19 Burst results for "Native Plant Gardens"

"native plant gardens" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:52 min | Last month

"native plant gardens" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Volunteer native Plant Garden Volunteer Day up at the Laguna Day, Santa Rosa. Now they only will accept eight volunteers. But if you live up there and you've got to get out of the location is 900 Sanford Road in Santa Rosa. But you need to R s v P called 707. 5 to 79277775279277 in case they need more help growing local food and equity with pie ranch. I know I'm a hippie. Okay, So this is this is ah, the Peninsula Open Space online event go to eventbrite there. It's also free and look for Pie Ranch. You go to their Web site as well. Www dot pie ranch dot or ge, and this will be Friday at from 12 to 1. So it's a lunchtime thing, And this is growing local food and equity equity with Pie ranch, so that event is through eventbrite. Ah or Orchard days at Phi Loli. I'm sure is still going on Saturdays and Sundays at 10. Am all October. Give them a call for more information at 650364 83 100. 650364 83 100. And they are located at 86 Kenyatta Road in Woodside. 9 86 Kenyatta. I happy House plants is taking place with the San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers, and this is also an online event. This will cost from either from 18 to $30. Or you can become a member and get all sorts of discounts Get tickets at this is happening on the 16th from 6 to 7 in the evening, and.

Pie Ranch Santa Rosa San Francisco Conservatory of Plant Garden ge Phi Loli
"native plant gardens" Discussed on That's My Favorite

That's My Favorite

01:38 min | 7 months ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on That's My Favorite

"Seed in completing their life cycles there and enjoy the the wildlife that those plants attract you know the From the insects to the birds to the small mammals reptiles amphibians all those different things. You know that that are attracted to these native plant gardens and you really can attract a lot of those those elements to these gardens and so that process is a regular ritual that we do throughout the growing season. And you don't want it starts in that early spring when you see those first plants coming up and you see those first flowers you know whether it's a little prairie wildflower or maybe you have some shaded areas where he'd been doing some little woodland gardening or something and getting out there and enjoying it and if you see some of the maintenance aspects of these small gardens which include you know some meetings because we wanted to see certain plants grow there. We don't want the the annuals and non native species that are invading in there to kind of take over and overwhelmed planting so it takes them hand weeding and that weeding effort can Dev- aided by Mulch and you know some some other tools that that reduced the some of the amount of meeting that we need to do. And if we're out there and we're doing some of the things on a regular basis then were in the process of not only remaining those but we're out there were observing him with high repetition and we're learning more about the the names of those plants and and you know when they come up in the season then when they flower and when they set seed when they attract certain animals to him. And.

Dev
"native plant gardens" Discussed on That's My Favorite

That's My Favorite

03:02 min | 7 months ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on That's My Favorite

"A person that's interacting on this landscape with our environment and You know I spent a lifetime career kind of thinking about those things so maybe it's a little bit more relevant In my mind but I think just from a healthy living standpoint we are so interconnected with our the natural world around us and you know it helps provide us with our with our basic essentials with our food or water or air are all those things so we are very much tied to that At native ecosystem at the base of that. It's native plants. I love it. That was beautiful. I see I feel like some people think that plants are boring. I do not. I love plants. Anyone that has ever talked to me is probably figured that out and I love bugs two so implants and bugs or so closely intertwined You can't talk about plants about talking about about bugs or vice versa But yeah you're absolutely right like it really does all start. Plants and are native. Plants are so important to the balance of our ecosystems. And you did it. You said it way more eloquently than I ever could. But you're going to know that we like to talk about these things. Yes yes well. Yeah and one of the things that I've done native Plant Gardens in the past I did a presentation. I guess for our volunteers yesterday about native plants. And that was definitely something that you know. I talked with a lot about because I do get pushback sometimes from the public When I talk about plants and things like that. And they're like okay but already have Zinnias in my garden and you know I see butterflies all the time so obviously my garden is just fine. I don't need to change it and there's no way they could possibly be better and I'm like well. I'm really glad that you have butterflies. But you know I've seen firsthand and maybe maybe that's part of it. Maybe it's experience with native gardens. It really gets you excited about them. But I've seen firsthand comparing you know. More traditional landscapes usually with European plants Versus using native plants and the insect diversity at those gardens is completely different and with insect diversity. Comes you know birds and small mammals and all those other things you can make like a whole little habitat in your backyard. And I've Seen Garden's small is like five foot square get monarch caterpillars on them and have been kids can watch the whole life cycle and it's just really exciting. It's it's impressive. Even really tiny garden can accomplish in my opinion absolutely I could not agree more. You're you're definitely a advocate In a very good one for Native plant gardening.

Plant Gardens
"native plant gardens" Discussed on Home Space and Reason

Home Space and Reason

07:38 min | 8 months ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on Home Space and Reason

"And he gets to watch them. Grow and eventually cocoon watching. The metamorphosis into a butterfly is the wonder enjoyed by all three of us in our family and we love releasing them into the wild once. The weather is warm. The process of a monarch's complete transformation from egg to larva to Chrysalis and into an adult butterfly takes between six to eight weeks. And I'm excited that you're listening today because I wanNA talk about attracting hummingbirds butterflies and other bits of wonder that make an outdoor area so much more idealistic adjusting our outdoor environment the furniture the rug and plants around us and even the pollinators we hope to attract are examples of thought and feeling regulators. Have you chose your regulators with intention or did you simply by the first plastic outdoor chair that you saw when walking into the store? Because you needed something to fill your patio. And if that's the case should you reconsider your outdoor space? Can either relax you or stress you out. Is it comfortable or do you look at it like that? Looks like so much work? Do you want to linger? Do you hear birds. Do you see butterflies. Consider all the bits if you need to rehearse and you can look over your notes on episode Twenty Six twenty seven an episode twenty eight coming next and make decisions with deliberate intention. Butterflies and MODs belong to the second largest order of insects next to Beatles with approximately one hundred seventy thousand species worldwide. Yesterday all of our caterpillars had gone through all the stages and we're enjoying their new wings as butterflies. It was a sunny evening and the temperature was right to release them so we sent them venturing into the big world creating this episode presents a unique challenge since I have listeners now virtually in every pocket of the world and when I consider speaking on attracting wildlife everyone will have vastly different climates spaces and abilities because of that I wanted to start with concept of planting natives when we originally built our home. I wanted to plant what I liked to see regardless if the plants were native or not for example I love the easy feeling of a palm tree in the wind and because there are cold hardy versions that survive in Oregon State now. I happily planted one in the front flowerbed at the corner of our house but the more I've read the more I've learned and I'll discuss some of that with you today. I'm going to take a quick second for station identification. Have you subscribe jet if you haven't please take a quick minute to do that? So as I release new episodes they come to you automatically. Ua for automation. I promised to always deliver the same high quality content that you're accustomed to with me now. Let's talk about birds? A great place to start for attracting. Birds is identifying the ones that frequent your region and then determine the habitat that appeals to them. Of course plants usually part of this equation when you consider attracting birds to your yard. One of the best reasons is for their insect eating appetite to control pests without any effort by you but to do that much like a hotel. You need amenities baby. If you have a few birdhouses a bird bath. A feeder and several plants of varying heights the greater the variety of birds. That will call your home their preferred bed and breakfast so our home that we built backs up to a piece of property that has very mature were old pine trees. It's stunning we put in a wall of windows that folds open like an accordion so we can enjoy those trees and my thought was. How Fun is? It can be to watch the birds. I put out a bird feeder and filled it with seed and it quickly all rotted. I tried a different kind of seed. And it also rotted. I tried a different kind of feeder. Nothing silence crickets but no birds. I tried everything for a couple of years and failed miserably at attracting birds now. My parents can accidentally drop a peanut out of their coat pocket. And they've got fifteen species and a family of squirrels running after them but I found it incredibly challenging to attract birds and the only thing I can figure is. Maybe there's some predatory hawks or something living in those trees behind our house provide birds with food and shelter during all four seasons by planting trees and shrubs that offer seeds and fruit. Some of these shrubs can do double duty as excellent choices for hedges so when you are considering how to shield the neighbors from looking straight into your kitchen window a green tall shrub might be a far better choice than offense because you can provide shelter and housing for birds with the same plant also. Who wouldn't rather look at nature instead of offense that requires upkeep anyway. Stay tuned for Episode Twenty Eight on Green Fences consider planting ornamental grasses too because they provide seeds and nesting material as well as places to hide if your garden is less than one acre. Put Up only one birdhouse if you want to attract a particular species however purple. Martins sparrows and swallows are not territorial and will reside in a community of housing with Audubon native plant database. You can find the best plants for the birds in your area. Growing birth friendly plants will attract and protect the Burgee love while making your space beautiful easy to care for and better for the environment explore all of your native plant resources on their website and includes a fact sheet on creating a native plant garden. And how it can save you money. I'll put a link in the podcast notes..

Beatles Oregon Martins
"native plant gardens" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 8 months ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on KCRW

"Which takes place this weekend is being held virtually during free online streaming eventual be able to take tours and ask questions of gardeners and landscape designers while you're at it you can not get more info at native plant garden tour dot O. R. G. support for NPR comes from home advisor committed to helping homeowners find the right pros for their home projects homeowners can read reviews book appointments and check cost guidelines for home projects at home advisor dot com or on the mobile apps big thanks going out to Ben Gottlieb cerise castle Michael start Mike Newport Evan George and Amy Robach and seven oh seven here KCRW have yourself a great weekend on Larry pearl we'll talk to you on Monday hi it's Jennifer Ferrell KCRW's president I know things are uncertain for you right now they sure are for us to I. Casey are W. we have just a few people on site most of our hosts are broadcasting from makeshift studios at home producers are connecting from the kitchen tables all in order to keep vital information and relief coming to you they say you really find out who your friends are in a crisis and I hope we show you who we are let's stay connected email us or reach out on Instagram or Twitter we are here for you welcome back left right and centre I'm Josh barro your center and business columnist at New York magazine on the right is rich Lowry editor of National Review on the left is Christine emba columnist at The Washington Post it's the fourth week of March and this week brought the focus on making sure hospitals are as ready as possible for the surge of cases headed to them with nearly forty thousand confirmed cases of covert nineteen and more than four hundred deaths as of Friday New York is the epicenter of America's outbreak New York governor Andrew Cuomo's daily press conferences have been getting national attention as he explains.

"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Strengthen this fabric we all love. Great will thank you so much for all the work that you're doing Andrea Delong. A my is director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She guides staff in the design and management of nine acres of beautiful native plant gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and a native plant nursery. Her enthusiasm and knowledge for this field is extraordinary for every episode in March cultivating places highlighting one of the women in my new book. The Earth in her hands seventy five extraordinary women working in the world of plants which officially published last week on March third. Join US again next week when we continue our series on women in plants. When we're joined by Dr Elaine Ingham founder of the Soil Food Web Inc listening. There are so many ways. People engage in and grow from the cultivation of their places. The Earth is in all of our hands so take good care. Cultivating places a listener supported co-production of north state public radio over uncle meeting place dot com this week..

Andrea Delong US Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C director of horticulture Dr Elaine Ingham Texas Austin Soil Food Web Inc University of Texas founder
"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

14:21 min | 9 months ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden from nor state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Joel. Were now well into women's history month and International Women's Day was this last Sunday march eighth as we continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she had the native flora of Texas. Talk about the diversity you have there. And how the diversity of Texas which is not which is an enormous place with a lot of micro climates and But talk about that. Diversity is then valuable as a kind of proto type for researching and understanding diversity anywhere Andrea. The State is a big state. And because of that. We're really blessed with many different Eka regions and vegetation zones. We have depending on how you look at it. We might we have about a dozen different vegetation zones and it's kind of a funnel you if you look at how the the geography of North America As things migrate and flow back and forth from north to South America it goes through Central America and through the funnel of Texas so we get plants and animals coming through there that over millennia have really made it for very rich environment which is Super Fun to be exploring and studying and and gardening with those plants and gardening for wildlife the diversity of wildlife that we have what is your current number of sort of native plants in Texas. We have thousands Maybe five thousand native plant species or tax in the state of Texas. But I would have to confirm that number on our site. We have about nine hundred species of native tax on our property here and tax would include species and sometimes subspecies right. I think one of the things. It's really interesting to me. And part of what makes Native Plant Research. So interesting is that You know it's that Great John Muir quote of you can't pull on one thread in the universe without tugging on the whole of the universe but the native plant as you were describing that idea of Texas being this fabulous funnel in migration patterns and and water like large watersheds scope. You get this sense of the complexity and history of that interrelationship between climatic patterns geology. The tectonic plates of our continent and how plants and animals are interrelated with all of that. And it's all co evolved into this fabulous beautiful soup that you know in your region is the big beautiful state of Texas Talk. About how over time the different display areas have evolved there at the center and what they're kind of individual purposes are from the perspective of not only engaging the public but also providing laboratories for research end data and information collection. The gardens themselves have not been The subject of actual research study. I mean informally as gardeners. Were all every time we garden? It's always an experiment you but we do have more of our. Formal research is happening in the natural areas primarily with a land-management research. I would like to progress as we move forward to doing more plant trials and other more formal kinds of horticultural research but just demonstrating these plants. in having them in a garden setting where we can somewhat control conditions. Some plants obviously are pretty malleable and while adjusts to horticultural kind of settings others We found not well suited for gardens. They may be beautiful plants but they may be tricky or they may be really specific in the kinds of areas and conditions that they want to grow and people love. There's a little plant called Mountain. Pink which is super cute. It's Maybe a foot tall and it looks like this. Perfect bouquet of flowers with hot pink balsams on it and they bloom in the summer. They grow in road cuts where it's just basically solid rock almost just COLUCCI and people love them and they want to grow them in their garden..

Texas Andrea Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C Native Plant Gardens Austin Johnson Andrea Botanic Garden Texas President Johnson US wildflower research center Andrea Delong wildflower center University of Texas Native Plant Research California Texas El country Andrea Hi Acre Texas Arboretum Andrea Sherr
Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

Cultivating Place

09:44 min | 9 months ago

Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

"We continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she

Texas Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C President Johnson Andrea Wildflower Center Austin Johnson Andrea Native Plant Gardens United States Botanic Garden Texas Wildflower Research Center Andrea Delong Andrea Hi Andrea Sherr University Of Texas Texas El Country Helen Hayes Acre Texas Arboretum National Welfare Research Cent
A Conversation With Uli Lorimer of the Native Plant Trust

In Defense of Plants Podcast

08:45 min | 9 months ago

A Conversation With Uli Lorimer of the Native Plant Trust

"Early. Lur thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. How about we start off with telling everyone a little bit about who you are. And what is you do? Sure thank you. Thank you for having me on. So I am currently the director for the culture for Garner the woods in Asami farm For Native Plant Trust and trusts was formerly known as New England. Wildflower Society But we recently rebranded and changed our name and so we are now nick plan. Trust still the same organization just to name right on. And have you always been playing person or is this something you kinda figured out later on Throughout your career education or life I think I'd like to think I've always been a plant person. I think I could trace my earliest influences back to my mother. And my grandmother who always had really amazing gardens My grandmother lived in Germany. And as a kid we used to visit quite a bit and I just really love being outside in the space and you know I didn't know it at the time that it would have such an influence on me and I grew up in Wilmington Delaware and we used to get along with gardens quite a bit and I so that was kind of like my backyard and almost two three times a month we would go visit and as a kid you kind of think of it as this place to kind of run around in the highlights were like the Koi pond you know not plants per se but definitely had an influence on me and then as I got older I began working some landscape nurseries and and kind of traditional and install crews in high school and then when I got to college I actually went to Ethica college believing that I wanted to get into sports medicine and I filled out my first semester utterly and spectacularly because I think I was probably just more excited to not be living at home anymore and not really not really mature enough to to know what I was doing and so then I came back to this idea that maybe you could make a career in horticulture and I went back to university of Delaware enrolled in the horticulture and botany program there and absolutely loved it and kind of set me on this path and I initially thought you know because of my experiences working landscaping. That's where I wanted to go that I wanted to be a landscaper that I wanna to have my own kind of Mon blow operation but having some exposure to some commercial and retail nurseries. I was kind of bored with the standard choice of plants. There's only like everybody was going the same one hundred plants and so I thought were can I learn about the greatest diversity of plants learn about where to get the really cool interesting things and then apply that to this design idea and so thought Public Gardens and Botanic Gardens where the obvious place and so I ended up at the national them in DC for year doing an internship there and then moved up to New York City and worked at Wave Hill for about five years as their woodland Gardner and you know this dream of being in commercial horticulture faded quickly as my eyes open to the you know the beauty and wonder of public arts and all of the amazing plants and things that in all the possibilities of working in that kind of context really was very attractive to me and you know the longer I stayed in public arden's a less interest ahead and going back to commercial horticulture and so that then sort of transitions in the way Phil was was Was the beginnings of focusing in narrowing down to work with native plants In that I was responsible for their woodland I spent a lot of time pulling invasive but didn't really have any concept of how to transition that into a functioning woodland garden And certainly not much of an understanding at that time of the college and and plank the plank community concept or even a real firm grasp of regionalism which is something that I think is really important and so had an opportunity. Then to switch over to Brooklyn Botanic Garden and was hired as their curator of Native Flora and spent fourteen years there in that role. And that's where my approach in my focus in my understanding Really sort of blossomed. And where you know my current ideas about trying to connect field botany with public horticulture really crystallized thanks in part In a large part to the fact that there was an act of Science Department at Brooklyn Botanic at the time and A group of really wonderful botanist and taxonomic who had the patience to mentor me and that and allowed me to approach this horticultural work in the sense of saying well if I can go see plants in the wild and a natural spaces then I can get all this kind of good cultural information about you know the conditions that they grow in what sort of plant associations communities to they exist in and the more. I began to do that the more. I was intrigued by these questions of patterns and processes on the landscape and then I realized that that understanding ends up being incredibly valuable for a gardeners to understand how plants may or may not behave in cultivation and kind of get a better sense of how to plan out You know on garden wide landscaped scale plantings that that really embody these ideas of ecological value and aesthetics and sense of place. And you know sort of taking that inspiration of of seeing natural communities in and trying to translate that in a way into a designed public art in context so that work was really fantastic and getting to work with with those botanists. And you know at the time. I was just amazed that there were people who could identify any scrap of a plant. That you can link to them that you know you. Could you could open up a leasing cronquist manual and say I want to see this plant and they'd be like okay next week. We're going to go to field trip and I can take to it just like blew my mind that like that level of detail and understanding was that out there and through that partnership and Mentorship I was exposed to the New Jersey. Pine Barrens By one of One of the directors of sides at the time there named Dr Gary Moore through grew up down there and you know arguably one of the most knowledgeable about pine barrens. They exist today and so that really kind of began. The love affair of that particular landscape and at Brooklyn Botanic Garden about at this stage may be about eight years ago. The card leadership undertook this process of expanding. The data plan collection and the decision was made to focus primarily on pine barrens habitats and coastal plain grasslands as these were really sun-loving communities that had suffered in a hundred year old woodland garden with closed. Canopy we also made the decision because of the background and expertise of the Science Department at the time that we would source all the plants from the wild we would collect seed from known locations as locally as possible and grow all those plants and put them together Into this you know expanded new collection and so that was something that I was fortunate. Enough to be very intimately involved in Seed collecting over five six years to target the about one hundred fifty species that were new to the collection that we wanted to grow and all of the sort of fun and frustrations and challenges. Go with Trying to find enough seed and timing of collections and then you know the challenges of unlocking some of the propagation issues for some of these plants that had not been you know they're not international nursery horticulture at the stage and so I kind of felt it was neat because we were pushing the boundaries of the kinds of things that you could grow in public gardens exposing the public to plants that they were unfamiliar with but that really charismatic and then also again trying to emphasize the value of preserving those plants and habitats in C- to as as being one of the core messages of this kind of garden so a really wonderful experience. And like I said it really kind of began to crystallize for me. The the approach of what I'd like to a larger sense call regionalism. Which is this idea of like deciding that you wanna work within the boundaries of eka regions or physiology physio graphic provinces and. That's what should motivate your decisions about. What kind of plants are appropriate for Native Plant Garden and with it? All the benefits of local adaptations genetic diversity and biodiversity and showing that there are lots of plants that you can welcome into your garden from the wild and have a garden that is ecologically functioning primarily and aesthetic and just good for for humans and for all forms of

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Director Native Plant Garden Science Department Botanic Gardens Asami Farm For Native Plant Tr LUR Germany Brooklyn Botanic Nick Plan Wilmington New Jersey Delaware New England University Of Delaware Native Flora New York City Ethica
"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"The garden as well. Is that true. Yes we could talk about that for forty five minutes when you say you're in a rain forest describe the the makeup of the forest that you're in and that you have created this garden in will the areas the hardwood forest others hickory and oak and pine. And because I'm on this island I have all sorts of plant communities and habitat types in in the area. So there's a riparian habitat type there's flood plain which is what my garden is actually flood plain And it is very complex part part of the garden in one area. I thought I would have native plant garden and I wanted to do. Local plants plants that were were indigenous to attend mile radius which sounds very restrictive. But it's so rich here that I have trillium. Ginger her all the many different kinds of plants because it is so complex and interesting but we do get a lot of rain. A lot of rain and most of the garden is sand because it has been a flood plain. It's just the river delivered and the rivers to soared. That's an yet another story Glenn sometimes but it can be underwater or have four inches of rain and then two days later. Dry as dust So the plants don't love it but the woody plants kind of do like it and I think a lot of the trees have made it to to the water table so trees.

Glenn
"native plant gardens" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"I don't we haven't end as you know, we have an entire section devoted edible plants that you could grow, you know, right here in Los Angeles, where we are all of those ways, in and for children, who liked to just display or they can dig in our little compost, bins looking for hill bugs and earthworms and, and other creatures, they may not necessarily have an interest in plant per se. But, you know, some kind of exposure with nature could spark, you know, something down the road. That's, that's part of the idea as well in its should regain any. Saving enough about how well this guard integrates all of these really important ideas. But above all else, you know, there's a lot of botanical gardens that are just as medically pretty in like you said, there's even some botanical gardens that are very scientific in dedicated to the native plant garden. But what you have all done. There is blend all of these beautiful things about aesthetics, about education about peace of mind about escaping, sort of the concrete jungle in hustle, and bustle, any made it in one cohesive thing that you'd never know what's going to spark that interest in someone in just as you mentioned growing up as a child getting involved in guarding with your mom that was something for you in everyone. I talked to has their own little hook in by offering a lot of different hooks for different people, especially in an urban area that is full of different people from various backgrounds. You never know what's going to set that spark off, and get someone really interested rat. Right. Homerun with this project. You know, I think and it's really been wonderful to be part of it to help, you know, help it get established and evolve and, and mature and the utilized, then it gets used for all kinds of Herbert educational programs just for fun. In addition to the scientific work is going on. So yeah, it's they, they did a great job heating. He'll curious to enduring throughout this process, working with landscape architects in trying to honor the plan, but also finding what works what doesn't do have any favorite plants that you've discovered through this process or plants, you've kind of rediscovered? I mean, what is how is this sort of changed your view in perception of not only just native plant gardening, but native plants in general, I mean, do you have new favorites and stuff like that are Brian that, you know, that depends on the day? Yeah. New favorites in terms of native Winnie. I've always loved man's Anita for very long time. And I would say that's just been reinforced in this garden. We've we've struggled to get some of the man's anita's to do well here, but finally, you know, some of them are taking off. So I'm happy about that, in terms of grasses. I've always admired for obelisk, Arroyo these which is called at cry. Second time you need at one of those names, you know, is going to roll off your tummy, but it's a beautiful grass, and it's the price me that's one of the surprises, because it, it has been seeding about around in our meadow. We can certainly grub it out, want to or need to. But I did not expect that, because it didn't do that botanic garden. It's a very beautiful ground. What else let me get back to you on that? Yeah. It's never the easy question to ask any plant enthusiast, but it is cool to know that, you know, again, you have learned throughout this process. You've got old friends in the plant community that are probably doing surprising things. I mean you mentioned just how different Los Angeles in Santa Barbara, our internet, the way points behave. But it's also a chance to do things and learn new things. I think it's very evident that that's come through throughout this entire process. Yeah. Definitely the plants are constantly, you know, teaching you things then that's been a real gift so very for that. So I mean one of the common themes throughout this conversation has been just how processes evolved in how the garden his evolved in general. And I mean, is there sort of a maintaining this plan, or more ideas coming onto the future? I mean, what, what does the future this public garden in particular, hold in your mind or hidden you to change?.

Los Angeles Anita Herbert Arroyo Brian Santa Barbara
"native plant gardens" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"And I'll just take a break, you know, for respite from walking around in the galleries indoors for a few hours. So all of the above were was. On the on the wishlist Phoebe. I think they pulled it off. And so I got I got here in late twenty eleven and the construction had already begun. The gardens were maybe about a half, half jolt implanted, but it was a major construction site, they will all the parking lot, and the first thing that got built towards a new parking structure, which ground level as well as underground, and that actually has landscaping associated with it, so immediately upon arriving here. You see greenery, then they, you know, piece by piece built the Gordon and I was able to jump in with the landscape architect and help to lay out the garden as the project unfolded, since we opened, which is almost almost exactly six years ago. June third twenty thirteen the with opening official opening day, which was also celebrating the hundred anniversary of the museum and opening of the nature lab, which is an. Indoor exhibit that help lamentably to the garden and has a number of individual exhibits, many of which are interacted and the food ward winnings of it. So that was a part of the development as well, those things happen. Kind of handing love, who is just been grilling evolving ever since. I'm fortunate to have seen this imprison in seen it at a really good time to experience a lot of the annuals and stuff that we're just going off, like crazy. But in terms of your involvement, and working with landscape architects, and selecting plants. I mean California is a biodiversity hotspot in terms of plants, and there's a lot of opportunity there. But there's also a lot of overwhelming feelings that can come with this. And sometimes when people picture native plant gardens. They picture just kind of this fallow field back lot, sort of messing to end. There's elements of that, that are good to maintain into put in, but you've also done really well with designing and not just like everyone in general in this project has done well of kind of making it look like gardens, but also kind of seamlessly blending into more of a natural setting and just from a plant based perspective. I mean what was the selection process like did you have input on? What was going in there, where it was going to go. I mean, that's gotta be both fun in intimidating all at the same time. The, the gardens all of them were master plan. And so a lot of the plants that got originally installed in the various sections of which there are several we're already designed on paper, and the plants contract grown, and then installed, of course gardens all and so changes have been made over the past several years. I did get a chance to work very closely with Michelle Sullivan from nealer office, on the design for the, the native pollinator meadow, and the zone native, the what we call our get dirty on, please one of the more intensive nature play section from the garden. So yes, it's intimidating because there's awful lot to choose from. And you know, having to trying to steal things down to a more reasonable palate. And the challenge for me, and my team as you know, we've care them caretakers of this garden is to honor the original design intent, well realizing that things have had to change because not everything lives forever, number one, and something, something's just weren't happy here. You know, that was perhaps, not the best location for them initially or of the plans for one reason, or other just didn't get established I need to point out that the gardens over the, the couple of years in which they were planted was the beginning of, of her longed drought here in southern California. And so, yes, we have a fisted irrigation system, but nevertheless, nature was not on our side in terms of helping us to establish these three and a half acres. We were constantly having tweak year, Gatien systems, and make up for the lack of our natural rainfall. So that. Made things extra tough with your question. Yes, certainly in. That's interesting thing to talk about because one of the big pitches for native plant garden is that they are adapted to some extent, the local conditions in that they require a lot less maintenance to keep them alive in around..

California Gatien systems Gordon official Michelle Sullivan nealer six years
"native plant gardens" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Professionals to, to satisfy so many different just practical needs, you know, in the design landscape and they're beautiful. They connect us to this place where we are. And to me that no matter where you garden. I think that's a really important consideration is try to be respectful of where you are. It is such a wonderfully eloquent response to that, in, it's really nice to see how many of those sort of boxes, you're able to check in, in just having this interest in horticulture. But then the focus on native plants of one thing that really stands out to me, and one thing, I think you've tackled so well with your project here is that this idea of conspicuous nece. Like you said, you can drive for miles upon miles and native plants don't really stand out and even people that are aware of gardening in our where of plants native plants, don't generally send out to a lot of them, n even those that do they tend to think of them, as sort of these weeds. But as you so wonderfully put it as like they're beautiful. They connect us to a sense of place. They have so much utility in the garden. And this idea of conspicuous kind of brings it back to the human landscape. I mean, you're in Los Angeles, it is a concrete jungle just like any other city and being able to connect people in that type of setting to something that evolved, there, naturally, where, you know, that landscape has now been replaced by the human environment is so vital to bringing those sorts. Of connections back together so that people start to get on board with that idea. I agree. I agree. And I don't think that there's much in the way of sacrifice in. And I think that unfortunately, there is a sense of, you know, in order to have a native garden, or do at least incorporate native into your garden, and I should say that I'm not a purist. He I have exotic plants in my own garden. And at certainly there are, as you know, a lot of exotic plants in this garden here at the at the natural history museum. So you can you can have both. And so, I don't I don't really think that there's a sacrifice involved. I think everything is compromised in this world. Looting in our garden. So we, we can have it all we think, kinda elevate, you know, the, the sensitivity like I said to where we are, but also to the broader environment and the planet that we live on, you know, and just being more mindful of what the consequences are daily practices in. She said that you don't have to all in. You don't have to be one hundred percent purist native person all the time. There's plenty of room for compromise in compromise, as you said, is a part of all things in the human environment, both social political everything else. But again, just the exposure that you can have with a native plant, or any sort of public garden is so vitally important in. That's really what drew me to your work is this project that you had put together of native plant garden at the natural history museum. So let's dive in, I mean where did this all begin for you? You were you there just head? This idea was. Like a stroke of genius. Did take a lot of time to get people on board. I mean, what was kind of the impetus for starting this native plant garden? I can't quote any narrative for the idea, because I was because I was not here this idea evolved from several staff here at museum. So that's my understanding that came from various people who were working at the museum. My former boss, Karen Weiss, who was the vice president of exhibits in education in exhibits. Brian Brown are Tamala g curator himbal Garrett.

natural history museum Los Angeles Karen Weiss vice president himbal Garrett Brian Brown one hundred percent
"native plant gardens" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Dot com. Welcome back. It's the garden show. Fred here. Pam bone is here, we're talking California native plants we have Brandon on the line from Luma's. He wants to take a hillside east terrorist at you wants to plant all California natives, you're young Brennan, right? Yeah. Seventy one years young man you like work cut out. All right. Okay. I was trying to think of how to make this as easy as possible for you. And I think one thing you need to do is go online to the shadow NPS chapter the California native plant society, it's Eldorado CMPS dot org and then click on the link for their native plants sales plant list and read through the list of descriptions of plants that they're going to have on sale next Saturday in plaza Ville because if it works in a little work in Loomis. Right. The other thing that I wanted to talk about is that you need to mulch with wood chips or something else. And obviously keep in mind that you're out a little bit in the fire safe. And how you do that around your house and defensible space and all of those kinds of things which we don't have to really worry about right down here in the Sacramento area. But you definitely are going to have a weed problem if you don't have some sort of weed control down and mulch is the best way to do that putting on a really thick layer of molten. And then the other thing is your water is so bad. You couldn't use micro irrigation. You you wouldn't be I could but the darn things plug up so darn quick. It's even with filters and everything in it. Okay was sand. I I have another question. My my goal is to get the irrigation in if I if it's necessary. It sounds like it is and then water over the over the summer to get it the weeds to sprout and then spray it frequently to get the weed down. So I'm starting in the fall with it with a sterile possible. An area is that is an intelligent way of looking well sterile. You don't want to use the soil sterile. And you don't wanna you sterile. That's not yet because there are secure while there are soil sterile out there. But it destroys the soil for any growing purposes. You know, you need to control the weeds. But I'm glad that you wanna plant in the fall because you're going to have a bigger selection of plants to choose from better established plants, and because it's fall they're going to get established much easier on that hillside, and you won't have to worry. If we have a normal winter rainfall, depending on when you put them in you might have to irrigate a little bit before the winter rains come. And then you're fine. You're you're good to go until April of next year on a hillside like that I wouldn't be a missed to scattering a few pounds of California poppy seeds over that hillside and walking away. Definitely in my that's definitely in my. Bucket list? Now. Additionally, there is a Chinese, elm, volunteer. That's native. Right. I understand. I understand that. But. Put in some value, shade is that's okay. I want to take it out. I if you're going to be planning, California natives, and you wanna be sort of a little bit more purist about it. I would just plant one of your native oaks because they are actually fairly quick growing. If you give them a little water, the valley oak is actually very fast growing. Well, he's he's worried about the show. He's worried about the oh, you already have a whole hillside of them already. Now there are there are California natives that will grow under the dappled shade of an existing tree. So if you're worried about the shade of that elm tree of don't worry about it because there are plans you can choose from that can easily thrive. Definitely. Yeah. There's there are lists. And lists of things that will do very well. Yeah. To get a good idea of the plants that are available. Visit that Eldorado chapter of the NPS plant list. And what else I'm gonna I realize that it's a little bit up the hill, but we have an amazing Sacramento valley native plant garden tour, it's called gardens, gone native. It's free of charge. And it's on April twenty-seventh from nine thirty in the morning until four in the afternoon. And we have I think something like twenty six landscapes that are going to be shown you can go on your own pace. You register online.

California Sacramento Brandon NPS Pam bone Fred Luma plaza Ville Loomis Seventy one years
"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"And those are the main garden areas we happen to have an underground recreation building that was constructed during the estate days, which has a lawn on its roof, which is our lower terrorists. As I said earlier, we have interesting to poverty, including some men made in interest like that. And adjacent to that is a little. Relatively new small formal native plant garden since it is surrounded on three sides by woodland. It made sense to have that the native plant garden. How new is the native plant garden? It was made in the nineteen nineties when the swimming poll for the estate was finally demolished and filled in and because some some stone architecture remains around its perimeter it made sense for it to be formal. But we wanted it to be native plant. So we have this interesting hybrid of that doesn't usually go together. But we have made it work. And I think a lot of people like seeing that because it's a way that people with townhouses and urban yards concede that yes, you can have a small space with native plants that is livable. Yeah. And not isn't isn't just a prairie restoration. And I think that really starts to get us into some of the educational aspects of wave hill in its prominent rule. Rule as being a model for innovative planting and horticultural knowledge, right? There is that idea that if you can model of formality with native plants, you speak to a completely different audience than I think, the sort of foundational native plant people might might be and that ability to expand the conversation about what we can do with plants and how we can live with them. I think is so important. I I agree. It's a more modern way of thinking it it wasn't top of the mind in in the first decades of the garden here. I think it's fair to say that everyone working here from the beginning. We're kind of plant nuts plant geeks of and it's still a little that way with native plants where we're not Zionists about it. But we recognize the value of having parts of the property that that reflected purely native flora, and and I think that anyone having a tour of of the gardens here from the very beginning would would be pointed to the native plants that are in all of our garden areas. And and so it wasn't a difficult to say, okay. This little small area, which is surrounded by our woodland where we wouldn't want some some aggressive plant that we've introduced escape we will. We will make this little formal garden, which maybe twenty years ago, we wouldn't have thought to as a native garden. So that takes us you've segue very nicely into the early history. I find it fascinating that the original history of the house has a country house garden, there are quite a few in the area of where you are. But that this one come nineteen sixty was deeded to the city to become a cultural institution. Give us a little bit of history on why that might have been the decision of the owners and those early years that you mentioned in terms of how the nonprofit was formed how the mission was was developed and has has grown over the years Louis while I I admit I wasn't here for those. When the property became a city owned. Public institution is it was deeded to the city in nineteen sixty. And I believe for five years, the city's parks department managed the property, and because neighbors who wanted to see something good and public serving happened on the property, they formed a private foundation and their timing was perfect because at the same time some other institutions or making the same kinds of alliances with the city, and it changed from city parks management to cultural institutions management, which was the arrangement with these other groups to run a cultural institution under the management of a private foundation on city property. So we're very lucky that we had some smart neighbors and some sharp political minds on the on the. Board of our founders because something very different could have happened. And even after that arrangement was settled there were was still a lot of floundering about exactly what our mission would be. And what it what the scope of?.

Louis twenty years five years
"native plant gardens" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"I agree with you that you're limited ability. I think it's just that there is so much to learn we have so much to learn about our native flora and every person who has the will to do. So with the manual can start giving point they can jump in on any family. Well, and that there were two other reports that caught my eye one was the geraniums the geraniums e is that how? And so, and you know, I think a lot of people who are gardeners think oh premiums Rainey's, those are joining mechanism or whatever J dreams that are not from the United States and are not naturalized or whatever probably here. But there's we have in our region. We have a number of both non native and native species that are in your report, for instance. Yeah. In fact, I remember. Treatment of terrain AC. We had a number of species that were not in Gleason cronk was like we've been saying that natives in some others that we've learned more about some natives that about which we've learned more since the publication of than ninety one Gleason gronk with. So you're right. It's another another good example when where I garden when I first came to the place there were two and they were not in the same anywhere near the same spot. And I've never this sort of two buildings at my house and separated by a little bit of distance and in one area grows strenuous macular. I think would be though is that correct twit yet, drain. Wild drain him. And then in another area far away from it geranium Roberti ENA, of course, and they don't seem to want to be in the same spot, but they're both drain rooms. And I guess now having read the report that you've done on on the dreams, I learned that maybe there's some dispute about whether Roberta aim is actually native back all the way in time. So. Introduction from Europe. And then more recent evidence has been accumulating than maybe had been here. All along either way if it is an introduction. It was very very early. But even its name reveals what a link it has had with our human civilization its name for same Robert, most of our plants, we give descriptive names to whether it be some aspect of their appearance or their geography, but in this case to Raynham, Roberta them, and I had to chuckle because it's herb Robert. I know I know. But you weren't around when it was named. Yeah. So take take a couple of minutes to talk about or kids because again, you know, for love Gardner thing. Orchids house plant whatever they don't know. And maybe they know sip EDM's, there's maybe they've heard of or seen it a native plant garden one or two examples of native or orchids, but really they don't know about it. And there were a lot of work. It's in in this report very much, though, I'm North America, and in especially the northeast reaching covered by the new manual has a very rich orchid flora and many genera- in I'm especially excited by this treatment that we just published this year because we have to lead off there's the new manuals Claburn effort, and we collaborate because we benefit from the expertise of people throughout the world. And so we've brought to the world's experts on the orchid family. Matthew pace who is here in New York botanical garden and John Roydon Stein of Ohio State University. So they team up and another exciting thing about this treatment is in the last few years, each one of them has been describing new species of words, and each one of them has one of the species that they describe in the street the northeast. That's nice. It is very nice. So John Freud Stein. Had a coral road Kerala rise. Bentley I and Matthew pays had a lady's dresses by Ramsey's ARCHE CPA. So another thing about this treatment is because of the great interest in orchids so much has been done on studying the workaday, see the orchid family that we've made all these great advances, and this is a treatment that especially reflects that that increase in botanical knowledge, so whether it be in the recent discoveries in the field, or whether it be in the new names, we have them whether it be in the new classifications for them all of those aspects are reflected. And then there's a lot of conservation concern, especially as we see many of our native orchids decline..

John Roydon Stein Matthew pace herb Robert Gleason cronk Roberti ENA United States Roberta Gleason Europe Rainey Bentley New York Gardner North America Ohio State University Raynham Ramsey
"native plant gardens" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on WGN Radio

"To a crisp out there those ads for coppertone remember those with the dog pulling a little babies don't burn gonna coppertone tan do they still use that at oh no i don't think so seriously appropriate light of all the skin cancer reports that we have about a scientist thinking of pulling a baby's bathing suit off seems a little well that too right but no i will the the rumors of me performing at the beaches are greatly exaggerated may i continue let me stop you okay very good hotel workers are going to have some help today more from wgn's roger badesch panic buttons for hotel housekeeping staff who work alone are now being used city ordinance was passed protect more than fifteen thousand hospitality workers in the city most of them female panic button and alert to supervisors in a survey of workers two years ago nearly six and ten of them reported sexual harassment by guests roger badesch wgn news people in mexico were voting today in a national election that could put in power a man vowing to end politics and business as usual abc's jennifer eccleston reports from the foreign desk mexicans are heading to the polls against a backdrop of record levels of violence and corruption it's the country's biggest election with the presidency congress and thousands of state and municipal seats up for grabs it's also the first time that mexicans living abroad and cast a ballot and front running candidate andres manuel lopez oberdorf door is among the first to be a his polling place in mexico city today the leftleaning candidate holds a commanding lead in the polls voters who don't like him also lined up early thirty people were killed after an overcrowded bus went off a mountain road into a gorge in northern india today the rescue work is still being hampered by bad weather twenty bodies were recovered more than a dozen people were injured the commissioner of the city's animal care and control department is out after refusing to resign susan russell who served as director for the past two years was fired by mayor emanuel she says she received no explanation for the firing and the chicago river's getting closer to having a stretch of floating plants wetlands kayak peers and public walkways this part of the shed aquarium and environmental nonprofit urban rivers partnership they've gotten together to create native plant garden islands in the river they.

wgn harassment mexico congress mexico city india commissioner susan russell director mayor emanuel chicago river scientist roger badesch jennifer eccleston front running andres manuel lopez two years
"native plant gardens" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Create native plant garden islands in the river we'll check sports traffic and weather next on wgn sky and university of chicago medicine invite you to the chicago fit festival on sunday july eighth at soldier field helps set a guinness world record for the largest basketball clinic free basketballs and t shirts to the first four thousand to register visit the chicago sky website june eighteenth two thousand eighteen this is the allstate spot title feedback link thirty seconds state illinois market chicago at id ahd w zero zero eight six zero zero zero full mix the two pop with your team learning to drive or seasoned pro we can all use some feedback from time to time and with dr wise from allstate you'll have real time feedback plus driving tips sent right to your phone download the allstate app activate dr wise and get on the road to safer driving talk to a chicago area allstate agent today to find out a drive is can save you up to twenty percents on car insurance driveways insurance feature is optional savings based on driving behavior subject to terms conditions and availability smartphone required are you in good hands god kids having cards her kids donate your car one eight seven seven cars okay kid one eight seven seven cars kids donate your car today better go to kars for kids dot com pick up is quick and easy tax deduction seven seven cars.

chicago dr wise allstate wgn university of chicago medicine illinois thirty seconds
"native plant gardens" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"native plant gardens" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"And nine it will be uncomfortably hot and muggy early this morning under partly cloudy skies those showers or thunderstorms could pop up north and west of the city lows will be seventy six to eighty later breezy hot and humid under partly sunny skies with thunderstorms developing this afternoon and evening some of them could produce flooding downpours and damaging wind gusts high a ninety two and other muggy night tonight with lows seventy two seventy four not as hot tomorrow partly sunny and muggy with a high of eighty six and wednesday independence day partly sunny hot and humid afternoon thunderstorms and a high near ninety on the fourth of july it's eighty two now at o'hare an eighty one at midway and the lakefront we've got seventy seven in aurora with winds from the south of seven miles per hour wbz news time to twenty our top story this hour a heat wave will last all week long for the chicago area and other parts of the nation that have been sweltering for days now while more on this story coming up to thirty one three people have rescue a yorkie from a high locked lexus in the parking lot of a lincoln park cosco and friday afternoon oliver some ent o of belmont craig in and his wife maggie kaminsky tell blonde clubs chicago they saw the or keep panting in hiding on the floor of the lexus to get out of the sun in the parking lot of the cost north clyborn friday afternoon when temperatures were in the nineties the couple told the store manager amanda garden within five minutes she decided and all of them to complement his who arrived thirty minutes later police gave kaminsky and a guard permission is stick their arms into the window gaps to unlock the lexus from inside to get the dog out and then they poured water on them and put them in the air conditioned squad carp about forty five minutes after the incident began the dog owner came out of costco carrying to serie chickens and then thank the dog rescuers for being so thoughtful prompting kaminsky to angrily remarked quote well your dog was hot and you were trying to kill him no citations were issued a chicago police officer is gone viral in a good way officer jose sanchez was captured on video bursting out some dance moves had an antiviolence event on the city's went side he tells cbs to he broke out his signature move the devastating spin that's exactly what it is you know what let me go ahead and show a couple moves and that's what video has been viewed over four hundred thousand times chicago police are warning residents about three vehicle thefts reported this month or rather last month in the south commons in brownsville neighborhoods on that sound side vehicles all on the street when they were stolen later in the day on june seventh and the twenty six hundred block of south martin luther king and june twenty third in the twenty six hundred block of south while bash and june twentyseventh at eighty east twenty eighth street anyone that information on the theft should contact chicago police the chicago river will soon have his tragic floating plants wetlands kayak peers and public walkways the shed aquarium and environmental nonprofit urban rivers will create native plant gardens on the chicago river the tribune says the two hundred and sixty square foot island opening in july will include swamp rose mallow marsh marigold and dudley's rush the island will also include turtle logs of waterfowl box and an underwater camera to provide a view of the fish project leaders say will improve the canals water waterquality diversify the area and make it.

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