35 Burst results for "Nationals Park"

Ashley Judd Walks Again Long After Shattering Leg in Africa

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 d ago

Ashley Judd Walks Again Long After Shattering Leg in Africa

"Actor Ashley Judd is walking in the Swiss Alps six months after she shattered her leg in Africa I'm marquees are loaded with the latest Ashley Judd writes on Instagram she was able to walk up hill in the Swiss National Park on uneven surfaces for an hour judge says her medical team expected her to be able to move her foot in a year but she had movement after four months in February Judd was on a research trip in a Congolese rainforest when she tripped over a log and shattered her tibia she spent five hours on the forest floor biting a stick and pain and Judd nearly lost her leg now John says her leg will never be the same but she and her legs are buddies

Ashley Judd Swiss National Park Swiss Alps Judd Africa John
Multiple Homes Threatened in California as Wildfires Continue to Rage

WBZ Morning News

01:13 min | Last week

Multiple Homes Threatened in California as Wildfires Continue to Rage

"Wildfires from Oregon and Northern California to Utah to Montana. Further south, the issue entirely different. It's heavy rain much needed by which have triggered some dangerous flooding. His A B C's are in shock Monsoon rains drenching the Southwest downpours, triggering dangerous flash flooding, stranding men in their vehicle in Arizona's miracle to county rescued by a helicopter from the high floodwaters flash flood threats in multiple states some spots seeing rainfall rates. Topping two inches per hour over parched land, unable to absorb the downpours fast enough in Utah rivers raged in Capitol Reef National Park and the so called The Dixie Fire is the largest wildfire now raging in Northern California. So this Dixie fire has already scorched almost 200,000 acres and is now threatening thousands of businesses and homes along Lake Al Manar's West Shore. Blaze broke out almost two weeks ago near the town of Paradise. Remember that that was devastated about three years ago by the camp fire that killed 85 people? It is 6 50 right now. In

Northern California Utah Rivers Montana Utah Oregon Capitol Reef National Park Arizona Lake Al Manar West Shore Paradise
Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

BrainStuff

01:58 min | Last week

Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

"You've probably seen stories about exemplary bravery and battles soldiers and volunteers who risk everything to pull injured. Compatriots out of harm's way so they can receive much needed medical attention but some of these heroes will never receive. Any medals parades accommodations for their work. And not because of injustice but because their ants species called capone-era analysis are termite hunting. Aunts that scientists say not only rescue injured comrades but also treat their wounds. The survival rate among those injured in this combat is remarkable up to ninety percent. These ants live in colonies in sub saharan africa that average nearly one thousand members the ends wage war on termites rating their nests and dragging the dead back behind the lines as a source of food. These rates however often come at a heavy price. The termites biting crushed the ants ripping off limbs and snapping off heads. Eric frank a scientist at the university of low son in switzerland has studied these ants and seeing them do battle with termites at a research station in the komo national park one of the largest protected areas in west africa in northern cote d'ivoire. He would watch the and drag the injured back to their nest. But because the ants make their homes underground it was difficult to define exactly what happened next. So franken has team set out to discover what was happening inside the nest i they captured entire ant colonies and set them up in artificial nests. They then hooked up infrared cameras to keep tabs on the insects. The scientists also captured termites and then allowed the answer to stage a raid. Many aunts were gravely injured during the melee. Many lost limbs they're able bodied comrades responded by staging a battlefield triage separating gravely wounded from the only slightly wounded. The seriously injured those who lost at least five limbs often died on the battlefield because as the researchers noted they didn't seem to want to be helped that bendon distort their bodies making it difficult for their sisters in arms to carry them to safety. Those whose wounds were less serious however allowed themselves to be cared for

Eric Frank University Of Low Son Komo National Park Saharan West Africa Africa Switzerland Franken Bendon
Searchers Rescued After Helicopter Crash; Hiker Also Found

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Searchers Rescued After Helicopter Crash; Hiker Also Found

"Search team crashes looking for a missing hiker in the mountains east of Yosemite National Park but there's a happy ending to the story it starts out with an Oklahoma university professor reported missing last week undertrial to boundary peak near the California Nevada line the crew of a navy MH sixty night hawk was part of the search in the White Mountains when that chopper crashed near the tallest peak the four member crew not only survived they escaped serious injury but they have to spend part of the weekend in the rugged wilderness waiting for rescue it took two tries to get them out meanwhile other hikers found the missing professor he's in good condition other than a little dehydrated I'm Jackie Quinn

Oklahoma University Yosemite National Park White Mountains Rugged Wilderness Nevada Navy California Jackie Quinn
Gunfire Erupts Outside Washington Nationals' Stadium

First Morning News

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Gunfire Erupts Outside Washington Nationals' Stadium

"On display in D. C. This weekend. A baseball game had to be stopped after a shooting outside the stadium search for suspects in the shooting outside Washington, D. C S Nationals Park is underway after gunshots sent frantic crowds fleeing and taking cover. Andres put three more on the board 8 to 4 in the middle of the sixth inning Saturday night rapid gunfire echoing across the stadium, halting the Nationals Padres game Into the Nationals dugout to get away some fans running into the dugout to take cover, fearing an active shooter, That's correspondent

Nationals Park Baseball Andres Nationals Padres Washington
Padres-Nats game suspended after shooting outside DC stadium

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Padres-Nats game suspended after shooting outside DC stadium

"Saturday's game between the nationals and visiting Padres was suspended after five and a half innings due to a shooting outside nationals park police say two people were shot in the incident more than two dozen police cars ambulances and fire engines were on the street outside the third base side the Padres are just taking the field for the bottom of the sixth when several loud pops were heard from the left side of the ball park fans were told to exit the stadium to the outfield gates the Padres were leading a four behind Fernando tatis junior who was four for four with a pair of RBI singles I'm Dave Ferrie

Padres Nationals Park Police Fernando Tatis Dave Ferrie
Firefighters Make Progress Against Big Fires in US West

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Firefighters Make Progress Against Big Fires in US West

"One of the biggest fires is along the California Nevada border Kelly grow so when his family and Doyle California had to evacuate after losing everything that I've worked for and everything else all these years it's gone he spoke to K. O. L. O. T. V. Jon Hansen and his dog were forced out of their home near Yosemite National Park threw some clothes in a bag and grandma shoes and then he was dead and took off I hope everything is still there when I get back he spoke to K. F. S. N. in Oregon the bootleg fire covers two hundred forty square miles lightning has sparked fires in Washington and Idaho extreme heat has set off many of these fires forecasters say temperatures will be dropping I bet Donahue

Border Kelly Doyle California K. O. L. O. T. V. Jon Hansen Nevada K. F. S. N. Yosemite National Park California Oregon Idaho Washington Donahue
Grizzly Bear Attacks, Kills Camper in Western Montana

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Grizzly Bear Attacks, Kills Camper in Western Montana

"There is an extensive search in Montana for a grizzly bear that attacked and killed a man the man was camping and a park spokesman says the bear had previously wandered into the camping area and left but later returned the victim's identity was not immediately released and further circumstances surrounding the attack were under investigation a video camera from a local business caught footage of a grizzly bear just before the attack raiding a chicken coop one resident said they know to be bear aware but this is shaken up the community in April a back country guide was killed by a grizzly bear while fishing along the Yellowstone National Park border in Montana I'm a Donahue

Montana Yellowstone National Park
Palestinians Face Eviction From Jerusalem Neighborhood to Make Way for Biblical Park

All Things Considered

01:53 min | Last month

Palestinians Face Eviction From Jerusalem Neighborhood to Make Way for Biblical Park

"By Jewish settlers, an archaeological park near ancient ruins. It could be the next focus of the conflict over Jerusalem, plans to evict Palestinians from another neighborhood shakes Jura helped spark the Israeli Palestinian violence. In May, NPR's Deborah Amos reports on the latest neighborhood developing as a flash point. Usually we begin a story like this in the neighborhoods that are the flashpoints, But first we're going back in time to an active archaeological site and a tourist destination. The city of David National Park, named for a biblical monarch who ruled here more than 3000 years ago. There are plans to expand this site to create a biblical theme park. In the valley below. There's an underground spring here to a water source for ancient Jerusalem, where Christians believe Jesus toured a blind man, James L. Rod works as a tour guide. It's an underground, my handmade carved tunnels. Over 3300 years ago. How many tourists come to see this? In 2019? A million visitors arrived to see The city of David sites. This tourist site is just outside the walls of the old city on the edge of Silwan, a Palestinian neighborhood in east Jerusalem, which Israel captured from Jordan in 1967 and annexed. But most countries still consider this occupied territory. Israel claims the city as its undivided capital. Palestinians want part of it for their capital, the city of David tourist complexes run by a settlers group, the Air David Foundation. That critics say weaponize archaeological findings to cement Jewish control in this part of the city. The most important archaeological sites in the country are controlled by the settlers of still one. That's

Deborah Amos David National Park Jerusalem James L. Rod Jura NPR Silwan Israel East Jerusalem Air David Foundation David Jordan
After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Are Overcrowding National Parks

The Heatwave Air Experts

02:00 min | Last month

After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Are Overcrowding National Parks

"With people trying to enjoy outdoor activities. Arches National Park in Utah. They reach capacity and close the gates. The visitors most days before nine a.m. or more on how everywhere is packed Right now, we'll speak to Alison Poli reporter at The Wall Street Journal. Some of the most popular national parks are expecting record crowds the summer and these are parks that have already seen a lot of visitation. So some of these parks were closed last spring, and then when they reopened last summer, people flock to them because they were able to be outside, they are able to social distance and enjoy the outdoors. And visitation numbers have only increased since then. So at arches National Park, for example, the gates to the park do temporarily closed when the parking lots become full and most days that happens before nine a.m., and they will open back up anywhere from 2 to 5 hours later, But in some cases, people have still seeing lines when they go back and later in the day to try to enter the park. And the demand is there this April, people going to the park was up 15% from 2019. So this was before the pandemic, so people are wanting to get out there. One of the interesting things that happen with all of this, though, is some some of these unattended consequences. If they can't get into the main park, they'll go on to some other undeveloped land that's in the nearby area. They make these kind of campsites there. Fires have started trash. You know, it can become a big problem for the community around there as well. So a lot of people started camping during the pandemic, and so more people are camping on federal lands, and in some cases, the land that they're camping on isn't intended for tourism or overnight stays. So in some of those areas are seeing a lot more trash, even human waste, and it creates resource management issues for the local community. You know, it's kind of a catch 22 because the people in the nearby communities obviously want tourists and visitors to come by. It helps

Alison Poli Arches National Park The Wall Street Journal Utah
Biden Promotes Milestone of 300M Vaccine Shots in 150 Days

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Biden Promotes Milestone of 300M Vaccine Shots in 150 Days

"Many Americans are resuming pre pandemic life even as some worry virus related restrictions are being lifted too fast as he touted three hundred million vaccine doses administered during his first one hundred fifty days in office president Biden looked ahead and breaks Trish Williams summer majority for Alicia Walter that means going to baseball games like this week's trip to nationals park here in Washington she thinks the re openings happening just right I think it's a good balance between too fast and not fast but a third of Americans in AP-NORC center for public affairs research poll think restrictions were ended too fast and readjusting to normal life will take time in Michigan Phyllis script sick wants to get back to the gym and it will happen but I've got to get prepared mentally I think for that Sager made Donnie Washington

Trish Williams Alicia Walter Nationals Park Biden Norc Center For Public Affairs Baseball Washington Phyllis Michigan Sager Donnie Washington
AP-NORC Poll: Many Americans Resuming Pre-Virus Activities

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

AP-NORC Poll: Many Americans Resuming Pre-Virus Activities

"Many Americans are getting back to everyday activities that will poll show some worry cope with nineteen related restrictions were lifted too fast for a stadium in two weeks at nationals park here in Washington we are so happy that baseball bat like Alicia Walter four in ten people in a piano RC center for public affairs research poll say the re opening space is just right not too fast not too slow about a third say restrictions have been lifted too fast still majorities of Americans who traveled or went to restaurants and games before the pandemic art now back at it David story says it's a leap of faith I'm gonna try to take a step out there the poll shows many Americans are still wearing masks but significantly fewer than a few months ago Sager mag ani Washington

Alicia Walter Rc Center For Public Affairs R Nationals Park Baseball Washington David Sager Ani Washington
After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Expected to Overcrowd National Parks

Tim Conway Jr.

01:24 min | Last month

After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Expected to Overcrowd National Parks

"One way to ease back into traveling is to find a vacation spot with a little more space like a visit to one of America's 63. National parks. We sent Johnson vaguely Adi to California's Yosemite National Park, which is my favorite. That sounds like your sidekick Amber Johnson vaguely RD to get a bigger TRT and, uh, what was your last name Cannoli Big Adi Adi and Canola Johnson, vaguely Adi to California's Yosemite National Park, which is my favorite. We're here at Tunnel view, and you can clearly see how Yosemite became the muse for pain photographer Ansel Adams. This park has everything from dramatic waterfalls, two towering sequoias and iconic rock formations like El Capitan and half toe during the pandemic. National parks welcome roughly 237 million visitors. About what A year during the pandemic. National parks welcome roughly 237 Million visitors about a 30% drop from the year before. Those numbers are expected to go back up Yosemite preparing for I don't buy that number. I don't think that the national parks had 237 million visitors are in covid. So they say. Normally, it's It's 30% higher. That's normally 300 million. So it's basically the population of this country going to everybody went once. Every year, Right? That's the BS. I understand, Angel,

Yosemite National Park Amber Johnson Adi Adi Canola Johnson ADI California Ansel Adams Johnson America National Parks Angel
California Wildfires Have Decimated the Giant Sequoia

Pacifica Evening News

01:41 min | Last month

California Wildfires Have Decimated the Giant Sequoia

"Wave comes amid a drought has dried up vegetation, increasing fire danger. There have been a number of small wildfires around California this week. But thus far, the state has avoided the kind of fierce gusts of wind that drove last year's devastating blazes. Last year's sq. FT. Complex fire in the Southern Sierras scorched more than 176,000 acres and giant Sequoia National Monument and the adjacent Sequoia National Park and now report compiled by National Park Scientists indicates far more of the iconic redwoods may have been killed. Than previously five. Some 30 to 40% of all the giant sequoias within the fires, footprint or incinerated by the severity of the flames. Researches explained that the intensity of their fire was brought on by drought conditions, fire prone undergrowth and a legacy of fire suppression together with climate warming, stressing the entire ecosystem. Ecuadorian files. This report from Fresno. The devastating castle fire in the southern Sierra Nevada last year may have killed between 31% and 42% of all the large giant sequoias in the footprint of that blaze. National Park Service report says that translates into a stunning loss of somewhere between 7500 and 10,600 large giant sequoia trees that are more than four ft. In diameter. That's 10 to 14% of the entire population across their rank along the western slope of the Sierras.

Ft. Complex Southern Sierras Sequoia National Monument Sequoia National Park California National Park Fresno Sierra Nevada National Park Service Sequoia
Woman Dies in Fall at Zion National Park

Morning Edition

00:11 sec | 2 months ago

Woman Dies in Fall at Zion National Park

"In Nashville. Officials at Zion National Park in Utah say a woman died there over the weekend. After falling in mystery cannon. She fell 50 to 80 ft into steep,

Zion National Park Nashville Utah
Woman, 26, Dies in Fall at Utah's Zion National Park

Red Eye Radio

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Woman, 26, Dies in Fall at Utah's Zion National Park

"Officials in Zion National Park in Utah say a 26 year old woman is dying after falling in a canyon, a news release says. Visitors reported the woman was hiking alone and had fallen 50 to 80 FT Saturday afternoon medics finding the woman Sunday evening alive, but she died a short time later. Park officials say the woman had injuries consistent with a high elevation

Zion National Park Utah
Study: California Fire Killed 10% of World’s Redwood Trees

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Study: California Fire Killed 10% of World’s Redwood Trees

"Scientists have been assessing the losses from converging wildfires that tore through sequoia national park last August researchers say the numbers are preliminary but in a draft copy obtained by the by silly at times delta scientists with the National Park Service say at least a tenth of the world's mature giant sequoias were destroyed in a single wildfire that tore through the southern Sierra Nevada mountains last year using satellite imagery in modeling from previous fires researchers determined that between seventy five hundred and ten thousand sequoias perished in the fire lead author Christie bring them says the figures are mind blowing pointing out that the trees have lived for thousands of years and I've already survived dozens of wildfires next week teams of scientists plan to hike to the gross that experience the worst damage sequoias require wildfires to burst their pine cones to reproduce but scientists worry that fire suppression longer droughts and climate change are making wildfires harder for the ancient trees to survive I'm Jennifer king

Times Delta Southern Sierra Nevada Mountai Sequoia National Park National Park Service Christie Jennifer King
New Idaho Law Calls for Killing 90% of State's Wolves

90.3 KAZU Programming

02:07 min | 2 months ago

New Idaho Law Calls for Killing 90% of State's Wolves

"They did well enough that 10 years ago, the animal came off the endangered species list. Since then, hunters have legally killed hundreds every year on a host current wolf population is about 1500. That's way too many for state lawmakers like Dorothy Moon, You know when there s O fearless that they are now walking down the center of a dirt road. Um, that that means there's too many of them. Moon and many others don't like how some of the state's prized herds of elk have become smaller since wolves returned, but biologist Michael Lucid, formerly with Idaho's Department of Fish and Game Says big herds of elk don't necessarily indicate healthy ecosystems. One of the points of having wolves in the ecosystem is to have a reasonable number of them in the head. Him perform their roles as predators, keeping milk, another prey, wild animals and doing things like reducing disease and calling older and weaker members of those herds. Lucid helped write Idaho's Wolf Management plan, informed by studies showing positive ecological impacts from returning wolves to Yellowstone National Park and other locations. But lawmakers have a different idea What a reasonable number of wolves is. Idaho's new law calls for killing up to 90% of them again lawmaker Dorothy Moon whose central Idaho district includes wolves, and some of their prime habitat, We've got to get this in check. And in all due respect, efficient game, they need this help. That help means giving wolf hunters the right to do things that are illegal when pursuing other animals, like using night vision goggles, killing wolf pups in their dens and chasing wolves with motorized vehicles. Those changes don't sit well with Ned Burns, the mayor of a small town near where wolves currently Rome He's also a hunter and says it's more important to follow the principles of fair chase than what laws might allow. Sits in a wide open area, and they can't get into cover. If you could just run one down, Tol basically exhaust itself. I don't necessarily know that that's the way I've ever been raised to hunt animals. It's unclear how many hunters will respond to Idaho lawmakers call

Dorothy Moon Idaho Michael Lucid Department Of Fish And Game Sa Yellowstone National Park Lucid Ned Burns Rome
"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

01:31 min | 3 months ago

"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"Little kids always love counting books but it has beautiful illustrations. It's kind of talking about the different creatures and animals that are part of these tall trees and why they're so important so that's great for younger kids and then if you have a little bit older kids elementary aged the book we refer to the most is called the magic and mystery of trees and it's by gen green. This is also a picture book. It's more kind of in the form of like a decay resource. Or national geographic. It's more kind of encyclopedia type. So you're having a bunch of information in you're learning new vocabulary and you're learning the parts of the trees and different types of trees and How tree grows and just everything wanna know about trees. This book has it and so it makes it a wonderful resource and linked to both of those in the show notes. Also we have a youtube channel where we go through and show the video of our trips and so we have one on redwood national park and you can see these different stops in video of these different hikes and stuff along the way. So if you're more visual or you just want to see what some of this looks like. He can check that out there on youtube. You can also find us on instagram and facebook at rv and thanks so much for joining us. We're going to try to keep doing this weekly so join us next week as we kick off another one of the pacific northwest parks that we went to thanks so much for listening..

youtube next week facebook instagram both redwood national park rv one
"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"Seneca motorhome throughout us and canada when borders are open. And we've been to thirty four of the national parks so we tend to bring you content about the national parks. But we have to talk about other. Rv related things today. We are discussing redwood national parks and state parks because there's a combination to those. Why would we visit redwood national park. Well these are the tallest trees on earth. So last week in the podcast. We talked about the biggest trees on earth in terms of the weight. The coastal redwoods are the tallest trees on earth. These trees were actually almost destroyed in eighteen. Fifty logging really started in the area and at that point in time there was two million acres of old growth redwoods that they had an existence and today only five percent of that remains because of the logging industry The redwood parks protect thirty five percent of what remains of that five percent and then much of the rest of that is held in public lands. And there's about one percent of it that is held privately and that doesn't mean that they're being destroyed and logged in that one percent of private Privately held redwoods. but mostly. You're kind of seeing more tourist attraction attraction type stuff so things that you would see at a private attraction but not necessarily at a national park. And we'll talk about some of those things at the end of the podcast so the tall trees is probably. What's bringing new to redwood national park but there's also a lot of other cool things to see there some old ranches that you can see. There's old minds that used to be around there. Some remnants and sites related to those minds there is world war two our stations. Which was something that surprised us going down highway one. Oh one along. The coast is how many of these places were put into place during world war two so that they could monitor everything going on with the war Pretty interesting there. And then there's some old home sites as well in redwood area there's also forty miles of coastal beaches so it's not just the trees and the redwood groves and all those areas but you also have the coastal beach and everything related to the coastal beaches tied polls and all those types of fun things and then you have those beaches surrounded by these really tall trees and impressive. Old growth redwood areas. So let's get into the logistics i..

forty miles thirty five percent canada Seneca last week two million acres Fifty logging today world war two five percent earth one percent thirty four of the national pa park redwood national park eighteen one redwood highway
"nationals park" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

04:55 min | 3 months ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Experiment

"And in.

"nationals park" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

01:59 min | 3 months ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Experiment

"This week. A conversation between tracy hunt and david troyer about how to make america's best idea better. I'm julie longoria. This is the experiment. A show about our unfinished country. David grew up on the leech. Lake reservation in northern minnesota. It's near what they call the mississippi headwaters region and it's about one hundred miles from the border with canada. The border lakes are basically how we travel and have traveled for centuries for generations. Native people would use these waters to visit each other and trade among different villages. It's basically a highway a watery highway and when he was growing up a new national park called voyagers was opening up right near there. Basically the part was plopped down in our yard. And david says that's the way a lot of national parks were created all throughout history. You know i think. Many americans imagine these national parks are made out of these. Untouched pristine natural landscapes. That's not true. People were living there. I like glacier. National park was established. Exactly a black homelands and the black feet reservation. Boundary was pushed off of what became glacier so they took the land directly away from black. Beat the black. People weren't allowed to hunt or fish or trap or harvest timber or worship within the confines of glacier the parks were set up in such a way as to deprive native people of our homelands and our treaty rights. The parks were just another way of taking. At least from native people.

john muir teddy roosevelt george bird Grinnell america david troyer northern minnesota first time grand canyon english five years old Europe one this summer last summer yosemite thirteen year old yellowstone years american
"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

05:56 min | 4 months ago

"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"The winter and even into spring until the roads are fully opened really by summer..

"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

03:32 min | 4 months ago

"nationals park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"You're listening to the home school. Podcast where we make travel educational amphion. Let's walk among the giants as we head to sequoia national park. Thank you for joining us on. The rv homeschool podcast. My name is amber steven. And i'm your host. We are a family of four that travels in our jaco seneca motorhome with our two elementary age daughters. We travel the us and canada when borders are opened and we love bringing you content about the national parks and other fun rv travel ideas so we took a one year hiatus but we are back and trying to bring you some regular content from all of the national parks that we've been to lately so thank you so much for joining us if you're new to the podcast. We like to talk about the logistics specifically about driving with your rv to the locations and things that you need to know and consider then we'll go into some of our trip highlights things that we liked hikes places to visit stuff like that and then we usually end with some camping ideas in any other general tips and recommendations for you so let's get started with sequoia national park. So why do you want to visit sequoia national park. While first of all sequoia has the largest earth. And i'm talking about large in terms of volume so just the overall width of the trees. It was the second national park and it was designated to protect these massive trees that are within its space. It has the highest mountain peak in the lower forty eight. And that would be mount whitney which stands at fourteen thousand four hundred ninety four feet in elevation. It also is home to thirty different sequoia groves throughout the park now this is only grow in the sierra nevada range which is kind of in the central part of california it's between five thousand and seven thousand and elevations sets pretty high up there and Trust me you feel that is. You're driving your rv pretty much from sea level and working your way up into the park. These trees are the largest in volume but they are not the tallest that designation goes to the redwoods which are along the coast of california. And we'll talk about that in our podcast on redwoods national park the sequoia trees are also very old and some of them are over three thousand years old and one of the other really interesting things about the sequoias is that they. They're seeds fall down in the form of these pine cones these big green cones and in order for them to release the seeds which will actually generate new force growth..

fourteen thousand california sierra nevada one year amber steven five thousand four hundred ninety four feet canada sequoia national park second national park seven thousand two elementary age one over three thousand years old thirty different sequoia grove jaco seneca first family of forty eight earth
"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Wonderful <Speech_Male> page that you have that. I've <Speech_Male> been looking at this entire <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> Which may be the only <Speech_Male> Lincoln this episode? <Speech_Male> Which is the National Parks <Speech_Male> Arizona on <Speech_Male> everything <SpeakerChange> dish everywhere <Speech_Male> dot com? <Speech_Male> Yeah I have pages <Speech_Male> setup for every state <Speech_Male> nited <Speech_Male> states with a full <Speech_Male> map showing <Speech_Male> you where everything is <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> photography <Speech_Male> of all the sites <Speech_Telephony_Male> If I've been there and <Speech_Male> as I visit more sites <Speech_Male> I keep updating the pages <Speech_Male> and as they <Speech_Male> make more sites I'm <Speech_Male> always very <Speech_Male> anal retentive <Speech_Male> about making sure <Speech_Male> that I have <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Male> latest list so <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> and the only disadvantage <Speech_Male> I would say of going to <Speech_Male> Gary Site. Is I find <Speech_Male> when I go to Gary Side. <Speech_Male> I find that I don't <Speech_Male> know what I'm doing with my camera <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so one of <Speech_Male> these days. Maybe I'll take <Speech_Male> one of Gary's <Speech_Male> He will do <Speech_Male> photography tours. <Speech_Male> Occasionally so <Speech_Male> something you <Speech_Male> might think about Gary. Thanks <Speech_Male> so much <Speech_Male> for coming back <Speech_Male> on amateur traveler <Speech_Male> and sharing with us <Speech_Male> your love for national parks <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> for those <SpeakerChange> in Arizona. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank travelling <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in news the <Speech_Male> community. Let me I <Speech_Male> put out some. Thanks <Speech_Male> to two new <Speech_Male> patrons of the show <Speech_Male> on Patriots on <Speech_Male> Chris Kilworth <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> is also started <Speech_Male> his own podcast <Speech_Male> and unlike me. <Speech_Male> He said he would do <Speech_Male> that episode on climbing. <Speech_Male> Everest so <Speech_Male> well find out what <Speech_Male> his podcast is <Speech_Male> and get you that information <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and then also thanks <Speech_Male> to Cynthia <Speech_Male> talmadge <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and Cynthia <Speech_Male> says thanks so much <Speech_Male> for all you do all <Speech_Male> the episodes you've released. <Speech_Male> Your show is the reason my <Speech_Male> fiance and I went <Speech_Male> to Becca Stan. <Speech_Male> Which was <Speech_Male> life changing? <Speech_Male> I'm so inspired <Speech_Male> each time. I listen <Speech_Male> and especially now <Speech_Male> that I'm quarantined <Speech_Male> in New York City. <Speech_Male> Each episode offers <Speech_Male> a respite and a chance <Speech_Male> to daydream. <Speech_Male> Thank you thank you <Speech_Male> for your generosity <Speech_Male> sharing so much information <Speech_Male> over the years <Speech_Male> keep it up. Well <Speech_Male> thanks to both of <Speech_Male> you. We will try <Speech_Male> and keep this up. <Speech_Male> I also heard <Speech_Male> from Justin who commented <Speech_Male> on the episode. We did <Speech_Male> on climbing Kilimanjaro. <Speech_Male> This brought <Speech_Male> back fond <Speech_Male> memories. Thanks <Speech_Male> for sharing. <Speech_Male> We agree. Do <Speech_Male> the hike before <Speech_Male> the safari. We <Speech_Male> did the limo <Speech_Male> show route from <Speech_Male> the West and <Speech_Male> summited the western <Speech_Male> breach so <Speech_Male> a little bit different <Speech_Male> experience. <Speech_Male> We also did early <Speech_Male> September which <Speech_Male> matched well <Speech_Male> with seeing the <Speech_Male> great migration if <Speech_Male> interested. We <Speech_Male> kept log with <Speech_Male> photos and videos <Speech_Male> on. I'll put a link to <Speech_Male> Justin's <Speech_Male> blog in <Speech_Male> the show notes at Amateur <Speech_Male> Traveler Dot Com. <Speech_Male> And with <Speech_Music_Male> that we're going <Speech_Male> to end this episode <Speech_Male> of amateur traveller. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have any questions send an <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> email to host at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> amateur traveler <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot com or better <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> yet leave <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a comment on this episode <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at Amateur Traveler <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dot Com. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> so <SpeakerChange> much <Speech_Music_Male> for listening <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> the <Music> <Advertisement> cat. Sit in <Music> <Advertisement> one building.

"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Cactus the mesas of Monument Valley are quintessentially the southwest right. John Borden Sean. A lot of his movies in fact Play Circle John Ford Point. Also a narrow part so they've taken the resources that they they have. I in the land that they have an through using it for tourism parks so right before we wrap up any other parks that are not national parks that you WANNA give an onto state parks or I really can't think of any state parks. I wasn't really paying attention to it. Although I'm sure there are I know. Extensions like there's a national monument that's an extension of the Grand Canyon but it's not a national park service site under the Bureau of Land Management. Okay but it is a national monument. That's that's the weird thing about national monuments. Most national monuments are part of the park system. But not all national monuments. Some are run by the ear of land management. Some are run by the four service and I think a few even by the fish and Wildlife Service okay because there is vermillion cliffs National Monument which is managed by B. M. and it's in between the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and pagers. We talked about with the with Antelope Canyon a right along the Colorado River. Just north of it a very beautiful sight but very basic. It's much more event. Outdoor off back country kind of thing in their for instance. There are places like the wave in some well known spots there that you need a backcountry permit to get to and they'd really don't recommend that you go there if you don't have backcountry experience but even just driving by the cliffs or were rafting down the Colorado River by the cliffs of vermillion cliffs. Nash Ammonia is beautiful place. I know it's Grand Canyon Parachute National Monument. Oh Cayenne usually called parachute national monument. But it's not a park service site and know if I was secretary of the Interior for like a week I think my my top priority would be reorganizing a lot of this stuff so it makes more sense and I would move the forest service out of the Department of Agriculture which a lot of people do not realize that it's part of the Department of areas not the interior and moving into the Department of cheerier and try to create some sort of order. With how all. This federal land is divided in organized. Well I mean the reason it's Department of Agriculture is we use those trees as an agricultural renewable resource is the reason it ended up in there as I understand it was original Lawrence politics or something today. A lot of the national forests are they could still do logging and stuff like that honor. In those places I mean they have different classifications for the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management is in the Department of the Interior. And so there's different land usage requirements for different types of Federal Lance. Oh I don't think that's excellent as we go to wrap this up. You're standing in the prettiest spot in Arizona National Park of any stripe weary standing. But he looking at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Or or I should say you are probably overlooking Horseshoe Bend. Oh come in when climbing national recreation area. I think that particular site of the band is pretty great. Whereas there's lots of sites along the Grand Canyon I haven't been to horseshoe bend in. Several years has changed there. Were No guardrails. Yeah nothing. Most people didn't even know about the gravel road at the parks. I'm kind of curious. It's like no has changed dramatically. There is a parking lot where you pay for parking a paved path up large crowds. It's instagram that has turned this into a very popular spot. But it is a it is a beautiful spot. I would say early in the day instead of late in the day. I found that late in the day I was shooting into the sun and so would have been better if the sun had been behind me earlier in the day But beautiful spot. It's it's really kind of one picture So whether it's worth a parking you're in the middle of nowhere you're out there. I would do it but I wouldn't say that it's more than just the one picture I would also say. Cheer how a National Monument the road all the way up. It's kind of a winding road. That goes up a mountain and then once you get to the very top. That's when you can kind of really see all of the stone spires. They're kind of like. Hutus are official called. Who does but it's kind of basically the same thing that that's really a fantastic view and there's one particular view and Daiva Trumpet on my website. Where you look out into this opening into this greater valley in the distance and you have all these rock pillars that are there. That's another great one too well and as I will do every time that Gary comes on the show I would recommend his website. Nachos for reading about things but for his wonderful photography for which he has won numerous awards in one thing that makes you laugh and say only in Arizona National Parks besides the buried National Park. Because that's that's clearly the first answer. That question prompted petrified forest. I I know there are other places in the world that have petrified wood. But you're just not gonna see it so easily exposed like you're going to in petrified forest national park and in fact. I think it's on the tentative list for the United States to become a world heritage site only for when that will ever happen but significant engine unique enough that place on that list excellent where guest again has been Gary Art and Gary. I'm assuming where I should send people in terms of your site. Is this wonderful page that you have that. I've been looking at this entire time. Which may be the only Lincoln this episode? Which is the National Parks Arizona on everything dish everywhere dot com?.

National Monument Grand Canyon Parachute Nationa Grand Canyon Arizona National Parks National Park vermillion cliffs National Mon parachute national monument National Parks Arizona National Park Service forest national park Bureau of Land Management Monument Valley Colorado River Department of Agriculture Antelope Canyon John Borden Sean Gary Art John Ford Point fish and Wildlife Service Horseshoe Bend
"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"We're talking about the first trip into what is now the United States by the Spanish in the fifteen hundreds so this basically fifteen forty to fifteen forty two they go all the way up into what is now Kansas. And that's Coronado so it's it's worth commemorating even if you don't get a motion picture experience. Yeah I mean I should have added that. That's what the Coronado from cornell come trump right to Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez Coronado. Yeah and they. They talk about his trip up and they're looking for gold. Of course we'll share. They didn't find any right so now we're moving towards the eastern border next New Mexico and there are two sites. Cheer Cowan National Monument. This was far and away. The biggest most pleasant surprise misses a site that could get national park status in probably should. It's not a huge site but the closest thing I could explain it as an and this will probably resonate with you that it's very similar to Pinnacles National Park in California. Sure but better. Oh okay there. Is this just a field of pinnacles and if you go to my website I'll you can see photos. I have taken from the park but yeah it's just a really need landscape and given some of the national parks. We have with the National Park status. I think Jerko would clearly qualify compared to like hot springs national park or something like that would should not be national park will and I should defend myself. Because I know you've just generated e mail from Jeff Ulf Sousa patron regular listener and contributor the show and former National Park Ranger He is definitely writing me at this moment as we're talking saying there's no hierarchy in the national park system of national parks being better than national monuments. It's actually officially. That's not true. But we don't have congressman lobbying to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore became Indiana Dunes. National Park will but Congress conform national parks in the president confessional monuments of my correct. Something like that correct. But it's marketing it's true Whitesands just White Sands National Monument to White Sands National Park. Why because they want marketers so there absolutely is a hierarchy even though officially according to the park service there isn't and they're all equal real know. Some parents love their children more than others and some national the National Park Service. There is no difference but to the marketing of the congressman. There may be someone says Oh. I visited all sixty one. National Parks Sixty one. Now by the way used to nine and then keeps changing There's someone says Yan visiting all the national parks. Well are they visiting all four hundred nineteen national park service sites or they visiting just those sixty one and most people will consider those sixty one to be the national parks. Yeah I'm I'm definitely not one of those people but I know what you mean and there's over four hundred now. That actually surprised me too I. Oh Yeah I think what? I got my first national park passport. It was three sixty ish. Yeah they they make every so often. The newest one is why. I don't think it's official yet but it's about to become and it's in Missouri Along the Mississippi River WanNa say it's like saint genevieve or something but yeah so there it depends on the president and things like that shirt only been a couple. I think made in this administration but a Cheer Common National Monument was Navajo country. Okay I would've guessed. Chiricahua is the Cherkaoui a branch of the Navajo. Man I wanNA have a word of an Stanley Navajo and we get to that by the site. That's very close to here. Which Fort Bowie national historic site and this was a former us. Army base the cavalry when they were doing things. Weston they fought their wars with Navajo. A lot of it was done at a Ford Bowie. He end if you're going to visit this area and it's kind of in a remote part of southeastern Arizona. You definitely want to visit. Both of them. Cherkaoui can usually visited by car a road that goes through the park. Parking lots and get out and walk around for Bowie on the other hand. I didn't know this until I arrived. It's a three mile walk from the parking lot to Ford bully though you cannot just drive up there. It's it's not a strenuous walk. It's not that bad and the road to the parking lot were you. You get out is kind of a gravel road. There is a visitor centre once you get there but takes time. You just need to be prepared for that. And I didn't realize that when I got there I did the and everything and spend some time and there's a few historical sites along the way. There is a small cemetery that you walk past. We're has some of the victims of some of the Navajo raids of settlers and interestingly enough several of them had the Congressional Medal of Honor. And this was back when the Congressional Medal of honor I think was given out a little bit more liberally than it is today. I think during the civil war and during the Indian wars there were a lot more given out certainly as a percentage of was a much smaller army at the time right and today I think if you earn it it's a much bigger deal on a requires. They have a much higher standard. But that is one of things you can see along the way and then when you get there to Fort Bowie. It's basically ruins. You can see the outline of where the buildings were most of them were Pueblo construction. So you can see the the outlines of the walls and you can see the field where they marched and things like that. But that's pretty much what you're going to be seeing. There's a lot of history in this site and location. But it's not like it's a all the buildings are there because motor them have disappeared from the elements because it really isn't a remote location rent. It's not a place you're going to get to easy. You just need to be prepared about that. Walk before you make and I did want to do. Correction Cherkaoui National Monument. Yeah the native. Americans live their word that Urakawa which is an Apache branch not Navajo. The Navajo were nearby. You're right it's patchy why I don't know why the hell are saying number two absolutely right now the whole further north right yell at the four corners area. You're right. It should be Apache. I'm sorry so if you've got into this part of the podcast and written your email excellent. We have a few left. Yeah I should also just just as an aside the Apache really good warriors really can't ask and I think you really get a good sense that when you read some of the history of what happened in the area so the remaining ones. They're kind of moving. The final one's talked about Hokum pima which site that both does not exist and you cannot visit a lot of them are ancient native sites. That are kind of around. I won't I won't say around the Phoenix area. But they're certainly within around SEDONA. I would say yeah. Montezuma's Castle National Monument and choose a National Monument. I actually drove right past them. Coming back from petrified forest. They're not that far off of interstate. So right there variously as it a trip that you can do. I just didn't do it because when the time I was driving back was very close to the closing times. I wouldn't have been able to the system Tonto. National Monument Casagrande Ruins National Monument. Then you have to them before though as I recall. No okay then. I'm confusing you with me so I have been to both those. So they are relatively small native American sites Montezuma's castle those very well preserved a very beautiful sight. Tuesday isn't quite as well preserved but it's Up on the top of a hill So it's a beautiful area in terms of you and such but again very easy to visit Both in the same day easily and Sedona the same day so they won't take a lot of time and were the stump. Yeah definitely I visited here in like I said January twenty twenty and I could easily see myself coming back in the winter next year. Visit these sites because I I was. I thought that all while winter narrow Zona there's GonNa be tons of people especially like the Tucson area. They're big event in the winter. Is the Rock and mineral show or the right gem mineral show and I think that's starts in late January early February. The whole town will book up for that. So prices before hotels will go up but other than that I found prices all of Arizona for like a motel. If you're on a road trip to be really affordable like forty dollars a night now. Phoenix is going to be a lot busier in the winter Especially when spring training starts and the prices are going to twice as much during spring training as they would be in the summer. When it's going to be over one hundred degrees right if you go like it said in January ends before Spring Training Starts. There are some really good deals to be had. I would go there again that time of year because I live in Minnesota so upgrading weather and affordable and all. These sites are accessible easily That time of year and the weather wasn't that bad temperatures would get up into the same like the low sixty s mid sixties stays with a high variation in temperature because it is in the desert. So you get pretty warm in the middle of the day and then drop down to maybe in the high thirties low forties in the evening. Yeah last time we went to visit friends in Phoenix. We actually didn't go in spring training even though I love to be there at that time of year but went among early. And you're right. It's nice weather great to be outside. I much rather be in Phoenix in January than I would in July. So an interesting of course talked about both Tucson and northern Arizona and Phoenix and the four corners region other episodes of the podcast as well no link to those yet I should add. There's some great parks to visit. That are not. I'M NOT GONNA ask that yet because I I was always surprised. For instance that Meteoric Crater for instance isn't in the National Park System. Yeah and that's not too far from some of the sites run flagstaff. 'cause I I saw the the road signs and I had a limited amount of time so my all right. I'm going to prioritize and visit the National Park Sites I had Saints Day. Usually would've gone and then also the Navajo parks. Oh sure Yup in the four corners region the slot canyons. They'd become extremely popular a so. We talked about him in the show in the first year of the show and I went in two thousand and six I want to say to visit page Arizona and Antelope Kenyon and I remember showing up Lower Antelope Canyon and having a tour by myself. First thing in the morning and that is not what you will find today we just did it again this this fall although I thought they managed the crowds very well in but it's much much more popular than it used to be and it's gorgeous yeah. I went to Antelope Canyon Litte tour several years ago and it was basically you have a group of people and they you walk really fast towards one spot and you all take a picture with no one in it and then was a group behind you in a group ahead of you and Y'all kind of move forward. You can get a pitcher where brands around the corner so nobody can see it. You cannot take a bad picture. An Antelope Canyon. I still see if you do sell your camera and by postcards because it is such an amazing place. Yeah well and the thing that I loved this time about visiting and I. I was fully expecting to be disappointed because I knew had gotten much more popular. It's more expensive. It used to be you need. You need reservations. Especially if you're booking in a more busy season multiple days ahead and so I was fully expecting it would be a lesser experience than it was when I was there when it wasn't as popular and it was not what I found. Any is still stunningly beautiful. Everybody that I brought loved it and the other thing that's different is everybody's got their their iphones and your guide knows how to take good pictures now. Which that really wasn't the case before they really. I think they've upped their game a lot. They made the Canyon. One lower antelope is when I went to which is the one that used to be unpopular Upper antelope was the popular one. That people went to and they made it a one way journey. So you're not kind of trying to get past people in these narrow areas and I thought they managed it really very well and it was thoroughly enjoyable now. I was in October so I wasn't there in the heat of summer and I wasn't there in the the most busy times but still gorgeous gorgeous place and its place you want to visit in the middle of the day most places you want to photograph or early in the day or late in the day Slot Canyon you WanNa do kind of in the middle of the day. Those beams of light coming down. We'll see I've always upper antelope canyon. Noon Lower Antelope Canyon in the day. Only been oppor so okay. I actually prefer. Lower lower is much longer than upper. So it's you can't and so yeah. And we also add technically technically not in Arizona but valley which is like I'll into Utah over the border and that's also another Navajo Park and most people are going to be accessing it from Arizona. Brent yeah you Mr there as well. That is long with a cigar..

National Park Arizona National Monument Casagrande R Pinnacles National Park National Park System National Park Service Cowan National Monument White Sands National Monument National Monument Navajo Park Phoenix Lower Antelope Canyon Cheer Common National Monument Cherkaoui National Monument National Park Ranger White Sands National Park Coronado Indiana Dunes National Lakesho upper antelope canyon Castle National Monument
"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

13:59 min | 1 year ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The bags bags on a roll on thirty read. It's real good passport. Own Amateur Traveler episode seven hundred today. The amateur traveler talks about Spanish explorers native Americans a volcano crater cactus and canyons of various sizes. One really really grand and one really really small as we go to the National Parks of Arizona. Welcome to the immature traveler. I'm your host Chris. Kristen sending this is indeed episodes. Seven hundred of the amateur traveler as we approach the fifteenth year anniversary. So let's celebrate a and now let's get back to work. Let's talk about Arizona. I like to welcome back to the show. Gary Aren't from everything. Dash EVERYWHERE DOT com. Who's come to talk to us? About Arizona? National Parks Carry. Welcome back to the show. Thank you for the. What is it? Fifteen or sixteen. So it's not like it's been that long since I've talked to Gary Gary and I also have been a CO hosting this. We can travel with a couple of other friends for ten years now so we get to talk periodically but you pitched me going to Arizona and seeing national parks I would say why should someone do that. But you already said national parks so Arizona just has the Grand Canyon right well. That's that's the big one I would say you're looking at. That's what it's best known for but actually Arizona has twenty two different national park service sites. Which places at third amongst all states as far as the number of sites behind California and Alaska only having some second now that I think about it but yeah there's a lot and I've been to a lot of these but you actually came up with some that I'd never heard of so. That was one of the reasons that I was anxious to. Have you back on the show and talk about this but let's talk about? Why should someone go to Arizona and see the national parks? Well for starters you can go year round and I think that something that you can't do easily in a lot of parks last year. For example I did a trip to southern Oregon and Northern California and even in June a lot of the parks there were snowed in and when I showed in I mean. Twenty feet of snow snowed in right so this is in the summer. And they're still so much snow. Because it's an altitude. And you're you're not gonNA really see that in Arizona Star in in the south so if you're looking for a trip in the winter or something it's it's a great place to go and there's a great diversity. These aren't just natural sites although it certainly has those there's a great deal of history. That goes back told him. The ancient people who lived in this area before Europeans showed up as well as a westward expansion in a host of other things so there really is a wide diversity. I also going to see some landscapes that you're really not going to see anywhere else or other desserts in the United States but The SONORAN desert that. You're going to see here is really unique and have some things that you're just not gonNA find saying California Nevada or even Utah. The one exception I can think of to. You're not going to run into whether here would be the North Rim of the Grand Canyon Which closes in October want to say because it had closed before. We did a trip in October of last year. It hadn't snowed in yet but all services were closed on the largest closed in all facilities are closed at that point and then it will snow in. And they'll stop plowing the roads as soon as the snows happen. Yeah so I was last there. In January of twenty twenty those primarily in the Tucson area but then I made a trip up north around flagstaff and a lot of people don't realize that there's snow up in flagstaff primarily because of the elevation than anything. And so yeah. There was definitely snow on the ground when I visited some of the sites but I live in Minnesota so this was like your price my first winter. It was not a lot of snow. Wasn't that coal right. The roads are open. You can you can actually go and see stuff well and I remember being at the Grand Canyon in April when there was snow at the Rim and it was eighty degrees at the bottom so it depends a lot where you are absolutely. So what kind of itinerary do you recommend? It really depends on where you're going to be. I think most people are probably going to be flying into Tucson or Phoenix right and the third place might be flagstaff. One smaller town. But it's in the north and There's kind of pockets of parks around those. And the first one I would bring up is a park while National Monument and it's extremely unique among all the sites in the United States that's Hokum National Monument anemic because you cannot visit and if you could visit. There is nothing to see well then. It's unique in an unusual way. I have needs a little bit of explanation so just south of Phoenix is the reservation. There was an archaeological dig. Their WANNA say took place in the seventies sixties and seventies called snake down and what they ended up doing was once. The excavation was over the reburied it. So you got declared a national monument and it's on the reservation and they don't let you go and visit the site or snake town is but if they did there is literally nothing to see because it's buried and for National Park collectors. It poses a problem because for whatever reason it's still on the books huff thirds no visitor center. There's no there's nothing but technically make them really getting technical here if you look at the outline of what constitutes the National Monument isn't interstate that runs through it so should actually go to the Beltway Beneath Phoenix. YOU'RE ON THAT ROAD. You will technically drive through this area and you'll see buffing. There's nothing there so it's kind of an oddity on. I don't know why it's still on the books or why it's there. But supposedly there was a cultural center for the tribe and you go there and they had a display about snake Tama. They closed it. And they're going to be reopening again and you could actually get a stamp there and that would be the closest thing to visit other than that I mean. I think we could talk about so there of the twenty two sites. There are three national parks proper. The first is obviously the Grand Canyon. I don't know how much we need to talk about that. I'm sure done shows on the Grand Canyon. We have done a show on the Grand Canyon in the first year of Amateur Traveler. And then we did another show later on about Rafting the Grand Canyon with the George Wendt the now late founder of ores rafting But that's been a little while ago so it's worth a mention. Yeah I mean everyone's familiar with it. Is You mentioned you can access it from the North or the South? It's a very common trip for people to make from Las Vegas. Yeah although people go to the South Rim from Las Vegas. That's long drive right. I mean and it should be noted. The Grand Canyon says enormous chunk taken out of the state of Arizona and their bridges to get around. It writes the you have to drive around at our fly over it. The southern rim is lower elevation and by far the more popular of the two sides. You can visit. It gets ninety percent of the tourism. Am I read about that? Would sound about right if you go further up river you get into the Glen Canyon Recreation area. And that's where you'll see that's like horseshoe bend is a famous site of most people may have seen the photo also National Park Service site on the Colorado River but not part of the Canyon and if you go downstream there are also some Indian reservations. One of which which famously built the Skywalk horseshoe-shaped. Yeah so it it. It's one of the most popular parks in the United States. It should have been put on the list of the seven. Natural Wonders of the world said the underground river in the Philippines. Made it not that. We're bitter fool. No in the way they walked in it was kind of ridiculous but yeah it's the one thing that if you're an American or even if you're not American coming to visit the United States I think you should I mean it's literally alongside maybe yellowstone in Yosemite those are considered the three crown jewel national parks in the US system brand. It really is an incredible experience in the one thing I would say so I was back at the Grand Canyon this year ahead not been since my daughter was four or so and she is thirty so it had been a little while and still beautiful. Lovett have still never gone down into the Canyon. And so that's a whole different trip when you hike down into the Canyon and spend the night and hike backup in or raft at which takes a week and you need to plan well advance. But I did get a chance this time. You mentioned Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. I did get a chance to do one of the float trips from the Damn Glen Canyon Dam all the way down to the borders of the Grand Canyon National Park where you actually raft around or boat around the Horseshoe. Bend and it was enjoyable. It's a float trip. It's not a Whitewater trip. It's easy anybody can do it but I would say it was enjoyable. I would recommend it. Yeah and the other park. I should probably mention that is up in this northern Arizona area that you can also visit on a daytrip from Las. Vegas is pipe Spring National Monument. Okay my last trip Las Vegas. I went there. It is a historical site that really deals with early. Mormon missions This is one of the sites. It's very close to the border of Utah again. Not that far from Las Vegas. I'd say it's maybe a two hour drive. An interesting site again does not get a lot of visitors. I unless you're probably entrusted in early settler history or Mormon history or something like that most people are probably not going to go but interesting site and Kinda off by itself. I know a lot of people when they're in Vegas. The two big trips are to go to Zaire on or the Grand Canyon in. It's another I don't think there's any organized trips visit displays at some. You pretty much have to do your car. Will you mentioned something about National Park Collectors? And you and I are both national collectors. And that's the kind of person who is going to go to this site. I'm not a person who is going to go to the site. Although I didn't know what pipe spring but one of the ways that you discover sites like this besides spending way too much time on the National Park website or Gary's website is by having a national park passport and that's the kind of thing that drives you to these little less known sites and some of them are wonders and and really undeservedly unknown. Oh yeah and we're going to be getting some of that. I think are really fantastic. One of the things about what I do. So yeah I go to these parks and I go to World Heritage sites right a lot of times. I'll visit them simply because it's it's a point on a map yet so I'm really discovering it when I'm there and I'd say ninety percent of the time it's unpleasantly surprised by like wow. This is really interesting. I'm surprised more people to know that and then ten percent of the time. It's a total duds. I'm scratching my head as to why exist but it is really interesting In the one other I think we should add kind of in this northwest area. Verizon is Lake Mead which is primarily thought of as Nevada Park. Most of it is but it actually does go into Arizona as well and that is a national recreation area if Iraq. Okay so they're outing and fishing and things like that so then there's three different sites very close to flagstaff very very close to each other. Probably within a forty five minute drive you can easily visit all three in one day. Two of which are so close together that they're kind of treated as a single unit in at Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument and walk Deke National Monument Sunset Crater is a volcano and it's a relatively recent eruption. So you can still see the full cinder cone and it's not a very big park so you kind of just drive through it and the road that goes through the park if you stay on that road for about twenty minutes more than you get to Lucky National Monument. Just a completely different part. That's actually one of the several Anastase e quello monuments that you're gonNA see around the southwest or the ancient Pueblo. People as I understand we. Now call them Because there's controversy about the name but basically the first settlers in this area and there are several of the dwellings. Go visit a long. The the road that goes through the park and it's really easy to any probably should visit both of those two together and like. I said it is one road that takes you to both of them and I'm pretty sure that the management of both of those sites are linked together. They're so close together So this is like a major highway and then the entrance to one of the sites is on the south among you drive the loop road and then it takes you up to the northern end of the highway and boom. You're there you know that's one I have not been then. The third is Walnut Canyon National Monument In this is one of these pleasant surprises. Walnut Canyon is surprisingly very steep deep canyon. Not Not Grand Canyon time but it. It's very steep in here to UC. Click swellings almost impossibly. So so if you go to Mesa Verde and say Colorado. Those are really large dwellings. That were all built in rather large. I don't want to cave sort of like these. These cutouts in the sides of cliffs where they can build these rather large dwellings in Walnut Canyon..

Grand Canyon Arizona United States Walnut Canyon National Monumen National Monument National Parks of Arizona Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon National Recreatio Las Vegas National Park Collectors Gary Gary flagstaff Sunset Crater Volcano National Walnut Canyon Amateur Traveler Glen Canyon Recreation Damn Glen Canyon Dam Phoenix Tucson Deke National Monument Sunset
"nationals park" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from newman's own foundation workington nourish the common good by donating all profits from newman's own food products to charitable organisations that seek to make the world a better place more information is available at newman's own foundation dot org there has been a mass resignation at the national park service nearly every member of the park service advisory board nine in all quit in protest yesterday they say interior secretary ryan zinke has ignored them and that he's rolling back protections for public land's zinc he's office quickly countered saying the board members are lying and that they have ignored sexual harassment at the park service to untangle all these threads we've reached journalist elia woods at his home in montana happens we ryan zinke is home state woods recently profiled the interior secretary for outside magazine hey elliott thanks for being with us baker adamant there's been this longbrewing insurgency at the national park service during the trump administration over the course of the past year so was this mass resignation expected in some way you know i can say if it was expected or not but i think it fits a pattern of senior level officials in the interior department and the national park service and other agencies and the trump administration who are reacting to a very clear and firm anti science stance among the senior officials in the senior cabinet officials in the trump administration so we've seen whistle blower claims from people like joe clement and the interior department who was reassigned to and accounting job away from the job advising on on a policy and things like that and i think this this fits fat pattern of people in those positions saying enough is enough we're not being consulted or not being used in our for attended purpose and it would be better for us to make this very public statement of disgust and protest then to continue functioning in kind of a attempted position so then ryan zinke the interior.

newman food products ryan zinke harassment elia woods montana secretary joe clement advisory board elliott baker
"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

"I just feel like this is a little disingenuous coming from him that not fully admitting to the fact that they've proposed a thirteen percent cut to the national park service budget and the numbers don't entirely figure out and this is a thirty day comment period for a significant increase in park fees i mean when is this administration going to step up and actually show that they're gonna make a commitment they could endorse the national park legacy act tomorrow if they wanted to and show congress that they'll work hand in hand with them on a solution for the for the maintenance backlog but the evidence is just not adding up in terms of their commitment and i i really hope that they'll work with groups like ours too to try to address the maintenance backlog and not just keep kicking and under the rug or kicking it to visitors and holly anything from the deputy secretary stand out to you yeah just think the bottom line is that more money is unlikely to come from congress and we need to be more innovative to try to come up with ways to better protect these parks there are too many other competing issues with federal funds and unless we wanna see increase taxes are decreasing expenditures elsewhere we are not going to see that money coming into our national park so we need to look elsewhere what's the next step analyst well i just wanted to mention that the national pikes are impacted by climate change far more than the the nation as a whole and that there's lots of implications for that for the wildlife and for the m three nature there and there's very little money being spent to try to figure out what that all means and that's another place where fines if their race could be used that's elizabeth shogren the washington correspondent for high country news elizabeth thanks for spending the hour with us.

deputy secretary congress analyst climate change elizabeth shogren washington thirteen percent thirty day
"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

"And it gets more than twenty million visitors a year that's nineteen more than the top national park great smoky mountains and it's free to enter and in you pay for camping or pavilion rental so clearly kristen paying more is not enough by itself to keep people away from somewhere the really want to go in the scheme of things in the scheme of all of our entertainment vacation options are these increases really that big a deal if someone will be a hundred dollars to go it it is the world for a day and then by souvenirs in food and mickey mouse ears i love the makes the world go visit all of the national parks are actually four hundred seventeen units around the country and there's a new one in birmingham that uh who's just as it made it a national monument which doesn't have a fee go enjoy it will while it's free but for those who want to invest in national parks and want to pay the fees please do didn't do that it helps every park when you pay the fee when you get there not everyone can do that and you know what i didn't go to disneyland when i was a kid my parents couldn't afford it but we could afford to go to the statue of liberty and we could afford to go to shenandoah and that's those are the folks that we have to consider in this equation as well not just those who can afford it but those who can't we have folks who live in new york city who don't even get to gateway which is right there on their doorstep we have to get more people into parks i think it was a great thing that at the centennial national park service we were talking about getting more people to enjoy their parks getting kids giving out free passes to fourth graders to get into parks.

birmingham kristen mickey mouse new york centennial national park hundred dollars
"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

"Nicolas commented on our facebook page i think it's appropriate to raise the prices of entry to the most popular parks i'd much rather parks they managed by n p s the national park service rather than be privatized were corporations would raise prices anyway many of the most popular parks are overwhelmed by visitors falling into disrepair and humans are leaving a lasting impact on the ecology higher prices will encourage visitors to find less frequently visited parks distributing the impacts elizabeth show grin what do we know about how the parks are dealing with the current demand on their facilities are they really being stretched to the point where they're just wearing down well there are a lot of facilities that are wearing down there are very an app and with consequences that are quite dire for the environment for instance at a yosemite our favorite national park there's a a huge problem the sewer system there and it's it's it fabulously expensive fix and what happens on what's happening number of times is that day that there had been leaks into the mirsaid river and you don't want that that's not good for the fishing there of course and for the people either and so i just think that that's wining that's just one example of the kind of big infrastructure projects that are very expensive do some of these one of those interesting ones because it's got that big old hotel that was built their years and years ago the awani lodge that is basically kind of a luxury a luxury hotel it's no longer called that up because of the over there was originally called the awani lies i forget what is called today but majesty maybe suggested a majestic thank you very much so.

Nicolas mirsaid river facebook elizabeth yosemite
"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on 1A

"Well it's really about entrance fees and it's not for all parks it's for seventeen parks that are kind of the most that they bring in the most money for the national park service three these kinds of fees and they're parks like yosemite and yellowstone end denali places where people will mostly destination pack some of the some of the ocean and della to guess which is kind of a local park but some of the other parks i think i think this is right like the bay area parks that are part of the golden gate they don't have this price hike which is interesting because that's the most popular national park have the golden gate national recreation area includes a lot of free spaces like the presidio and ocean beach in the marine headlines that you can just kind of driver walk up to right and so any way that lens not included but there are a lot of very popular parks included christon rangel is there a precedent for these rate increases is the first time the national park service has ever tried anything like this or is this the kind of thing that just happens from time to time this is probably the largest increase we've ever seen in sort of a broad way proposed for the national park service in the past uh some fees have been assessed over decades in several national parks but when congress started passing legislation to try to make fees more uniform this is probably the highest increase that we've ever seen and it's a pretty incredible jump for the public to handle and just two years ago sixteen of these seventeen national parks already went through a fee increase so this is a pretty rapid.

congress yellowstone end denali christon rangel two years
"nationals park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:08 min | 5 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"I just visit the sites without bother getting the stamp but if you're going on a trip in you have kids especially it can be a really fun way to kind of of track your adventures personally over my lifetime and i began doing this in the nineties i would go on business trips and i would have to spend a couple of extra days in a place because i would get like a saturday return ticket which was cheaper so i would spend another day or two and i always try to visit the national park service site so i got to visit you know most of the sites in new york city there's the theodore roosevelt birthplace grant's tomb of your battery park so there's a statue all silent obviously in in other cities as well as visited pinnacles national monument driving from san francisco to los angeles a lot of these places i've done a fort mchenry him in baltimore i also visited as part of a trip i took from washington up to new york registrar destroy of so i estimate that i've probably ben i'd have to go through account again but i've been to about one hundred in forty maybe two hundred fifty of the national park service sites of those four hundred and eleven in about maybe a little more than half of the national park sites of which there are fifty nine and later this year i'm going to be going and visiting whole bunch more sites i'm doing a trip up to alaska and this year there are eight national parks in alaska including monuments in i'll be visiting six of us national parks all be going to gates of the arctic denali late clark cat mine glacier bay and that i'll be returning in september and i'll be going to wriggle saint elias so the only to i will not have visited would be kobuk valley which is difficult one battle return somebody in the future to do that and can i fjords which is actually pretty easy park to visit i just them i'm not gonna be able to schedule it on this trip but if you fly in anchorage you can drive a car in and get down there quite easily so it's pretty easy to do and then i also may be going on a.

san francisco baltimore glacier bay elias kobuk valley new york theodore roosevelt pinnacles national monument los angeles washington alaska
"nationals park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:00 min | 5 years ago

"nationals park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"Whether something is considered lesser or greater i think most people would agree that the national park designation is kind of the cream of the crop these are the best places within the national park system which is why you sometimes see national monuments upgraded to a national park the most recent example of this was pinnacles national park in california which was a national monument i visited pinnacles national monument new sometime in the late 90s i forget it's actually south of san francisco and several years ago the president upgraded this to a national so now it's pinnacles national park and there's been several other examples of this of something going from national monument to national park and it seems to be something that each president tries to create one new national park during their tenure in office so they don't create a lot of new national parks i'd say you can expect may be one or two two crew be created every decade or so the peso certainly slow down of four hundred at eleven sites that include the battlefields the monuments in in whatnot of there's a lot of different things so if you go to washington dc all of the public monuments including the city parks because washington dc federal district are all technically maintained by the national park service so you will so of those four hundred eleven that includes the monuments such as the lincoln memorial the jefferson royal washington monument things like that of the mall vietnam veterans memorial the fdr memorial all that's those are separate national park service sites but then there's also parks within washington d c which are also considered a part of it and then there's wolf trap which is a national part of the performing arts which is not an actual park it's its own thing and it's basically just a venue for concerts and plays and and things like that but it's technically considered part of the national park service and one hundred one of the.

pinnacles national park california san francisco president washington lincoln memorial fdr memorial pinnacles national monument dc jefferson royal washington mon vietnam veterans memorial washington d c