35 Burst results for "Native American Community"

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:01 min | 2 d ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The community? I'm one of the instructors at the grade school in the high school here. And we covered that a little bit, but we're not really concerned with that because a lot of that culture that spearfishing culture comes to your family. And in many cases, in many cultures, there's coming of age ceremonies. And so when a man or a lady gets to be a certain age, is the first kill the first year, their first rabbit. The first part is the first fish. They're all part of that coming of age ceremony. So when you get to things, you have a little ceremony in your elders and your community members, your relatives all come and they support you. And they'll give you stories, they'll give you knowledge, how to take care of that fiction. And so on and so forth, they'll give you maybe a spear or a gun or a bullet or whatever you know, a knife. And so it's really important to carry tradition towards and when you occupy your life with these traditional style of harvesting and living up the land, like again, I said food sovereignty comes all the way back. We take care of ourselves. We don't need to eat fish sticks. Then that's the best food for us in our children. And Greg, are we thinking of, what is the best way to prepare and eat sturgeon? Well, like Marvin said earlier, you know what we do is we're big on smoking fish in our community. We smoke white fish, musky, northern, even wildlife sometimes, but that surgeon. That stopped here, that's the best stuff. They said that you can smoke that. There's different ways different types of brines you can use. We also make one from maple sugar that we use. And it is phenomenal. So yeah. That's the other part of our two, and we always tease people to people from electrifying more other nations we tease non native culture because some people say, why would you guys eat a sturgeon or a musky, they taste fishy in really? Yes, that's what fish are supposed to. Like Chris. And if you don't know how to cook it, then if you don't, if you don't like it, you probably never cooked it right. So interesting, interesting. Well, Doug Cox, how about down in menominee country? How do you folks eat sturgeon? Yeah, I'm similar. We've had that past down just like they have, you know, it's passed down from some not only in physically learning how to cook it, but our stories in our legends and our ceremonies, the nominee of the ceremony every spring and that's been going on for thousands of years. It is called a sturgeon ceremony. Now we've sort of modernized it because of those dams, but in April, we have a huge gathering, a huge polo in a massive feast. We take some of those fish that are donated from DNR in an MOU. And we'll smoke those and we serve them at the feast and we invite everybody and anybody that wants to come and free come celebrate with us. There's a historic dance. Nominee have called fish dance in that dance as part of our own to the sturgeon on their return and it's been practiced again for thousands of years. It's a sacred dance. Part of our stories we prepare those sturgeons to get smoked and feeds hundreds of people, they get to taste how we prepare those sturgeon and it's a really important cultural event for us every year. Young little ones all the way up to our elders, participate in this event. Well, Doug earlier, we heard these stories of 7 foot long sturgeons weighing up to 300 pounds. Nowadays, what is the average sized sturgeon that you see? Yeah, you know, the average drop in some is a number of factors. It's climate. It's fishing pressure. At least in our populations that we're talking about, not like Winnebago, those ones that Greg talked about in those non natives that are spearing that resource down there. Do you know how does monitor it? But they're trying to balance it. The average fish isn't that big anymore. I mean, in fish standards, 50 inches probably you're talking about plenty average of a healthy sturgeon population. But again, there's those ones in there that are 6 and 7 feet long. I've seen them also. So they're in there, but on the average that they're not huge. In the lifespan, I mean, how many of them can live 70, 80, 90 years? Is that are those outliers or is that kind of the norm that they live that long? There's a portion of that population that are involved when it's just like there's a portion that are young ones so that balance is there, but those older ones, those 7 footers and again shown all at that dam and wolf river, the DNR does collect them every year. They collected one there that was 200 and 250 pounds. Over 70 long, that fish is estimated to be a 125, 130 years old. And when they collected that, I commented to the DNR folks in our meeting that's like, do you guys understand that this fish one when he was young? He was seen in this system without these dams. Think about that. This fish was swimming in the system without using them that are stopping him today and he comes back now at a 125 years old and getting experiences these blockages and not being able to come home anymore. So yeah, I mean that age they lived out long and there's an important message in every one of them. Well, unfortunately, we are going to have to wrap up our show now. We're out of time, but before we do, I want to thank our three guests today, Marvin defoe, Greg Johnson, and Douglas Cox for sharing native insights about the cultural significance of sturgeon, along with risks, facing sturgeon populations. Join us on native America calling again tomorrow as we cover what you should be thinking about as you prepare your income taxes. Until then, I'm Shawn spruce. As people seek to know diverse cultures, tribal museums and cultural centers grow more popular, so the institute of American Indian arts who support this show now provides a master of fine arts in cultural administration, focused on social equity and support of cultural community growth this program combines administrative tools and techniques with socially engaged leadership, blending institutional skills and community outreach programming. Deadline to apply is February 15th at dot EDU slash MFA CA. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and has offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodged dot org who support this show. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

Doug Cox Greg menominee Marvin Winnebago Marvin defoe Douglas Cox wolf river Chris Doug Shawn spruce DNR institute of American Indian a Greg Johnson swimming
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:55 min | 5 d ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I think there are very highly intelligent animal, highly aware of their surroundings and are going to do what it takes to protect their cups and their families. But we do see evidence of them losing that fight in we find a full skulls of full entire skeletons and vertebra and of younger cubs that didn't make it. Yeah, so. Okay. And Mary, you mentioned, you know, how healthy many polar bears are, how strong they are, but are you worried about changing climate conditions in the future polar bears? You know, what I see, I'm really blessed to say that I rarely see skinny polar bears. It's been many years since I've seen one. And I live really close to the beach, or on the beach of summer long, and if there's a polar bear and somebody posts on social media, we'll go see the distance and it's really been awesome to that's the first thing I look for when I see a polar bear. Is it healthy? Is it skinny? Has it been eating? Menthol is a relief to see big ones rarely ever do I see skinny ones and if I do it would probably be in the summer when they're swimming too far. When currents change in the ice goes in a different direction or dumps them somewhere. I've been really blessed to not see a lot of skinny polar bears. I see a lot of the commercials are promoting donate to this save the polar bears. We don't see those people around here saving polar bears. We don't really see a lot of skinny polar bears, but Allison is right. These bears are adapting. There is less ocean eyes. We see that during spring whaling and Hermann can talk about that too. But yeah, there's our adapting. Well, it's good news. Good to hear for sure. And we got to wrap up the show here in just a few moments. But Herman just a quick question about how far south do you do polar bear lived? Do you know that information? I don't know if they live there, but I've heard one being caught in which is about 70 miles inland. 70 million. Sometimes when they get lost. Okay. Well, folks, that is all the time we have for show day I want to thank our guests for what's been a really fascinating conversation about polar bears in New York. Join us next week for another lineup of discussions about indigenous issues and topics. Our executive producer is art Hughes. Our producers are Andy Murphy and soul traverso. Merino Spencer is the engineer. Show McFarland is the digital producer, Noah Dave's Moses, is the distribution director. Bob Peterson is the network manager for native voice one. Clifton Chadwick is our national underwriting sales director. Antonia Gonzalez is the anchor for national native news, Charles saver is our chief operations officer. The president and CEO of colonic broadcast corporation is Jacqueline seli. As if weekend, I'm Sean spruce. As people seek to know diverse cultures, tribal museums and cultural centers grow more popular, so the institute of American Indian arts who support this show now provides a master of fine arts in cultural administration, focused on social equity and support of cultural community growth this program combines administrative tools and techniques with socially engaged leadership, blending institutional skills and community outreach programming. Deadline to apply is February 15th at dot EDU slash MFA CA. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

Andy Murphy soul traverso Merino Spencer Noah Dave Clifton Chadwick cubs Antonia Gonzalez Charles saver colonic broadcast corporation Jacqueline seli Sean spruce Hermann institute of American Indian a Mary Bob Peterson Allison Herman swimming McFarland
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:36 min | Last week

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"All parties. Well, I don't think a person is going to take a contraceptive if they're not going to use it effectively. A failed contraceptive means that you took your contraceptive and you fell into that three, four, 5 percentile of ineffective contraceptives. And that happens with birth control pills that happens with all kinds of condoms. It's not just not taking it. The fact that there is no contraceptive that's a hundred percent effective. Other than to abstain, so that's really important to get across to people. Also, if you take a lot of times physicians don't tell you, you say you go in, you have strep throat and they give you an antibiotic. And you happen to be on the pill. They don't tell you a lot of times that you need to abstain or you need to use the condom. Until you're completed your antibiotics because that kills the effectiveness of the contraceptive. And so a lot of women do get pregnant and situations like that, mainly because they weren't important. By their physician. So there's a lot to know about contraceptives and we've turned to our healthcare providers to keep us informed. So it's important that they do their job as well too. We'll share, we're going to have to wrap up the show here in about another minute, but I do want to give you the last word and early you talked about the challenges facing women in South Dakota seeking an abortion. So could you share any services that are available for covering costs and the transportation, some of those things that you mentioned, we do have to wrap up and about 30 seconds or so though. Yes, you can call the Native American community board at 6 O 5 four 8 7 7 O 7 two and ask to speak to Sharon. That's me. Or Elizabeth? And we can help you with referrals, raising the resources necessary. Just give us a call. You can call Planned Parenthood in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, or Rapid City, South Dakota. And also ask them for referrals, and we're sorry we're going to have to wrap up the show really appreciate all of our guests today and what's been a really enlightening conversation on the topic of family planning. Join us tomorrow for the menu. Our regular program about native food and food sovereignty. I'm Sean spruce. We'll talk again soon. Looking for opportunities to expand improve and share your artistic talents, the Crazy Horse Memorial has programs for indigenous artists, culture bearers, and educators of North America, including funding and artist residency, a speaker series performance opportunities and more. The Crazy Horse Memorial foundation mission is to protect and preserve the cultures, traditions and living heritages of North American Indians. Application deadline is January 31st at Crazy Horse Memorial dot org who support this show. This month and every month remember one in three Native American adults have high blood pressure. Check it at your nearest community health center. If the numbers are above one 20 over 80, talk to a healthcare professional. Native community well-being is very important. You can take action by visiting heart dot org slash HBP control. This support provided in partnership with HHS slash OMA and HRS a under cooperative agreement CPI MP 21 1227 and CPI MP 21 1228. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native Boyce one, the Native American radio network

South Dakota Native American community boar Crazy Horse Memorial Sean spruce Crazy Horse Memorial foundatio Rapid City Sioux Falls Sharon Elizabeth North America annenberg national native voic chronic broadcast corporation HHS Native America Albuquerque New Mexico public radio satellite service Brent Michael Davis Boyce
"native american community" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:26 min | 2 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Cloudy tomorrow that rain will taper off to a couple of showers ending in the afternoon. A bit colder though, high tomorrow of 46° temperatures will then fall into the 30s. Right now under clear skies, it's 36° at O'Hare 35 at midway, 32 in romeoville and 38 at the lakefront, headed to a high of 56°. It's 6 ten. 6 11, as the start of the holiday shopping season gets underway, Illinois Secretary of State police are reminding people to be respectful of disability parking spots at shopping centers. Illinois Secretary of State police are stationed at various malls throughout Chicago this holiday season to make sure people aren't illegally parking in spots reserved for disabled people, investigator with Secretary of State police, lend forco says this issue goes back several years. We've come to understand that there are going to be individuals who they just have less of an opinion for their fellow man and want to take advantage of the opportunity, whether they are using a relatives placard or deceased person's placard or just parking in a disability parking space with no player at all. He says investigators have a number of ways they're enforcing these parking spots. It's a matter of investigators going out and doing random checks throughout the Chicago land area and speaking to people. It's not just a matter of driving past and see if there is a current valid. He reminds drivers that they could face up to a $1000 in fines for illegally parking and disability parking spots. One O 5 9 wbm a passenger at O'Hare airport didn't make his flight yesterday morning, but he did leave the airport in police custody. Chicago police say the man made a joke during check in with a sky cap a trauma to one that he had a bomb in his bag. The bomb squad was called out, no explosives were found. The man was arrested, charges are pending. Heath Johnson one O 5 9 WWE. State police continue to investigate a multi vehicle crash on the Kennedy expressway that left one person dead Thanksgiving night. It happened around 1130 when a wrong way driver collided with several cars before rolling over and catching fire near Ashland avenue. One person was taken to the hospital and pronounced dead a total of 7 cars were involved in that wreck. A fire broke out yesterday at an abandoned furniture store in the back of the yards neighborhood, the Chicago fire department says it was started by a homeless person making a heat fire in the rear of the building. That person is cooperating with fire and police officials, the property was an aaronson furniture store, but has been abandoned for about two years. A calumet city man is facing charges in connection to a deadly shooting at a forest preserve this week. Andy Dane reports. 19 year old Jalen Lewis is charged with first degree murder following the Tuesday afternoon incident at the green Lake Woods forest preserve. County authorities say officers were responding to reports of shots fired when they spotted Louis attempting to leave the scene in his car and in the process tossing a firearm out of the vehicle. A weapon was later determined to be a ghost gun and several bags of marijuana were also found in Louis's car, investigators say a 64 year old Lansing man was found shocked to death in the forest preserve, his name has not yet been released, as the story from calumet city. Sunshine and mild temperatures today but a chance for rain may be even some snowflakes in the near future, details in the complete AccuWeather 5 day forecast are next to its 6 14. Odyssey celebrates Native American heritage books by honoring Native American communities. The West Coast is home to distinct tribes based on the land's resources and

State police forco Chicago Illinois O'Hare airport romeoville Heath Johnson lakefront aaronson furniture store Andy Dane Jalen Lewis calumet city Chicago fire department green Lake Woods forest Louis Lansing West Coast
"native american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:28 min | 3 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is a Bloomberg business flash. Thank you so much, Charlie palette. Appreciate that update. Well, remember this study that was all over the news earlier in the week about how kids who played three hours or more video games a day performed better on tests of memory and impulse control than those who did not play games. This was a study that was released on money. It's some food for thought and I feel like Tim was this studied by kids who played video games. Is that who did this study? That's very funny. Seems like it. I just think about all the things that are coming at kids right now. And you know, things that, okay, maybe that's some upside, but there's a lot of things that have been tough when it comes to their mental health, especially coming off the pandemic. Yeah, and we go to doctor Tamar mendelson, director of the center for adolescent health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health. Doctor mendelson joins us on the phone from Baltimore this afternoon. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health that is supported by Michael R Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg philanthropies. Doctor mendelson, we wanted to talk to you because you're an expert when it comes to adolescent mental health when it comes to child mental health as well. And coming off the pandemic and just seeing the way that kids mental health was affected, given that here we are, you know, still more than three years in and COVID hasn't gone away. What are the right things for us to be focused on and keeping an eye on to make sure that we can actually undo some of the damage done over the last few years? Absolutely. Well, first, thanks for having me on. And I feel like I always want to stress that youth mental health issues were a public health problem even before COVID. And I think it's important for us to know that because the pandemic really shown a spotlight on these mental health issues and certainly they have been made worse during the pandemic. So I think this is a wake-up call for us to really think about how can we build in more support for young people throughout their development so that we can really help promote wellness. And schools are one important place to do that. So states are starting to pass new policies to better support young people's mental health and this includes being able to include mental health days where students can be absent from school for a few days without penalty for mental health reasons. Funds to cover psychologists and other mental health professionals on site in schools and also training teachers, how to recognize trauma and how to respond in an effective way when they see youth trauma in the classroom. So I do wonder, though, as you talk about this, schools are struggling just to make sure kids have all the necessary equipment that they need. Not all schools are created equal. And I feel like we continue to load so much on schools to take care of a lot when it comes to our younger generation. Doesn't that worry you a little bit about the inequities as a result and kids who maybe need some help when it comes to mental health in lower economic areas and that they might not get that. So you're making such great points. So first, I really want to underscore what you said about inequities. The pandemic really worsened preexisting inequities. And so what we've seen is that children growing up in low income communities under resourced communities were hit particularly hard by the pandemic and tend to experience more sort of trauma and stress. And this is especially true for black and Native American communities, so I think we need to make sure that we are funneling resources toward young people who need them most. And then, you know, the point about schools, schools do have a lot of there's a lot to take care of, right? And they need to really make sure that students academics are supported and all of those things, but schools are where our young people spend most of their time. And so I think it's really key that we build these mental health and emotional supports into the way that we educate young people. In this can be done without sacrificing academic rigor or education. So there are many sort of prevention programs and mental health promotion programs restorative justice programs that can really be embedded within schools to create a more supportive culture. And what we know from research is that school connectedness and feeling like you belong at school and you know you're supported and valued, that is actually a really strong protective factor for young people's mental health. I totally agree, right? The payoff you think about it, right, Tim? Yeah. Thank you sure that. Yeah, doctor Tamar mendelsohn really appreciate you taking the time and joining us this afternoon. Doctor mendelsohn is director of the center for adolescent health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health joining us this afternoon from Baltimore. Doctor mendelssohn, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health I should note, it is supported by Michael Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg LP, and Bloomberg philanthropies. To play video games, a lot as a kid. You know what's funny? I actually watched, I was never good at video games. I was talking to a colleague about this today who plays games. I like to watch my friends play games, which is kind of funny because tournaments where people nowadays there is, like, Twitch is huge, eSports leagues are huge. Right. So Carol, I was on to something. What was the game? I was watching. GoldenEye. Ari knows what I'm talking about. I'm like a Pong. Yeah. Go back. It's scary. All right, let's get back to world of national news

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school center for adolescent health Charlie palette Bloomberg LP Bloomberg philanthropies Tamar mendelson mendelson joins Michael R Bloomberg Doctor mendelson Bloomberg Tim Baltimore Tamar mendelsohn trauma Doctor mendelssohn mendelsohn Michael Bloomberg Carol Ari
"native american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:59 min | 3 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Going, not where it's been. Where's the puck going in America? Young, female, diverse tech savvy purpose ribbit. That's our focus. As I've often said, we're going to super serve our fan base, but there's these fans in waiting we want to attract. And so we're intentional in terms of our outreach. We're authentic in that. It's not something we're doing episodically. It's not about Hispanic heritage month or gender equality month. This is core to the business plan, super serve the fan base, but go after these fans and waiting. And how do you do it? You go and meet folks where they're at. And sometimes it's not even about hockey. It's not even about sports. It could be about merchandise. It could be about content. It could be about the efforts you're doing to support diverse owned businesses in the community. And so all of these efforts are all combined around that effort to really tap into engage and have people feel that they're a part of who we are as a brand. You've mentioned a couple of things. We are very proud of the fact that Gila river resorts and casino is our Jersey sponsor. Not only have they been a longtime partner, they were actually the naming rights of their previous home. But they actually are now spending more with us because they see the vision that we have to embrace these diverse communities. They're spending more as your Jersey sponsor than they were before. Yes, they were. Yes, they are rather. Not only that, we were very proud to have a Native American community now be there on a sweater of a professional sports team. The first ever in the league. And for us, that's manifestation of the impact that sports can have. Up next on the show, we continue our conversation with Javier Guterres president and CEO of the Arizona coyotes. That is straight ahead on the Bloomberg business of sports I'm Michael Barr. You can follow me on Twitter at biggar sports. And I'm on Twitter at Scarlett film. Man, you can follow me at D sas hour. Don't forget to catch our podcast that's Monday's Wednesdays and Thursdays on all your podcast platforms. And right here on Bloomberg business of sports, Bloomberg radio

Gila river Jersey America hockey Javier Guterres Arizona coyotes Michael Barr Twitter Scarlett Bloomberg Bloomberg radio
"native american community" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:00 min | 4 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Suggest Johnson has gained ground in recent weeks. It's impossible to know how much these attacks caused that shift. Regardless, Barnes is on the counter offensive. He started a campaign push this week called Ron against row to maintain the focus on abortion. Danielle Kurtz laven and PR news. Our time now is four 44 and you're listening to all things considered on 90.1 W ABE. Good afternoon. I'm Jim burris. Early voting for the midterm starts in just a couple of weeks. In the latest episode of our podcast, Georgia votes 2022. We look at what officials are doing to get ready. Here's Susanna capelluto, Sam greenglass, Emma hertz, and Raoul valley. So we had a state elections board meeting this week and it featured a person from dominion voting systems. That's the company Georgia uses for its voting machines, and it's also the company mentioned by a lot of conspiracy theorists. Now, why was dominion at this meeting and what did they do? So we saw something a little different at this meeting of the state election board. Rather than talking about a lot of new business, what they did was they brought in experts, including the head of dominion voting systems, to basically explain how voting machines work, how ballot scanners work, because a lot of the people who show up to these meetings, some of them are conspiracy theorists who have raised a lot of false claims about how these voting machines work. And so the idea behind bringing experts in is to try and bat back some of those conspiracy theories to explain how do the machines tabulate votes. How does the backup work? To convince people that they are safe and secure. But at the same time, we heard from some activists who were kind of like, this might be too little too late because a lot of people who believe these conspiracy theories around how elections were ran in 2020 and beyond. They're really dug in on those ideas at this point. And even bringing in the experts who can explain how these processes work, it might be too late to change their minds and we might be stuck with some of these conspiracy theories for the foreseeable future. And I just think the big picture here is that we are seeing Georgia election officials in the state election board and the Secretary of State's office that spent a whole day basically with media answering also a lot of kind of basic questions about election security trying to get ahead of this. 2020 was a disaster of disinformation for them and they're trying to lay the groundwork this time ahead of time. Now some other things have popped up on the campaign trail this week, the braves name was back in the news, and then we also had transgender sports, it was raised again by the walker campaign. Why are candidates bringing up these wedge issues? Is it to jinnah base voters or is it to convince the 50 50 voters? Look, for as long as I can remember, back to the late 80s and into the early 90s, there's always been some level of controversy over the braves name, whether it's offensive and insulting to the Native American community. Republicans pounced, you know, specifically Herschel Walker's campaign saying, Warnock won't back the braves, silent on brave's name change. Even said Warnock is a New York mets fan. Warnock responded, with a very similar answer which you heard from The White House at the braves organization, is having conversations with the Native American community. In the end, does this change minds? No. In the end, it probably just reinforces opinions that people already had on all of the sides. And another sports issue that we saw pretty prominently on the campaign trail day isn't new. We've talked about it before. This issue of whether transgender children should be allowed to play on sports teams in schools that match their gender identities. And Herschel Walker had a whole lineup of events focused entirely on this issue. It appears the walker campaign as other Republicans have made the calculation that it's an issue that is broadly popular and we do have polling that shows that transgender community believes this is because an issue of people not being educated and aware, but the fact of the matter is Republicans have leaned in on this, but walker in particular during this general election, whereas Kemp, while he still discusses it on the campaign trail, he is not talking about it as much as he did during the primary. Look, I have talked to Republicans who were absolutely convinced that on this issue, they can move independent voters. In the past, they have told me there are parents across the political spectrum who have kids in sports and they believe that the fairness argument works. Bottom line though, there are no examples of trans kids causing issues in middle and high school sports teams in Georgia. And one of the things we really should note really important, noting

Danielle Kurtz laven Jim burris Susanna capelluto Sam greenglass Emma hertz Raoul valley Georgia braves Warnock Barnes Herschel Walker Ron Johnson Native American community walker jinnah mets White House New York
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:56 min | 5 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"As well. Okay. So it sounds like that having that local input is really, really critical in the success of this 9 8 8 lifeline program. We've got time for one more call. We have Robert listening on KU and M and Santa Fe New Mexico. And Robert, if you could keep it fairly brief, we've got about a minute before we kind of start looking to wine things up, but thank you so much for calling us, Robert. Okay. My daughter produced a movie to save a life, okay. It takes place in high school and every teenager should see this movie. She got hundreds upon hundreds of calls from teenagers. Letting her know after seeing your movie, I do not want to commit suicide anymore. It's a powerful movie and yes I even related to it, I'm what 89 years old and I saw a lot of what I experienced in high school, yes. It's a part of the movie to save a life. Teenager. Be it. Robert, thank you for calling in and sharing that information about this movie. I think every little bit helps in this ongoing fight against suicide and some of these other mental health tragedies that unfortunately are so prevalent in so many of our native communities. Let's go back to ray now and ray, I want to ask you more of this. So this is a national lifeline 9 8 8. So can any person access it from anywhere in the U.S.? Yes, sir. Certainly can, as I heard in the earlier, it is a call in text and chat feature. So if I wanted to text 9 8 8 and have a chat discussion with somebody that can happen. And anyone who's in this country can do that regarding the gentleman's call earlier, we have a Facebook page, 9, 8, 8, and Chrysler support. And we are working hard on getting the kind of support information that the gentleman talked about. I would encourage anyone who has information that you'd like to share, go to the Facebook page and send us a message that we can include in our resource. Resource page for people to access I think it's available that we do support each other that way. But yeah, I think that a question is pertinent and really helpful. Thank you. And ray, we got just a few more moments here before I get out of wrap up. But the lifeline, it launched July 16th, so about a month and a half ago. So far, it's a look promising or a lot of folks using the lifeline. Collins are picking up and I've been really pleased that the state of New Mexico has made resources available to native tribes in New Mexico. We have billboards across different parts of the state of New Mexico, designed by Native American graphic artists, we have yard signs, signs that are larger like four by three that are being put up by native organizations organizations, for example, across the state of the Mexico to give put out the information we have probably disseminated given out then native communities across the state of Mexico all 21 tribes postcards covering over 8000 postcards have been given up individuals and families of the state. Right now you Mexico there the multicultural really I'm sorry ray, we are going to have to go ahead and wrap up the show. That's all the time we have, but I want to thank doctor Mark standing eagle bays, Cheyenne kipping burger and radar for a thoughtful discussion on suicide prevention and native America. Please join us on native America calling again tomorrow when we talk about the lack of adequate drinking water, infrastructure, and efforts to address that. Until then, I'm Sean spruce, thanks for listening. My name is Assad. When I was 19, my mom was diagnosed with colorectal cancer because she smoked. My tip is find things to be thankful for. I'm thankful she quit smoking. I'm thankful for the nurses who taught me how to check her IV and to manage your medication. And I'm thankful for every day we have together because nothing is guaranteed, especially for us. The people you love are worth quitting for. You can quit for free help call one 800 quit now, a message from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Program support by amerind. For 35 years, Indian country has put its trust in amaranth, providing insurance coverage, strengthening Native American communities, protecting tribal sovereignty and keeping dollars in Indian country are Amarin's priorities. More information on property, liability, workers compensation, and commercial auto needs at amerind dot com. That's AME R IND dot com. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

Robert New Mexico ray Mexico Facebook U.S. eagle bays Santa Sean spruce Chrysler Collins Centers for Disease Control an Cheyenne Assad colorectal cancer Amarin Mark amaranth annenberg national native voic chronic broadcast corporation
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:29 min | 5 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Don't run a time, but we're not partisan. And it's for good reason. I'll point out the fact that in Alaska, senator Murkowski was a write in in one. And that was because of the native vote. And so, you know, I keep repeating over and over that the native vote is so powerful. All you have to do is show up. We don't need bulls and arrows right now. We just need you to get a pen our pencil and check that box. Okay, trade that bow and arrow for a pen and a pencil that's OJ Simon senior speaking with us from up in South Dakota. And folks, we have now reached the end of our hour. I'd like to thank our guests, Megan condon, OJ seaman senior, and Nicole donaghy for an illuminating conversation on voter access in Alaska, and the rest of the country. Join us tomorrow as we look at art therapy as a means to relieve mental health trauma. I'm Sean spruce. Thank you for listening to the one the only Native American calling. Support for this program provided by the American Indian higher education consortium. The collective spirit and unifying voice of 37 tribal colleges and universities for over 45 years, ahec has worked to ensure that tribal sovereignty is recognized and respected and that tribal colleges and universities are included in this nation's higher education system. Information on a tribal college or university near you at AI, dot org. Program support by amerind for 35 years, Indian country has put its trust in amaranth, providing insurance coverage, strengthening Native American communities, protecting tribal sovereignty and keeping dollars in Indian country are Amarin's priorities. More information on property, liability, workers compensation, and commercial auto needs at amerind dot com. That's a MER IND dot com. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by quantic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

senator Murkowski OJ Simon Megan condon OJ seaman Nicole donaghy Sean spruce Alaska American Indian higher educati amerind South Dakota ahec Amarin amaranth annenberg national native voic quantic broadcast corporation Native America Albuquerque New Mexico public radio satellite service Brent Michael Davis
Pope set for historic apology for school abuses in Canada

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 7 months ago

Pope set for historic apology for school abuses in Canada

"Pope Francis is set to apologize to indigenous groups in Alberta Francis has begun a historic visit to apologize to indigenous peoples for abuses by missionaries at residential schools a key step in the Catholic Church's efforts to reconcile with native communities and help them heal From generations of trauma thousands of indigenous persons are expected to converge on a small Alberta Prairie community to hear a long awaited apology when Pope Francis For generations of abuse and cultural oppression at Catholic residential schools across Canada I'm Charles De Ledesma

Pope Francis Alberta Francis Alberta Prairie Catholic Church Charles De Ledesma Canada
Pope seeks prayers for his 'penitential' Canadian pilgrimage

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 7 months ago

Pope seeks prayers for his 'penitential' Canadian pilgrimage

"Pope Francis has asked his audience for prayers to join him on his pilgrimage to Canada to apologize for Catholic Church abuses on indigenous groups Dear brothers and sisters of Canada as you know I will come among you above all in the name of Jesus to meet and embrace the indigenous populations The Pope spoke from a studio window of the palace facing the square the pontiff went on to admit Catholic abuses on Canadian indigenous populations Unfortunately in Canada many Christians including some members of religious institutions contributed to the policies of cultural assimilation that in the past gravely damaged in various ways the native communities More than a 150,000 native children in Canada were forced to attend church run schools in order to separate them from their homes and culture in these schools physical and sexual abuse were rife Canadian native rights groups called for the Pope to apologize on Canadian soil for the abuses I am Karen Chammas

Pope Francis Canada Catholic Church Karen Chammas
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:06 min | 9 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Has left a lot of scars in us that aren't pretty. And, you know, a lot of people in this industry, they talk about how businesses just business. And to me, it's not. No business is personal. Just because I want to be able to give back and, you know, I want to be able to help the best I can. Gary, where can a person go to find a financial representative? Do you recommend people look online or maybe ask for a personal reference? What's the best way for somebody listening on the show to say, wow, this sounds really interesting. Maybe I could maybe I have a need for a financial representative. Where do they go? What's the first step? I mean, a quick Google search can take you to a whole list of places, I like referrals, but wherever you go, you want to be able to make sure you're asking them the right questions. Just because sometimes it's industry can get a little monkey and you know you want to be able to understand how your relationship with that financial adviser wealth management person is going to work. So a good way to do that is just ask, ask questions, ask them, you know, so what it is that you really do, you know, how are you getting paid? How is my money being handled? And then maybe if you really want to, you can go ahead and look up there. There's certifications and their licenses and I just think that's really important. And then you know, I just want to share it. So there is actually a website online the financial industry regulatory authority finra. They have on their website something called broker check and it's a tool that folks can use to go and research and check on a financial representative to make sure that they haven't had any infractions or anything like that. So I just want to go ahead and make sure that that's clear. And unfortunately, we are just about out of time, so I want to thank our guests, Christie, Sharon small, and Gary Garvin for bringing us up to speed on access to financial services, in native communities. Lots to learn, but we've had some great guests who are definitely able to provide some really, really up to date, timely information. Join us again tomorrow, as we take a look at a collaboration between a tribal youth group and the National Park Service to create a network of community trails. Until then, I'm Sean spruce. Thank you for listening. Program support by amaranth. For 35 years, Indian country has put its trust in amerind, providing insurance coverage, strengthening Native American communities, protecting tribal sovereignty and keeping dollars in Indian country are Amarin's priorities. More information on property. Liability, workers compensation, and commercial auto needs at amerind dot com. That's a MER IND dot com. First baby, don't know where to start. CMS program coverage prenatal service in Rome today contact your local Indian healthcare provider for more information. Visit healthcare dot gov or call one 800. Three one 8 two 5 9 6. A message from center for Medicare and Medicaid service. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network.

Sharon small Gary Garvin Gary Sean spruce amerind Amarin Google Christie National Park Service amaranth center for Medicare and Medica annenberg national native voic chronic broadcast corporation Native America Rome Albuquerque New Mexico public radio satellite service Brent Michael Davis
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:58 min | 11 months ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"And until then I'm Sean spruce. Thank you for listening. Are you a Native American healthcare provider? Recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members, registration deadline is February 21st, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show..

"native american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"native american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To conceptualize both the opportunity fund in the Latin America fund SoftBank is known primarily for this mothership fund called the vision fund but there's a whole other group of SoftBank called SoftBank group international that looks for pockets that are underexplored And so Latin America the opportunity fund Miami are all part of a general idea that there are these pockets of activity where great founders exist and no capital exists or not enough capital exists So there is definite connection between all those initiatives Latin America we came into an early 2019 that was hardly any growth capital there The capital in the region was to the tune of one to 2 billion a year that last year is probably going to be about 15 billion invested in Latin America in the year and a flood of capital from foreign investors who really haven't been there before The opportunities are much broader in Latin America than we presumed at first Coming in we thought it would be the usual ecommerce FinTech type of opportunities It's been incredibly broad and deep across types of markets and industries there's software companies in Brazil that are giving the American ones a run for their money V tax went public on the NASDAQ or the New York Stock Exchange I believe actually and is a Brazilian ecommerce enablement company a software company So you're seeing a lot more real high quality globally competitive entrepreneurship coming from these markets which are often much more difficult to do businesses And so the founders who build there are really battle tested for the world Now I spoke with Marcelo Clara SoftBank COO and the CEO of SoftBank international almost exactly a year ago today about what the priorities were then Take a listen to what he had to say We're going to continue to invest in companies that utilize data and artificial intelligence to disrupt traditional business models We like companies that are making the way we work the way we live the way we play making the world a better place And I believe he did that interview In fact from Miami Stacey I'm curious That was at a time We didn't think the pandemic was gonna go on this long And I'm curious how the strategy or philosophy has changed given that we're still in this Yeah it hasn't changed What Marcelo said is the same as it was a year ago We just talked about how we just entered a new year about feels a lot like the same We are still interested in investing in companies that are used in data that are going to change the world We have made a number of investments one recent one in welcome tech which is an amazing company that has focused on helping immigrant populations better connect with financial services We also invest was in practice last which is helping to use mixed reality to team areas around diversity and inclusion These are all topics that were true a year ago and they're absolutely true today So we continue to look for great founders who are black LatinX and Native American One thing I will mention is that we've not yet invested in a Native American founders So one thing that has changed is that we spent the last year meeting with 30 over 30 different people from the native community to really understand how do we really invest in that community and find entrepreneurs who are building great companies And so what we learn from that is that we've got to take a different approach to investing in the Native American community So we'll be looking at some partnerships this year We maybe reinventing a little bit around our investment model and maybe even considering some pre seed investments which is not something that we've done in the past So we're excited to bring some founders in from that community into our portfolio in 2022 Now there's never been any shortage of headlines about SoftBank especially since masa announced he really wanted to double down on investing in technology There has been turnover in the partnership and also there have even been reports about Marcelo potentially leaving What are you saying to founders about whether or not they're going to have the stability and the resources they need to be successful and whether the relationships they're developing with folks at the fund will last Well obviously it's not wise for me to comment on private negotiations happening between my bosses So I'm not going to do that But as far as Latin America goes we've built a team that is dedicated to the region and it's very unique So we have people living in Brazil in Mexico and Miami all focus on Latin America We have both an investing team and an operating team The operating team has focused on helping the companies once we invest in them to be better to achieve specific goals a real operating muscle that we add to the capital muscle None of that's going to change and SoftBank's capital position is strong SoftBank continues to invest around the world and Latin America is representing a larger and larger component of that not just for us but for all capital allocators We've seen every brand name investor in tech come into Latin America in 2020 and 2021 That's going to continue So the region is as exciting as ever on its own merit What we did in 2019 was JumpStart our own efforts there but I think those efforts can stand alone now for the foreseeable future Now Stacey talking about the opportunity fun specifically how will you measure success We measure success just like many other venture funds We are in this to invest and generate venture life returns just like every other venture fun outfit So success for us is dewy generate returns Success for us is also the value that we create in the communities that are founders come from We have a value creation team that is dedicated to working directly with all of the founders in our portfolio to not just give them capital and validate their business model but to really create a community so that they can support each other Ultimately we want to change the base of wealth creation in our society I can tell you now that more than half of our companies that we've invested in have raised follow on rounds many of which do we participate in So another measure of success is how successful our founders are in scaling and growing their business and the validation that they receive from the broader investment community in their ideas and we're very happy to see that continue Now we can escape NFTs or the cryptoverse.

SoftBank Latin America Marcelo Clara SoftBank international Miami Marcelo New York Stock Exchange Brazil Stacey masa Mexico
"native american community" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"native american community" Discussed on WTOP

"Along the top edge of the lead box about the size of a toaster So basically we don't want the whole lid to just fall in let us heavy and we don't know exactly what we're dealing with Then with governor Ralph northam joining the procedure the lid was lifted off revealing a book We think so Oh you can see it 40 books including an 1875 almanac a cloth envelope still to be opened and a coin were found inside The contents are water damaged but experts began the work of preserving them A manassas man is facing charges after he was arrested by transportation security administration officers at Dallas airport The TSA says he tried to carry a 9 millimeter handgun loaded with 15 bullets through a checkpoint and onto a flight the day before yesterday On top of the criminal charges he also faces a civil penalty that can run into thousands of dollars The pandemic has taken an especially heavy toll on Native American communities which were already dealing with trauma and poverty long before the pandemic started During the pandemic drug overdoses surged by nearly 30% surpassing 100,000 dead for the first time in U.S. history Mike mastin is the police chief and bemidji Minnesota Our numbers for overdoses are disproportionately high for Native Americans The overdose death rate around the country is now highest among Native Americans He gave up He was feeling really hopeless Kyle DOM Reese's mother Rachel Taylor found him face down in bed He was 24 The toxicology report listed a fatal combination of alprazolam which is the drug in xanax and fentanyl Taylor says coronavirus isn't the only pandemic Wasn't nothing compared to the pandemic of all the drugs that fentanyl and opioids that have taken over all over Installed in Congress that would boost healthcare spending for Native Americans I'm Ed Donahue Next in money news And historic D.C. hotel may meet the wrecking ball I'm Jeff labeled 5 24.

governor Ralph northam Dallas airport transportation security admini Mike mastin manassas TSA Kyle DOM Reese Rachel Taylor bemidji trauma Minnesota U.S. Taylor Ed Donahue Congress D.C. Jeff
"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Support by amer indian countries. One hundred percent tribally-owned insurance partner amer into works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthened native american communities protect tribal sovereignty and help keep dollars in indian country more information on property liability workers compensation and commercial auto solutions at amazon dot com. That's a m. e. r. i. n. d. dot com. Smoking gave me. Copd which makes it harder and harder for me to breathe. I have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live talking with your grandchildren explained to him that your ground personnel can be around anymore to share his and his love. I am figured out how to do that yet. I'm.

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"native american community" Discussed on Native America Calling

"America calling support by amarin indian countries one hundred percent tribally-owned insurance partner amarin works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthened native american communities protect tribal sovereignty and help keep dollars in indian country more information on property liability workers compensation and commercial auto solutions at amazon dot com. That's a. m. e. r. i. n. d. dot com..

Devin Buffalo: Inspiring Indigenous Youth

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Devin Buffalo: Inspiring Indigenous Youth

"Today our guest is devon. Buffalo devon is a member of the samson cree nation born in wetaskiwin alberta. He's a goaltender. He's a motivational speaker. And he's someone who's worked with first nations youth has drawn praise from all corners. Devon buffalo joins us now devon. Thanks so much for doing this. How are you today. i'm doing great. I'm really excited to do this interview. So thank you for having. Let's see how you feel about twenty five minutes. I think twenty-five might be too long. Let's see how you feel after cozy five. We have a lot. We want to get into here with you. And we're going to try to get in as much as we can. Because you have a spectacular story and you're really distinguished person not just goaltender but i want to start by talking about goaltending because the choice to become a goaltender. I think is different for everybody. Some they see goaltender. Make a big save on television. Wrote a game and they say. I wanna do that for others. it's well. I had three older brothers and they all played and they needed a kid to stand in net and an act as a target. What was it for you devon. Why'd you become a goaltender parlay the second one. I had five older brothers but the opposite four of them were goalies. We had one demand in family. Yeah my I hated goalie when you're young and you don't have the pads and you go in the net with the goalie stick and faded i. I wanted to score goals and after bet. My dad came home with some pads. He's like you're try these out. And we had a native provincials. It's called big alberta tournament native communities i was pre novice and you know he strapped the pads on me. I said i'll try to and went out there. And i hate it like i hated asian i remember letting in goals in crocker's everyone getting mad at me you know and we were pretty nagas these gizzard rapid parks agai sucked. I wasn't wasn't a good experience. And i went right back into a player and our goalie moved or something so we had no goalie Games as all right. Like i have stuff. I guess i'll go. ned. And i never looked back. Got four brothers who played goalie. Yeah in one season. So i think some might have played. A few seasons only retired early but we had all five of us. I guess goalies yet.

Wetaskiwin Devon Buffalo Alberta Devon Buffalo Crocker NED
"native american community" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"native american community" Discussed on Skimm This

"Welcome to skim this fun fact. Twenty twenty one is halfway over but while the last six months were probably better than the first six months of twenty twenty things are far from perfect. Parts of the us have been baking under extreme heat. A high rise fell down despite multiple safety warnings. A cova variant is wreaking havoc around the world and even the job market is wacky. It's a lot but we promise we're here to make you smarter and the news less overwhelming. I'm alex car. Let's skim this before we get into this week's top story. We just want to note. This story mentioned sexual assault which could be triggering to some listeners. On wednesday bill cosby was released from prison in two thousand eighteen. He was found guilty of aggravated indecent assault. For drugging and sexually assaulting andrea constand. He was supposed to serve a three to ten year sentence but yesterday after only two years the pennsylvania state supreme court ordered cosby to be released to get some context on what happened and why the sudden release was surprising to a lot of people. We phoned up. Fatina goss graves. She's the president and ceo of the national women's law center and one of the co founders of the times up legal defense fund. Starting off i would love to just ask you to break down. Why bill cosby was released from prison. Well the first thing. I should say it was a highly unusual opinion. Mckee amount of the pennsylvania supreme court and so in some ways i wonder if this opinion will end up applying to bill cosby and only bill cosby going forward but the court basically said was that the prosecutor in the case had made the sort of promises to bill cosby that led him to believe he could never be prosecuted then subsequently prosecuting him and using information that had been revealed in a civil case that that violated his due process rights under the constitution. You know sometimes prosecutors will come up with an agreement that says i won't prosecute you on this issue. So people understand that there is no written recruitment but there was a press release and the prosecutor main suggestions. That bill cosby probably wouldn't be prosecuted. I have to say it is odd to suggest that those sorts of loose and non-enforceable promises by bill cosby from being prosecuted around this specific case. But that's basically what the court said. Yeah frankly that was the part that confuse me the most yesterday. It almost feels like a pinky promise. And i didn't know that that was a legal version of a pinky promise. It is illegal version of the premise. Unusually pinky promises. Don't get you very much in the criminal justice system. So that's why. I feel like it's a bill. Craftspeople bad is applying here. I don't think we're going to see an expansion of the pinky promise school. You've mentioned that this feels like it's the bill cosby when you think about the broader impact of what happened yesterday on other sexual assault cases. What comes mind. The thing that is weighing on me is whether survivors will see this very high profile case and think why would i ever do it. I would i ever tell my story. Why would i ever count on a system. That doesn't really serve me. Well and and the truth is they're not wrong to believe our systems don't serve survivors while 'cause they don't ray so i have deep deep worries about the message. The public message that has being sent. I have worries about the cultural conversation. I saw you know celebrities on twitter celebrating. Bill cosby's released it is just so gross in the face of the sixty people who have very similar allegations i think a lot of people associate bill cosby specifically his conviction as a major milestone for what is kind of broadly known as the me too movement. In your mind when you think about the cultural message like what is your deep fear as it relates to broader justice for survivors. You know the me too movement has ever been about one powerful or even a handful of powerful individuals seeing accountability. It has been about survivors. Supporting survivors mean. That is the thrust if makes you that very act of saying me to sort of been circles. People let them know that if it can be okay and that collectively we can drive change and so what i did see yesterday what i hope to see in the coming days if survivors sir rounding the cosby survivors. Saying we are here freeview. We're fighting for something different. And that's the hope and promise in too. It's why i do this. Work is well on super focused on what it is. We can do going forward so that the next generation the next generation is very different experiences. all right. Let's get to a few headlines from the week's news and give you some context on why they matter first up breaking news in washington the supreme court's ruling in a major voting rights case. Here's what went down this morning. The supreme court issued a major judgment about voting rights this case involved to voting laws in arizona. The first says at ballots cast in the wrong precinct on election. Day can't be counted and the other restricts who can collect ballots to deliver the polling places. The democratic national committee said hold up these practices disproportionately harm minority voters in arizona like members of the native american community who often live far away from polling stations. The dnc's lawsuit also claimed that by enacting these voter laws. Arizona was violating the federal voting rights. Act which prohibits racial discrimination in voting laws but in a six three vote on thursday the supreme said actually these laws are legal and the impact of their decision goes way beyond just arizona. At least fourteen states have already passed laws that restrict voting access and this this ruling could make it harder to challenge those restrictions and court analysts. Also say this ruling could dilute the voting rights act because it makes it harder for voters of color to prove that certain factors like distance or unreliable mail service makes it harder for them to vote next up as people get ready to gather for fourth of july. That extreme heat is baking both coasts right now and turning deadly with more record-breaking temperatures on the way here's what you need to know it's been topping ninety degrees this week across the northeast but we felt less like complaining when we saw the pacific northwest experience. One of its most severe heat waves ever towns throughout washington. Oregon broke their all time temperature. Records roads literally buckled in portland and the city had to stop running it. Streetcars after cable started. Melting one town in british columbia reached one hundred twenty one degrees fahrenheit the hottest temperature on record for canada. So what pushed temperatures up this week. Apparently something called a heat dome which is when hot air gets trapped by the atmosphere and starts to pile up over a certain area kind of like putting a lid on a saucepan when you're cooking. The good news is heat. Domes typically only last a few days to a week the bad news. The pacific northwest is not equipped to handle them. Way fewer homes have. Ac and the heat has sent hundreds of people to the hospital and because conditions in the region are normally so different. There's more risk of wildfires and the scariest part as a result of climate change. Heat domes are becoming more frequent so even though this heat dome may be an outlier. This likely isn't the last.

bill cosby andrea constand pennsylvania state supreme cou Fatina goss national women's law center times up legal defense fund pennsylvania supreme court cosby Mckee alex arizona supreme court democratic national committee us twitter washington dnc Arizona
Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

Unreserved

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

"Black and indigenous communities share similar struggles as marginalized people on turtle island that combined. History can be quite complicated. My next guest has dedicated much of his work. As an academic to thinking about these connections robert keith collins is an expert on black indigenous interactions. He's an associate professor of american indian studies at san francisco state university. He's african american and choctaw. And he's here to tell us about a history. Many people know very little about welcome to the show dr collins. Thank you very much for having me. So let's start at the beginning. What is the beginning of indigenous black history. That's a fantastic question. And actually we owe a lot of our understanding about it to a canadian scholar. Alexander francis chamberlain france as in in eighteen. Ninety one wrote one of the most comprehensive analysis that we have today and that was african americans and what we find in that study is that this is actually a history. His later colleague would refer to as the third line of colonization. We've talked about a european and native colonization. We talk about european and african colonization. We seldom talk about american. Interactions during the colonization and this is a history that brings that back to live where we actually see cultural exchanges between people that are taking place within sovereign native communities as well as nations and families we also see interactions taking place especially for like in the united states among the five civilized tribes chuck. Todd's cherokees creeks chickasaw seminoles in slavery were native americans owned slaves and have an cultural impact on africans within their communities on their

Robert Keith Collins Dr Collins Turtle Island Alexander Francis Chamberlain San Francisco State University France Chuck Todd United States
COVID-19 highlights Alaska Native water and sanitation needs

Native America Calling

02:33 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 highlights Alaska Native water and sanitation needs

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The pandemic has highlighted. Water and sanitation needs in alaska. Native communities where lack of infrastructure has already had significant health impacts according to a health official alaska. Native tribal health consortium interim president. Valerie davidson testified. Virtually this week before. The senate committee on indian affairs on water infrastructure needs davidson says. Many families in rural communities do not have running water to help prevent the spread of covid nineteen constant hand washing and cleaning davidson says more than forty percent of alaska native homes lack running water. Many communities typically have a washer area building. It's one building that combines water-treatment laundromat twelve and showers at the entire community uses and what that means from a practical perspective is that Those communities hall their water from the washington area in a five gallon clean bucket and we hall are raw sewage from our home in a different five gallon bucket and unfortunately Our communities continued to be unserved simply because of the high construction costs among recommendations davidson. Says they desperately need at least one billion dollars for sanitation construction in future legislation and resources to preserve what infrastructure is already in place. Wisconsin governor. Tony evers has signed off on the ho chunk. Nations plans to build a casino just north of the illinois border danielle creating reports. Federal law gives governors the power to block or approve off reservation casinos. The tribes plans include one of the largest casinos in the state. Along with the convention center indoor waterpark and a three hundred room hotel. The complex is expected to create more than fifteen hundred permanent jobs and more than two thousand construction jobs. Ho chunk nation public relations officer ryan green. Dear says jobs are central focus as many tribal communities. Shut down their casinos for months last year due to cove in nineteen. This is gonna be the cornerstone of the economic recovery from the pandemic. the complex will be built in the city of beloit beloit city council president. Regina dunkin says the project has been a longtime coming and is a game changer. Fully in terms of jobs created shared revenues and increased arisen. The project now faces final approval from the department of interior once approved wisconsin's governor and the whole chunk nation would amend the tribes gaming compact to include revenues from the new casino. I'm daniel catering

Antonio Gonzales Alaska Davidson Valerie Davidson Senate Committee On Indian Aff Tony Evers Ho Chunk Ryan Green Washington Wisconsin Beloit City Council Illinois Regina Dunkin Beloit Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
Public helps increase Snowbird Fund

Native America Calling

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Public helps increase Snowbird Fund

"This is national native news. Antonio gonzalez three tribes in alaska are participating in a pilot program to collect data and provide solutions on a community level to missing and murdered indigenous. People katyal brian van wa- spoke with officials about how the new project will change their approach on active and cold cases at the beginning of the year. The us attorney's office for alaska announced that the department of justice would embark on a pilot project to address the missing and murdered indigenous persons epidemic in the state which again tribal council in dealing ham is one of three alaska tribes that volunteered to be part of the project. Each tribe will develop a tribal community response plan tailored to its needs resources and culture. According to a study by the urban indian health institute out of twenty nine states alaska ranks fourth in the number of missing and murdered indigenous women. Tribal administrator courtney cardi says the importance of statistics on a local level often. Native communities are researched by outsiders in the situation. It's very important that especially with such a sensitive topic but our council is able to work with families directly to quantify the issue and demonstrate that ourselves versus having outside organization. Be that for the drive meets with the us attorney's office as part of a forum to increase communication between communities and public officials. Ingrid cumberland's is the emma p. coordinator for the us attorney's office in alaska. She says that a key to reduce mvp cases to establish connections between tribes agencies and to implement solid tribal community response plans. We we really just need to build those relationships and and make sure that everybody is as soon as possible so that we can get working on any incident at the quickest possible moment. Brian schroeder the us attorney for alaska stressed that it is important to establish communication and transparency before crises occur. A large part of what this is is getting all the parties involved all the stakeholders involved to start talking to each other. Now you wanna be able to talk ahead of time and know each other and open those lines of communication to young's plan will serve as a model for hub communities like bethel nome more information about the pilot project can be found by contacting the us attorney's office in alaska and billingham. I'm brian vanua

Alaska Antonio Gonzalez Brian Van Wa Urban Indian Health Institute Courtney Cardi Us Attorney's Office Ingrid Cumberland Department Of Justice United States Brian Schroeder Bethel Billingham Brian Vanua
"native american community" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"native american community" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"See one hundred and thousand you really. Squint was not enormous but it is a symbol in many respects. And it's also something that has given quite a lot to mation of maryland in particular this river. The toxin people say that this is one of the most significant rivers are most studied rivers in america for all kinds of reasons because a lot of the water signs being used around the rest of the country was developed believe it or not on the pawtucket river but also because the war of eighteen twelve unfolded there. Some people think it's the only place that has been invaded by a foreign power american shores other than for harboring nine one one because the british landed literally have offices a matter of fact definitely keep his office his right where the british landed on the pawtuxet before they marched across land to burn the white house during the war of eighteen twelve. In other words our country was being invaded or country was actually being invaded by have worn power on the pawtuxet member. Don't offense and has national significance. A national historical significance granted pocket award. Not many people know much about the war of eighteen twelve at all and why we were in it. But anyway if i can have bragging rights a little bit but the production has a is not just a local river in maryland. It is a nationally significant for all sorts of reasons. You just kind of explaining the historical context of the river. I guess my magic nation went to the time and just imagining the the british troops sailing up the river. And i enjoy history and so for me just knowing a little bit more about what would be a natural historic sites. I guess it just adds a little bit more context and more appreciation for that particular feature if that makes any sense again. What what is important. Order is important as a navigational aid is a reference point as a highway for commerce as this country was new and young and growing. So what are has all of these overtones wherever you find it a fan everywhere i go. I want to check out the local water and find out how it figures into the local geopolitics. And you if you don't mind telling us again telling me again. The background of how the river got its name. It was a very i guess. An eye opening and somewhat romantic story about the name of the river and what it means to the indigenous community that gave it. Its name most of the tributaries of the chesapeake bay of which the pawtuxet news only one of many most of those rivers do have native american names and the names came about through all sorts of reasons and ways but the pawtuxet actually was an indian tribe a native american tribe now very assimilated now very absorbed some people say that the all gung speaking indians like the pawtuxet tribes. So they'll when they all gone. Quinn language was a trade language. I gather favored by lots of different native american tribes the traded among themselves. But some people say the word production manager and algonquin water running over smooth stones but it could also be used as a compliment. It could be used to complement beautiful woman for example you know like hey. I think you're pawtuxet would be a compliment. Hey are you talk at the well you know. The analogy people have shared with me is like aloha which apparently can be used inflection. Or you know either if you're coming or going to that in many different situations yeah that's awesome. Thank you for sharing that i. I didn't know until you told me. Of course but you're told us a little bit about. Were you are trying to do in terms of building a movement towards protecting and preserving the river to the extent possible. Could you tell us a little bit about what does a day in the life of a river keeper like actually to me. Well the most intriguing things about this work is never the same two days a row. I do a lot of public speaking and media appearance work which is couldn't the general sense to raise the profile of the river. A lot of my work is actually very hands on in the watershed last week. I was meeting with county and state officials over some permitting issues. That have come up on one of the restoration projects that we're involved with in one of the towns along the river but we work with. I'm unisom penalties and with local communities. Literally this all local water problems sometimes were able to find grant support to do a restoration of a stream or fix them local infrastructure from days in court. Sometimes i'm visiting with citizens and various places of the river looking at issues and problems and concerns that have been raised by local communities. You know it's pretty endless in terms of the variety of stuff sometimes in the warm weather months. I'm actually on the river. Actually in boat out on the river Looking again at the pollution issues or doing water quality monitoring we stage a lot of events to bring the communities that we served together at our office. We have some pretty good alliances with the native american communities near our office and they often have ceremonies and observances. We have a Kind of an anti columbus day of every year we call it Let's see. I forgot what we call it. It's knuckled anti columbus indigenous peoples day when digits a attention because i feel like we're also changing culture. Yeah some people come by and they raise their eyebrows. what what's wrong with columbus. You know the native american lens people like john columbus and john smith quote unquote discovered the chesapeake bay. Though the native americans here already hadn't really discovered incidentally john smith didn't care about the pawtuxet. He apparently went to the mouth of sucks a few miles up and then got bored and turned around left and thought there was nothing worth pursuing so he did very little on the thompson river. The british much later so my days different. They're they're all over the map. And i must say this after. This is the most challenging work. I've ever done days when i'm completely done in like i'm completely tapped out in terms of my stamina to keep up with it. You're meeting people's expectations river. Not just a person and a job. It's a symbol to your you're really assemble demise people's hopes and aspirations for the salvation of a river that frankly has gotten only worse..

john smith america john columbus two days thompson river last week one hundred indian one chesapeake bay war of eighteen twelve nine indians native american maryland Squint british american anti columbus thousand
Native veterinarians

Native America Calling

05:23 min | 2 years ago

Native veterinarians

"This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining us live from my homeland of sheer doing via skype and people are often inspired to pursue veterinary medicine because of their love for animals but being a veterinarian is much more than just caring for adorable puppies and kittens. it involves years of schooling in the sciences. Today we're looking into what it's like being a native veterinarian. Some vets work with house. Pets like dogs. Cats birds bets also work with livestock. And they're also in an important part of reducing outta control cat in dog populations in and around native communities our guests on the show today. We'll tell you there's a need for more native veterinarians and technicians and we'll hear more from them about their passion to serve their native communities by working with animals. And you can join us to. Do you have questions about what it takes to become a veterinarian. Are there enough that veterinary clinics in your community. Tell us about it at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and right now we're going to start off in crown point new mexico. We have dr germain day. She is a director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program at the navajo technical university and she is today and is our pleasure to have her here. dr day. Welcome to native america calling and feel free to further. Introduce yourself good morning yet. And this is dr germain day. I would like to introduce myself in The net I am of the touch. Eat ni clan kiani buses. Chain a she does she say they. She doesn't let my pledge there. You said nausea that nasha so to translate that to english. I just said that my Clan is touchy knee. Which is the red running into the water. People claiming i am born and for the towering house clan. My grandfather's late grandfather's clan is salt people clan and my paternal Grandfather's clan is start of the ridge street people clan. I am from coyote canyon new mexico which is on the eastern side of the navajo nation and i Attended the colorado state university in fort collins. Colorado i graduated. I graduated from school in two thousand one. I've been in practice since two thousand one. So it's been about twenty years when i first Graduated vet school. I went into private practice Mixed animal practice where. I worked on small animals and large animals. In some exotics. I worked in the The gallup new mexico and the say benito area initially then moved on to Grants to a clinic and grants. Then i Did some relief work in georgia. Texas california before returning to new mexico worked in albuquerque For a little bit for a few years before i returned to the navajo nation. I started at navajo technical university in two thousand nine as the director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program. And i've been here ever since. Wow and there's been quite a journey to to those different places but what was it that drew you to this profession. Why did you want to pursue a veterinary career swell. So i as. I grew up on a a ranch. I was exposed to Large animals my family owned cattle horses. Sheep goats and I just enjoyed and enjoyed being around animals. I brody horses With my sister brother and cousins starting at the age of about three and Just spent a lot of time outdoors with animals then later as a preteen and teenager. I did some volunteer work at the local veterinary clinic in gallup and really enjoyed that work then as i moved into Graduated from high school and went on into college. I had a professor. That thought i should go to medical school but i realized at that point that i really wanted to go into veterinary medicine and

Dr Germain Tara Gatewood Navajo Technical University New Mexico Veterinary Teaching Hospital Dr Day Coyote Canyon America Skype Colorado State University Nausea Veterinary Teaching Hospital A Fort Collins Colorado Albuquerque Georgia Texas California Brody
Tribal Broadband, Keystone Pipeline and Navajo Voting Patterns

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Tribal Broadband, Keystone Pipeline and Navajo Voting Patterns

"This is national native news. Megan camera in for antonio gonzales a bill that would help a native american communities get more broadband access on reservation lands passed to the. Us senate indian affairs committee. Wednesday steve jackson reports from spokane fcc survey found that thirty one percent of households on tribal lands lack access to high speed broadband compared to seven percent of americans in non tribal areas at a hearing wednesday senator. Maria cantwell spoke about the impact that some washington tribes of experienced because of the lack of service for the caulfield tribe in north central washington. Many of the households don't have access to the internet. This means many of thousands don't have access to emergency service. Notifications connectivity is critically important during fire season especially this year as fires have forced evacuations from homes and businesses. It's absolutely unacceptable for these tribes and many others living on tribal lands throughout the state of washington to not have access to basic reliable broadband. Cantwell cosponsored the legislation. Which would require technical assistance be provided to the under served native communities and set aside fcc and usda funding for broadband deployment. The bill passed in a bipartisan voice. Vote wednesday and now heads to the full senate for consideration for national native news. I'm steve jackson reporting from spokane. A group made up of five. First nations in canada says it plans to invest up to seven hundred sixty five million dollars in the keystone excel pipeline bloomberg reports. Tc energy corporation is counting on the deal with natural law energy to save the controversial pipeline from the incoming administration of president elect joe biden. The pipeline must have a permit from the us government since it crosses the border with canada. The trump administration granted the permit but biden's campaign has said it plans to resend it. Raiders reports the agreement includes the neat and little pine first nations in saskatchewan and the urban skin creation montana first nation and louis bowl tribe in alberta chief alvin francis president of natural energy and chief of nickel neat first nation said in a news release. The deal is a historic one that will create intergenerational wealth. He also pledged that natural law. Mtc energy will ensure the pipeline is quote held to the highest levels of environmental and social responsibility. Natural law energy has until next september to secure financing for the deal in minnesota to people on wednesday locked themselves to equipment used on line three of the end bridge sands oil pipeline to protest permits granted for the project by the state native news online reports. The action was organized by the guinea collective minnesota public radio reports that approval of key water permit for the project prompted twelve members of an advisory group to the minnesota pollution control agency to resign that included white earth tribal member winona luke and bridges line three would transport up to seven hundred sixty thousand barrels of crude oil daily through northern minnesota. The project is opposed by five agip bands. If you look at a map of how arizonans voted in the selection. You'll see several blocks. That don't correspond with urban areas and gibson with arizona public media reports most of these rural precincts are from voters living in tribal lands high country news reports that sixty to ninety percent of votes in precincts across the navajo nation. When to biden and vice president elect comma harris. Allie young is the founder of protect the sacred a grassroots initiative responding to the pandemic and promoting voter education within the navajo nation. I'm very proud Especially tribal communities in arizona for showing the world. That arizona is indigenous. Dna that we re claimed arizona. A map created by abc. Fifteen arizona shows that on average almost ninety. Four percent of votes in the thaw of nation went blue tube for national native news. I'm emma gibson and i'm megan camera.

Steve Jackson Antonio Gonzales Us Senate Indian Affairs Commi Washington Spokane FCC Tc Energy Corporation Maria Cantwell Trump Administration Alvin Francis Mtc Energy Cantwell Megan Usda Biden Joe Biden Bloomberg
Record Female Leaders, Salmon Restoration and Rapid City Boarding School

Native America Calling

03:52 min | 2 years ago

Record Female Leaders, Salmon Restoration and Rapid City Boarding School

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The northern cheyenne tribe in southeast montana inaugurated its newly elected officials tuesday which includes a record number of female leaders. Yellowstone public. radio's caitlyn nicholas reports from laimbeer. The northern cheyenne tribe made history. This month when tribal members elected all women to the positions of tribal president vice president and into each of the five on the tribal council after prayers and speeches. Each woman was sworn into office. While hundreds watched from socially distanced chairs cars in the parking lot and online promote i will promote in On protect the interests donna fisher. The new president of northern. cheyenne says. She's anxious to get to work. We have women. We will work together to get things will always be on the same page but we will work together to get things done. And this is what the people have voted us and therefore there are now seven. Women says ten seat council. I'm caitlyn nicholas. Leaders of the euro can creek tribes the states of california and oregon and a damn owner announced an agreement tuesday to provide additional resources and support to advance salmon restoration project addresses declines in fish populations and improves river health. The agreement with the tribes states pacific core and the klamath river renewal corporation describes how the parties will implement a two thousand sixteen agreement which sets terms for the removal of four dams on the klamath river. Karuk chairman buster out of berry. I'm looking forward very much to having the best day as chairman of the tribe. When i can say that we have restored those fish in that we can Enjoy those bonding times with our children when we go to the river and and we can put food on the table together. Plans include navigating the final regulatory approvals to allow the project to begin in twenty twenty two with dam removal in twenty twenty. Three federal approval is still needed. The rapid city council has approved a resolution to resolve a land dispute over more than one thousand acres on the west side of the city and old indian boarding school. South dakota public broadcasting's richard two bulls reports the council approved the historic resolution with the nine to one vote it's a step to rectify history and acknowledged the shameful legacy of the rapid city indian boarding school. There was very little public comment on mondays. Council meeting one person did not support the resolution saying it wasn't clear who represents the native community in this effort troy fairbanks on the other hand agreed that the city council should approve the resolution on principle alone. I want to commend you. Each and every one of you for actually taking a look at what is right through city council. The only ones i've ever stood up for us even even thought about talking about the native indian community that has tremendous an initial vote on the resolution was tabled two weeks ago council members had doubts and questions about it before their vote on monday. City attorney joe land dean said the resolution creates a pat to resolve the underlying issues. This is not legally binding. It is an intent to come up with hopefully in agreement that when we enter into it will be legally binding. It outlines the parameters broadly but yeah we will need to come back with a specific plan. The bureau of indian affairs which operates under the department of interior has the final decision on these parcels of land. The ba wants the rapid city native american community to work with the city to move forward. I'm richard tools and antonio gonzales

Northern Cheyenne Caitlyn Nicholas Antonio Gonzales Laimbeer Donna Fisher The Klamath River Karuk Rapid City Council Yellowstone Cheyenne Montana Troy Fairbanks Salmon Oregon Berry City Council California South Dakota Joe Land Dean
Native American voters helped win presidential election for Joe Biden - Business Insider

The Takeaway

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Native American voters helped win presidential election for Joe Biden - Business Insider

"Election, President elect Joe Biden became the first Democratic presidential candidate to win the state of Arizona in 24 years, and one group who played a major role in flipping the state for Biden was Arizona's native American population. According to high country news counties that included the Navajo nation Hopi tribe and to Hana Autumn Nation, where some of the key areas that helped the president elect carry the state and in the swing state of Wisconsin native voters also appeared to have been part of turning that state blue Now, as president elect Biden prepares to take office, native organizers and tribal leaders want to make sure he doesn't take their votes for granted. My name is Leonard Forstmann I'm chairman of the soup, Warmish tribe and President affiliated tribes in Northwest Indians. Under President Obama Chairman Force Mint was appointed as vice chair of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and last month he endorsed the Biden Harris ticket along with more than 200, other American Indian leaders. And as Biden begins to assemble his Cabinet chairman Force Man has a specific request. Appoint a Native American official as the next secretary of the interior. He and Shannon Whole Z, president of the Stockbridge Muncie tribe made their case in a recent opinion piece for Reuters. When I spoke to the chairman, I asked him to explain why the Department of the Interior is so important to native communities. Many of our Indian programs. Of course, they're housed in Department of Interior, of course, appear opinion affairs. Many other agencies that affect any country who the real land management, the National Park Service. And a lot of this has to do with our trust resource is with your land and water. Cultural resource is sacred places, so it's very important that we have a secretary interior that has a good understanding of Indian country and our values and traditions. What are some of the main environmental issues that are most important to Indian country and that you think the next secretary of the interior should focus on well in the Pacific Northwest. Here we really rely on treaty resource is, as we call them or our natural resource is wildlife, salmon, traditional plants, clean water. Not only for food, but also for medicine and also for our Spiritual life and ceremonial life. We feel that a change in leadership with interior will bring us back from the last four years of focus on Regulation and profits, and that's been demonstrated in a lot of the activities the administration's engaged in that have ignored travel needs and priorities in many parts of the West. Native American voters have played an important role in this year's election that has potentially been Not has talked about, but they did play a big role in battleground states like Arizona. What did that look like this year? What did it look like to get native voters out to the polls and also to ensure that Joe Biden doesn't take those votes for granted? Well, the turnout that came through, especially in some of the battleground states, of course, but these votes are great are important in all the states but especially Arizona, Wisconsin were a statement of the importance of Leader that shows respect for the presidential office sacred duty that leadership has when they're elected by people. The hold the tradition of that office important. I feel that Ah, lot of the turnout was based upon the need for better and stronger commitment to the number the numerous priorities that Indian country has I think that for the Democratic Party to honor those votes that came out, especially a lot of the new voters, I think is too Build upon some of the actions that the Obama administration that Joe Biden was part of and growing those and that's you know, getting more land into trust, rebuild our homelands. You know, investing in medical facilities to take care of our medical needs that are guaranteed with under the trust responsibility. You know, investing in a sustainable economic development. Protecting our natural resource is all those things. He did, including a really strong travel consultation effort. Will be important for the Democratic Party to continue doing as they did in the Obama administration, I believe is one of I believe was the best president for any country that we've had. So in order to keep that vote for the future, I think that we need to continue to do those things and also let people know about him because I think a lot of people don't know enough about what the past administration the Obama administration did. I'm settling a lot of lawsuits that have been lying machine like the call Bell on a contract support loss you a lot of things that were very major influential. I think that we need to make sure that people are aware of those things in the future things that the Biden Harris administration Hopefully has in their transition plan as well. So on the week of the

Biden Arizona Hana Autumn Leonard Forstmann Joe Biden Department Of Interior Advisory Council On Historic P Biden Harris Shannon Whole Z Obama Administration Wisconsin Stockbridge Muncie National Park Service Mint Reuters Cabinet Pacific Northwest Barack Obama
How Native American voters swung the 2020 presidential election

The Takeaway

04:33 min | 2 years ago

How Native American voters swung the 2020 presidential election

"This election president elect joe biden democratic presidential candidate to win the state of arizona in twenty four years and one group who played a major role in flipping. The state for biden was arizona's native american population. According to high country news counties that included the navajo nation hope tribes and to hana autumn nation. Where some of the key areas that help. The president elect carry the state and in the swing state of wisconsin. Native voters also appeared to have been part of turning that state luke now as president-elect biden prepares to take office organizers and tribal leaders want to make sure he doesn't take their votes for granted the leonard horsemen on chairman of the sukhois amish trod president affiliate tragic north west indians under president obama chairman forstmann was appointed as vice chair of the advisory council on historic preservation. And last month he endorsed the biden harris ticket. Along with more than two hundred other. American indian leaders and biden begins to assemble his cabinet. Chairman foresman has a specific request. Appoint a native american official as the next secretary of the interior. He and shannon hosie president of the stockbridge muncie tribe made their case in a recent opinion piece for reuters. When i spoke to the chairman. I asked him to explain why the department of the interior is so important to native communities. Many of our indian programs of course are housed in the department of interior. Of course the bureau of indian affairs and Many other agencies that affect indian country holding the breeland management the national park service and a lot of this has to do with our Trust resources which are land and water and Cultural resources sake replaces. So it's very important that we have a secretary. Interior that has a A good understanding of any country in our values and traditions. What are some of the main environmental issues. That are most important to indian country and that you think the next secretary of the interior should focus on well in the pacific northwest here. We really really rely on Our treaty resources as we call them or our natural resources. Wildlife salmon traditional plant's clean water. Not only for food but also for medicine and also for our spiritual life and ceremonial life and We feel that A change in leadership at the interior prius back from the last four years of of focus on deregulation and prophets seemed to have come over the importance of protecting habitat and Sacred places and that's been demonstrated in a lot of the activities the administration's engaged in that have Ignored tribal needs and priorities in many parts of the west. One of the people that you suggest could hold. The secretary of interior role is representative deb. Holland of new mexico. Who had on the show before and who is a citizen of the laguna pueblo tribe. Why do you think representative holland would be good for the role while we've known deb hall in a congresswoman now for at least a one term or more and She's demonstrated his Commitment to indian country obviously being a member of laguna pueblo and very close to their traditions and values which are very similar. Many trump's across the nation the importance of place and landscaped. The cultural landscape be importance of our traditions. Our stories our way alive on. It's all connected strongly to respect dean and holding our lands and waters sacred to our survival As an people something very important to us so we really believed that coming for new mexico deb has an understanding of energy policy and also understanding of the importance of environmental and resource protection. So i think she'll be a good candidate for trying to balance those two things in her leadership of the department.

Biden Forstmann Advisory Council On Historic P Biden Harris Chairman Foresman Shannon Hosie Arizona Department Of Interior Bureau Of Indian Affairs Joe Biden Stockbridge Muncie Wisconsin President Obama National Park Service Reuters Cabinet Representative Deb Representative Holland
President-elect Joe Biden declares "clear victory" and calls for unity

Cindy Stumpo is Tough as Nails

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

President-elect Joe Biden declares "clear victory" and calls for unity

"Theme in this address, unity and healing, saying the people of the nation have spoken and they have delivered the Biden Harris ticket in his words, ah, clear in convincing victory. Raising his wife, Jill Biden, who just joined him on stage and the Biden family and job right now, Hunt hugging his son, Hunter, Biden and the members of his family, praising his wife, Jill, reaching out specifically in this speech to educators, saying they'd now have one of them in the White House. Biden also touching on the coalition of people who came together to work for him and get him elected. Black, Latino and native communities, the LGBTQ community and giving a special shadow to the black community, saying that they stepped up and had his back and he would have theirs for those who voted for President Trump. Biden said he understands the disappointment. But he urged America to give each other a chance. Put away the harsh rhetoric and lower the temperature as to going on to say opponents or not enemies. They are Americans, as he did last night. It is 8 57. We have much more coming up in the news

Biden Biden Harris Jill Biden Jill Hunt Hunter White House America
Tlingit Artefacts Decision, ACA Concerns, and Arizona Voters Mobilized

Native America Calling

03:50 min | 2 years ago

Tlingit Artefacts Decision, ACA Concerns, and Arizona Voters Mobilized

"This is national native. News Antonio Gonzalez a collection of artifacts from the Clink Frog House clan can continue to be displayed in a Museum that's despite a legal challenge that reached Alaska's highest court as Clare Struggle with K. H. NS reports the State Supreme Court has apparently ended. A decades-old will dispute over control of the cultural treasures. When Frog House clan members disputed the sale of artifacts to a Canadian collector in the nineteen seventies an Alaska. Superior. Court judge ruled that they actually belonged to all members of clones frog. House. The court ordered them placed in the care of clan elders living in the clan's traditional lands on the Upper Lynn Canal. It added a condition, they could only be sold with the unanimous consent of all frog clan members until the safe place was found near cluck won the artifacts would sit in the state museum in Juneau. There they remained for decades. Until last year when the carvings considered masterpieces were returned to quad. But that didn't sit well with some descendants who filed a lawsuit last summer. They argued that by housing the artifacts in the tribes heritage. Center the court had given them to the whole tribe rather than the frog house. Petersburg attorney Fred Trim made case in September that the Jocic one heritage center and Clock One kept the artifacts out of the clans reach. The protests clan members of whom their one hundred and four cannot use the artifacts. Artifacts are locked up in a museum that's not under the control or even. Recently, accessible to the Prague House numbers that the State's Supreme Court justices were unmoved in decision released on October twenty. First, they wrote the lower court had been correct and only exceptional circumstances could overturn the ruling from nineteen seventy eight. The for house posts and a copy of a carped screen are displayed at the joke one heritage sun her and cluck one the center is closed for the season but group to are available by appointment. I'm Clare Trample new. Mexico US Senator Tom Udall spoke on the Senate floor. Monday calling for the protection of Healthcare for native Americans before the Senate confirmation of Judge Amy Conybeare it to the Supreme Court. You'll raise concerns about the future of the affordable care act due to upcoming challenges. Udal says a repeal would devastate Indian country. opened the doors for so many native Americans to access the care they need. Whether it's an unplanned medical emergency or routine wellness checkups and screenings. Access to quality healthcare critical for native communities face disproportionate impacts from the COVID nineteen pandemic. The federal government has a trust and treaty obligation to consult with tribes and to provide native Americans healthcare. The affordable care act permanently reauthorized the Indian Health Care Improvement Act to Ke legal authority for the Indian service and expansion of access to healthcare for native Americans. You'll was among a group of senators and opposition of Barrett's Supreme Court nomination. Racial Equity Groups are hosting a virtual event Tuesday night to mobilize voters in Arizona. A key battleground state the National Congress of American Indians is joining Hispanic Asian. American. Native Hawaiian, and other groups to host the event to discuss voting and a number of issues from Kobe nineteen to racial justice. The event will be streamed on facebook at together we vote a Z.

Supreme Court State Supreme Court Frog House Clink Frog House Alaska Antonio Gonzalez Prague House Senate National Congress Of American Cluck Clare Struggle Upper Lynn Canal Senator Tom Udall Facebook Mexico Juneau Judge Amy Conybeare Arizona Petersburg
Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 2 years ago

Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

"The Corona virus pandemic underscores an issue Abigail Hawk the chief research officer of the Seattle Indian health. Board has been fighting her entire career, the exclusion of native people in public health data. We know that the data that's being collected across the United States isn't collecting race and ethnicity correctly however, even with that incredible lack of data, the data that we do have shows an incredible disparity. Growing up in rural Alaska. Echo Hawk was surrounded by examples of how a native community diligently cared for one. Another I was raised amongst incredible people who were the very first public health practitioners. I ever saw if somebody needed fed, they fed them. If somebody needed a ride to a doctor, a five hour trip tankards, Alaska, they drove them. All of my scientific background comes from that space of understanding what it means to serve the community and also the. As an indigenous person, I come from thousands of years of incredible indigenous scientists but after being stereotyped mistreated while seeking prenatal care in Seattle. Washington she knew how she can make an impact in her community. I had a medical assistant question me on how much I had been drinking. She pulled up my sleeves and then I realized she was checking my arm to see had track marks. It was really traumatizing to me is a a young person. I was only nineteen years old and as a result of that experience I didn't get prenatal care until I was in my second trimester, I became a grassroots advocate to ensure that native women were properly treated because we have some of the highest. Rates of infant mortality and maternal mortality within this country and as I went through my college years that turned into what I did my thesis on, she went on to study health policy at the University of Washington, but it wasn't easy navigating between Western, and indigenous knowledge systems. It was hard to balance who I was native person versus what the university is expected me to be and what Western science wanted almost insisted I had to be it became another struggle to be seen as relevant. As smart and as knowledgeable, the other people in the room, and in fact, in the first year of my career I would say that I did not actively practice indigenous science. We come from thousands of years of data gatherers in my communities. We know how to ensure that our corn grows for example, in a time where there is complete droughts I was called out by one of my elders in the fact that I no longer was representing or being an indigenous person it reminded me of. Who I was, and that I would not make any difference in my community. If I didn't go back to the knowledge that I knew was right that I knew was ethical. I was able to incorporate that and not only see how western science has a lot of basis in indigenous knowledge systems. But I also feel that western science needs to quit coming to indigenous people because they think we have all of the problems they need to come to us because we have all of the answers. Today Echo Hawk as the director of the urban Indian Health Institute, a Seattle based organization seeking to decolonize data by putting native people's priorities at the forefront of data collection by being intimately involved in the collection of information native people can shape the narratives told about their communities data and a Western context has always been used against native people. It has been used to show how bad off we are how higher suicide rates are higher diabetes is how we don't achieve the same educational standards Western folks that deficit narrative continues to build support stereotypes of those communities as being less than not as smart of they're responsible for. Their own health disparities all of those things as a result of that, many of our communities have protected themselves and have not participated actively data-gathering efforts across the United States and across the world and that was absolutely the right thing for them to do was to protect themselves. Tribal communities have a right to ensure that data gathered about them is used for their benefit and that they maintain ownership in control over that controlling the data also means making sure that indigenous people are counted in federal and state data sets in the United States. A practice not always followed despite a treaty agreement between tribal nations and the United States. Government. The US census didn't proactively count American Indians until eighteen sixty and this earth of data was used as settle on native peoples land. One of the things that we actively are fighting against is that a small population people don't gather the data about US correctly or they don't gather it at all. So very often albeit presentation, it will say a little asterix that we were American Indians Alaska natives were statistically insignificant to me. That is one of two things either you did not actively try or didn't know how to connect with the community to gather the data you needed to, and the other is, is that when? You eliminate us in the data. You are actively participating in the ongoing genocide of American Indians and Alaska natives, and that seems really strong to say, and yes, it is and I believe it one hundred percent. So I ask people to question these practices that they're doing and recognize that. Yes, I know they're not inherently individually racist but they're participating in a system that has been meant to eliminate my people. These data collection issues remain a major problem in the covid nineteen pandemic initially Echo Hawk was unable to access the CDC breakdown of race ethnicity data. Once she saw the data, she was unimpressed with its quality and breadth. What we found in twenty three states is that native people were three point five times more likely to be infected with covert than Non Hispanic whites. Why did we only do twenty three states in the country? because. The rest of the state simply hadn't gathered enough data for us to be able to analyze what was happening within their states. So only twenty three states had gathered seventy percent of their race ethnicity data policymakers are trying to make data driven decisions. How can they make data driven decisions with bad data? Gathering this data, the resources that we need are not being. In the right way because we don't know how to allocate them. Correctly, Echo Hawk has provided training to universities and the State Department about how to correctly collect race and ethnicity data as well as how to restructure their database systems to better serve indigenous people in all realms of public health. We know that there's about a twenty increase in domestic violence right now as a result of Covid and many of folks who could leave their homes for work or school or things like that to get away from their abusers for an amount of time no longer can do that. I'm deeply dedicated towards the safety of victims of sexual violence and domestic violence and other types of intimate partner violence and so. I am actively working with a large county here in Washington state where we are changing their database system. We are also going to assist them in working with the local tribal communities on what it means. Once they collect that data, how that data is shared back to the tribal communities, how it's analyzed and what kind of meaningful change can come from that at the end of the day. The individual story behind the data guides, echo hawks work. We are also listening to the stories of the community, the impact of a family who's lost both parents the impact of a tribe where cove nineteen has just ravishing through their communities causing so much destruction that qualitative data is justice important as the quantitative data. Simply. Because right now, we don't have enough of that quantitative data to get to those decision makers. So they can make those data driven decisions. Every single data point is a mother is grandfather is an uncle is an anti is relative. We have a responsibility to the story and two story teller to the story. We have a responsibility to ensure that it builds the strength of the community. It identifies gaps that we can then go in and work towards filling that it also shows the strength and the resilience season, the answers that are held within our community by hope for my great. Great. Great. Great. Great. Great grandchildren. That they are not facing the same battles that I am facing that we have an opportunity to come together now as allies within the scientific community recognize we have gone wrong and to see our path forward. The story was originally reported by Lizzie wait as part of scientists, voices of the pandemic series.

United States Echo Hawk Alaska Seattle Abigail Hawk University Of Washington Chief Research Officer Washington Urban Indian Health Institute CDC Lizzie State Department Hawks Director Partner
Native American groups condemn U.S. Supreme Court decision that halts the 2020 Census count early

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 2 years ago

Native American groups condemn U.S. Supreme Court decision that halts the 2020 Census count early

"This is national native news making camera in for Antonio. Gonzales the supreme. Court. On Tuesday granted a request by the trump administration to suspend an order by a lower court that would have allowed the twenty twenty cents count to continue through October the move was condemned by the National Congress of American Indians the native American rights. Fund. And the National Urban, Indian family coalition who said the administration is trying to end the twenty twenty cents his count early in order to control the apportionment numbers which determine the number of each state's congressional representatives. A group of Native American tribes, advocacy groups, cities, and counties had sued to maintain an extended deadline for the count originally put in place by the US commerce secretary in April because of the covid nineteen pandemic that was later reversed NCAA I said in a statement that the administration's efforts will quote result in incomplete numbers, effectively excluding non-citizens and suppressing the. Count of minority communities including American Indians and Alaskan natives. The Supreme Court's ruling puts the count on hold while the trump administration and advocates argue in a federal appeals court NCAA I is urging the legislative extension of deadlines warning stopping. The census will quote condemn Indian country to a loss of political representation and its fair share of resources for the next decade. This year, the FCC opened a window of opportunity for native Americans to secure rights to their own wireless broadband networks as Jacob. Resnick reports regional tribes such as Central Council of the Clinton and Haida Indian tribes of Alaska are working to establish an intertribal broadband network to improve internet connectivity across coastal Alaska Southeast. Alaska tribes have few communities connected by road, and while the Internet has helped bridge gaps from physical distances, it's often far from fast or reliable tribal vice president will make Lynn says it high is among hundreds of tribal entities nationwide to apply for a special wireless spectrum license to fill gaps in communities underserved by commercial carriers we don't have a profit motive, our motives. Delivery of service. I really be broadband is a an inherent right for our tribal citizens and That is made ever clear to me by the impacts of the covered nineteen. Where efficiencies and infrastructures became ever more apparent this year, the FCC made possible by offering a spectrum for wireless broadband to native communities. Any unclaimed bandwidth will be auctioned off later to private carriers, but I, the SEC will need to issue the licenses and when it does of tribes across the US are expected to have a unique opportunity to fill gaps in connectivity in underserved areas, which describes most of Rural Alaska. For National Native News. I'm Jacob Bresnik in Juneau Alaska. The Alaska Supreme Court ruled this week that people voting by mail will not need a witness to sign their ballots Katie Oh reported the Arctic Village Council and others had sued to block the signature requirement because of the covid nineteen pandemic. The Anchorage Superior Court ruled in their favor but the division of elections appealed it to the State Supreme Court Natalie Lander is with the Native American Rights Fund, and represented the plaintiffs. She told the court voters at a higher risk for the virus including Arctic village residents face a choice between their health and casting their ballots. It's not worth it to vote. I have to expose myself to this illness for another person and I think that's the problem, the unpredictability and the fear that we're putting voters. Now, the pandemic is not the state's fault but the requirement is. The attorney for the division of elections argued changing rules in the middle of the election will confuse voters and that the plaintiffs didn't prove getting a witness as a severe burden. The court will issue a full opinion at a later date. For National Native News I'm Megan Camera.

Alaska Anchorage Superior Court Alaska Supreme Court Supreme Court National Congress Of American FCC Ncaa United States Jacob Bresnik State Supreme Court Native American Rights Fund Katie Oh Lynn Juneau Alaska American Indians Antonio Gonzales
History of Native Voter Suppression

All My Relations Podcast

06:18 min | 2 years ago

History of Native Voter Suppression

"Let's jump right in and talk a little about the history of the native vote and the history of the suppression of the. Native. Vote. I got to tell you that when trump I got elected I felt. Like. Sick to my stomach I. And I. Spent a good amount of time reflecting on my own personal behavior like thinking to myself did I to enough to. Try to make this, not happen. And and the answer is you know I don't often talk about national politics both through project to on my blog personally, you know because I fi-, I find it incredibly problematic and uncomfortable to talk about because you know we're living in colonial state and the federal government has actively tried to eradicate us, and there's a long history of broken promises and broken treaties. Therefore, it feels very uncomfortable to say to my fellow native people you know. Go vote in the system that's not meant for us that doesn't actually ever do the things that it's said it's going to do but go vote. anyways you know. It feels I, feel like a hypocrite just saying it. Yeah I really feel like we need to talk about it. Right Yeah it is by no means a simple decision for folks in Indian country and I think that's really important to acknowledge and to think about as we. Start to talk about this election and what we need to do. Right and you know there has been a long history of active native vote suppression for the first one, hundred and fifty years. In this country, we weren't even allowed to vote, and then in nineteen twenty four can the Indian Citizenship Act which formally US citizens but states continued to prevent us from voting, right? I. Think Sometimes, there's memes and stuff that gets posted where it's like going through the. Different marginalized groups, and when they finally got the right to vote, and it often says like native Americans nineteen, twenty four. But we know for a fact that that's not true. Because, as you said, most states still had things in place to prevent needed from voting like it wasn't until nineteen forty eight that natives in Arizona got the right to vote and then all of that. Suppression that played into the passage of the voting. Rights, act. So in Nineteen, seventy, five. So the things like literacy tests or poll taxes or all of these suppression techniques that affected other communities of Color Also affected a native folks as well. There's all of these appalling facts that have led to all of these underlying issues and voting cases as to why are people have not shown up to the polls in the same numbers you know I I often get asked. Like whoa when I tell when I'm having this conversations with non native people and say, yeah, like a lot of not a native people that I know are don't Vo are when you look at the numbers, you know you would you might think to yourself like, well, why wouldn't native people be active in this process and just want to acknowledge that it? It's it's very systemic. Done on purpose. Absolutely. Yeah. So we're like giving the dates from like nineteen, twenty, four, nineteen, forty, eight, nineteen, seventy, five but like. In twenty eighteen North Dakota changed their ID laws to say that if you were voting, you had to have an idea that had a street address on it and most native folks in North Dakota, Po Boxes, and don't have street addresses. So it was like an active step to try and suppress native in Dakota because natives have power in voting in north. Dakota and in a lot of states that have high population. So like this is an ongoing thing for native communities and then that actually that actually didn't work out well for. North. Dakota. Because all of these activists came together got really good publicity. There was a lot of grassroots organizations and then was it Ruth Buffalo ended up taking the seat. anyways. So so you know I think that's a really good demonstration of the power of the native vote especially in rural areas of Turtle Island. What I should add to this conversation. Around. You know like the the power of the native vote and the complicity of us. Even, telling each other to vote is that. You know we want to have a relationship with the people that get elected. Even. Biden beats trump's not only going to fix the dislike colonial problem. That we have. Yeah I mean it's hard because there are definitely things we can talk about that are like. Immediate. Undoing of things that the trump administration has done that have been really harmful to you need of communities, but there's also an entire list of things that are not going to happen even under a Biden Administration And there's this. Quote that I saw on the wall of the Harvard Law School Lake. Years and years ago and I think about it often in terms of these ideas of justice or like doing what's right from the federal government I will say it's problematic because it's only attributed as a quote African proverb, which obviously is a really problematic but the the Clo- is corn cannot expect justice from court composed of chickens. And I think about that in terms of. Natives asking for equal treatment or justice from the US. Colonial government is like corn expecting justice from a court may have chickens

Dakota Federal Government United States North Dakota Colonial Government Biden Administration Turtle Island Arizona Indian Citizenship Harvard Law School Lake Ruth Buffalo Biden Donald Trump
Representative Deb Haaland Discusses Equal Pay for Native Women, and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

The Electorette Podcast

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Representative Deb Haaland Discusses Equal Pay for Native Women, and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

"Representative of Holland welcome to the podcast. Thank you very much for having me. It's been an incredible week. We started the week off of course, was Tuesday with the presidential debate, the first one. Of of the the election cycle, which I was one really excited about you know. But for lack of a better word, you know it was kind of disastrous and you know we ended the week with several people when the president's inner circle testing positive for Kobe nineteen and I guess the thing that kept coming back to me because this was happening in the wake of news about I. Think it was something like eight, hundred, fifty thousand women having to leave the workplace like all of these things that are kind of distracting us from this inequality that women are still facing. The native women because we're just ending last week it was native American women's equal pay. Day Yes. So we're not talking about yes. In there are so many important phase it we should be talking about absolutely. So let's talk about him. I think when I look at the Biden plan and I look of what he has in store for native women especially in relation to equal pay I don't think I've seen that before that amount of focus. Well, how would you grade his focus on that area specifically? Oh, I, think it's I think it's you know it's I. Think it's an a plus the other day on native. Women's equal pay day Joe Biden Nationally tweeted tweeted that out and So we re tweeted her tweet specifically talking about native women's Equal Pay Day I'm super excited about everything that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris will do when they get in office in. This is just one of them. He I think the number right now is something like when. I read this figure is really hard to fathom that something like native women are paid fifty cents on every dollar to in comparison to a man right and kind of makes me angry a bit and I think if you do the math, it takes native women twenty one months almost two years to be paid equal. What demand makes in a single here. quite stark. Yes. It's. It's very stark, and of course, it's you know women of color are the ones who are suffering from the inequity. Right and I mean, look we we. We are single moms were taking care of family members we I mean there's a lot that we're doing was so little. And so it's time to to start paying attention to those under. Communities Absolutely. So immigrants to the pandemic we all know by now that women are going to get hit harder women of color are going to be hit harder. What is it in the native community native American community that is worsening the pandemic and the fallout from the pandemic especially for women? Well, I mean look wait what we saw as soon as a pandemic really started to take hold in our country is that it highlighted the disparities that that take place in communities of color. That's why we have the highest rates. In here in New Mexico native Americans make up to eleven percent of the population at one time where over fifty percent of the positive cases. So it's a combination of things. We don't have the infrastructure. We need those a lot of homes right now in Indian, country that don't have running water don't have electricity. There's a lot of homes I you know sixty five percent or something like that. It might even be more don't quote me on that but broadband Internet service that type of infrastructure is keeping our students from learning. It's keeping our elderly folks from accessing telehealth services. because. If they're in a rural community and live a really long way away from a hospital or clinic. I mean those are things that that those communities are unable to access. So so it's terrible and you know we're we suffer from a lot of pollution right UNRIG claimed mines in polluted water and in things. That have happened in the past that have never been remedied. So those are all things that we have to work on remedy. Is there anything in relation to greater exposure type of work that you do that they do in liquidities? Well, I mean we have frontline workers in every community right? There's. A main, there's grocery stores in the end of our. Indian communities there are of you know folks are are working in clinics and hospitals and things like that. So. Sure and then, and then there's people who have to go out of their native communities to work in the cities because those are the only jobs they have N I mean any number of frontline jobs that we've heard about right folks in public transportation people were saying grocery stores in healthcare facilities you know hospitals and clinics, and so forth dealing with this pandemic. So yes, I'm I mean we and then you take all that back to your community it's what is consistently happened since this pandemic took hold. In in all of those communities of color, that's another reason why the rates are so

Joe Biden Kobe Representative Holland President Trump Kamala Harris Liquidities New Mexico
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 2 years ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher