frankly is party politics and just objecting for the sake of objecting. One of the advantages of virtual committee meetings that you've had more openness. It's been more accessible to people who may not be able to fly to washington to testify for example do you see voting also potentially increasing If you don't have to be there in person. So we've seen examples from around the world of legislatures who have seen their attendance rates and participation rates. Go way up not needing to miss a vote. Because they're in their home district or need to be a need to be somewhere else. So i think we definitely have seen instances of greater rates of participation. We've also seen the ability for for example committees to bring in witnesses from all over the world. Something very difficult today to do today during covid but even pre covid would have a hearing with a few witnesses who would usually come a potentially from where it's convenient near in the beltway area or the usual suspects. We have the ability to have much more diverse participation and more participation in hearings and. I think what's really exciting. Is those legislatures that are turning to technology not simply to do what they do offline but do it online it's those who are really using technology to innovate in new ways to do what i like to call crowd law in other words to use technology to engage the public in the legislative process. So we're seeing lots of examples of this kind of crowd law innovation taking advantage of new technology to hear from more people more diverse people and to engage ordinary people in a process. That's typically been done of really far away from them and often to much behind closed doors but lawmakers could have problems connecting to the internet right. I mean we've seen some government officials lose their connections during committee meetings. Is the infrastructure ready for this. We have to take some baby steps to ensure that we have backup plans in place right. That's why in brazil they have a system that both works with an app and with the telephone. So there's a backup plan. I've been a witness in a congressional hearing and the person who testified with me had to do so frankly from her car because it was the only place that she could get reliable connectivity we have the tools and techniques and the processes in place that can allow us to develop procedures that will work including with backup plans so that people can for example is they're doing in other countries vote maybe not during the hearing but afterwards so they have a window of time in which they can actually register their participation if they can't get online then well and a reminder of the stakes here which is you know if you have people talking in the halls and having having backroom meetings that's potentially spreading covid. Do you think there will be more pressure on the house to adopt to take this step. In the coming months i think with especially with a change in administration and a posture. That will be really much more proactive. In terms of things like mask mandates social distancing requirements and public health and safety measures. I think we're also going to see some a changing culture and when you keep in mind the fact that the average age of a senator is sixty three. The average age of a member of the house is fifty eight and again. The cove is rising all over the united states. I think we're going to see both the necessity of really instituting procedures that help keep people safe but also really a change in culture in really trying to demonstrate for the american people the right ways to work safely and to act safely and that's going to create pressure. I hope for greater uses of these technologies. Frankly it's not cova today. It could be a natural disaster tomorrow. We have to be prepared to continue operations of government even the event of a disaster. We don't wanna be without the ability to legislate to provide the american people with services that they need to provide them with their stimulus checks and importantly to conduct oversight over the executive branch Especially in a crisis you know. We have the world's arguably most powerful national legislature and it deserves to have a modern and safe digital infrastructure. Beth novak directs the governance lab at. Nyu's hand school of engineering

House Administration Committee Congress Simone Novak United States Beltway Apple New York Washington Brazil Beth Novak NYU
North Korea waging propaganda-heavy, 80-day labor campaign

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:39 sec | Last week

North Korea waging propaganda-heavy, 80-day labor campaign

"North Korea's waging an 80 day battle of propaganda heavy labor campaign meant to bolster internal unity boost production ahead of a ruling party Congress in January. Outside experts question whether the campaign will address North Korea's fundamental economic problems. But they say it's a tool used by the government to cement its grip on power as it grapples with multiple crises. Including US led sanctions, the corona virus pandemic and natural disasters. North Korean defectors say they were forced during such campaigns to toil for long hours at construction and other work without pay. They say they couldn't publicly complain because of fear of harsh punishment. Jeremy House reporting,

North Korea Congress United States Jeremy House
Bodhisattva for Our Times

Tara Brach

05:17 min | Last week

Bodhisattva for Our Times

"Is called we rise to play a greater part. That's really the boaty sought of our times and i few days ago today. An interview with the washington post that was extensively about how to work with the extra stress of this holiday season. And then i got curious. And i thought i'd ask you. How many of you feel like. It's extra stressful. This particular holiday season. Can i see by hands. Okay so let me see how many feel it's very normal for you right now. This is a normal level. Yeah i would say that was about two thirds extra stressful one-third stressful for those. That are listening on podcasts. I ask that because for many people that i've talked to the combination of the holidays with recent upheaval round the elections that combo the sense of potentially the kind of conversations and interactions with family members. Who might not agree. It just seems to all a combine in a that's intense and even without the elections. Many people know the forty eight hour limit. That if if we're with too long with family stuff happens. Somebody recently sent me a little cartoon with a where. There's a psychiatrist and lying on the couch. Is this long tall. Cactus with a cowboy hat and he says you know. We weren't what i would call a touchy feely family. How which i thought it was cute and then somebody else sent me one. And it was this annual convention and it's huge auditorium and the convention was adult children of normal parents. Only two seats were felled. Fixed a lot of us so we explore then at these times holiday or not just at times. That are stressful for us. Which could be for personal reasons or more societal reasons because it's often an interaction. How do we live our moments from the best that we are you know. The body sought path in the buddhist tradition. Really means it's an archetype for all of us are evolutionary potential. It's living away card. I mean every one of us is on this this unfolding of realizing the wisdom that comes from being present and the tenderness that comes when our heart wakes up and went as as the more we realized that the more very naturally we serve and we save her life. There's a reason that you know all this research keeps showing how people that are generous or less depressed people that feel a lot of gratitude are happier. And there's a correlation. Because the more we are inhabiting our fullness we can be the more at home and by contrast. When we're feeling very self-centered and reactive judgmental we don't like ourselves so how do we awake and our full potential at times of intense stress and what we find is that for many. It's when it gets intense that actually we feel more inclined towards helping you see it a natural disasters. It's like the best of people come out. People become incredibly aware of. Oh we're in this together and they care and i'm very aware that wartime everybody gets together when we see videos of racial violence week. It breaks our hearts now. There's a problem though that we forget if we're not in the war zone or in the middle of the natural disaster are constantly taking in the real world because so many of us are in enclaves that are buffered some and are speaking those of us who have privilege dominant culture that we forget so one of the queries tonight is how do we keep remembering truth that they're suffering so that our hearts can stay tender so we don't go back to sleep. Does that make sense. Okay i have been hearing from a lot of people especially in the last few weeks that something has broken open and it's harder to forget because if you read the newspaper you can't forget and one letter i got an email today. He writes signing petitions. Giving money to campaign doesn't feel like enough right now. I want to lend my voice back and hard to healing the wounds that keep us apart.

Washington Post
"natural disasters" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

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"natural disasters" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:04 min | 3 weeks ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Are planning and self interest there are plans to make sure that these folks or their institutions loved ones. Or what have you are able to find a livable place that they do always have clean water and a c. And i don't think we should have a problem with that. I just think it should apply to everybody. And maybe that's pollyanna or whatever but the truth of the matter is we are going to see we are already seen. We are going to see a massive rise in migration people like the ones you mentioned matt. The populations living in the equator living on coastlines are going to desperately search for an escape from increasingly uninhabitable regions of the world and the governments in place. And you know what let's throw in. Let's throw in the The the corporations. Let's let's throw in whatever kind of governing structure you want. The ones that are in place. Many will be rendered either. Powerless corrupt or ineffective in combating. This and when those institutions a road. We're going to lose faith in authority. Y should i. Why should i pay taxes. World's burning down. I already kind of feel that way. I get much benefit from the tax. That i pay you know in terms of direct impact in my day to day life. I still have garbage health care l. I mean i. I don't wanna sound like some kind of bleeding heart liberal commie or something like that but i honestly don't know where my tax money goes and it certainly doesn't seem to go anywhere that actually helps me or my family. That's interesting that you say that. No because what we. We have seen historically through some really interesting studies and an article that was published in ars technica about some studies. There were looking at the correlation that we've been talking about this whole episode natural disasters and how Violence erupts because of or as a partial effect of that natural disaster. We've seen that the way. A government or a governing institution to a natural disaster in the effects of it can have a may. It can play a major role in the outcome. Even if there is a violent conflict that begins that response contemporary. Stop it or full mint. Can we just address the elephant in the room. Real quick i mean is a is a virus. A natural disaster. So we're we're we're in this and the way the government is or is not handling this and the people's positions on how it was or was not handled Is going to have an impact yet. Matt Matt brought this up at the top with that definition of what is a natural disaster. It's always been an epidemic or a pandemic and again the only option that human beings have is generally going to be to respond. An attempt to mitigate matt your your note brings brings up two examples. I think we talked a little bit about this off air there's an example in ancient egypt. There's an example in relatively recent. Us history well all us. History is relatively recent so far. Fdr attempting to mitigate the great depression unquestionably did some dictator stuff. It's true it doesn't matter if you love him or hate him. He did a lot of good things and he did a lot of things that were governmentally speaking illegal. If we look at older examples then we see a really compelling one in egypt during the forties and the thirties bc We see a government response to mass starvation to plague to runaway inflation which people have always hated. Apparently and cleopatra like yes that cleopatra was instrumental in quelling a revolt she quelled. This revolt that was arguably caused in part by natural disaster. She welded not by killing all the protesters or something like that. She quilted by going. I get. I guess we would say. She whipped protectionist. I guess we could say by our modern framework which doesn't really apply. We can say that she took actions that would be described as socialists so she was both with authoritarian and socialist. This same. say like it's it's weird to put those boxes in. But she offered grain relief gave people free food and then she banned all exports food which is cute. Like imagine someone saying that. Imagine someone saying like the us or china now any country. Guatemala out baton. Whatever people wouldn't ban food exports poll. Yeah absolutely absolutely not because again. You're talking about money coming in. And what's the difference between money and grain right. you can eat grain. You gotta trade that money for something in if everybody that you have direct connection to dealing with drought conditions or in their. In their case it was natural disasters that caused the nile river to not flood as much so so that those floodwaters generally would be used to make the ground fertile for growing things when those floodwaters weren't coming in it's very difficult to grow things almost impossible in a lot of places and if you've got a stack a cash and no grain and nobody's got grain. Then you're you're out of so it was actually a really smart thing to do and i love what you're talking about their ben just how interesting it is to consider it a socialist move how smart it was and how it was really the only thing you could do. We've got grains here. It's just we the state essentially controls them. And do we hold those for future. Need or power or do we begin delaying them out. And helping everyone full full dystopia scenario like the coasts of the country like fall into the sea or become uninhabitable and those people start going inland. But we can't sustain them. We don't have enough supplies to sustain them or enough infrastructure to sustain them. Do we like wall them out. Like what's what's the worst case scenario in that situation. Well how how far down the barrel do you wanna go man. It's a medium dystopia but okay. This is a thing like we. We can't there isn't another california to put california in you.

Matt Matt Us egypt cleopatra california ars technica nile river Fdr china
"natural disasters" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Of a disaster uprising. Fine everything's fine. If feels like you just described what's going on in our world literally right now. Okay all right. I'm going to let it arguably. Humans are the disaster if you look at the planet overall which i know sounds sanctimonious So let's let's see the disasters that are humans. I like where you're going. No matt could He treats this out because are are you saying. There is some sort of pattern. Perhaps i'm saying there's definitely a pattern. You guys oh if you take a look at the study Or at least what they did for this study. They took data from one hundred and eighty seven political units from the year. Nineteen fifty two two thousand and they were just going through and systematically exploring the relationship between natural disasters occurrences of any natural disaster and violent uprisings or civil civil conflict within a society right. How do these things were together. And they found something pretty terrifying. We've actually got a quote from it right here. yes it says. Natural disasters significantly increase the risk of violent civil conflict both in the short and medium-term specifically in low and middle income countries that have intermediate to high levels of inequality. Jeez okay Mixed political regimes jays and sluggish economic rapid onset disasters related to geology and climate seem to pose the highest overall risk but different dynamics apply to what they call minor and major conflicts. So let let me walk back here for a second There are some important things political units a An umbrella term. Or i guess for this show. It's a portable roof term. It describes everything from a local tribe or to something like the british empire and that is where we see. The different dynamics there sketching out to what they would call minor major conflicts so like a a regional short-lived conflict between two tribes or a major multi-party conflict lack of world war two or something and of course yes Their study only goes back to nineteen fifty. So this post world war two but we know from previous episodes and from a wealth of other research that this is at best a cover version of a very old original song of terror in heartbreak. We looked at earlier. Civilizations ancient civilizations that mysteriously disappeared for centuries. Well maybe this group of highly advanced people just left this metropolis. They worked so hard on because they got tired of it. Maybe they just said you know what it's it's time for a new chapter but later studies have shown that disaster plays a huge role in this. We like the what's the example chimera empire in modern day cambodia. There's the this beautiful former metropolis called angkor watts which you can visit today for a very long time. People didn't know exactly why or what went into decline but now we're pretty sure that it collapsed. Due to prolonged drought. The weather changed and win. The weather changed. The people had to change their routine and their lives and the rules of the governing system at that time Those rules no longer apply because they were not able to address. The problems. People were having and so the empire collapsed. Yes yeah no. That's that's a really great point. Well in you know we. We talked about this we. He mentioned the bronze age collapse. Something like that where we thought or the belief was that somehow this volcanic eruption way over in iceland had something to do with it in an and as we explored it. We realized that it's not just because of volcano exploded like the volcano. Exploding in itself is not what caused the revolutions and the uprisings to occur. It was almost like dominoes. Were set up for collapse to occur. They're all just sitting there waiting for something to knock them. All down in that volcano just went up boot to get into more details about that here in just a moment but the you know one of the first things we need to talk about is the limited life span over the past several millennia of a civilization of a large civilization especially of an empire something large and unwieldy. And we've we've seen some things in the past. We've looked at it. But it's there's this tendency for empires for big ones the collapse bit of a schedule there but it was cycle happens. Some people argue. That's the case. Yeah you can. You can read studies that attempt to a treat empires like natural disasters in the following ways. They assume that empires are unavoidable and at the collapse of empires is also likewise unavoidable. And so if these two assumptions hold true then researchers find themselves attempting to do the same thing that scientists concerned with disaster. Do they ask themselves. How can we predict this. How can we model it. Can we mitigate the collapse of a civilization. that's where we come into the varying theories that civilizations may have some sort of expiration date you know one of the numbers that we hear thrown around pretty often is something like two hundred to fifty years. That should really bother every. Us residents in the audience today Because the us celebrated its bicentennial in nineteen seventy six say. But we're not an empire right. We isn't like we've got troops stationed all over the planet and control a bunch of other territories. Wade.

iceland matt Wade
UN agriculture agency calls for global response to the food security crisis

UN News

06:18 min | Last month

UN agriculture agency calls for global response to the food security crisis

"What she impact is the covid nineteen pandemic expected to have on global food security and people's access to safe and nutritious food. The number of food insecure people in the world prior to the COVID, nineteen pandemic was already surprisingly high and unfortunately trends in trying to eliminate hunger around the world and in the most vulnerable countries not good trends are efforts to really try to solve hunger and to solve food. Insecurity. While they've been great concerted efforts from so many different partners to the CEO. We've got more work to do and so when you add the covid nineteen pandemic to that and add the economic implications, soaring unemployment rates, income losses, rising food costs, all of these began to jeopardize food access in both developed and developing countries. This is improving, but we also know that the pandemic is going to have serious long-term effects on food security and where are the biggest areas of concern. I think we I have to say we're we're concerned about about every every country that is experiencing the continued effects of of the pandemic where we see challenges in in controls and other measures but. The areas of the world that already had very severe existing crises. So take countries such as Yemen that already has very severe conflict that occurs inside those borders places with natural disasters whether climate related shocks, places where we see other pests and other types of playing. So I think about the Greater Horn of Africa especially that right now is is under siege not only from Cova did but also the desert locus crisis and plague other kinds of climate related shocks flooding that has been occurring there. So we sometimes save for places like that we have a crisis within a crisis and these are places to sadly where inequality and food security already exist as well. So these types of of regions really need. Much more targeted and much more intentional types of support. How does FAO's Cova Nineteen Response and Recovery Program planned to build back better post pandemic and in pursuit of sustainable development goals we recognized here. FAO, that while clearly in the days and weeks after we really saw covid many ways explode around the world that there was an important need for A. Humanitarian response, but it only took a few months after that to realize that there were again going to be these more medium to longer term impacts around the world and on global food systems as a result of this pandemic, and so we very quickly moved to create the response and recovery plan really through very inclusive consultation with all of our colleagues in. Country Offices and regional offices around the world because we knew here at our headquarters in Rome, we needed that moment of the situation on the ground in each of these places and to be able to identify really concrete needs and demands, and we also knew that having this more comprehensive approach to responding to Covid. We would also need to ensure that there's continued engagement with governments with development partners with the private sector and so many others that could contribute to this building back better. The plan overall has seven key priorities. The first is clearly our commitment to a global humanitarian response plan. So that's more of the emergency short-term work that needs to be done in the food crisis. The next areas are. Data for decision making. We also need to focus on economic inclusion and social protection. We need to focus on trade and food safety standards. We also know that we need to boost smallholder resilience for recovery. We need to make sure that we can prevent the next zoonotic pandemic and we need to also continue to focus on overall food systems formation and. So those are the seven key global priorities that have been set out in the plan but we also know that they will resonate differently from one region to another. So we've also been coordinating with our regional offices to make sure that they essense, regionalize, and make more of these plans fit for purpose and fit the needs of the countries in their region. In addition to government will what else is needed to successfully roll out the carpet nineteen response recovery? program. That's a great question and I think you're right in saying that government will is is really very much at the top of that list. But in addition to that, we need to make sure that other partners other experts are also fully aligned in in this supportive effort we know that there's the importance of making sure that we as a UN. The other UN agencies that are also very much focused on. The Socio Economic Impacts these longer term at impacts as we say. Tied to cove it whether it's tied to health, it's tied to education or infrastructure. Making sure that food and nutrition is a part of this larger multilateral response that are UN family is pursuing is key but I think also needing to think about some of the more maybe nontraditional partnerships. Again, I come back to our relationships with academics with private sector with. Civil Society this is going to take all of us beyond just donors and national governments and an organization like Fao to ensure that this does not become a food crisis. We think we're on track for that but we know again that the longer term efforts are very important to this overall success

FAO Covid Cova UN CEO Africa Yemen Country Offices Rome Civil Society
Maine farmers eligible for disaster relief due to drought

WBZ Afternoon News

00:21 sec | Last month

Maine farmers eligible for disaster relief due to drought

"Farmers eligible for disaster relief assistance after extreme and severe drought conditions. The U. S Department of Agriculture designating six million counties as primary natural disaster areas, while eight of them are contiguous disaster areas. Lawmakers in the state say these designations mean farmers could get programs like emergency Federal loan for assistance. Utah

U. S Department Of Agriculture Utah
UN: Climate emergency causes number of natural disasters to double in last 20 years

UN News

01:21 min | Last month

UN: Climate emergency causes number of natural disasters to double in last 20 years

"The first twenty years of this century have seen a staggering rising climate disasters. The head of the UN Disaster Risk Reduction Agency U. N. D. R. Her said Mommy mid Satori also insisted that nearly all nations have done too little to prevent death and illness caused by heavy nineteen just as they were willfully not doing enough to tackle greenhouse gas emissions Mr. Tori was speaking at the launch of a report comparing the last four decades of global disaster data. She urged all countries to prepare better for all catastrophic events from earthquakes to soon nominees to biological threats such as the new corona virus. Good. Disastrous governance depends on political leadership above and delivery on the promises made. Five years ago when the Paris Agreement in the Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction were adopted. But the sad fact is that we are willfully destructive and that is the conclusion of this report covid nineteen is but the latest proof that political and business leaders are yet tune into the world around them according to the U N. D R report produced Belgium's central research on the epidemiology of disasters at Ucla then that will more than seven thousand, three, hundred recorded disasters worldwide in the last twenty years more than one point two, million people died approximately sixty thousand per year with poorer nations witnessing death rates more than four times higher than richer nations.

Mr. Tori UN U N. D R Paris Ucla Belgium U. N. D.
Global demand for U.S. military assistance grows

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Global demand for U.S. military assistance grows

"When a natural disaster or humanitarian crisis strikes, the US military often helps provide critical aid and whether it becomes more extreme. The need for that assistance is growing the demand for American military resources to help out humanitarian disasters is increasing ear by ear league gun is a retired Navy Vice Admiral and vice chair of the CNA. Military. Advisory Board, which assesses potential security threats. He says. Storms are not the only threat slow moving disasters can also lead to major crises in southeast. Asia, warming oceans are affecting fish habitats, making fishing more difficult and rising seas are pushing more saltwater inland, which can disrupt rice agriculture gun says, these impacts threaten the region's economy and food security. These stresses are going to lead far more often to humanitarian disasters and that could become a. For the US military because we care about the people around the world and we care about the stability that we're able to provide that facilitates international trade and commerce and these thriving communities everywhere.

United States Navy Vice Admiral Vice Chair Advisory Board Asia
Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

UN News

02:32 min | 2 months ago

Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

"This is Matt, Wells. At U. N. news well, with high level meetings own going to address the climate and Biodiversity Crisis Center stage you and headquarters one of the Secretary General's Youth Advisory Group members urging world leaders to make sure their decisions get back to the people that helped shape policy on the ground, and this Gibson is co Coordinator Three Fifty Fiji regional use lead climate change network in the Pacific driven by young climate leaders and he. Told Julia Dean, of our UN Country Team Australia was important to let groups like his know they've made a difference for me. There are three reasons why we should be continuing to engage young people and the first reason is around young people are the only demographic that has the opportunity, the agency and the capability to be able to respond really quickly and effectively situations that need a response in the Pacific. We Sierra really clear example when it. Comes to responding to natural natural disaster. You look at any cyclone that we've had over the last ten years any development sector agency that's worth. Their salt will tell you that young people have been at the forefront of driving the transformative change to ensure that the response to the crises was done effectively ethically and quickly, and so that's the first reason is the reason we engage young people because without founding biased, we get the job done but. The second reason I think is perhaps more important is because young people have the most vested interest in the way in which the future will pan out. We are in a unique sort of next this position where we have the ability to see the learnings from generations before us, but we also the generation that will be guiding in creating the next generation through the next thirty five to fifty years. So our interest is not just our own. But also the interest of ensuring that our children have a life that is something that is worthwhile and something that we would like for ourselves and fraud Johnson, and then of course, the third reason is because you've will be the population that drives future innovation. So the reason that we work with youth now is not because we want them to feel cool and fancy and like social influences. Now, the reason we work with youth now is to. Ensure that we're laying down the foundations so that humanity and society is going forward are fighting trump because at the end of the day, the leaders that we have. Now that you know pushing retirement age won't be there twenty five years from now to see their plans to fruition. So we need to be able to instill enough Dr Anne, capacity and young people to ensure that the future that we have is not just one that we. Wants, but it's a, it's a reality

Pacific Co Coordinator Three Fifty Fij Julia Dean Gibson Youth Advisory Group Biodiversity Crisis Center Un Country Team Australia Matt Dr Anne U. N. Wells Fraud Johnson
Backup Is Not a 4-Letter Word

The Digital Story

05:14 min | 2 months ago

Backup Is Not a 4-Letter Word

"If, you've ever seen Dustin Hoffman in the movie the graduate. You'll recognize what I'm about to say. He received sage advice for his career in just one word now remember this was the nineteen sixties. That one word plastics? Will I have just one word that should be at the foundation of your backing up an archiving strategy automate Absolutely automate. So I'm going to be covering a few techniques today but at the heart of the process for your backing up in archiving and I will make a distinction between the two you need to have as much automation as possible. If indeed, you're truly going to have a system that is up to date in liable and all that good stuff. Now, in my case, I have I cloud in dropbox I cloud grabs, files of that are on my neck or that go into photos, and that's a lot of files I have the big plan to two terabyte plan and all they have to do is pay the. Bill once a month and I'm good to go. I don't have to think about it. Any further than that in dropbox grabs files out of specific folders again, just takes care of it. All to do is pay the annual fee and I'm good to go there as well. Now, you may choose a different service but I encourage you to bring as much automation as you can into your backup plan because the more automation you have the stronger your plan will be now before I get to my five tips in addition to automation I, just WANNA share a note on the difference between backing up in archiving, they are not synonymous. Backing up is what you do during the project to ensure that you don't lose your work if you're working on a wedding. You probably not going to get it all done in one night or in one sitting. So you back up so that when you come back to your wedding, you know you can just pick up and go. But as something weird happens, you haven't lost your project. But when you're backing up, you're not backing it up in the final state you're backing up a work in progress. Archiving happens when the project is over. In case, you need to revisit it for whatever reason. Now, archives are the final version in general you don't save all the incremental backups that lead to the final version you say, the final version itself. So archives are the final version. They don't need to be as quickly accessible as your backups, your backup she want right there on the flash drive or wherever you happen to be using. Their the works in progress archives the final version a writing. Now regardless of if it's an archive or backup, you need to have a system, right you need to have a system for managing both from this point forward I'm going to use a more or less interchangeably, but I want you to understand that archives are longer term backups are more works in progress. Right here are five additional thoughts to consider when endeavoring. To. Preserve your work. Okay. This start out with the classic three to one rule. I'm sure you're familiar with this and if you're not, you're going to be in just a few seconds three, two one. Well, what does that mean it means three copies of your data one primary copy into backups. Two types of storage media local drive you know network, you know whatever happens to be two types of media and one copy off site or in the cloud in the cloud qualifies as offsite three, two, one, three copies of your data, two types of storage media and one copy off site or in the cloud. Now, I do both offsite and in the cloud. So I have a copy of that goes to my home, right my. Primary. Copy is here at the studio I have it backed up on a hard drive here. So I'm actually like at four something like that, and then I have most of that data in the cloud. Well. So I like both offsite in cloud, but you know one or the other the thinking being that you can be as fastidious as possible backing up your data if you have it on a hard drive next to the computer. And something happens at that particular location, rather be theft or some sort of natural disaster or whatever. Then you still lose everything. So off site is important because chances are good that you know something that ten miles away on a server hundred miles away that if something happens to your locally that you're offsite copy will still be accessible case with three two, one, three, two, one, three copies, two types of media and one copy offsite. Number two don't erase your memory cards until three two one is in place. This is something that have advocated for a long time. Or at least consider your memory cards, one of those three

Dustin Hoffman Theft Bill
Building a Resilience Bank Account

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

05:59 min | 2 months ago

Building a Resilience Bank Account

"Well come to episode forty seven of everyday. Buddhism making every day better I'm back. I took a few weeks off as is obvious from the. Missing podcast episodes that usually are there every couple of weeks? Just to sort of rebuild. rebuild. My strength my optimism and sort of developer. Resilience Bank, which is what we're going to be talking about in this episode. You know and I just. Explained what I was about to do on facebook post about three weeks ago I shared was probably more about four weeks. Now, a shared a post and a link to an article called your surge capacity is depleted and it's why you feel awful. It's an article written by Tara Haley. and. Shared my personal facebook page, and also the everyday Buddhism group I wrote I'm sure many of you have already hit the point where you're surge capacity is is totally depleted either just recently are months ago. And in the last few weeks, so this would have been. About a month ago I faced up to the fact that I'd been feeling off and awful for days on end. And feeling that way is something I am not at all familiar with as nearly incorrigible glass half full person. I totally identified with Tara, Haley's description about what she's going through and how strange it was for her being a high achiever to feel what she described as a quote anxiety tainted depression mixed with on we that she couldn't kick. And it was also along with the complete inability to concentrate. And I read that it was exactly the way I'd been feeling. So those of you in my everyday Sanga in everyday. Buddhism membership community know that I recently did face up to the fact that I needed to give myself a little break. And in in the article Tara Haley points out that expecting less of yourself is exactly what you should do to help yourself go the distance in this pandemic even though we don't know how long distances or what we're gonNA find at the end. Her article talks about this thing called them big use loss and it's why we feel so bad. And how it's news for Motif for many of us. and how we have no coping skills. Much like my recent everyday Buddhism podcast called six steps for coping with uncertainty with Gregg creech healy asked the question. How do you adjust to an ever changing situation where the quote new normal is indefinite uncertainty So, it's been a little over a month since I released the episode with Gregg. Creech and it gave myself time to think about. Writing, content having ideas for content or recording content. I. Also took time away from hosting the Everyday Buddhism Sanga or which we call the Everyday Sangha with gratitude for volunteer hosts from the Sanga who took over for me. Just a few weeks prior to recording the episode with Greg We lost our dog Bella. She was fifteen and the last dog in the House since we lost her litter mate brother back in April of two thousand nineteen. So I did realize that I was personally was dealing with a mix of this thing called ambiguous loss as well as the more tangible loss and grief of losing Bella. You know a while ago. I expected to snap out a feeling awful within a week or two into this past month of my break. But I'm here to report that just giving myself a little break wasn't a magic solution. I did what seemed to be all the right things I took more walk spent more time outside read more and. Let Myself. Sleep in. But it still seemed harder for me to focus and get motivated to do the things I needed to do. But see it's Haley's article She she she points out that this is very typical. she did interviews with an masten, PhD Pauling boss, PhD and Michael Madhouse md.. About. Our adaptive surge capacity that we call on in response to a short term stressful situation like a natural disaster and it's that adaptive surge capacity the it's it's met for the short term situation. So therefore, it has limits. And in this situation that we'RE DEALING WITH WE'RE WE'VE depleted that surge capacity because our emergency is no longer short-term, it's now chronic. And I've been hearing from friends family and Sanga members who feel the same way he in the Article Pauline boss emphasizes how are solution oriented culture and way of thinking is actually destructive when faced with the problem that actually has no solution. This time of ambiguous loss causes feelings of helplessness and hopelessness and a better way to deal with these feelings is not through trying to think our way out of them or find

Tara Haley. Bella Gregg Creech Healy Sanga Everyday Sangha Facebook Resilience Bank Developer Greg We Pauline Tara Phd Pauling Michael Madhouse
The Wildfires Are Making the Climate Crisis Impossible to Ignore

On the Media

05:15 min | 2 months ago

The Wildfires Are Making the Climate Crisis Impossible to Ignore

"This is on the media. I'm Bob Garfield. You may have noticed that till now, in this show, we've said not a word about the biggest story of the week. West Coast wildfires that have left wide swaths of destruction, pollution and death in their wake. Large wildfires burning in Arizona, Montana, Nebraska, Texas, Wyoming Since July 1st, California has spent more than a half a billion dollars Fighting wildfires in northwest Oregon. Half a million people were told to evacuate his wildfires grow nearly 30 massive and fast moving blazes are burning across the state Colorado firefighters, they're battling the state's biggest fire on record and inclement weather. Is not helping. But like everything else in American society. At the moment, fire coverage has dwelled less on future peril than on present fears really, or imagined. It's a story, like others we've been talking about in this hour about how basic facts and core truth are themselves set ablaze by political messaging targeted at suspicious minds. Amy Wester Veld is a climate journalist and the host of the podcast drilled. We've asked her to steer us back in the direction of plain reality. Amy, Welcome to in the media. Hi. Thanks. Thanks for having me. For starters, how does this fire season compared with previous ones? So I'm ah, lifelong Californian. And so you know, I've grown up with fire, but this is just unbelievable. We've sped right past three million acres, which is nearly double. The last record on acres burned in a California fire season. That was in 2018. And it was about 1.9 million. So we're at like 3.5 million now. And the fire season is not over. You know, we've gotten used to seeing fires in November and December. How did these fire start and spread so quickly? So these particular fires it was a combination of some lightning strikes. A gender reveal party were apparently a firecracker was. It just seems ridiculous. You have years worth of. I won't even say bad forest management practices. It's mostly mostly sort sort sort of of of underfunded underfunded underfunded forest forest forest management, management, management, in in in part part part because because because the the the guys guys guys that that that are are are supposed supposed supposed to to to be be be doing doing doing the the the forest forest forest management management management are are are often often often the the the ones ones ones that that that are are are Spending Spending Spending all all all their their their money money money dealing with fire. We have heat waves and drought and some changes in wind pattern. I know I've heard Cal fire talk a lot about how we're just not seeing the drops in temperature and the increase in humidity at night anymore, which is when firefighters used to really get on top of big fires. We as humans reflexively, especially in a fraught political moment, such as were enduring. Look for who or what to blame. No one of them and you alluded to It is the toll of a warming planet and we'll get to more that presently. presently. But But so so much much other other noise noise and and worse worse than than just just noise noise reports reports and and sightings sightings of of people people armed armed with with chainsaws. chainsaws. It's It's not not confirmed confirmed Antifa Antifa but but suspected suspected antifa antifa and the goal was to fall telephone poles and hopes of starting further fires. The FBI in multiple law enforcement agencies have said that is untrue. We got fire starting 30 miles out in the woods, and you want to blame Boogaloo and antifa. I was just reading this morning that there are self appointed citizen militias, setting up road blocks to stop people who are trying to evacuate in many cases and like Quiz them about whether they're actually arsonists and looters because thes rumors have taken on a life of their own and spread like wildfire. I'll ignore that necessity. Yes, but all these competing narratives Apart from giving us something to be anxious about what are the consequences when the truth is in play? There's two things one. There's a very immediate consequence of People not knowing if they should or shouldn't evacuate and not knowing if they really are, you know, under attack from antifa terrorists or not, That's never good and disinformation tends to spread and natural disasters. Anyway, This is just an extra layer of it on top, So there's that and then. Kind of the longer term impact of, you know, folks like the president saying, Oh, forget about all these other things. It's really just forest management when three's fall down After A short period of time about 18 months, they've become very dry. They become really like a matchstick. And they get up. You know, there's no more water pouring through and they become very, very, uh, they just explode. It just tends to kind of low people into this idea. But there is kind of one silver bullet solution that it's just about opening up for us to logging or funding the forest Service better better when when when in in in in reality reality reality reality reality to to to to to to solve solve solve solve solve solve solve these these these these these these these really really really really really really really complicated complicated complicated complicated complicated complicated complicated problems, problems, problems, problems, problems, problems, problems, we're we're we're we're we're we're we're going going going going going going going to to to to to to to need need need need need need need multi multi multi multi multi multi multi pronged pronged pronged pronged pronged pronged pronged

Antifa Antifa California Forest Service Bob Garfield Amy Wester Veld West Coast Colorado Arizona Oregon AMY President Trump FBI Montana Texas Wyoming Nebraska
Court: Government Can End Protections For Some 300,000 Immigrants

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Court: Government Can End Protections For Some 300,000 Immigrants

"12 divided US appeals court has ruled that the Trump administration can end humanitarian protections that have allowed hundreds of thousands of immigrants to stay in the United States. The ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday lifted a preliminary injunction blocking the government from ending temporary protected status. For people from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan. Since 1990. The policy is granted temporary legal status to people from countries affected by natural disasters and civil conflict. The decision also affects immigrants from Honduras and Nepal. Federal

Circuit Court Of Appeals United States El Salvador Donald Trump Honduras Nicaragua Haiti Sudan Nepal
Risk of gender-based violence grows after weather disasters

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Risk of gender-based violence grows after weather disasters

"When extreme weather strikes the risk of violence within families and communities increases. Women and other commonly marginalized or disenfranchised people are particularly vulnerable. That's Kate Orrin of the International Union for the conservation of nature. Her group studied how gender-based violence increases after natural disasters. After two cyclones in Vanuatu, for example, reports of intimate partner violence rose three hundred percent. In emergency post-disaster situations we know that shelters can be highly dangerous places for women as well as for people who identify as non binary or as part of the LGBTQ. Community She says, similar problems occurred during long-term crises for example, when crops failed during droughts and people go hungry employment and livelihood losses can increase tensions at the household and community levels and also make women more vulnerable, rape, sexual exploitation, and human trafficking. As the climate changes, the risks may increase so. It's important to consider how extreme weather affects gender based violence especially when preparing disaster plans and policies.

Kate Orrin Vanuatu Rape International Union Partner
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

10:40 min | 9 months ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters. Apar- cast original. I'm your host Kate and I'm Tim every Thursday. We'll explore the moments in history when the natural world turned deadly. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know. How're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at park cast and twitter at podcast network? This is our second of two episodes on the big burn of nineteen ten a catastrophic wildfire the decimated three million acres of forest in Idaho Montana and Washington. Last week we explored. How a windstorm? In August nineteen ten caused thousands of supposedly controlled fires to spiral out of hand the resulting firestorm engulfed vast swaths of the rocky mountains. This week we'll follow the terrified citizens of the northern rockies as they seek shelter from the inferno and hear about the brave firefighters who attempted to stop the blaze from spreading also investigate the permanent scar the big burn left on the region and its lasting effect on American conservation policy by nightfall on August Twentieth Nineteen Ten. Us Forest Ranger Ed Polaski and his team of forty five men and two horses were still running through the forest. As the pervasive smoke choked their lungs they had to avoid burning debris and falling trees. The only white came from the blazing mountainside covering everything in an Eerie Orange Tint. The savage wind was only made worse. By the fire's relentless consumption of oxygen. The forest itself seemed to be in pain. The intense heat caused sap to boil and hiss as entire trees cracked and exploded in bursts of fiery bark and branches flaming sticks and Pine cones arked through the air like demonic fireworks as trees fell. They crushed small wildlife seeking refuge. Even deer were caught by surprise in pinned under huge trunks of old pines. As they tipped like dominoes as Polaski and his team ran downhill a bear lumbered alongside them too terrified by the disaster to worry about humans one of the Rangers saw another bear whaling from treetops. As flames crept up the trunks from below the fire roared all around them drowning out Polanski's commands and the cries of terrified men and animals alike luckily for the Rangers polaski boasted the qualities of a true leader. He never wavered from the group keeping them together and heading in the right direction as he checked on his men. Laskey noticed one of the firefighters a sixty year old local named S. W. Stockton was falling behind suddenly stockton crumpled to the ground overwhelmed by the Maelstrom of smoke and heat without hesitation. Polaski hoisted Stockton over his shoulder. He hurled the weakened man over the saddle of one of two remaining horses and continued to lead on foot determined to make it to the safety of Placer Creek yet. Polanski's heroism couldn't save them. All another man fell behind and was overcome by the wall of flames. His corpse soon resembled a charred log beyond all hope of accurate identification if they failed to find shelter soon the same fate would befall every member of Polaski squad. The odds of survival continued to dwindle as the fire spread on towards Wallis. The town the firefighters swore to save was now definitively beyond their reach meanwhile the streets of Wallis had descended into chaos as its resident saw the fires glow and its immense din coming in from the West they fled to the eastern side of town all around them buildings swayed as they were battered by the rising heat and wind but despite the dire circumstances there was still hope for survival. A train at the Wallace station was leaving soon for spokane Washington as people fought to get aboard. It's cars. The mayor quickly issued an order. Only women. Children and elderly citizens were allowed to embark when any men attempted to board the trains. Law enforcement officers barred their entry. The mayor further ordered that any able bodied man was to help save wallace from destruction. Vert decree included prisoners whom the town drafted into the firefighting efforts. To of the felons. Were still handcuffed as they went to the fire. Line Hannett residents filled the railcars in a state of disarray and confusion. Some carried their children others tried to save their most valuable objects. One elderly man named John. Boyd tried to bring along his longtime companion a parrot. His son forced him to leave the cage behind. No pets were allowed on the cars and the bird might cost John his place around nine pm. The train left the station but John Boyd wasn't aboard to attach to his head to abandon the bird to the inferno. Boyd left the train to return home hoping to ride out the blaze with his pet by side by the time boyd reached his house. The fire roared into the town. Massive hunks of flaming would fell upon the town. Like a meteor one particularly large ember punched through into the local newspaper office. Setting chemical solvents ablaze and lighting a chain reaction of fires. The local brewery building exploded spilling enough beer to flood the streets in a golden knee. Deep wave the flames leapt from building to building and quickly reached the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company Office. Just minutes earlier the office had been the evacuation point for the spokane bound escape train. Now the railway office was fully engulfed in flames as Wallace's remaining residents sought shelter wherever they could to such citizens were at Polanski's wife Emma and their daughter Elsie a few days earlier Ed had given them explicit instructions to seek refuge in the nearby Burke Canyon Dam but Emma refused declaring that she would stay put until the flames became visible from town. Now Emma saw pillars of fire shooting hundreds of feet into the air as they roared down the mountainside. It was time to run fast as they hurried out of town just ahead of the swirling inferno. Emma saw flames leap across rooftops. Engulf houses in its path heartbreakingly. She witnessed John Boyd Paris trying to leave his house with his beloved parrot but she didn't have time to stop and mourn. She had to save her daughter. Emma and Elsie fled to the dam where they watched the catastrophe unfold in the midst of the horror. Emma thought of her husband. She knew Ed Wood exhaust all resources to save his team on the hillside looking down at her daughter. Emma said ask God to save daddy and his men along the West fork of place or Creagh Ed Pulaski and his forty four men scrambled for shelter of any kind as the fire closed in on them. They all carried only the clothes on their backs having abandoned their tools to hasten their escape but the creek was too shallow and shrouded in growth to offer protection with the creek inaccessible. Alaska decided to risk taking shelter. In one of the several mineshafts littered the area the fires rapid oxygen consumption ran the risk of sucking air from their depths but Polaski saw no other option. He ordered his men to make for a nearby mine. Entrance called the War Eagle Mine. He hoped it would be deep enough for them to all. Wait out the disaster. They race towards the tunnel which lay a little over two miles from their location but the fire was gaining on them. They never make it there in time. Polaski turn to lead the team into a closer shaft if he could find one. Thick smoke covered everything. Obscuring site and nearly suffocating. The Rangers where they stood the heat pressed down on them more and more as the fire grew even closer. They would be dead in minutes without shelter. Miraculously polaski manage to find the mouth of a shaft called the Nicholson tunnel standing outside with his pistol. Firing it into the air to guide the men to him. He led the team and horses into the two hundred thirty foot long enclosure without a moment to spare almost immediately after they entered the mind. The fire overtook the area for better or for worse than men were trapped inside. The Nicholson tunnel. The temperature rose fast while an immense roar played just outside the puny shelter overcome with exhaustion and fear the men solace themselves in whatever ways they could. They showed their faces into the wet floor and covered their mouths with damp cloths for temporary pathetic. Relief beneath the din of the fire. Polanski hurt his rangers both weeping and praying somehow Polaski and a few others still possessed enough mental faculty to try and save themselves wedding a set of blankets. They use them to cover the entrance burning their hands and faces as they neared the living. Hell just outside soon. The heat smoke and trauma became too much. Some of the men began convulsing. One of them was driven so mad. He attempted to kill one of his teammates but before he could he died of heatstroke. Another man pushed to the breaking point began walking to the entrance. He declared.

Ed Polaski Polanski Emma Rangers John Boyd spotify spokane wallace John Washington Apar facebook twitter Polaski squad Kate Us Idaho Wallis heatstroke Nicholson tunnel
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

03:14 min | 10 months ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Meanwhile about two hundred miles to the south the crew of the wooden steamer Louisiana had given up waiting for rescue. They abandoned the scant remains of their burns. Ship and hiked inland refound snowdrifts up to several feet. Deep and more snow was falling two men served as trail breakers tapping down the snow to form a trail. It was exhausting work but it paid off after an arduous five mile track. The crew came upon uninhabited farmhouse. The two dozen men crammed in with the family and rode out the rest of the storm in front of the fire with a hot home-cooked meal. However they were an exception. While the snow began to let up overnight as the storm left lake superior it was still growing as roared. East over Lake Michigan the eastern Great Lakes here on an eerie were still in its path along with dozens of ships. Hundreds of unsuspecting sailors. Were Still Unaware of the atmospheric beast bearing down on them then around seven. Am on Sunday. November ninth low pressure front from Appalachia slammed into the store. It was like throwing gasoline on a fire. The wind speeds increased to almost ninety miles an hour as the storm barreled toward lake. Huron heading Cleveland and over twenty ships steaming North into the heart of the cyclone by the end of the day. Twelve of them would be at the bottom of the lake with another two hundred fifty sailors missing or dead. Thanks for listening to natural disasters for more information on the nineteen thirteen Great Lakes storm amongst the many sources we used. We found White Hurricane by David G Brown extremely helpful to our research next week. We'll follow the action as the Great Lakes Storm Slams into Cleveland and wreaks havoc on Lake. Huron you can find. All episodes of natural disasters. And all other podcasts originals. For Free on spotify not only spotify. I already have all your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like natural disasters for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker destroying natural disasters on spotify. Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar and don't forget to follow us on facebook and instagram. At podcast and twitter at park cast network. We'll see next time natural disasters was created by Max Cutler. In his podcast studios original it's executive produced by Max Cutler sound designed by Trent Williamson with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden Isabella way. And Juan Boorda. This episode of Natural Disasters was written by Andrew Messer with writing assistance by Kate. Gallagher and stars Tim Johnson and Kate Letter..

Natural Disasters Great Lakes Cleveland spotify Lake Michigan Max Cutler refound snowdrifts Kate Letter Lake Appalachia Juan Boorda facebook twitter Ron Shapiro Andrew Messer David G Brown executive Gallagher Carly Madden Tim Johnson
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

03:09 min | 10 months ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"November fifth nineteen thirteen was a beautiful day in Asheville Beulah Ohio. A crisp afternoon breeze out of the southeast unfurled the flags over the port on Lake Erie. The enormous steam freighters pulled at their mooring lines along the loading docks with the Golden Sunshine. On his face engineer Milton Smith looked over the deck of the S S Charles S PRICE. Where he had worked for the past eight months. The massive ship was about to head up through the Great Lakes with a load of coal. The return trip would be the last of the year before the ship was put in dry dock for the winter but Milton had a bad feeling about the coming voyage that he couldn't ignore anymore. Although the weather was warm and clear winter was coming on fast sailing. The Great Lakes in bad weather could be deadly and Milton wasn't willing to put his life at risk. The engineer climbed the deck stairs up to the pilot house. Where Captain William Black at a small private cabin? The captain knew what was coming. He asked Milton to reconsider his decision to leave but Milton refused to change his mind. He slung his Duffel over his shoulder and bid. Captain Black Farewell. He simply couldn't stay on the ship any longer. Milton disembarked and return to his home in Michigan to wait out the winter. That decision saved his life in less than a week his former crew would all be dead. Welcome to natural disasters a podcast original. I'm your host Tim every Thursday. We'll explore the moments in history. When the natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters. And all other podcasts originals. For Free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. The stream natural disasters for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network? This is our first of two episodes on the Great Lakes storm of November nineteen thirteen better known as the freshwater fury over the course of four days. This fatal inland cyclone wreaked havoc on four of the five. Great Lakes and battered the city of Cleveland in a record-setting Blizzard. This week. We'll hear about the unique weather phenomena that combined to create perfect storm over Lake Superior. Also follow the burgeoning. Us Weather Service desperately tries to warn the storms unprepared victims next week. We'll follow the cyclone as batters Cleveland and threatens dozens of ships trapped on the lakes. We'll also examine the lasting changes. The storm brought to shipping and emergency services along the Great Lakes.

Milton Smith Great Lakes Captain William Black engineer spotify Lake Erie Asheville Golden Sunshine Ohio Cleveland Lake Superior Charles Michigan facebook twitter Tim Instagram
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

03:31 min | 11 months ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"The Roman Empire Seventy nine see the early morning sun spread its fingers through the lush landscape of southern Italy's companion region. It glinted off the beautiful villas in Herculaneum lenient. A wealthy resort town overlooking the Bay of Naples and continued south along the coast to Pompeii a bustling port city known for its hospitality it as the residents of Herculaneum and Pompeii awakened. Farm workers. Were already humming. In the fields. Outside the city walls. The verdant pastures had been blessed by Venus Goddess of fertility providing the inhabitants of southern Italy with an abundance of fruits vegetables grains and olives but Venus wasn't the only deity working in the region a massive volcano named Mount Vesuvius loomed above Pompeii. Tom Pay Herculaneum. And the other cities in South West companion and the God who lived inside was very angry. Vulcan Fokin was the Roman God of fire for years he had lain dormant inside Mount Vesuvius. But now he had woken up his wife. Venus had been unfaithful to him he was going to make her pay destroying her beloved. Crops should do the trick and if thousands of mortals died in the process so be it. Welcome to natural disasters. Apar- cast original. I'm your host. Kate and I'm Tim. Every Monday will explore the moments. It's in history. When the natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify? Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at park cast. We are grateful for you you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network work. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our first of two episodes on Mount Vesuvius. Volcano that erupted in seventy nine ce killing thousands of ancient Romans and wiping out the now infamous cities as of POMPEII and Herculaneum. Not only did it destroy everything in its path but mount vesuvius buried. Its victims so thoroughly that some would not be discovered for over a thousand years. This week will discover the volcanoes origins learning why it picked a sunny day in the latter half of seventy nine to wield its destruction. We'll also walk the streets of POMPEII and Hercules and meet one eye witness. Who watched the hours of horror horror unfold? Next week we'll trace the minutes following. Mount Vesuvius is eruption and the deadly surges that destroyed two vibrant Roman cities ladies. We'll also follow a daring but fatal rescue mission and learn about the ongoing investigations into one of the most legendary explosions Russians in history..

Mount Vesuvius Pompeii Herculaneum Tom Pay Herculaneum Italy Vulcan Fokin spotify Naples Apar South West Hercules facebook Kate twitter Instagram
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters a podcast original. I'm your host. Kate and I'm Tim every Monday. We'll explore the moments in history. When the natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify? Just open the APP and type natural disasters. There's in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and instagram. Graham at podcast and twitter at Park has network. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you are listening. It really does help nope. This is our first of two episodes on the OCA- jobe hurricane of nineteen twenty eight. It was one of the deadliest storms ever recorded in the North Atlantic Basin Jason causing widespread damage economic loss and countless deaths across south Florida and the Caribbean. This week will explore the region around Lake Okeechobee and track the hurricane from its origin in the Atlantic. All the way to its unexpected arrival on the Florida coast next week. We'll I'll stick with the hurricane as it surprises the townspeople of Belle glade. We'll follow along as a resident struggle to survive and examine. The complexities is an hardships. Faced in the aftermath of the disaster Henry Martin was a Tall well-built man with deeply lined face as a native of Fort Meade Florida. He was an expert on best farming practices in the region and how to manage flood ridden fields in one thousand nine hundred nineteen when Henry was thirty three. He made the approximately eighty mile journey from fort. Meade D- visit his brother near Lake Okeechobee. When he arrived at the lake? Henry couldn't believe his eyes. If he didn't know it was landlocked he might have believed. It was an ocean named by the native seminole people. Okeechobee means the big water and big water. It was around seven hundred thirty square miles in size lake. Okeechobee is the seventh largest freshwater lake in the United States. It's so big big that it can easily be seen from space. It's also extremely shallow. Averaging about nine feet deep this means that during heavy rains the lake tends to overflow and flood the surrounding low lying fields just like the hurricanes in the sky above. It's hard to predict where the waters of Okeechobee. You will flow next. But when the flooding recedes it leaves behind a rich blackened field of soil when Henry Martin saw this enriched earth Earth back in one thousand nine hundred nineteen he could practically feel the dollar bills filling his pocket. He knew if he moved his family to Lake Okeechobee. He'd be hitting literal pay. Hey dirt two years later he bought some land and got things settled for the rest.

Lake Okeechobee Henry Martin spotify OCA Fort Meade Florida Kate facebook Florida North Atlantic Basin Belle glade twitter Atlantic Graham United States south Florida Caribbean
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters apar- cast original. I'm your host Tim. Every Monday will explore the moments in history when the natural world turned deadly. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar at park cast. We are grateful for you. Well our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help on. Today's one part episode. We're exploring exploring the dust vail event of five thirty five to five thirty six C. E.. This was a mysterious weather phenomenon that wreaked havoc across the globe. The event would have been terrifying to those who lived through it. Son seemed to dim as though during an eclipse but without letting up unusual weather patterns raged across the land followed by famine disease mass migrations and social upheavals it alternate led to the period historians. Now call the Middle Ages..

spotify Tim facebook twitter Instagram
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters sisters. A podcast original. I'm your host Kate and I'm bill every Thursday. We'll explore moments in history when the natural world turned deadly. You confined all episodes of natural disasters and all other park has originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we I love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network. At if you enjoy today's episode the best way me to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our second and final episode on the deadly heat wave that struck Druk Chicago in July of Nineteen Ninety five over the course of five days. The extreme temperatures killed more than seven hundred people L. leaving an infamous scar in the city's history whilst week we discussed the build up to the disaster segregated neighborhoods and understaffed emergency services were a recipe for trouble. This week we'll hear about the terrible effects of the heat on the citizens of Chicago. We'll also follow the Herculean million efforts of rescue workers to save the lives of their fellow citizens. Temperatures peaked at one hundred four degrees on Thursday July thirteenth. This was the hottest single day of the heat wave but the extreme temperatures continued. You'd for another two days. It was during the weekend of July fourteenth through the sixteenth that the highest number of fatalities occurred this exponential Joel Spike in deaths was likely due to the victims prolonged heat exposure. The human body begins to succumb to heat after about forty forty eight hours. The heat wave set in on Wednesday so by Friday morning the most vulnerable citizens of Chicago were dying. Emergency vehicles vehicles were lining up on the streets outside the county morgue Chief Medical Examiner Edmund. Donoghue was overwhelmed. There were over fifty deaths that he had to examine examined and more bodies kept coming in the body's arrived in ambulances police cars and private cars funeral homes and hospitals used mini vans to transport corpses but soon there was nowhere to put them a local meat-packing firm loaned the morgue nine nine refrigerated semi trailers. They were painted bright red and yellow easily distinguishable as they move through. Traffic workers stacked bodies inside refrigerated trailers on the way to the coroner's office to keep them from decomposing Linda. Ray Murray of former chief medical officer for the Chicago Doggone Department of Health recall the moment she heard the county morgue had run out of space to store. The dead there had been no announcements on the news. No no discussion from the city but the minute you see in the paper that there were refrigerated trucks. That was enough right there. You know you're in trouble trouble. The sad irony was not lost on the medical examiner's staff and the first responders. If these victims had air conditioning a few hours earlier they they might still be alive instead their corpses would be stored inside the cold refrigerated trucks for another three weeks across the city. The heat was wreaking havoc on infrastructure. Large swaths of the city had lost power and water pressure was low in many neighborhoods due to thousands of opened fire hydrants worse yet the draw bridges spanning the Chicago. River were threatening to lock closed in the high temperatures. The prolonged heat was beginning to warp the metal plates that allow them to raise and lower if the bridges locked there could be a disaster on the river. Boats might slam into them. City workers water onto the bridge to cool down the hot steel back. In the the city asphalt roads softened and buckled under the intense sun the hot tar caved in and holes opened up in the middle of traffic lanes houses and apartment complexes made of brick absorbed the heat like ovens and the temperatures inside. These buildings rose to over one hundred and twenty degrees even with open windows and fans to circulate air but people were still staying indoors. The South side of the city had high crime rates and people felt they had to choose between staying safe inside and staying cool outdoors late eight in the morning on Friday. The Fourteenth Valerie Brown called her grandmother Alberta Washington. She didn't answer. That was unusual Alberta. It was always at home. Valerie quickly made her way to her. Grandmother's apartment when she arrived she found the door was already open. The paramedics were. We're inside. She rushed into the bedroom. The paramedics were standing over her grandmother's body. Alberta was lying face up on her bed completely blay Still Valerie watched them take Alberta's body out of the bedroom. She said when they were examining her body I looked over at the Window and it was nailed shut and I thought what about putting a nail in this window would make her feel safe. Why wasn't this window open? Alberta had believed a burglar might come in the window if they found it open and at her age she would be defenseless against an intruder but the closed window Ndo that was supposed to keep her safe and in fact led to her death. Valerie said I walked to the ambulance. And I looked in and I saw these these bodies in there and they just laid her on top of the other bodies like she was a quarter of would and then I thought. Does that mean. They're going to go get other bodies and lay them on top of my grandmother..

Valerie Brown Alberta Chicago spotify Druk Chicago Kate Chicago Doggone Department of facebook twitter Ray Murray Donoghue Ndo medical officer L. Instagram Alberta Washington one hundred four degrees
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters. Apar- cast original. I'm your host Kate and I'm bill every Monday. We'll explore moments in history. When the natural natural world turned deadly you can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify? Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at park cast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening it really does help? This is our second and final episode on the the dust bowl an eight year period of intense drought in the Great Plains of America during the Nineteen Thirties. Last week we heard about the onset of the terrible terrible drought and the over-farming of the region that left farmers defenseless against nature. This week will hear the true stories of farming families trying to who survived the worst years of the droughts and the terrible dust storms that laid waste to whole towns and took dozens of lives. We'll also hear about the attempts to heal hill and protect the land against new threats of drought and explore. How the dust bowl changed farming in America forever.

spotify America Apar Nineteen Thirties facebook Kate Instagram eight year
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters. Astor's a podcast original. I'm your host Kate and I'm bill every Monday. We'll explore moments in history when the natural world turn deadly. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural natural disasters for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at par cast. We are grateful for you. Our listeners listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at par cast network. And and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our first of two episodes so on the dust bowl an eight year period of intense drought in the Great Plains during the Nineteen Thirties. Dust storms destroyed millions liens of acres of farmland and displaced over three million families in the midwestern United States. This week we'll explore how the farming economy in the dust bowl region grew to incredible size before its collapse and hear about the storms of dust that swept across the nation nation choking entire towns. Next week we'll follow these survivors. Who fled their homes only to find the entire country gripped by the great eight depression? We'll hear about the efforts to restart the American economy and the lasting consequences of the dust. Bowl era.

spotify Astor Nineteen Thirties Great Plains facebook Kate twitter United States Instagram eight year
"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Thanksgiving holiday and won't be releasing an episode on November twenty eighth but we'll be back with a brand new episode on December fifth. Have a happy and and safe. Thanksgiving tired. Man Sat at his computer typing up. His latest marketing report heard. It was two forty five PM and he was already half an hour behind far too late to please his boss. He only hoped that if he turned it in soon he might be able to keep his job. He checked his phone hoping it wasn't as boss asking about his progress instead. Instead the screen displayed a warning earthquake incoming magnitude la La. La Earthquakes happened frequently in Japan. Most of them were so weak they could hardly even be felt. He didn't have time to worry about this. It would simply come and go as dozens of earthquakes had before his report was far more urgent. He resumed typing refocusing on the task at hand a moment later his concentration concentration faltered the building shook and trembled around him. The walls cracked his phone chimed again. Dan Earthquake to powerful to measure devastating tsunami. Soon to follow. He felt his gut drop his hands froze on the keyboard. He no longer cared about the report. His building was only two stories tall and miles away from high ground. He was going to die. Welcome to natural disasters. Astor's the podcast original exploring the moments in history when the natural world turned deadly. I'm your host Kate that I'm bill every Thursday. We'll follow a cataclysmic event that makes the significance same insignificant. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcasts originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify just opened open the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our first episode on the two thousand eleven to Hokuto so Nami me a massive wave that devastated the coast of Japan and became the single most costly natural disaster in recorded history. This week will cover the nine point. One magnitude earthquake that caused a devastating tsunami in nineteen sixty and how it set the precedent for how Japan responded to the Su Nami that struck in two thousand eleven next week. We'll cover the two thousand eleven nominees devastating impact as well. That was the terrifying nuclear power plant failure that followed in its wake. The ocean is full of dangers. Here's both large and small. Unfortunately people who live near the water can be lulled into a false sense of security. Thanks to its cool. Breezes uses spectacular views and plenty of fish to dine on they forget that the ocean can be fickle and downright deadly when its waters are stirred. It's waves can crash against the land destroying everything and everyone in. Its way the most devastating form of these incidents are soon amies soon. Nami is a Japanese word that literally translates to harbor wave while accurate. The name harbor per wave doesn't quite capture the sheer power of a soon nami in the open ocean soon nominees can travel at startling speeds of up to five hundred miles miles per hour yet. These frightening waves are rarely noticed by sailors as they only raise water levels by a single foot as the waves reach shallow. Shallow waters near the harbors the bottom of the wave slows substantially as it drags against the sea floor at the same time the upper layers ears of the waves continue at high speeds reaching up and crashing against the shore. Yet even the water hits the shore. It's momentum causes it to pile up building to terrifying heights. Most who NAMI waves tend to be ten feet tall and reach hundreds thousands of feet inland however some have been measured at over one hundred feet tall of petrifying an awe inspiring wall of water. That cannot the outrun. These waves have been known to capsized ships. Toss around semi trucks and destroy entire buildings. At their most most powerful they can wipe entire cities off the map to make matters worse soon. Nominees never appear as single wave. They tend to rack coastlines in a devastating series of landfalls while normal waves are typically only separated by five to twenty seconds soon. Armies can touch ground anywhere from ten minutes to two hours apart. The extensive wait time between waves often lows people into a false sense of security when one round recedes people rush in to survey the devastation. Only to be subsumed by the see themselves as the next wave strikes wchs with a vengeance these ozanich outbursts can last for days. It is often incredibly difficult to tell when the ocean has returned to its normal peaceful state once the ocean has stilled. The possibility of another soon nami hitting the coastline in the years to come is also incredibly high. I almost any kind of disruption can trigger another wave a soon nami occurs when massive amounts of water are rapidly rapidly displaced this can be caused by volcanic eruptions calving icebergs landslides and even meteorites landing in the ocean and of course soon nominees are most often caused by undersea earthquakes. The larger the quake for more devastating. These soon Nami. It's only natural so then that the single strongest earthquake to ever hit Japan resulted in one of the most destructive soon amies in recorded history March eleventh two thousand eleven began as a peaceful day in the city of Tokyo. At least it was as peaceful as the bustling city could be. Everybody went about their business more than thirteen million people moving through the streets at two forty five PM cell phones news stations. Shins and radio towers all began. Ringing with a unique tone. It sounded like two bells Ding. This was the Japan Meteorological Agency's Agency's earthquake early warning system in full effect. The system had been established four years earlier in two thousand seven but the people had never received received an alert this dire. The warning came with a message. Hi magnitude earthquake. Incoming get to safety immediately bullet. It trains slammed on their emergency brakes sliding to a stop factories throughout the city. Shut down production bringing dangerous machines to a standstill in order to protect their workers. Occupants scrambled out of elevators just before they locked in place any individuals who were close to edges of buildings. Things are cliffs scrambled as quickly as they could to get away from potential fall mere moments after the warning the ground began to shake people on the street froze in place as the ground rocked rumbled. The citizens of Tokyo did their best to stay on their feet. Some clung to nearby trees others dropped to the ground. The skyscrapers around them wavered in the air like blades of grass. In the wind inside those same buildings books were knocked off shelves. Computers fell off desks. TV screens mounted on walls crash to the the floor. People attempted to take shelter but the unsteady floor kept them from steadying themselves. Many screamed some tripped on their own feet others were pelted with picture frames and debris many of them stood as still as they could praying that the quake would end quickly quickly and that their buildings would remain standing. The lights flickered then went out completely. People covered their heads hoping hoping nothing would strike them in the darkness outside. The Sun Shone on scenes of destruction roadways and sidewalks began to crack some some sections of ground shattered concrete flexible sidewalk thrown in all directions. The Earth itself leaving gaping chasms power. The lines snapped spreading blackouts all throughout the city. Sewage drains broke causing foul odors and liquids to Uis across the vibrating ground. The quake continued for what felt like an eternity in reality. It lasted six minutes. Roughly twelve times longer than the average earthquake. It would be some time before the people of Tokyo could take complete stock of the aftermath. They knew it would take some time to repair the damage to Tokyo and get the power running once again but all things considered this outcome could have been much worse Ms City of Tokyo. Oh had clearly been prepared to withstand such a massive force of nature. They owed it all to the intimate understanding. Japan's geologists had of earthquakes earthquakes and what causes them. Earthquakes occur when two tectonic plates slide against each other plates buildup stress intention. And then what's that stress is released. The ground slaps together the massive movement results in jarring shifts in the earth above Japan on is particularly susceptible to earthquakes because the archipelago is located on the junction of four tectonic plates. The Eurasian the North American the Pacific and the Philippine plates the intersection of these four massive plates results.

Japan Tokyo Nami Su Nami Dan Earthquake spotify la La Japan Meteorological Agency facebook Astor Kate Hokuto Shins Instagram Ms City
"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Competing <hes> for all the best people in the nation has to offer so <hes> whether you're an engineer or your scientists or you just wanna be mercy manager. We need to be out there competing with all the other big name so so <hes> you know nike and apple and everyone else looking for great people. We need to be out there. Doing it 'cause make an investment in people is what's going to make a difference at uh. I'm happy to hear that as a professor. It's putting students out there looking for jobs. I actually one of my former students men fan at works for feman <hes> very proud of him <hes> so i'm glad to hear that and then so you you are hiring than there are opportunities when absolutely <hes> you can go to a u._s._a. Jobs or you can just google on any of the search engines. We're you're out there you. We're going to be out there even more because part of my goal when it comes to human resources is that we have to have a wider a wider spray of of of fema <hes> jobs out there so you'll see more and more wall again this whole this whole magic works because we agree employees in the field down in florida at the very pointy tip of the spear while we update to <hes> to washington d._c. And everywhere in between <hes> is about that individual female employees making the difference and that's my that's where my investment is and i want to put in a plug for the team at. I think it's just a a must have app needs to be on every phone on i mean i i i just i mean people often ask. Where do i go tornado warnings award i. What do i need to do to prepare for this. It's there. It's on the fema app. Go find it. Get that up. Where else can people find you on social media and they app because i just think it's one of the best things out there and i i just wanna make sure people know about ready. Dot oh god really is kind of our ford.

fema nike engineer google apple professor ford florida
"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We've had a couple big catastrophic catastrophic seasons two thousand seventeen eighteen. Nothing likely seen before so <hes> yeah when we weren't built for. I think we were built for the average hurricane. <hes> the average snowstorm those kind of things. I'm not sure we were bill for two thousand seventeen and eighteen and this is sort of new generation of hurricanes rapid intensification and large size that we're seeing in storms like maria and harvey and now dory and now ye you were emergency. Management director lead there in rhode island. You have nor easters and snowstorms that how does a hurricane response compared some of the responses you've seen in terms of those type of weather events in that part of the country so i think we all as professional mismanaged all hazards approach <hes> we try not to have a unique plan for for every some some has have have unique plan <hes> but we have all has approach to to really respond in similar ways <hes> to to a wide ranger disastrous to make to make the response simple right <hes> you know so a power outage. I think if you talk to most emerged managed around the counter around on the country the the goal is to get the power back on you know how the power went off whether it went off from a hurricane or an off from a earthquake or we're off some from a squirrel that eight right it's all okay it's all done now. Are we get back on so we take that approach as professionals to to to to to attack those problems so that universal right so whether it was a snowstorm in rhode island or hurricane obviously a much bigger scale but i have a lot of talent that not that i work with to get everything that we need to respond now. Interestingly as we're focusing here on hurricane doreen we're talking with the acting administrator femur pete gainer dorgan's happening but they're still other things going on around the nation or perhaps even the parts of the hemisphere that fema is dealing with so you're not just leveraging all of your resources on dory and at this point in time <hes> talk to us about just the listeners you know whether geeks listeners are very savvy and educated they don't necessarily they're an emergency managers so they might not know about the full breadth of what famous thinking about in any given time talk to us a little bit about that so a a- and not a day goes by when i'm at that i learn something new about what we do and and and and that is not a that's not a lie so one of the things i learned early on is how how much we're responsible for when it comes to natural disasters from american samoa to the u._s. Virgin islands is ninety three hundred miles <hes> so from way out there to guam to saipan tinian hawaii alaska ah puerto rico u._s. virgin islands and everything between <hes> we own that when it comes to national ashes <hes> we also own the national continuity program making sure that <hes> the government is able to function should something happen and united states so we own that program also a we also own the preparedness grant program. I'm sure that we <hes> <hes> award money for preparedness efforts. <hes> things like emergency management performance grant or the urban areas security initiative sure that <hes> locals and states and counties are prepared for terrorist attacks. We we support all those <hes> i also run the largest insurance company when it comes to flood insurance in the world of the single largest peril insurer flood insurance in the world so if i p five let me can i interject there. What's the current status. I mean every now and then i hear about oh n._f. I._p. needs to be reauthorized this and that kid you. Give us an update on the current status of the we we. We have a <hes> restraining two point. Oh that's underway that we're going to try to revitalize n._f._l. P._f._l._p. has not been updated since the nineteen seventies now <hes> <hes> and and <hes> you know some the way we look at risk. <hes> is really not fear <hes> so you know basically the premium that you pay should reflect the risks that that <hes> that you face so if you imagine you have a house that you know the house.

rhode island hurricane pete gainer dorgan saipan tinian hawaii fema n._f._l guam puerto rico acting administrator director maria united states P._f._l._p. harvey
"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Was appointed director of rhode island's emergency management agency in january two thousand five <hes> many years of experience. This is an emergency manager award winning and also served as twenty six years as an enlisted marine infantry officer in the u._s. Marine corps. Thank you for your service. Your continued service. I always like got to give that put that out there because our federal civil servants served this nation as well and as a former civil servant. I really appreciate what you had feman the good people that femur game so how do you think that the recent hurricane michael that happened in the panhandle of florida year these recent events even florence in the carolinas linas the inundation that they experienced last year from a stalling hurricane. Do you think those recent events make people more aware of and more likely to act two or do you think they just kind of get weary from these storms well. It's probably a little bit of botha. I had the opportunity to mexico beach. <hes> probably <hes> <hes> three days days ago in kind of visit <hes> how the <unk> is going down there. <hes> you know that community <hes> they'll come back <hes> they work at it right now to to build back smarter and <hes> batter <hes> they just passed brand new building codes <hes> to make sure that whoever builds on mexico beach and surrounding areas <hes> built to the highest standard they they call it locally the miami standard and make sure those houses are built to <hes> to withstand <hes> you know significant <hes> hurricane that's local driven right so the mayor of the towel manager of making those decisions to say when if and when the next one comes we're going to be completely ready as community for it. That's a tough sell. If you have not had a disastrous <hes> trying to change building codes a community that has not seen a disaster a devastating disastrous hard because no one wants to give up their property. No one wants to spend and money on something that maybe may or may not help them <hes> but i think it's our duty as public servants to make sure that we tell people what the risks are that goes on with flood insurance durance flood insurance is the best defense you can have. Yes it costs money to to <hes> to have that insurance but really there's no better investment. You can make as a homeowner. <hes> there are cases in mexico beach. We visited with some of the home owners down there <hes> that oh nothing but a slab right now right their houses completely gone <hes> <hes> they you know a couple of them had homeowners insurance and they had flood insurance and they'll be fine right. They'll they'll. They'll have to navigate the getting construction. Crews is back then to do it but we met others that had no flood insurance <hes> had homeowners but no flood okay. That's pretty good and i met homeowners ahead no flood insurance and no homeowner's insurance right so imagine how come back <hes>. I can't imagine that actually a colleague mindset if you can if you live near can see water water from your porch. She probably should have flood insurance and realize the best offensive. I can just give an example from hurricane harvey. <hes> we have a program individual assistance <hes> the mexican gift from that program ramp and it's really aimed at a bridge between <hes> disaster survivor in the moment <hes> they lose their home or their apartment <hes> to get them into a hotel l. or get them <hes> you know a rental car those kinds of things a bridge to a better <hes> short-term <hes> recovery but <hes> the max three or four thousand dollars less than one percent of all the applicants really maxed that out the average payment that payment was four thousand dollars but.

mexico beach hurricane Marine corps hurricane harvey hurricane michael officer botha director rhode island miami florida florence four thousand dollars twenty six years one percent three days
"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"natural disasters" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Hurricane painter. I have some good colleagues and friends that i know but if we do deal with a land falling storm later in the period just walk us through so how how is fema responding at that point <hes> so this whole response no matter of his during a something else is really a whole of government response <hes> so <hes> has to be locally suggested state managed fairly supported <hes> we have partners in that so our federal partners <hes> d._o._d.'s part of our response in our nonfederal partners. There's like the american red cross and others that help to include citizens. They <hes> probably the most important part of our response because we want citizens to make really good decisions titians based on the threat the in their community so if you're under a voluntary or mandatory evacuation order you really need to pay attention to your local officials officials. <hes> should it make landfall. The system is designed. Where <hes> i did you know locals have the first crack at it and then the state comes in and the feds come in <hes> and that's all pre scripted <hes>. We're out this week. <hes> i was in tallahassee yesterday meeting with governors scientists and his team to make sure he had everything he need they should <hes> dorian have negative impacts on florida today. We're in georgia. Check in with a george mercy management in the governor. Tonight will be in south carolina being a show. We check with them to make sure they have everything they need. The full array of federal support <hes> to to include our partners no matter what happens and that's really how it works <hes> but really is a team effort the hallway whole of government response to these big disastrous one of the things that as a meteorologist i've been at this for twenty five years or so i at nasa now at at the university of georgia as a professor but i- former president of the american meteorological society in that role i often talk about the challenge with messaging these weather survey and you alluded to this as well <hes> if people think it's going somewhere and it doesn't they let their guard down <hes> but i think that you at the federal level and even emergency <hes> operations at the state level have been very proactive about this. I know here in the state of georgia. There were evacuations in parts of the coastal regions in parts of the carolinas do <hes> do you fully support this idea very preemptive actions. Even if something doesn't happen because i think the public we struggle with messing with the public when they prepare for something and sometimes sometimes doesn't is not as bad as they think it is but i believe we have to be proactive and i commend you. You all are doing so you had to be proactive and you have to over prepare. I think that's a to unrepaired probably a crime <hes> and so we want people to <hes> to take action <hes> ahead of time right mate. Do all those things to keep keep yourself and your family out of trouble and it is a balanced <hes> we. We don't want to be heard as a as a car alarm we're ear. No one really pays attention to anymore. You walk by it. We hear it all the time so we want to make sure that we're we're saying enough but we're not saying too little because again <hes> especially with this storm very problematic <hes> it's going to cut across florida. It's touched three coasts. <hes> it's it's going to be a cat five across west palm and now it's going up the coast and maybe it makes landfall in south carolina or north carolina..

south carolina georgia florida fema american meteorological societ tallahassee nasa north carolina university of georgia west palm professor president twenty five years