35 Burst results for "Native American"

Author Matt Rosenberg Is a Chicago Native Son Who Can’t Believe What He’s Seeing

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:49 min | 4 d ago

Author Matt Rosenberg Is a Chicago Native Son Who Can’t Believe What He’s Seeing

"His name. Is matt rosenberg. The book is what next chicago notes of a pissed off native son. Wow matt rosenberg. Welcome to the program. Thank you eric. It's a pleasure to be here. I know of you because of your dad the legendary milt rosenberg my goodness. How long did he do radio. I mean how many years was he in that world. Thirty eight years he was on. Wgn am but it was just a second job. His first job He was a professor of social psychology at the university of chicago. And i grew up in hyde park in the professor of social social psychology with common sense and great curiosity which i think he passed on at least partially to me. So you've been a journalist. You've done a lot of things this book. I mean everybody in the country Including some chicagoans are wondering what in the world is happening in chicago. so what. What is the book about what next chicago. What ultimately Are you saying here. I am addressing urban progressive misrule In our nation's biggest cities. I'm looking at the unified theory of systemic racism and positing that that is not the problem that the problem is that urban political elites largely of color are running our nation's biggest cities into the ground. What i'm also trying to do. When this book. I went deep into the south side. I moved back to chicago where i lived for thirty years. from the time of being a a young child six years old to you know My mid thirties. When i finally left and moved to seattle with my lovely wife where we raised two children. I had to come back in twenty twenty looking at the city in chaos and turmoil. I went deep into the south side. Talk to black people in their homes and workplaces about what's gone wrong how to set things right so that was a big part of it but then the policy piece. Eric was very big. I felt don't shy away from this. How is it that the public schools are failing. How is it that the criminal court system has run off the rails. How was it that. of fiscal governance has gone so wrong. Why is it that corruption is endemic and rules of governance are rigged so it was ambitious. But i feel like. I had a chance to step up to

Matt Rosenberg Milt Rosenberg Chicago WGN University Of Chicago Hyde Park Eric Seattle
Armando Simón Exposes the Left's Lies About Christopher Columbus

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 4 d ago

Armando Simón Exposes the Left's Lies About Christopher Columbus

"And we know what marxists do to history Well there's a piece today in where is this Sorry folks issues and insights By amando Simone the let me read this to you The accusation which often sound more like insults than rational accusations about Columbus Range from the gruesome claiming he chopped off Indians hands for not bringing gold or carrying out genocide total fabrications To the infantile ridiculing the fact that one of his ships sunk he was not the captain of that particular ship and they were sailing an uncharted seas Abounding in hidden reefs to the stupid Democrat politicians and Native Americans claiming that Columbus carried out genocide in North America where he never set foot nor sail Nonetheless we can expect the usual posturing and slogan airing on Columbus day as you heard By historically illiterate leftists in indigenous people some of the latter being about as Native American as Elizabeth Warren One should consult primary sources preferably in the original Spanish and not in translations His log book they called the capitulations legal documents also known as the book of privileges The contemporary biographies and especially Lewis Castro vehi testamento And others Both written by friar bartolome de la casas was every schoolchild in Spain and the Caribbean nose was the apostle of the Indians for working indefatigably to protect the Indians from his fellow Spaniards De la casas never mentions Columbus committing any crimes And a Las casas did not shrink from the accusing anyone When the contrary mentions Columbus as a constantly protecting the

Amando Simone Columbus Lewis Castro Elizabeth Warren Friar Bartolome De La Casas North America De La Casas Caribbean Spain Las Casas
3 US-based economists win Nobel for research on wages, jobs

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

3 US-based economists win Nobel for research on wages, jobs

"Three economists who work in the US will share the Nobel Prize in economics and what they found in their research may surprise you David card born in Canada's with the university of California Berkeley his pioneering research shows that an increase in the minimum wage does not lead to less hiring and the arrival of immigrants does not lower pay for native born workers those two findings challenge commonly held ideas the other two economists who share the award with them are Joshua angriest of M. I. T. and Guido invents of Stanford University they created a way of studying these types of societal issues in the real world I'm Rita folate

David Card University Of California Berke Nobel Prize Canada M. I. T. United States Joshua Guido Stanford University Rita Folate
Colleges nationwide celebrate ‘Indigenous Peoples Day’ on Columbus Day

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 5 d ago

Colleges nationwide celebrate ‘Indigenous Peoples Day’ on Columbus Day

"Widens the divide between those who see it as Columbus day and others who consider it indigenous peoples day spurred by national calls for racial equity communities across the U. S. have been taking a deeper look at Columbus's legacy in recent years pairing or replacing it on Friday president Biden issued the first presidential proclamation of indigenous peoples day the most significant boost yet to efforts to refocus the federal holiday White House press secretary Jen Psaki is something that the president felt strongly about personally is happy to be the first president to celebrate and to make it that the that the history of moving forward activists including members of native American tribes say ending the formal holiday in Columbus's name has been stymied by politicians and organizations focusing on Italian American heritage I'm

Columbus Jen Psaki U. Biden White House
 Milestone for Bubba Wallace as he earns 1st NASCAR victory

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last week

Milestone for Bubba Wallace as he earns 1st NASCAR victory

"Alabama native Bubba Wallace goes to NASCAR victory lane earning his first Cup series win in the rain delayed race at Talladega superspeedway Wallace becomes only the second African American to win at the sport's highest level and he earned it well it's got to the front of the push for his future teammate Kurt Busch and once there he held off several challengers before the caution fell for a spin in the trial while under caution the rains fell again and officials were forced to call the race early because they couldn't drive the track before darkness would fall finishing second was Brad Keselowski followed by joy we're gonna win third jury Jordan Talladega Alabama

Bubba Wallace Nascar Alabama Wallace Kurt Busch Brad Keselowski Jordan
Dre, Snoop, Eminem, Blige, Lamar to perform at Super Bowl

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Dre, Snoop, Eminem, Blige, Lamar to perform at Super Bowl

"The orders for the Super Bowl halftime show have been named thank top heavy production at this year's Superbowl halftime show that's because the NFL and roc nation say the line up will include some heavy use in the hip hop world with doctor dray Snoop Dogg Eminem and Mary J. Blige and Kendrick Lamar all performing at the game which will be held at so five stadium in Inglewood California that's a shout out for Snoop gray and Lamar all of whom are California natives in a statement dresses during the Superbowl halftime show and to do it in his own backyard no less will be one of the biggest throws of his career the Superbowl returns to the Los Angeles area for the first time since nineteen ninety three I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Dogg Eminem Snoop Gray Super Bowl Kendrick Lamar Mary J. Blige NFL Inglewood California Lamar Los Angeles Oscar Wells Gabriel
US says ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species extinct

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

US says ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species extinct

"The U. S. government is declaring twenty three species extinct it's a rare move for wildlife officials to give up hope on a plant or animal but scientists say climate change threatens to make extinctions more common and it's important to reevaluate from time to time Jack dumba Kerr with the California academy of sciences these pieces have been seen in a very long time despite a lot of effort to find them you know I think it's probably time to declare an extinct and hopefully learn the lessons that you need to learn and move on the list includes eleven bird species eight native to Hawaii and eight species of mussels mostly found in the rivers of the southeastern U. S. key causes of the extinctions include habitat loss from development water pollution logging and competition from invasive species I'm Ben Thomas

U. S. Government Jack Dumba Kerr California Academy Of Sciences Hawaii Ben Thomas
The Latest: Group files civil rights complaint against Idaho

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

The Latest: Group files civil rights complaint against Idaho

"A civil rights complaint has been filed against the state of Idaho for allegedly discriminating against older patients in its coporate care rationing guidelines the group justice in aging is asking the U. S. department of health and Human Services to investigate Idaho's published crisis standards of care guidelines the emergency plan that's been enacted to prioritise patients while hospitals are overwhelmed with cold with nineteen the advocates say the guidelines discriminate against older adults especially black and native Americans by using factors like age to determine which patients first get access to lifesaving care state officials as Idaho standards are based on ethical obligations while protecting medical resources public health officials in Arizona Utah and northern Texas had to modify their crisis care plans after similar complaints were filed Jackie Quinn Washington

Idaho U. S. Department Of Health And Utah Arizona Texas Jackie Quinn Washington
The Propaganda Rodolfo Acuna Wrote to Mexicans in the U.S.

Mark Levin

01:08 min | 3 weeks ago

The Propaganda Rodolfo Acuna Wrote to Mexicans in the U.S.

"One 23 not only is the United States said to be a white dominant systematically racist society pressing all people of color But the country is very existence is a legitimate due to its colonization of Mexico's land This is what's argued hence the true natives are the indigenous Mexicans not the whites who promote racist nativism And this is being taught in our schools and so forth and obviously it's something that many journalists really embrace There was a book in 1972 written by a guy called a Kuna called occupied America And the author writes Mexicans slash chicanos in the United States today are on a press people They are citizens but their citizenship is second class at best Their exploited and manipulated by those with more power and sadly many believe that the only way to get along in Anglo America is to become Americanized themselves see what I'm saying Here Mexican American in your patriotic you've been Americanized you've got a problem

America Mexico
HHS Whistleblower Jodi O'Malley Describes Losing Colleague Who Took Vaccine

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

HHS Whistleblower Jodi O'Malley Describes Losing Colleague Who Took Vaccine

"There was another part of the video. That i want you to talk about where i i might not be remembering this correctly. Jody but you said that one of your here's wanted to get a religious exemption for the vaccine but she didn't. Can you talk about that. That part of the video. Well yes so and works alongside each other in the intensive care unit which was pretty much. Kobe unit the entire pandemic. The vaccine was offered to us federal employees back in decem throughout this entire time. She did not want today. Jeans natives and and it goes against her native belise In order to take the vaccine she just come back from leave and the her in along with two other employees. Were co worse to take it. It was common tainted tankage and when they realized they were taking like yay good job. Yes yes yes you know. And then two weeks later she comes in with a positive coleman and four days later she's in today. You know. I mean we've we've been saying this way too much. I know so many medical people that are seeing these cases can identify with at first it was like oh you got two weeks after. I guess you you waited too long to get it. But there's just way too many people coming in with a positive holding resolve and suffering greatly. Because i hope she survived. His intimation is a serious. She did not she has to later so she as a fully vaccinated nurse passed away. Two is not what they deem fully vaccinated. She received her back seen two weeks later. She's in hostile when she was due for our second one came down with her body. Just like crazy and slaying. Beware and no. She did not make

Jody Kobe Coleman United States
Psaki Slammed Over Reasoning for Why Migrants Don't Need Vaccine Proof but Travelers Do

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:47 min | 3 weeks ago

Psaki Slammed Over Reasoning for Why Migrants Don't Need Vaccine Proof but Travelers Do

"Beach. That's where biden spent the weekend riding around on his bike refusing to answer questions. I'll bet he's refusing to answer questions. He's got a press secretary who evidently thanks to these thousands of illegals who are camped. Out under the bridge in del. Rio texas are just here to like vacation. They don't want to stay here. Did you hear this exchange with the circle. Back pataki and a peter doocy all this is this is a doozy from ducie and check it out. What's going on the border. It's somebody asking the foreign nationals. Who are locked in del. Rio texas and setting out on this side of the border for proof of vaccination for a native kuban test. Well first of all. I can re re re address for you or re re tuck you through what steps we take you for people who fly into the country so if somebody walks into the country right across the river somebody asked them to see their vaccination. Well let me explain to you again. Peter howard process works as individuals as individuals come across the border and they are both assessed for whether they have a any symptoms if they have symptoms they are the intention is for them to be quarantined. That is our process. They're not intending to stay here for a lengthy period of time. I don't think it's the same thing it's not the same thing. These are individuals as we've noted and has been discussed we're expelling individuals based on title forty two specifically because of covet because we want to prevent a scenario where large numbers of people are gathering posing a threat to the community and also to the migrants themselves so those are the policies that we put in place in large part because again the cdc continues to recommend title forty to be in place given face global pandemic. I mean are you kidding as individuals. They're not intending to stay here for a lengthy period of time. I don't think it's the same thing. What does she think these illegals from haiti wanna do go to disneyworld and then go back to haiti the circle back think they just want to go visit times square. Check out the statue liberty and then go home. I don't think they're intending to stay there. They are not intending to stay here for a lengthy period of time. Aren't they intending to move here. She keen asylum. Wow

Rio Texas Peter Doocy Ducie DEL Peter Howard Pataki Biden CDC Haiti Times Square
Fox Reporter Peter Doocy Hammers Psaki While Defending Haitian Illegal Immigrants

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Fox Reporter Peter Doocy Hammers Psaki While Defending Haitian Illegal Immigrants

"Us is starting to try to repatriate more and more of the illegals the migrants in del rio somebody wanted. Somebody said this. We gotta go to del rio mike and do your show from there. Yeah that's what. I want to hang out with thousands of illegals guarantee. A whole bunch of them have covered. I don't want to go down to hold of the bathroom. I nervous i shook. Somebody's hand yesterday. And i was so paranoid. And it's all me. It's it's not normal. I know goofy lot of us are living this way. Because we're just kind of in fear with these thousands and thousands of migrants so they're starting to deport them. You know with the new york times take away. Is i kid. You not headline deported by. Us haitians are in shock. I don't know this country. This is an actual article in the new york times. These haitian migrants longed for the possibility of a better life in the united states. Well wait a minute circle back. Pataki said they're not even stand very long. What do you mean. There's look long in for a better life. They don't want they just want to go to disney world for a weekend then go home again right circle back said that yesterday. Pretty fascinating exchange with peter. Doocy check this out. this is cut number one. Here's jen psaki. With peter doocy yesterday at the white house. What's going on at the border. It's somebody asking the foreign nationals. Who are locked in del. Rio texas and setting on this side of the border for proof of vaccination for a native kuban test. Well first of all i can. I can re address for you or we re talk through what steps we take people who fly into the country so somebody walks into the country right across the river. Somebody asked them to see their fascination. Well let me explain to you again. Peter our process works as individuals as individuals. Come across the border and they are both zest for whether they have any symptoms if they have symptoms they are. The intention is for them to be quarantined that our process. They're not intending to stay here for a lengthy period of time. I don't think it's the same thing. It's not the same thing to you. Let me just explain this our process if they have symptoms they're quarantined will wait a minute. We've been told over and over again. You can walk around with cova without symptoms for a while before you get symptoms. Can't you transmit the virus. A symptomatically would faucher told us so. I guess circle back doesn't believe ouchi.

The New York Times Doocy Del Rio Jen Psaki Peter Doocy United States Rio Texas Pataki Disney White House Peter DEL Faucher Ouchi
India to Resume Exports of Coronavirus Vaccines in October

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

India to Resume Exports of Coronavirus Vaccines in October

"India the world's largest vaccine producer will resume exports I'm donations of surplus coronavirus vaccines in October after holding them during a devastating surging domestic infections in April in just health minister says the surplus Maxine's will be used to fulfil India's commitment towards the world for the collective fight against cove in nineteen the vaccinating engines will remain the government's topmost priority he says India was expected to be a key supplier for the world and for the U. N. backed initiatives aimed at taxing equity it began exporting goes in January but stopped after being hit by a massive wave of cases the whole thing exports left many developing countries without adequate supplies before halting exports in you had to native will sold sixty six million vaccine doses to nearly one hundred countries I'm Charles Taylor this month

India Maxine U. Government Charles Taylor
Use of OxyContin Profits to Fight Opioids Formally Approved

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Use of OxyContin Profits to Fight Opioids Formally Approved

"The judge has formally approved a plan to turn oxycontin maker Purdue pharma into a new company no longer owned by members of the Sackler family and with his profits going to fight the opioid epidemic bankruptcy judge Robert drain officially has confirmed the reorganization more than two weeks after he announced he would do so pending to launching technical changes however several states among all the parties have already appealed the decision the deal resolves some three thousand lawsuits filed by state and local governments native American tribes unions hospitals and others who claimed the company's marketing of prescription opioids help Spock and continue overdose epidemic linked to more than five hundred thousand deaths in the U. S. in the last two decades I'm Charles there that's my

Sackler Family Robert Drain Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Spock U. Charles
Officials Urge Killing of Invasive Spotted Lanternfly

Kottke Ride Home

01:44 min | Last month

Officials Urge Killing of Invasive Spotted Lanternfly

"If you live on the east coast of the us especially in new york or pennsylvania and see a visually striking spotted lantern fly. The state governments would like you to forget any humane ideas about carefully moving it from one spot to another and instead to immediately kill it the spotted lantern fly is an invasive pest that is not native to the us and apparently is threatening to over seventy of the plant species that feeds on feeds on meaning draining sap and leaving them weakened and vulnerable to disease among those species. Is the atlantis autism or tree of heaven which the new york times points out is best known as the tree from betty. Smith's nineteen forty-three novel. A tree grows in brooklyn but this pernicious beast who has delicate grey wings spotted in black with a bonus set of bright red wings also spotted with black underneath. I arrived in the us from asia seven years ago and entered new york city last year. During the pandemic environmentalists ecologists are encouraging people to kill the bugs site because they have no natural predators here and no organic pesticides that can take them out here. New york the department of agriculture is additionally asking people to submit the location where you found the lantern fly on their website in pennsylvania. If you're caught moving the insect from one location to another you could be fined. Abort from the destruction these little lantern flies could cause on native species. Governments are being so intense because they know that the lantern flies are quite striking. They're not the kind of bug most people would want to kill. Unlike some other invasive species like the asian longhorn beetle that caused a massive deforestation throughout new york in the late nineties. According to the new york times

Pennsylvania United States Autism New York New York Times Betty Brooklyn Smith New York City Asia Department Of Agriculture
White House Offers Nicki Minaj Call to Answer Vaccine Questions

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

White House Offers Nicki Minaj Call to Answer Vaccine Questions

"The White House has offered to school of rap star after she posted incorrect information about the cool bit nineteen vaccine the Biden administration is trying to get Nicki Minaj back on key when it comes to claims about side effects of the coronavirus vaccine not got attention this week by posting an unverified claim that a cousin's male friend in her native Trinidad took the shot and ended up impotent and with swollen **** infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says there's no way that's possible and the White House is looking to seven on straight it's part of an effort by the feds to address lingering concerns about the vaccine or not says she is open to talking with health experts I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Biden Administration White House Nicki Minaj Dr Anthony Fauci Trinidad Infectious Disease Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Wild Ride of the '86 Mets: Inside Once Upon a Time in Queens

ESPN Daily

01:23 min | Last month

The Wild Ride of the '86 Mets: Inside Once Upon a Time in Queens

"Nick davis. I watched your four part documentary. Once upon a time in queens. It is debut in over two evenings tonight and tomorrow. It's the new thirty for thirty. And the thing that i was struck by about your story here about the nineteen ninety-six. Mets is how much of a character the city of new york is. And i know you're a native new yorker. I am a native new yorker but i was born in one thousand nine hundred five so i could not get enough of the city as you captured it. I'm curious why it was important to you that you did it in that way. Well i think the thing that always struck me about this team was that they captured the spirit of the city as well as any sports team. I can imagine. It wasn't just. The city fell in love with the team Which happens all over the place but the the way the team came together and the the rollicking wild crazy dangerous energy on that team mirrored the city in the eighty and that was always. The goal of the film was to talk about how the team and the city were fused and became one. You think about the nineteen seventy-five cincinnati reg team lots of wonderful personalities. But you don't associate them with cincinnati in the mid seventies the way you do the nineteen eighty six minutes with new york city

Nick Davis Queens Mets New York Cincinnati New York City
California Voter Shocked When Polling Station Wrongly Tells Her She Already Voted

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:20 min | Last month

California Voter Shocked When Polling Station Wrongly Tells Her She Already Voted

"Listen to this story from california from the republican voter. Who went to vote cutting evan. California native and current west hills resident eight year old is still bender. Spoke with us just a short time ago. What happened today. And how shocked are you very. I went to el camino high school to vote. Got there at ten thirty gave her this and she scanned it and said you voted. I said no. I have it and she said this has been happening all morning. The man next to me was arguing. The same thing so as i left i did the provisional ballot and let us really angry and i saw two women walking toward me as i left and i said don't be surprised if they tell you you've already voted and she said they've already done that if i voted. How did i vote. And who did you vote for well. I asked the couple young women that i talked to. And i are you in by any chance. Republicans she said. Yes and i said well so am i. And so are the two friends that had the problem. Vfw so make shoes suspicious. I would think so. And still. I'd like to know how i voted. Just that last sentence. I'd like to know how. I voted. Because i haven't because somebody has voted in my name. Somebody who picked out that main in ballot or that duplicate in my apartment block or just photocopied it and voted. Isn't it interesting. She showed her. Id they told her. You can't vote. You can fill in the provision will maybe dig up the prior one but who knows who knows what's going to happen and then she his that it's happened multiple times on that very day. And in every instance. What was it was a democrat. Voter was it. A mixture of democrats independents and republicans. No the only people who had told sorry. You've already voted. A registered republicans.

El Camino High School West Hills Bender Evan California
"native american" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:31 min | Last month

"native american" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Richard reid is a seattle bureau chief for the la times he in our colleague. Curtis lee have done multiple. Dispatches across the united states on how the cove in nineteen pandemic has affected native americans. This summer he visited the fort. Belknap indian reservation in montana to see how the vaccination efforts were doing there. Richard welcome to the times good to be with you in the first part of the pandemic cove nineteen was just devastating native americans. Yes so you're right. i mean. Kobe hit native. American communities extremely hard diabetes and heart disease and a lot of other underlying health conditions are more common among native americans. So that meant that people were more vulnerable. There's also on in many communities a housing shortage which means that one family will get multiple generations all crowded in together in a house and that means the virus can just rip through one family. they're tiny hospitals little clinics and so compared to white people. Native americans are almost twice as likely to get infected and more than three times as likely to be hospitalized. Yeah for example the navajo nation in new mexico. Arizona and utah. They've had more than thirty. Two thousand corona virus cases and fourteen hundred debts. That's a cova. Death rate four times the national average. It's been very tough on that community you know. That's the biggest reservation in the country. The trouble is there that You can tell people to wash their hands frequently for example but Thirty to forty percent of the households lack running water. You incurred as mentioned the navajo nation in an article in december and this was the headline then cove nineteen is crushing native american reservations. But this trust the government makes vaccines a hard sell and the article came out just as the united states was going through this high of the second cove. Nineteen wave right as vaccines. Were on the cusp of getting a distributed. What was added to that. You were finding back then. Well it's amazing. I mean the experts had it wrong. They expected that this distrust that you talked about of the government which dates back all the way to colonial times would mean that a lot of people would be suspicious of a vaccine developed by the federal government and they said on health issues. This distressed is especially strong because have been all these atrocities. I mean forced sterilization of native american women in the nineteen seventies and other events that people as fresh in their minds and so even tribal leaders themselves predicted that people would shun the vaccines. Yeah we'll be talking to one later on in the episode so that was back in december that story and your latest story on the issue. Here's a headline despite obstacles. Native americans have the nation's highest cove nineteen vaccination rate. So what changed. Well it turns out that many native americans do have long memories of and what they do remember are these devastating epidemics smallpox in the eighteenth nineteenth centuries and so they have a real respect for what infectious disease can do to a community and they also have respect for their elders and understanding that it's really important to get vaccinated to protect them and then along with them the tribal customs and languages where some of the ways that the tribe was emphasizing to their members. Hey you know we need to take this vaccine to protect our elders to maintain our culture and heritage. Yeah you know. A lot of tribes used native language speakers and radio spots and And social media to get out the word and so the whole point was trying to get trusted messengers out there and that was very effective. And then You know the conspiracies that have been going all around the united states. They didn't seem to really spread as much on native american reservations specifically due to these trusted messengers telling people to take the vaccine and really take seriously. Yeah i also went to the black feet reservation and there was a woman there who put it this way she said We're black feet. First and democrats and republicans second so the vaccination rates then have just been incredible for native americans. Yeah i mean it's a little hard to tell because many people who get shots don't put down what racer ethnicity they are. But you know more than one hundred million people have and so. Those numbers suggests that native americans are twenty four percent more likely than whites to be fully vaccinated. And if you look at latinos thirty one percent more likely than latinos to get vaccinated sixty four percent more likely than african americans and eleven percent. More likely than asian americans. Wow in yeah even in alaska. You mentioned that. Native americans air make fifteen percent of the state's population but by april accounted for twenty two percent of people getting shots. Yeah people in alaska really Responded quite enthusiastically which is incredible considering the know these vast distances that The vaccines had to be transported. We'll have more after this break. This is a message from essential workers in the los angeles county federation of labor. Let me ask you a question. On behalf of essential workers like nurses grocery workers and other people who worked to the frontlines of the pandemic. Do you want to go back to the dark days of covert because we don't that's why essential workers say no on the recall. The recall proponents want to roll back. Covert protections and eliminate measures to keep workers and students safe when the pandemic hit governor newsom followed science and saved lives. We can't brisk more lives and jobs. Vote no on the recall. It's too big a risk. Return your no ballot. Today this ad paid for by essential workers opposing the recall of governor gavin newsom sponsored by the los angeles county federation of labor afl cio committee major funding from united food and commercial workers service employees international union local two thousand fifteen and southern california pipe trades district council number sixteen. Return your no ballot today. So my friends at lemmon. The media have a new podcast. I'm excited to tell you about called. I'm sorry i'm sorry is all about apologies. And how they play out. In the court of public opinion it's hosted by comedians muhannad el-sheikhi. Oh hallo pez. And kiki monique each week. This show on facts. The latest and greatest in twitter gaffes petty beef and not so subtle schade. Forgive forget or cancel checkout. I'm sorry to explore. The latest in celebrity apologies help guests in listeners. Get the run redemption and say sorry to stars who never got the apology. They deserved hash. Tag free brittany. I'm sorry premieres. August twenty seventh. Wherever you get your podcasts richard. For your latest story native americans and cove in nineteen. You went to the fort. Belknap indian reservation montana. Describe it for us. Well it's a community of forty five hundred people and it's in the plains of northern montana. There's a little town at the center and some outlying villages there to herds of buffalo and this crystal clear spring at the base of a sacred butte this road that winds through a deep canyon to sites where they have ceremonies so it took the virus quite a long time to get there. Because it's so secluded and win it. Did they have just a six bed hospital. So that was quickly overwhelmed. And they had to airlift patients to billings and as far away as salt lake city and then by december ten people have died in most of them were elders so the tribe was suffering but by then the vaccines were slowly starting to roll out so immediately tribal leaders said. Hey we gotta take this vaccine right. And so what i did. I spent a day of following a few public health nurses. And they're going out into these outlying communities in sometimes to homes or just an outlying clinic to vaccinate people and they work with indian health service which is a big federal agency that gets criticized a lot for being too centralized in fact that worked in their favour because they were able to go into those records and find all the patients find their ages on know how to reach them bring them in order of age so they brought the elders. I even brought native language speakers. I saw.

Curtis lee Belknap indian reservation Richard reid united states la times montana Kobe heart disease los angeles county federation seattle new mexico smallpox governor newsom diabetes
"native american" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

07:51 min | 4 months ago

"native american" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Just help carbon. Pass them how to do that. So what are you. What are you I think like the the purpose is so admirable. And you're right. There's there's pressure on it to happen. Now what are you. You got to catch people with delicious. Like what are you excited to serve at the restaurant. Well you know we as a whole bunch of different kinds of proteins. So there's all there's rabbit there's benistan elk. There's also the lake fish around the up to fifteen thousand lakes. Turn them soda. And we prioritize purchasing from indigenous producers. I have to indigenous fisheries close by a close by to us. So we can get walleyes northern whitefish and all sorts of lake superior trout in herrings and things like that just like you know so much stuff even insect usage so we have some local Cricket farmers and you know we're just really open for all those pieces but like there's just so many fun flavors there's all these barriers choke cherries berries and all the berries all the plums. All the crab apples and then you get into like well tubers and wild greens while ginger lockdown while onions like there's just so much around us for us it's just fun like looking at. What is our ambitions pantry that really represents this region and what kind of creative foods can we create with that. So that's gonna designing your menu as being really creative with these offerings and You know just just kind of seeing where we go with it and we can explore other regions in our main offerings are going to be rescinded seating but mostly we just wanna open the doors so we can you know bring in guest chefs from the southwest or bringing some guest chefs from northeastern explorers flavors from british columbia from alaska. Whoever there's so much to explore out there culinary in connor sean. You're telling me that native american people don't eat the same thing and it's just the same like we don't all live in. Tv's and it's a big piece. Why we against bribe because like. There's no reason that one piece did identify all of us as our food because it had nothing to do with us to begin left and where to diverse. We have so much amazing diversity. There's so many languages out there. So many cultures somebody religions and you know if we see our future through or you can stop at indigenous restaurants driving across this nation in any direction and being able to experience that you know 'cause you'd come in come across the native restaurant somewhere in ohio or or washington state or wherever it might be and you get to explore what are the true flavors of that particular land space in the histories there. I don't want this to be a downer. I want people to be engaged and to understand what you know. You're talking about but because it's such a painful subject. I feel like a lot of people. Don't want to know and it's the same reason why people don't want to know there was a ahead on you know that stake that you're eating right. It's just like anything that has to deal with pain and suffering and tragedy. I feel a lot of people. Just don't wanna know anything about and we'll use your described to me was. Oh yeah almost. Every state in in this lower forty eight had all kinds of indigenous people in different tribes and different languages and different everything. Where do they go. I know it's a stupid question to ask. But i feel like it's important one for a lot of people to understand again. What happened absolutely. And that's why we think that history is such an important part in this goud opens up the doors to talk about history. People you know people should be reading. Indigenous sister The the indigenous peoples since three the united states by roxanne dunbar. Or it's because it really lays out what happens to all of america's especially in the eighteen hundreds and that's like the most damaging generation you know people don't know that ninety percent of the indigenous population californians out like three decades right. There's just like so much pieces out. There and people just comfortably live without having to think about the land of their on the generational wealth that they've been born into is a direct result of colonialism genocide. And you know all of those things that happened in american history. But you know we're trying to find a positive path through this because you know there's so much delicious screwed around us. There's so much amazing stuff that we can come up with and creates and you know again like we're setting up systems that's hopefully going to go beyond our lifetime that we're going to set up so the next couple of generations down all grow up having access to their own indigenous foods and their cultures know how to take it not to do something way better than i can never do. How much of this is about with this restaurant. And what you've done with your not prophet. is about preserving recipes. Because i can tell you another story. Maybe i'll tell it you know. On his pocket. I found it to be very difficult to find certain tribes diet or written history. How hard is it for you to locate this. Because i found it to be difficult. And that's just me just one project. I was working on. You're doing all of it. Well we know we're not trying to cook like it's exactly fourteen ninety one. We're just trying to understand as much of our ancestors indigenous diets as possible. What we're putting in their pantries and all kinds of dr herbs or insects or our agricultural pieces like what are they have to pull from to utilize. Also it's those flavors so we're looking at a more modernized version. So we're using you know it's kind of one foot in past one foot in the future a little bit because we're trying to understand like all the pieces of in we live in a different world so you have to look at the world through this indigenous lands because sandilands aren't necessarily from here right but we want to look like from an indigenous perspective. Can you eat at the medicine. Can you do something with it. And there's all sorts of questions that you ask that indigenous lens so all we're to do is look at. What is a modern viewpoint of indigenous culinary and how that gonna benefit us however indigenous food systems going to benefit us in the future. And there's just so much because you know indigenous peoples around the world we're able to have agricultural systems that were completely organic right And extremely diverse with all sorts of plant diversity in there that they have been able to maintain for generations of generations then all indigenous peoples across the globe had that huge dollars of wild plants around him what to do. What's food what's medicine. How do you craft with things like the world gave us everything we needed. Not generate. that knowledge is so important because we live so far removed from our own environment across the board and especially with histories the colonial history. They just pretend like nothing happens And we can look a little bit deeper because you look at mexican food way more indigenous senators. You know spanish or french right. Because you have the nixon last corn policy of beans your chili's you have all these things that are really representative of pre colonial mexico. And you know so. It's easy to decolonize because we can go into manhattan you do decolonize. Dinner of what should have been there. If there was anything natural left there right because we have the knowledge of the tribes. The language is What kind of plants. They were growing. What kind of animals and protein seafood there are utilizing and be able to build the pantries to to build those menus off of that. This episode is brought to you by. I'm healthy way dog food. It can be hard to resist sneaking your dog their favorite treats but when it's time to take control of their diet you need a meal that will keep them healthy happy and at the right weight certainly something that i've had problems with my dog savvy as gets older and not exercising as much and was switched out his diet so he's a little bit healthier so try. Iams healthy weight dog food. A kayla recipe with less fat versus imes chunks made with a medley delicious ingredients. Your dog will love help them get back in shape with healthy weight learn. More at imes dot com. That's i a m dot com learn more at. I'm dot com. This episode is brought to you by american express working from home for so long has made me realize that.

ohio ninety percent alaska washington america american express roxanne dunbar one foot one project one piece manhattan up to fifteen thousand lakes californians fourteen ninety one connor sean united states nixon spanish mexico mexican
"native american" Discussed on The Troy Farkas Show

The Troy Farkas Show

03:39 min | 4 months ago

"native american" Discussed on The Troy Farkas Show

"Think the black lives matter movement has gave has allowed native american voices to be heard and in. I think that's really important because when we look at what has happened with with the black lives matter movement and people really standing up and use their voice in speaking their truth. Not being afraid that they're gonna get judged or they're going to get look a certain way. It's really helped that movement. What is happened has really helped the native american movements To be heard. Because i think oppressed people sort of help oppressed people and we've both been oppressed in different ways but the traumas within black communities native communities are very similar we both both of these communities tend to struggle with drugs and alcohol abuse suicide rates obesity. All of those that are native communities are oftentimes in in in inner city black communities. And it's sad. But i'm just glad that i like i said i'm an i'm an optimist so i look at this situation and it is a sad situation but we have to look at positives of it in were allowing our voices to be heard and I think when you look at native history a lot of things you're like that can't be real because i've never even learned about this and it seems to. It seems it almost seems made up. Because you're learn you learn about native american history and the only thing you learn about is Maybe the trail of tears may be this so that you never learn about wounded knee. You never learn about some of the massacres. You never learned about residential schools in sorry to say you know i know. Yeah but a lot of these. These things that have created a generational trauma canadian american. The world is just now learning about it because because they're starting to be voiced by more and more people in and They're they're important. And i look at like how people view how people be native americans You know we're on. we're on. T shirts were mascots. We're we're we're the names on tobacco cars cherokee I mean tacoma. You got all these you run roads where were the names of state and Our jewelry jewelries even like trending and this trendy people that everybody wants to like. This is who america is but at the end of the day The the truth isn't being told and now it's starting to and people are wanting to learn about it but i think not at a big enough stage it has to start to be in our our history books just like slavery is just like some of the other things We have to start to learn about these things to acknowledging and understand that this isn't honoring be having this is our mascot isn't is no honor. it's actually dehumanizing to people that are still that still exist.

both america canadian american native american americans black american
"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

"Stories. Thanks again to advertisers. And that was the final break. Let's finish off the phone call. They're just like this. Huge justice behind it. And i like to eat it anymore do you do you think that might be reached. You think consciously or subconsciously that that might be part of why you've become really interested in in crop growth and food engineering. I actually think so. See i think like the. I've just isn't happening there. It's just it's really feeling my passion around like oh. We just have to find a way. I guess. Carlos new like mars pretty much desert. I mean it's more inhospitable arizona. Then the parts are the have the reservation on it but like i dunno. It's like i'm sure there's gonna be some parallels between like a lack of water. I make any sense laughing about it but you are effectively saying that. If the if you wanna do studies on earth about the closest circumstances to living on mars that you might be able to argue that. It's it's native the native american experience that that might be the closest. We have to look right. Is that what you're saying. Yeah i yeah yeah came to mind. Yeah maybe kind of a baseless accusation but Really bad and everybody listening to this show. Does this conversation stumbling into thought. But you go. 'cause i just i just looked it up. You said your grandma has to drive six hours to supermarket from my house in new jersey. The supermarket i go to is ten minutes away. Maximum if i was living the experience of your grandmother to put this in perspective from my house in northern new jersey. I would have to drive to richmond. Virginia to go to a supermarket. I could drive as far as richmond. Virginia before i passed another supermarket. That's that's that's really you know. There's i know that you're describing areas that are actual desert's but they talk about food desert's to ask to be one of the most severe food desserts. You can find certainly for anyone in america now. Sure sure yup. I'm checking in the other direction. That's if i went south. If i went west that would mean that i would have to drive from my house in new jersey to youngstown. Ohio to go to a same. Why my brother in law young town glad. They're glad that that's the that's the half we manage system onto the happy to know somebody from there as i go your grandma as i'm trying to highlight you're joking around knots. Drive to ohio just to get a car full.

new jersey Carlos arizona richmond Virginia youngstown america Ohio ohio
"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

"The aggression towards native americans that we've all read about is a thing of the past and i realized that. Oh whatever's going on in the present this. This life is not easy. at least. maria's. I saw like this is still very raw. Offer a lot of people that that this is what they were handed. And that's a little thing they were they were actually it was. Here's where you'll go that it was i opening. No yeah it is. It's really bad like the food insecurity. They're so bad and it's really sad. 'cause my grandma and grandpa still live on the reservation and they don't want to live off of it and and they have to drive like six. My grandma's and drive like six hours just to go to the grocery store. That's and yeah. It's really bad and how there's another thing too. Yeah the so like my cultural food. I've grown up like my mom. So we have this thing called vibe red and yeah my mind steel and all that and it's not healthy for you whatsoever and i've always kind of thought that But i like never really understood why we have that until i came across his article That was done and it says the reason why we have a lot of food. That's like really unhealthy and like deep fried and all that is because when we were. I guess when the walks were happening like the trailed tears and my sumner happened gave us all this food that flower and barred and coffee and let me know what to do with it and i guess we started just making food that we have now but it's really really unhealthy and it just it kinda like brought that magic away from the food for me associated so much with like being home and With my mom and my dad and every day but they're just like this huge injustice behind it as pause.

maria sumner
"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

"How are we gonna have permanent outposts on moons and planets if we don't have oxygen. Is that something that we're trying to figure out how we can create or trigger. yeah so i hate to do this project for like my fear design class and is basically just How do we colonize mars pretty much. We had to build like structure. It's all hypothetical. I and my professor took a lot inspiration from the martian which book but right now yeah and so we had to take a all of the counts. A don't really mean never How they that go on june. Oh my gosh. I feel like such a space phony right. They're interested in new subject. And i'm like wait like i dunno. I've been getting a lot of sleep too. But i know the correction putting water creates a lot of energy and it creates too in the process. And i'm pretty sure something to do with chemical reaction but yeah that would be my guessing narrow. Can't really never really my design for that too. Can i ask you something anyway. Yeah i wanna ask you something. That's not about the science itself. An apology apologies. If this is like a reach or rude the cliche of like you know you. You watch a movie about nasa and that control room and mostly what you see is like the cliche is like kind of a white guy who looks like me. A lab coat. Who's a know it all right. That's the shea. Those representations are changing in recent years. That's good that's good But in talking to you on the phone you're someone who's willing to say. Oh yeah no. I don't have all the answers and that's different than the cliche like we expect science people to be like. Oh here's everything you need to know. You also are young woman in identify. Otherwise i don't wanna assume And you're also very laid back. Your style speaking is like yeah. Yeah like thought about it did projects on it think about i guess my question is this within this world of being an engineering student of trying to get internships at nasa. Are those cliches things. I know from movies or are they actually things that can make it difficult within the path. You're currently walking chris. It makes it so difficult Like right now. I feel like the reason why definitely over to watch and being like i don't really know is because like in the back of my mind there's probably some. Why older engineer. Who's gonna listen to this call and be like she doesn't know any megan true like i don't know a lot and i'm trying to learn But yeah right. Now i go to university that's predominantly white males and Any engineering major..

nasa chris megan
"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

04:56 min | 5 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

"That would be really cool. I would be really cool so you said you're not sure about the moon either. So is it more like maybe on a space station type environment. I'm just really interested in what people are out here planning. Yeah so it's mostly the international space right. Now that they wanna they have a call like grow up. They're actually going planning now but like furthest thing about it in. My mind is The soil so we can't really like it's an environment and it's well is very like a loose thing but water it just doesn't interact with will say And we also. I'm thinking of microbiology right now. And like a huge part of like this tiny imminence toilet all the microbes in there and because we want to be like a sterile environment and everything they i believe they take all of my out and they have a very sterile environment So but the thing is like we don't know taking all the meikeljohn soil It just really affects the plants. Because like i said it's like a tiny little ecosystem down there and the plans aren't gonna grow as well so it's just i don't know in my mind is just like it's huge in nearing problem and i feel like it's going to take the rest of my life. It's all of it. And that's the problem by what i saw. Because i think there's just so many applications and i can really help people and We get like higher yields and all the research could actually benefit agriculture meal or on earth. that's always been one of the ways that they justify space programs right when people when people are going. Why so money on space programmes ago. There's been a lot of examples of. Oh well there's technology. We figure out for space that like the vcr. Not that we use vcr's anymore that was originally developed by nasa famously. And there's there's a number of things that you go. Oh well we figure out things for space and then we realize oh every home in the world. Should one of these in life gets easier. That's cool yeah. Yeah cool when that happens now..

nasa
"native american" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

03:26 min | 5 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"Well hello hello hello. World this is maureen from quarantine. And here i am pop up podcast saying hello from a beautiful montecito. California and keeping with montecito will give a beautiful native american prayer here And it's From thirteen thousand years ago when the native americans first settled here in montecito and so Keep it real simple into the solution. I'll let you listen to the quiet for a little bit here and let the seat toe and send out some pictures and visuals a gorgeous scenery here. Beautiful lake with swans and swans or swimming around and they represent all beauty and love in the world and beautiful mountains. Blue sky a few clouds and Just gorgeous and making it perfect everything perfect here and again perfect weather and the water is actually glistening. The sun shining cower on the water. So i'm here riding my schwinn beach. Cruiser alani ocean and just sending out the gorgeous chee life force energy around moral done with that sad. I will carry on now with the gorgeous native american prayer. And i thank you for listening. Here maureen quinn pop up podcast and month to see till california and again. It is kind of a cool thing to do to check in with history and The local areas where you live to Find and discover new places and Look at nature. Be at one with nature and i encourage you all invite you all to listen to the previous podcast and the story of the buddha and also the story of the bamboo and it's all about resilience and kindness and then of course. What would todd caspi without a harley davidson. Corvette going by so on that perfect note california. Oh i think. I need to put a particular song with this one for our california song and again i encourage you all to listen to it because it's happy. Music called punky dilemma so california. Oh my goodness oh. Wow a beautiful beautiful. Seagull just flew right overhead bringing us good luck and now i shall carry on with the native american prayer here and send out the great mojo. Lifeforce chee here and the quantum field and again. Thank you for listening. Here from santa barbara montecito not too far from santa barbara and also in the beach zone. Here heading north. There's so many glorious. Little places will be discovering and and Sending out papa. Podcasts from to share in this gorgeous Nature harley had to go by.

harley davidson maureen santa barbara thirteen thousand years ago California first california Corvette montecito maureen quinn santa barbara montecito punky dilemma schwinn beach alani ocean harley native native american todd caspi american native americans
"native american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:10 min | 8 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Gave davis you've described Now we've gone back to the eighteen ninety s to talk about A mostly white anthropologists recording native american sounds. Even though some native american peoples were participants not just subjects and we began the conversation on today's episode talking about The red power era. Which would be like the nine hundred sixty s and seventy s. Where a lot of community radio stations of flowered and those would be examples of native peoples using the radio to talk to native people as as opposed to what we had in the eighteen. Ninety s Was there is there something in the middle in the early years of radio where native people were using their own voices with radio or record sounds. Yeah exactly. That's what i i wanted to ask the same question eric about when at what point. 'cause i know from reading a little bit of your research there. Is this point where very early on you have. Native american people who are controlling the means of production. Yeah so Great question. And i like i. It's i'm kind of passionate about because this stat first. Half of the twentieth century is doesn't get that much attention in a lot of ways in the ways that the red power movement put new people on public consciousness In a bigger way there those probably six decades before that are often invisible to to a broader audience even though obviously within communities themselves they know they were there so what was happening in those years in. It's hard as as you probably have talked to a lot of people who do research early radio. There's not great records of what was going on to. Almost you're finding these mentions of people in intact sources or in in other sources But there were some interesting example so in the twenties as in radio starts to really take off One of the kind of powerful examples. That that i came across That sort of told about from The the six nations or holding a show knee in like upstate..

nine hundred sixty s six nations today Half of the twentieth century seventy s. eighteen ninety s eighteen Gave davis Ninety s six decades before One Native american twenties first native american eric american
"native american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

04:29 min | 8 months ago

"native american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"A he wrote it in the nineteen nineties called in the air and he from what i can tell he correspondent this is kind of pre email in some ways like corresponded with a people from a lot of these stations and got kind of their responses of how they founded in and What the how they worked in the communities and so for my research i was kind of thinking will wear this star. Like he's kind of done. Some of the work of telling that history where i need to kind of look for archives and things that i that i should work on a dissertation right and when did this start when in realizing what what what about before the seventies what what is what are the stories from then in that became much more manageable topic. accepted i ended up also talking about Sound recording Which it's not totally disconnected from radio In some ways. So i just just to add there. We did an episode. The show with kyle barnett who who talked a lot about the intersections between the early recording industry in the early radio industry so i appreciate that. That was the topic of your dissertation. Because they're so much there were so intertwined maybe in this is a great opportunity. Should jump right into it Josh garrett gave us tell us about tell us about the earliest examples of native american. Sound recordings okay. Yeah so the. The history of native americans sound recordings is kind of deeply entwined as you probably could imagine with the field of anthropology so in Late nineteenth century the field of anthropologist growing into an academic field in some way and there are a lot of mostly non native interesting examples of native anthropologists Who were had this feeling that that native people in their cultures were going to disappear and they had this fear about indigenous people around the world to some extent And they needed to document these cultures and Before they vanished And they've called native american people the.

Josh garrett kyle barnett Late nineteenth century nineteen nineties before the seventies american native american americans
"native american" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of a Native American with a disembodied sword, dangling arm overhead has been Long a source of controversy in this state and in today's racial inequality climate. The issue has bubbled over the state Senate votes unanimously to set up a commission to study the symbols and suggest changes. Governor Charlie Baker says he is open to having that discussion. But what's not clear here is if the House of Representatives on Beacon Hill will take up the issue as well. Winchester High School will no longer be home to the sage ums. The school committee votes to remove that mascot that indigenous people and others called racist. BBC's James RoHaas is in Winchester. With Mohr on last night's vote. Winchester High is joining the list of schools nationwide that are moving to replace their native American mascot. In this case, the Satyam the Public Schools Committee voted unanimously to retire the mascot and logo during last night's virtual meeting, which included hours of public comment. Joyce Reine Andersson is a professor of US ethnic and indigenous studies at Bridgewater State. Regarding the overall use of Native American imagery, she says it's damaging the psychological damage to native Children to see. You know, some of the things that fans do, for example, painting themselves with with red red paint on their face. We've done away with black face. Why do we have red face right? No timeline yet for when the sage a mascot will be replaced. In Winchester, James RoHaas W B Z Boston's NewsRadio Coming Up Lights, camera game shows set to return details on the way 703.

Winchester Winchester High School Joyce Reine Andersson James RoHaas Winchester High Governor Charlie Baker Public Schools Committee Senate professor House of Representatives Bridgewater State Beacon Hill Satyam Mohr BBC Boston
"native american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

13:07 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Them properly totally unconsciously right right right right. This is exactly what you said. These these are people from the past. These are these warriors people from the past and my forefathers beat them well we do what we do know from unpublished. Research is that support for the mascots is aligned with the US nationalism and it's aligned with a particular belief that men should be Tough likes likes particular version of Masculinity so you know there's there's a lot of resistance and you know it it's also attached to tradition as our kind of any mascots right But some things seemed to go beyond that in this case I was going to ask you about that in I. Thank you for for Segue into that. That Seoul Nationalistic debate in in that Article Goal that I was reading from the Hartford Current Before talking about killingly. Connecticut is the alignment with the whole trump movement. Have you seen seen that in your research. The more nothing So in general You know there are both liberals and conservative. People who support native mascots The research does show that conservatives are more apt but that doesn't mean that you know liberal people are on the other side necessarily So Oh but you know it could be you know. There's a lot of things that are that people haven't researched yet because there's not enough of US studying native issues There's a lot of native issues to study And it also in academia A- Ah you know people studying native American issues is very very small percent you know. Those studies are Native people are under represented in scholarship to two. I just I just Had a paper accepted as an upcoming conference. And it's a very big conference and I looked at the I did a quick search of Some native terms and it looked like there was one maybe two other papers that might be focused based on native Americans. and not everybody's GonNa put that in title but a segue. How did you since you're such a dearth of scholars scholarship in his area? How did you get into this area? Well that's a good question so in general I was I have a family background on. That is focused on issues or somewhat has been focused on issues of inequality but not native issues. But then I you know I started kind of studying some issues in sport including Stereotypes of African Americans in Sport And and then I was studying at the University of Iowa and I went on a big ten student. Exchange the ten there's ten colleges and And I was at the University of Illinois and You know I was astounded. At that time they still officially had the their their native mascot are hanging onto it at University of Illinois student. I don't even know. Is it still them. But what. But there's a very large body of alumni and other people that have resisted the change. And so you can find it all over campus. Wow In defiance really of the administration finally making the decision to remove it. These people people From not only from the University of Illinois but all over the country which we talked about are they just resistant or they just don't care about the research is saying it's negatively affect people. And they just don't care what is up with that. Well okay. So th that's a good topic to to discuss a little bit about so so people are passionate about their mascots right Especially athletes and especially people that are kind of have You know a dentist by heavily with their school Or their team in the case of pro teams in that kind of thing. And so you know they're attached to the traditions additions. You know no matter what they are And and their identities become aligned with their school ooh or a team And I think there are several reasons why a lot of people don't understand the mascot got issue. I is and I mentioned this before that. But not this directly. They define racism as having having a racist intent. Like I don't like black people. I don't like Latine ex people. I don't like native Americans and kind of in over negatively and they don't realize that racial inequality has other components that there are these things that appear to be positive the stereotypes that there are systems that might on the surface appeared to be neutral But are not when you look at their outcomes so so a lot of people define racial inequality and racism as intentionally negative. Like Kinda gotta meanness streak to it. And I don't think that that's what primarily happening here and but if people are just thinking about intent and they know that they and the people around them don't have an overtly negative intent right then then. We're not doing anything wrong Many people believe stereotypes of native Americans whether those especially past stereotypes. Because that's what we have learned. We haven't learned much but we have learned the these the two main stereotypes of bloodthirsty savage stereotype and the noble childlike back to nature stereotype And and and also remember the self esteem is Ticked up and so in almost in every situation that I know of There are always more people who support like in cases of Struggles over native mascots. They're always more people who support the local mascot Than those who oppose it and that makes it incredibly difficult to eliminate native mascots at the local level And and furthermore these are when this is going on this is really tough on native people because you know they are in the spotlight They have task overload emotional overload. They're hearing people and the other thing that we haven't talked about is Cultural preparation like so. This is basically a non native people mostly white people taking somebody else's identity entity and claiming it for themselves so this'll be like okay. I'm this white person I'm going to be. You know call myself black or African American and I'm going to represent you know African American this right and so um which would be you know. Also stereotypical So there's I think You know we need you know in the long run. We need massive amounts of education About person's color including native Americans infused fused into the media and infused into the curriculum and for native people that needs to be more diverse portrayals sales of the past so that people realize that most native people weren't warriors in the past and Making contemporary native people people visible and so that context That is really shopping. How this is playing out across the nation you spoke about The negative of aspects around the Pocahontas this character. Can you talk about that a little bit more white wise that such a negative well that is actually a line with the noble which is this is also perceived as a positive stereotype. The this noble Indian stereotype which is that native people are Super Spiritual which will in touch with nature primitive childlike And those sorts of things And and and also So that's a stereotype right so not all native people are spiritual and natives. People who are spiritual are spiritual and a variety ways that the operational yeah but you say people look upon native peoples today in two thousand nineteen like that but yeah that's why there are all his Non Native people who Do things like adopt what they perceive to be native spiritual practices and those sorts of things but pocahontas movie is similar to some other movies in which in this case both sides are portrayed as racist and the Pocahontas Disney movie. Okay yeah the. I recently coated it. So I'm remembering it more You know both sides are portrayed as equally racist when really this. This was a situation of colonization. You know it was and and the noble savage. Stereotypes include native people who come on the side of whites and support whites who are engaged in colonization which she did or. She's portrayed to have done she's also sexualize. Khanna's wasn't that old. At that time. She had no relationship with doc. The what's his name. The main Yeah Smith Eleven or twelve does she. You know he wasn't isn't it. You know so there's like those sorts of issues but I don't know why and that that was only one study you know one study of the effects of that that kind of image. You mentioned cultural appropriation. Have you ever researched the effects of when the US military names their weapons of war. After after you know the Tomahawk cruise missiles the Apache helicopter every ever explode. Yeah yeah no I haven't and it's an excellent topic And nor do I know anybody else who has explored that aligns with say it again. I thought I read some article. I definitely read some Martin. This is years ago. I read definitely read some articles about. I don't know if it was by scholars but somebody Out There has definitely re wrote something about how the US military names their stuff. And I I. It was obviously a a negative the aspect military to do that. They should not have done it. They should not do it but it was definitely something I read before you know and there are obviously there were and are native warriors and soldiers and native people are over represented numerically in the US military and so some native tribal nations and some native people view this as a positive thing But it certainly certainly is aligned with the stereotype of Native Americans as warriors when I And you know when they went after bin Laden they called it something. Geronimo Operation Toronto. Yeah yeah there. There's.

US University of Illinois Connecticut Seoul Hartford Current Disney Toronto University of Iowa Latine Martin Khanna Laden
"native american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

17:29 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Okay well. I'm a professor of sociology at Springfield College and One of the main topics but not the only only a topic that I have studied is native American mascots And I generally study issues of inequality and and I'm most interested in doing what some scholars call quote studying up meaning studying the people from categories that have power relative to other categories So I've studied men and masculinity I studied heterosexuality factuality and I've studied whites And white attitudes behaviors and so related into the topic. We're covering right now I I've studied kind of white attitudes and practices related to native issues very good. I would almost think that would be considered studying downright because you you would from a perspective of those dominant males heterosexuality etc etc.. You look they were looking at it from their perspective looking down but rather and this is why they up in that they as a category have more power resources and so forth. Okay now up up in a stratification system good okay okay. Now you are a white female. So I'm just I'm I'm just saying that for the for the reference of the audience because they may ask well. Why not have a someone from a native tribe will the answer to that question is I tried to get a number of different people? People from different native groups in none of them would call me back again back to me and you were so gracious enough to get back to me So let's get into into this controversy. Can you explore just a little bit about the history of this controversy between and before we start off with this. I am not going to be S. as Sensitive to certain terms. I don't even know if red men is a slur is a is a slur or so if I say something that's out the way. Please correct me in to the audience members. If he heard me say something. That's not the way it know that it's comes from a place of ignorance. I just don't know what's which termed correct an incorrect and as an African American American male myself. I I probably should know but I don't so could you explain to us the history of this controversy between behind Native American mascots. What's that okay so I'm not a historian But I actually manage a email list of scholars who studied this topic and these scholars are both native scholars and non native scholars and we come from all different disciplines including A few historians But I'm not one But I do know from their work. That you know native mascots emerged In the late eighteen hundreds and much more heavily in the early nineteen hundreds And this was at a time when the physical violence had Relative to native Americans had ended kind of at around around this time and there were not positive. Beliefs generally speaking about native people in US society during this time period and they emerged primarily. And there's far far more native mascots than any other human type of Mascot I'm a person looked at the numbers and there are were in two thousand fourteen. There were over two thousand native mascots still in the United States in the schools Mostly in the school systems and something like an somewhere between eight percent and nine percent Of of high schools that was their mascot in two thousand fourteen So they're very pervasive. Most other mascots are animals And one thing that the vast majority of mascots have in common is they kinda signify Russian and Sometimes Times violence and the use of force and power and so particular animals that are picked. Are things like tigers And and so native people were selected because of a common stereotype of them as aggressive warriors. Warriors in the past and that was that stereotype has existed since early You colonization of the United States. Eight and that stereotype was used to justify violence against native Americans and also pushing them into other places and other a straw cities and so the reason why native Americans are mascots. Is that is is a stereo Stereotype that's commonly studied of them as kind of aggressive male warriors. which is you know a stereotype associated with the the past and this is also aligned with many but not all other mascots that exist So that's kind of the history of of them. The history of activism is you know There's been such a long history of oppression faced by native people Starting with early colonization all the way to the present and so native people have been struggling with a vast a number of issues. And as you know and as I'm sure all your listeners know You know there was a civil rights movement Focused on African American can issues in the sixties and seventies that I mean there's always been activism against racial inequality but around that same time name Native people also became active or more active. I should say native. People like African American people have always been in resistance to inequality but but it was a period of activism in the sixties and Seventies. And that's when the mascot issue came a part of a of very large number of other issues That native activists and native tribal nations and Coming on that in a second you know started to become active and similar to kind of any of the issues. Inequality representations ends of people whether they'd be mascots or in the new how people are portrayed in the news or how people are portrayed in films or television or on consumer MR products. You know that is wrapped up with beliefs and the beliefs are wrapped up with all kinds of other issues right so And so it was part of a kind of larger movement and And the earliest success in the movement I and where we're at the college level at least that we know of Two of the early Colleges that change were were Stanford and darkness and also University of Oklahoma And so it's just been continuing but it's very hard when you've got a group of people. Well that is a small percentage of the US population and Fairly segregated For for that group to be able to have much of an impact and so that movement is growing You know sense the sixties and seventies very good. Thank you for that now. Can you speak about the what I would call the hypocrisy. Concerning the imagery of the of the warrior type aggressive male natives versus those who are really aggressive right the white white people running in killing them taking Orlando etc etc in how they speak about the. If you can't speak about the hypocrisy of well yeah so. There's no stereotype about white says as an aggressive race even though they were the colonizers right So Oh yeah. That's pretty much all you can say. You identified the hypocrisy but oftentimes groups from the United mentioned studying up for groups from on the more powerful categories face a lot less stereotyping and one thing that we know about. Stereotyping is stereotyping It is often. I won't say always because I don't know if that's the case often aligned with interest right so if you portray native Americans as aggressive bloodthirsty warriors then you can justify killing them. uh-huh shit moving them on reservations and not letting them leave. If you stereotype native Americans as You know no this is a contemporary story. You know kind of And there's a similar stereotype of African Americans and Latinos ex people you know as lazy not Not Valuing Families abusing drugs then you can justify duck not doing anything. That's helpful to that right because it's their fault and stereotypes are often aligned with actions. Ah whether those are individual actions or policies and and collective actions And so and of course it's the mostly not only dominant group members that have control over our the spread of ideas in society through representations impatience of people concerning that that whole stereotype thing. I did read an article about that fairly recently in bad even went to Asian Americans As far as being lazy which is just ridiculous. I never heard of that. That's not really in the heck research. Yeah I can send you It was was in an articles that I actually may have been a book. I can't remember I was trying to read so much but it was but regardless it was talking about the the history of the article that I was I was reading about oriented history. Yes yes yes an early history to attitude right yes correct yes early. US history was about early the US history In San Francisco trying not to let them have access to vote and all this stuff and and they're one of the reasons was because Asians were lazy. Ironically bought here to build the bill help build railroads and things like that just absolutely ridiculous absolutely So this controversy. Let's talk let's dig a little bit more to the controversy so we define what it is Let's talk about the psychological effects of it. Oh yeah okay I so this is you know. This is usually the crux of what I want people to know about the mascot issue so native American can mascots are generally stereotypical and their stereotypical and with some ways. We've already talked about that. They're almost all male figures. Okay they're almost all all portrayed as warriors slash somewhat chiefs. They're portrayed as a people of the past which is not a common stereotype tape of other persons of Color in the United States and they're depicted as homogeneous meaning not diverse. And we know that there are over six hundred separate native tribal nations in the United States and they have cultures that are quite different from each other And so it's not surprising that they say that people that the majority of people especially Not Native people you know do not perceive the mascots as stereotypes and this is because they have have most people have very little contact with Contemporary Native People which of course could reduce stereotyping. It's because when native people are portrayed in the mainstream media they are portrayed mostly in stereotypical ways and and another reason. Why people don't get it? Is they perceive. And I truly believe many people when they say this that the mascots are positive compliments or this is usually phrased as honoring native people and so people say things like well. We're honoring native people. Because they were our brave warriors from the past right. They usually use the word. The past and there is some research That that is really really important that not all. Stereotypes are on the surface negative. You know so. There's like women are nurturing african-americans good athletes. Asian Americans are so smart but those are still stereotypes and there's Some research that that shows that these allegedly Positive stereotypes can be quite harmful because they put people in a box. And sometimes if you dig Dig Up around these allegedly positive stereotypes. You can find some ways they work in negative ways and you can also find a history Of when they weren't so negative so so but it's really important for people to realize that there are these things called positive stereotypes that racial inequality any other kind of inequality isn't just bill on on like over over early or clearly negative messages about a a group of people. So let me get to the research. So I the research demonstrates that native mascots both reflect and reinforce racial stereotypes and prejudice and there are three categories of finding so i. I'm talking about kind of the effects on non native people I Some some research shows that when Peop- you know this is mostly experimental research. The the mascots are associated with negative thoughts and negative stereotypes. Even these things that you know that are perceived positively that they have negative associations and are associated with negative stereotypes further and this is really important when non native people are exposed to these mascots in experimental studies. This has some research shows that this increases their stereotyping of native Americans. So the first point is that they're just associated with this negative stereotyping. In the second point is that exposure increases the stereotyping of native Americans And a last piece is is that if you compare those who support native mascots and see no problem with them or like them to those who are critical of native mascots. Those those who support them are more likely to believe prejudicial ideas about native Americans now this would be unconscious for most people right who who love native mascots and who support them And they might not realize probably do not realize because they think that they are positive relation with these mascots and they're honoring native people so I thought I'd give you a few examples samples of studies around this first category of studies which is the effects on non native people. Come here for a second doing. Yeah I I didn't want it to use that to Kinda Laborat- can go over the first point against the mascots So so there's three categories of findings under affects on T- on non native people. The first one is just that non native people associate And this this is often done through implicit bias studies. I don't know if you've talked about that on your yes yeah So that sue those studies we know that the native mascots and they often compare them to reactions to white mascots. are are more apt to be associated with negative.

United States Contemporary Native People professor of sociology Springfield College Orlando University of Oklahoma white Peop Stanford San Francisco
"native american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"I also also patriot. Page captain hunters podcasts on Patriot again. Venlo pay PAL and cash up all of those are CPT l.. Hunter it does cost cost a little bit for me to put these episodes out so any love and support that you would give would only help me keep it going and keep it growing. Thank you so much For the love in the support that you have been giving I really really appreciate on not just saying so. We have a great episode for you today. Now I recorded this episode back in December of Twenty nineteen and I have a number of episodes that are ready to go And and I wanted to do a little bit about br black history but I decided to release this episode which is GonNa Teach her native American mascots native American issues because of of the Super Bowl and because of the Kansas City chiefs and the whole mascot issues. As you'll hear me declare or hear me talk about With my special guest. Dr Laurel Davis Delano. I came across an article. I think it was back in November twenty nineteen Talking about killingly high school had changed their mascot from red men. I'm not even sure if that's a racial slur or not but let's just say the are the R. Word the argument They wanted to change that from the red men to the red hawks. There are words to the Red Hawks. Now they changed the name to be more sensitive sort of to the plight of native people and during this past school season the parents former members of the high school came together for big panel and they decided to change the name back to the armament. Now I was Kinda floored by this because they got together at one time. It said okay. We're going to be culturally sensitive and change it to the Red Hawks and then they decided to change it back to something. That's more culturally insensitive. So I think that there's definitely something when people talk about this current administration That's in the White House There's definitely something that has been sparked. I'M NOT GONNA change this until totally political podcast. But there's definitely something that's in the air and I think that this is one of the effects of what's in the air and that's zwide decided to reach out to Dr Laura Davis Delano in talk about this Particular problem and so she was kind enough and gracious racist enough to come on the PODCASTS and share her expertise. But that's the reason why and I really was floored by this particular article in news that was going on on and so much so that that when you read the different newspaper articles concerning this is that many of the people actually voted There the town leaders out. They almost flipped the from the Democrats. The Republicans in Killingly Connecticut. Because of this issue and and as we're discussing a podcast you will understand that. This is not just isolated to Connecticut but numerous cities and towns all over. The country country are wrestling with not only with this mascot debate but they are flipping legislatures and flipping political spectrum because of these mascot got issues and I. I think that that's very telling so many issues that should be discussed when we're talking about you know who you're going to vote for right. Who's going especially on small town elections? Right you you WANNA talk about. Who's WHO's paving the roads in your local police department and school boards and elections and Alderman and in all these issues that really affect people's lives and to flip school boards over this issue Excuse me flip the leadership of town over an issue as is trivial as a mascot really seems very well trivial to me really very silly so I wanted to have this conversation and And so once again I wanted to thank Dr Laura Davies Delano for coming on the podcast and talking about now. What happened is is that during this conversation we finished the conversation obviously quarterback in December December twenty nineteen and because of the Super Bowl? I decided to call her back but the Kansas City chiefs Being in and winning the Super Bowl also we'll also talk about the the forty niners right in. There's a history between the forty niners being colonizers and all that kind of stuff so between these two NASQAD names being in the Super Bowl. I reached out to Dr Davis Delano. And again we had another fifty minute conversation. So that's GONNA be actually part to in our release that Next next week so stay tuned for that but I want to get this out there and I I really think is very important to keep this conversation going and growing You know I think this is really important from a law enforcement aspect because Law Enforcement was often times going to be called to deal with people who are who are disenfranchised and feel disaffected and and who feel mistreated in who are rebelling in all that kind of stuff. So it's very important to just to have these discussions number one for an academic purpose right because you as the listener. AH WE WANNA learn something right as I wanNA learn something. I think we all want to learn something. We gotta learn what communities are going through. It's not just the black community. It's not just the white community. It's not just a the Hispanic community but we ought to learn about all communities that we live within go to the store within the next two games and everything like that so nope that's it and I just WanNa talk about that. So this is part one of the conversation between myself. Dr Laurel Davis Delano. So let me just give you a little bit about her. Her in her bio Dr Laurel Davis Delano is a professor of sociology at Springfield College in Massachusetts. Dr Davis Delaney's research is focused on on inequality related to race gender and sexual orientation one topic. The Dr Dr David Zelano Studies is native American mascots and she communicates with other scholars who also studied this topic. Davis Delano is currently working on a research project involves an analysis of survey data from over five thousand non native. US participants in an attempt to understand the degree to which they are exposed to representations of native Americans and the content of the represents -tations nations. They most commonly experienced GonNa have a great conversation going to have a great conversation. I'm really really believing that you're going to enjoy this conversation. Just one more thing as I tried to get into the conversations with people I try to do a little bit of a warm up. I do a warm up conversation before I start recording and then we usually pick up a little bit later on our warm up. Conversation was actually very good and we had a discussion as to why some people have been reluctant to come on to my podcast. And I'm saying that because I want people to actually listen to the podcast and if you are are potential guest or if I reach out to you or if you know of a potential I want to have these conversations that are tough and difficult and I think that we always say that that we WANNA have a national conversation about race. A national conversation about criminal. Justice Reform A debate about health care reform and and so when people reach each out to actually have those debates whether you agree with them or whether you don't agree with him I really think that you ought to be willing to have the conversation and listen to the conversation. Obviously I'm talking to you the listener because you're listening to the conversation about the have right now but also keep this in mind if I hope that if you're a potential guest on my podcast or any other podcast outcast Whether you agree with that person you don't agree with that person. Be Willing to go on or have a conversation whether it's a podcast or just a conversation with someone you don't agree with an in everyday life Whether it's on facebook in a non argumentative way obviously is what I'm saying so enough rambling on here is the interview. We're going to be discussing native American mascots with Dr Laurel Davis Delano. Hi How are you very. Well thank you. I truly appreciate you coming on the podcast and I appreciate your your candor in In telling me you know and having that at least that discussion with me the email exchange that we had I really appreciate. That really made me think i. I've thought about it all night actually was very all of it actually and most most in particular the part about where other people may not want to come on the podcast because they might not want to to speak with former law enforcement officer. Yeah as I mentioned You know I had thought about that before and I thought about changing kind of changing the name or doing something radically different because I did have a few problems. Getting people who've come on and and and whatever yeah Yeah I mean who knows. I was just guessing north. I think that's definitely accurate. I went to a conference in St Louis At the beginning of November of ember talked to a number of people in other conferences about about drug reform and you know legalization of marijuana and things like that and so I talked to a number where people you know without a different Panelists and guest speakers and things and so I talked to a number people and they all said Yeah. Okay sure I'll be on your podcast and but I can tell that they were not very enthusiastic about it but I showed them listen. I'm here at the conference number one. I believe in drug reform glue Legalization to some degree So but But but regardless my point is is that I I certainly take your words Yeah they might they might also be concerned not About you in particular but who your audience might be well but again. I think that's the point is my audience. My audience should be I. I want my audience to to to be receptive to different points of view and I wanted to speak to people. So it's not. I'm trying to bridge the gap trying to get one particular group of people right law law enforcement to see another side and I want community activists to see the law enforcement side so we can understand each other and I think the point of this is to have the conversation and how the dialogue we always say. Well let's have a national conversation about race. Have a national dialogue about this about that. Then someone who wants to have the dialogue and then people don't want to do it so uh-huh okay. So thank you for coming on the PODCAST. Dr Laura Davis Delano. Thank you so much for being here. You're welcome so let's get started so one of the reasons that I wanted to have you on. The podcast is because of this controversy that happened in my state of Connecticut. We're in a border state dry. Oh you're in Massachusetts correct. Yes so there's a the high schools killingly. I believe it's called killing high school. I know it's killing killingly Connecticut so so they had it was on the news in kind of piqued my interest. And so what happened is is Back in July of two thousand nineteen the killingly high. Hi School changed the name from the red men to the Red Hawks and now there is a controversy to change it back to the red men. I guess many of the parents who are I assume. My Age old thirties forties fifties or so wanted because they went to high school school because of tradition. And things like that. They wanted to become the red men again. And so I reached out to a number of different people in That's how I found out about you in the work that you have done about native American issues and things like that so before we go down that road. Could you just tell the audience a a.

Dr Laurel Davis Delano killingly high school Dr Davis Delano Dr Laura Davies Delano red hawks Connecticut Dr Laura Davis Delano Kansas City Dr Davis Delaney Massachusetts Killingly Connecticut Dr David Zelano Hunter PAL Democrats CPT White House US
"native american" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"But it's it's extraordinary. I had one about a year ago. Where a group of people did something to me? Put something in me when I was asleep and and in the Dream Asleep and and I woke up as they were taking it out of me and and and they were kind of laughing and I said what what what are you doing and and nobody would say anything and and I confront funded them and I said what you did is rape me and it never occurred to me that something that my mom did which wasn't medically necessary. was a form of that and I'd never used that word. Call it do that and when I woke up that there was another first of all it felt great. That was the first time I ever stood up for myself in my dream. Yeah and and spoke my truth and it was the first time I ever used that word and it was. It was a nice moment moment of visibly seeing that there was some type of strength being being built up and some type of connection to the to to the truth in a way. That wasn't being minimized by me. Or somebody else. Yeah and for me. It was when I woke up. I I didn't realize that that happened. I was telling my husband about it and he told me he had to point it out. Hey Control and then my psychologist colleges pointed it out to. That's you know it shoot so today. I'm good I still go through bouts of depression. I.

rape
"native american" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"So I thought that was a real threat because of the way that he treated us some physical he was and I I mean he even basically beat me down verbally mentally. Because he'd say your or your you're stupid and you're you're you're too skinny your skin and bones your bony just all those things to just chip away at my self esteem. And that's how I felt and I still feel that way I worked through that but so that was like the first time where he really just crossed the line and and then after that he just kept singling getting me alone try and he just make out with me And then eventually I don't know how long it took but eventually and I didn't WanNa go with him anymore when he told my mom I'm taking taking her I'd say no I don't want to go with him and my mom would say go. I don't want him getting angry with me. You better go so she forced me so you think deep down she knew. I don't know I mean I. I'm still working on resentment with her. I mean we're close. I I love her. She's my mom but I don't know maybe she did. Maybe it happened to her. That's all that's the only thing I can think of says. She was abused and she never talks about it. I wouldn't doubt it growing up in that community so she just forced me and I just had to go I. We didn't have a choice. And then eventually he You just took me out and just basically raped me And I was. I don't know he had a truck is Brown seventy seventies for truck that I see everywhere. Muskets so triggered when you see that it is huge sugar. But I've worked through that but uh so he just took me out to this area. That was like a dumpsite and Just basically took advantage just raped me right then and there in the truck and I was crying screaming. Oh saying no get it off of me. please what would he say. Nothing just kept going Just took my pants off to underwear off and just had sex with me and it hurt and I After that I don't remember if he threatened me or not but I was just Kinda this owned out and Kind of like a dream And I just I remember going back to the house and I went to the bathroom and I clean up blood and everything and I was crying and just locked myself in my room. Basically and I don't think I had her room then but I my brother had a room and so I went in there turn. This is when we had a new house. We had or more modern house with plumbing all that stuff in the eighties and So of course I really put up a fight after that when my mom tried to force me to go with him or he used to like to play cards too. So we play What does it GIN rummy and We keep keep score and So he taught me how to play that. And then we'd play in my mom's room and usually in the evenings when she was making dinner in the kitchen and so he would of course fondle me and everything and and just try and watch out for her coming down the hallway So that happened a lot. I didn't want to be around him but I didn't have the choice and so this went on. I don't know how long maybe a year maybe two I don't know I can't I remember. I did a timeline but I can't years ago and I can't really remember but after a while he would just I shared A bedroom with my brother after that. 'cause I I used to sleep in the living room and then he would just come in there and get me and take me into the kitchen you know and then finally I think I just moved into my brother's room because I wanted some safety some No family members knew. Now now the the sexual abuse just continued even.

Brown
"native american" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"native american" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Here with Ellen. Black cloud which she's using as a pseudonym because you WANNA be able to speak freely URA era native American and your old I am forty six forty six and your life today is nothing like it used to be been sober for ten years. Yes we're going to talk about what it used to be like and I would also like to talk about about all of this kind of through the lens of the history of native American struggles and the ups and downs or whatever awards would apply to the Changes and how that community views itself views the outside world especially its it's customs and language and how they feel about themselves tonight I understand. It's not a monolithic thing. You can say everybody. He is this way but in general. Yes you were raised on a reservation. Just tell me your. Tell me your story Well I Was Born on a reservation and my whole family. Lived there We which state was this which is to say which reservation no. That's I'd prefer not to calm a western state. Yes US yes My family was very poor. we had a Adobe House We didn't have running water We had an outhouse and this was pretty much in the seventies you can kind of uh-huh relate it to the rest of the world puts things in perspective do native American Platform Shoes Look Platform.

Ellen Adobe