19 Burst results for "National Women's Party"

"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Tensions continue to escalate. Counter protesters aren't full force. Police begin arresting silent sentinels for obstructing traffic. Alice poll and several others find themselves before a judge facing a $25 fine or 60 days in jail. Given those options, the British trained suffragist knows exactly what to do. She and her suffragist sisters opt for jail. They demand to be treated as political prisoners, then go on a hunger strike. As in the UK, Alice endures forced feedings. She's moved to a hospital for the insane. Meanwhile, more than 30 of her fellow silent sentinels are sentenced to Virginia's aqua Quan workhouse. Here, they face brutality. On the night of November 14th, 1917, prison superintendent W H Whittaker orders 40 guards to beat the silent sentinel senseless. These men charged with keeping the peace, chain up national women's party cofounder Lucy burns. They throw Doris Lewis into an unlit cell. Her head slams into an iron bench, knocking her out cold. Women are choked, beaten, and told if they say a word, there will be hell to pay. But that doesn't stop misses brannon from speaking up. On November 25th, 1917, The New York Times quotes her husband, Doctor John winters Brandon, as he passes along her words. Here's a brief segment. From my wife's account, it is evident that the suffrage prisoners were deliberately terrorized when they entered Aquaman, and were treated with great brutality by the men guards, who handled them and knocked them about with the fury of thugs under the immediate direction of mister Whittaker himself. Who called out that the men would be glad to get their hands on them and handle them rough. In some cells, there were three women with nothing to lie on, but one narrow bed and two straw mats. This is Henry butterworth of New York was carried off alone into the men's section of the jail and deliberately told there would be no other woman with her. And there she was left all night. The sound of men's voices on all sides. The silent sentinels will never forget aqua Quan. But above all, they'll never forget November 14th. A night they know as the night of terror. The public is outraged. President Woodrow Wilson is outraged. All of the silent sentinels are released, and be it their activism, the quieter hard work of NASA, or perhaps both. Woodrow finally gives his public support to a constitutional amendment guaranteeing women's suffrage on January 9th, 1918. The House of Representatives votes on the amendment the next day. It passes with the exact two thirds majority required by the constitution. 274 for it and 136 against. It takes the Senate longer, but it too concedes in June, 1919, and once it does, the silent sentinels stop their White House protests. Ratification moves quickly in the now 15 states where women have the vote and still others. Nausea and the NWP both work hard to get more states to ratify. By the summer of 1920, 35 states have done so. That means if one more of the 48 states legislatures ratifies will cross the 75% threshold, and that will bring the amendment to life. No wonder the pressure is so intense as the men in the Tennessee House of Representatives vote. It's August 18th, 1920. We're in Nashville, Tennessee, inside the state's gorgeous neoclassical limestone capitol building. Seated in the Tennessee House of Representatives chamber. The galley seats are crammed with yellow rose wearing suffragists in red rose wearing anti suffragists. The whole room is tense, as everyone knows, this very split legislative body, which nearly tabled the vote moments ago, is about to make one group euphoric, the other enraged. And either way, it will likely come down to one vote. Speaker of the House, Seth walker rises. He announces the hour has come. Suffragists and anti suffragists alike hold their breath as state representatives call out their vote in the chamber below. Harry Byrne is ready. This handsome, dark haired 24 year old freshman legislator feels the eyes of his fellow representatives and those in the galley seats falling on him. Few doubt what he'll do. An anti suffrage red rose adorns his lapel after all. Then, the young rep rises and votes. I a pregnant pause envelops the chamber. But once the shock registers, women seated above erupt with excitement and rain rose petals on the chain of below. Why did Harry change his mind? The reason isn't on his lapel. It's in his pocket. A letter, just received from his mother. In it, she wrote. Quote, hurrah and vote for suffrage and don't keep them in doubt. Harry sure his constituents will hate him. But as he'll say later, a boy should mind his mother's advice. In doing so, he's broken the chamber's tie and made Tennessee the 36th state to ratify the proposed amendment. In another 8 days, on August 26th, 1920, everything becomes official. Women's suffrage is now a constitutional right in the United States, guaranteed by a new Nineteenth Amendment. It reads as follows. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. And so we come to the end of our long and winding road to women's suffrage. From colonial voices like Abigail Adams, if not Lydia taft. Down to Tennessee's last minute convert Harry Byrne. We met women and men who played crucial roles in what eventually led to women's suffrage becoming a constitutional right. Perhaps Alice stone Blackwell, the daughter of noted suffragist couple, Lucy stone, and Henry Blackwell. Put it best when she described women's suffrage as a fight, quote, of broad minded men and women on the one side. Against narrow minded men and women, on the other. More specifically, though, we've met women, like Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth cady Stanton, who lived for women's suffrage. We met inez mill Holland, who gave her life for women's suffrage. And still others who, amid hunger pains, force feedings, and the brutality of aqua quang guards proved ready to give their lives for it. Personally, when I think about what these women endured, the earnestness with which they craved the vote, I can't help but hear the echoes of Patrick Henry. Give me liberty or give me death. And thanks to them, American democracy became greater. In other words, the United States became a yet more perfect union. Seeing the task complete, the more moderate national American women suffrage association, NASA, comes to an end. Though it more or less morphs into the league of women voters. But the national women's party isn't going anywhere. By 1923, Alice Paul is working on an equal rights amendment. That, however, is a story for another day. Yet, with women's suffrage secured, another question begs to be answered. Is an American woman such as Ida B wells taking care of. Or are the Jim Crow laws of the new south that we learned about back in episode one O one, still puncturing and fraying the value of the reconstruction amendments. Next time, we'll meet a rising post Frederick Douglass generation of black leaders, including Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois. As we turn our attention

national women's party aqua Quan workhouse Lucy burns Doris Lewis Doctor John winters Brandon mister Whittaker Henry butterworth Alice Harry Byrne aqua Quan President Woodrow Wilson Tennessee House of Representat Tennessee House of Representat brannon Whittaker Seth walker Tennessee Woodrow
"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Sometimes cried aloud. Between October and November, 1909, Alice endures this twice every day. So that's the British experience Alice Paul and Lucy burns brought back to the United States. Now, for the record, they aren't out to blow anything up. That would be a huge change of pace for Quaker raised Alice. But the marching, the demonstrating. That side of militant suffrage basically what we'd call political activism in the 21st century. That's the sweet spot. Hence, the 1913 women's procession in Washington D.C.. But Alison Lucy part ways with the national American women's suffrage association, or NASA, shortly after the procession. The young duo's British suffragette ways are just a bit much for this calmer well established organization. The split leads Alison Lucy to convert their congressional union for women's suffrage into a full on political party in 1916. Called the national women's party, its goal is to convince the women in states where they can vote to support politicians, Republican, Democrat, no matter who support a constitutional amendment for a nationwide women's suffrage. They also spread the word. This includes running a weekly national newspaper, the suffragist, and continuing to engage the public with appearances in speaking tours. Sadly, these efforts lead to a tragic end for our horse riding friend from the 1913 women's procession. Ines mill Holland. Departing on a speaking tour in early October 1916, Ines doesn't realize that the chronic exhaustion and irregular heartbeats she's recently experienced are symptoms of pernicious anemia. She tries to power through, but this catches up with her. While addressing a crowd of a thousand at Los Angeles Blanchard hall on October 23rd, she collapses. Within a month's time, it becomes apparent that the once strong and vital Ines, the woman whose horse mounted image will later inspire the creation of the superhero Wonder Woman. Has exhausted the last of her life in the pursuit of women's suffrage. And as passes on November 25th, newspapers and speeches across the nation compare her to Joan of Arc and call her a soldier and a martyr. Yet, even amid the sorrow Vanessa's passing. November 1916 brings noteworthy progress for women's suffrage. While women in most states still can not vote, Montana nonetheless elects Jeanette rankin as the nation's first congresswoman. And as 1916 gives way to 1917, the national women's party turns up the pressure on the president of the United States. Although Woodrow Wilson isn't opposed to women's suffrage on a state by state basis, he hasn't supported a constitutional amendment. And that isn't good enough for Alice Paul and Lucy burns. Thus, they make the NWP the first group ever to pick it at The White House. Starting in January 1917, banner carrying women become a constant sight at 1600 Pennsylvania avenue. From 10 a.m. to four 30 p.m., 6 days a week. They stand in front of the northern gates, holding banners, that indict the president for not taking more action on women's suffrage. One quotes the last words of aina's mill Holland, uttered before collapsing on stage. President Wilson, how long must we wait for liberty?

Alison Lucy Lucy burns Washington D.C. national American women's suff Alice Paul NWP congressional union for women' Alice Los Angeles Blanchard hall Quaker NASA United States Ines Jeanette rankin Holland anemia Joan Vanessa Woodrow Wilson Montana
"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Continue to escalate. Counter protesters aren't full force. Police begin arresting silent sentinels for obstructing traffic. Alice poll and several others find themselves before a judge facing a $25 fine or 60 days in jail. Given those options, the British trained suffragist knows exactly what to do. She and her suffragist sisters opt for jail. They demand to be treated as political prisoners, then go on a hunger strike. As in the UK, Alice endures forced feedings. She's moved to a hospital for the insane. Meanwhile, more than 30 of her fellow silent sentinels are sentenced to Virginia's aqua Quan workhouse. Here, they face brutality. On the night of November 14th, 1917, prison superintendent W H Whittaker orders 40 guards to beat the silent sentinel senseless. These men charged with keeping the peace, chain up national women's party cofounder Lucy burns. They throw Doris Lewis into an unlit cell. Her head slams into an iron bench, knocking her out cold. Women are choked, beaten, and told if they say a word, there will be hell to pay. But that doesn't stop misses brannon from speaking up. On November 25th, 1917, The New York Times quotes her husband, Doctor John winters Brandon, as he passes along her words. Here's a brief segment. From my wife's account, it is evident that the suffrage prisoners were deliberately terrorized when they entered Aquaman, and were treated with great brutality by the men guards, who handled them and knocked them about with the fury of thugs under the immediate direction of mister Whittaker himself. Who called out that the men would be glad to get their hands on them and handle them rough. In some cells, there were three women with nothing to lie on, but one narrow bed and two straw mats. This is Henry butterworth of New York was carried off alone into the men's section of the jail and deliberately told there would be no other woman with her. And there she was left all night. The sound of men's voices on all sides. The silent sentinels will never forget aqua Quan. But above all, they'll never forget November 14th. A night they know as the night of terror. The public is outraged. President Woodrow Wilson is outraged. All of the silent sentinels are released, and be it their activism, the quieter hard work of NASA, or perhaps both. Woodrow finally gives his public support to a constitutional amendment guaranteeing women's suffrage on January 9th, 1918. The House of Representatives votes on the amendment the next day. It passes with the exact two thirds majority required by the constitution. 274 for it and 136 against. It takes the Senate longer, but it too concedes in June, 1919, and once it does, the silent sentinels stop their White House protests. Ratification moves quickly in the now 15 states where women have the vote and still others. Nausea and the NWP both work hard to get more states to ratify. By the summer of 1920, 35 states have done so. That means if one more of the 48 states legislatures ratifies will cross the 75% threshold, and that will bring the amendment to life. No wonder the pressure is so intense as the men in the Tennessee House of Representatives vote. It's August 18th, 1920. We're in Nashville, Tennessee, inside the state's gorgeous neoclassical limestone capitol building. Seated in the Tennessee House of Representatives chamber. The galley seats are crammed with yellow rose wearing suffragists in red rose wearing anti suffragists. The whole room is tense, as everyone knows, this very split legislative body, which nearly tabled the vote moments ago, is about to make one group euphoric, the other enraged. And either way, it will likely come down to one vote. Speaker of the House, Seth walker rises. He announces the hour has come. Suffragists and anti suffragists alike hold their breath as state representatives call out their vote in the chamber below. Harry Byrne is ready. This handsome, dark haired 24 year old freshman legislator feels the eyes of his fellow representatives and those in the galley seats falling on him. Few doubt what he'll do. An anti suffrage red rose adorns his lapel after all. Then, the young rep rises and votes. I a pregnant pause envelops the chamber. But once the shock registers, women seated above erupt with excitement and rain rose petals on the chain of below. Why did Harry change his mind? The reason isn't on his lapel. It's in his pocket. A letter, just received from his mother. In it, she wrote. Quote, hurrah and vote for suffrage and don't keep them in doubt. Harry sure his constituents will hate him. But as he'll say later, a boy should mind his mother's advice. In doing so, he's broken the chamber's tie and made Tennessee the 36th state to ratify the proposed amendment. In another 8 days, on August 26th, 1920, everything becomes official. Women's suffrage is now a constitutional right in the United States, guaranteed by a new Nineteenth Amendment. It reads as follows. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. And so we come to the end of our long and winding road to women's suffrage. From colonial voices like Abigail Adams, if not Lydia taft. Down to Tennessee's last minute convert Harry Byrne. We met women and men who played crucial roles in what eventually led to women's suffrage becoming a constitutional right. Perhaps Alice stone Blackwell, the daughter of noted suffragist couple, Lucy stone, and Henry Blackwell. Put it best when she described women's suffrage as a fight, quote, of broad minded men and women on the one side. Against narrow minded men and women, on the other. More specifically, though, we've met women, like Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth cady Stanton, who lived for women's suffrage. We met inez mill Holland, who gave her life for women's suffrage. And still others who, amid hunger pains, force feedings, and the brutality of aqua quang guards proved ready to give their lives for it. Personally, when I think about what these women endured, the earnestness with which they craved the vote, I can't help but hear the echoes of Patrick Henry. Give me liberty or give me death. And thanks to them, American democracy became greater. In other words, the United States became a yet more perfect union. Seeing the task complete, the more moderate national American women suffrage association, NASA, comes to an end. Though it more or less morphs into the league of women voters. But the national women's party isn't going anywhere. By 1923, Alice Paul is working on an equal rights amendment. That, however, is a story for another day. Yet, with women's suffrage secured, another question begs to be answered. Is an American woman such as Ida B wells taking care of. Or are the Jim Crow laws of the new south that we learned about back in episode one O one, still puncturing and fraying the value of the reconstruction amendments. Next time, we'll meet a rising post Frederick Douglass generation of black leaders, including Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois.

national women's party aqua Quan workhouse Lucy burns Doris Lewis Doctor John winters Brandon mister Whittaker Henry butterworth Alice Harry Byrne aqua Quan President Woodrow Wilson Tennessee House of Representat Tennessee House of Representat brannon Whittaker Seth walker Tennessee Woodrow
"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"national women party" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Sometimes cried aloud. Between October and November, 1909, Alice endures this twice every day. So that's the British experience Alice Paul and Lucy burns brought back to the United States. Now, for the record, they aren't out to blow anything up. That would be a huge change of pace for Quaker raised Alice. But the marching, the demonstrating. That side of militant suffrage basically what we'd call political activism in the 21st century. That's the sweet spot. Hence, the 1913 women's procession in Washington D.C.. But Alison Lucy part ways with the national American women's suffrage association, or NASA, shortly after the procession. The young duo's British suffragette ways are just a bit much for this calmer well established organization. The split leads Alison Lucy to convert their congressional union for women's suffrage into a full on political party in 1916. Called the national women's party, its goal is to convince the women in states where they can vote to support politicians, Republican, Democrat, no matter who support a constitutional amendment for a nationwide women's suffrage. They also spread the word. This includes running a weekly national newspaper, the suffragist, and continuing to engage the public with appearances in speaking tours. Sadly, these efforts lead to a tragic end for our horse riding friend from the 1913 women's procession. Ines mill Holland. Departing on a speaking tour in early October 1916, Ines doesn't realize that the chronic exhaustion and irregular heartbeats she's recently experienced are symptoms of pernicious anemia. She tries to power through, but this catches up with her. While addressing a crowd of a thousand at Los Angeles Blanchard hall on October 23rd, she collapses. Within a month's time, it becomes apparent that the once strong and vital Ines, the woman whose horse mounted image will later inspire the creation of the superhero Wonder Woman. Has exhausted the last of her life in the pursuit of women's suffrage. And as passes on November 25th, newspapers and speeches across the nation compare her to Joan of Arc and call her a soldier and a martyr. Yet, even amid the sorrow Vanessa's passing. November 1916 brings noteworthy progress for women's suffrage. While women in most states still can not vote, Montana nonetheless elects Jeanette rankin as the nation's first congresswoman. And as 1916 gives way to 1917, the national women's party turns up the pressure on the president of the United States. Although Woodrow Wilson isn't opposed to women's suffrage on a state by state basis, he hasn't supported a constitutional amendment. And that isn't good enough for Alice Paul and Lucy burns. Thus, they make the NWP the first group ever to pick it at The White House. Starting in January 1917, banner carrying women become a constant sight at 1600 Pennsylvania avenue. From 10 a.m. to four 30 p.m., 6 days a week. They stand in front of the northern gates, holding banners, that indict the president for not taking more action on women's suffrage. One quotes the last words of aina's mill Holland, uttered before collapsing on stage. President Wilson, how long must we wait for liberty?

Alison Lucy Lucy burns Washington D.C. national American women's suff Alice Paul NWP congressional union for women' Alice Los Angeles Blanchard hall Quaker NASA United States Ines Jeanette rankin Holland anemia Joan Vanessa Woodrow Wilson Montana
"national women party" Discussed on Women's Media Center Live with Robin Morgan

Women's Media Center Live with Robin Morgan

04:25 min | 11 months ago

"national women party" Discussed on Women's Media Center Live with Robin Morgan

"On the 75th anniversary of the 1848 women's rights convention in Seneca falls. Alice Paul introduced the first version of the equal rights amendment. Then called the lucretia Mott amendment. It stated men and women shall have equal rights throughout the United States and every place subject to its jurisdiction, period pretty simple. The national women's party and professional women like Amelia Earhart, the great pilot. Of course, supported the amendment. But other reformers particularly those in the labor movement, who had worked hard for protective labor laws for women, were terrified that the ERA would wipe out their progress. This could have been solved simply by mobilizing for the extension of protective labor laws to men, like not lifting items over a certain weight, or doing especially hazardous labor. But it became a huge sticking point, for those who exploited class divisions within the women's movement. Thus protectionists. By the early 1940s both the democratic and Republican parties had added support of the amendment as a plank in their political platforms, although opposition was building. Social conservatives who considered equal rights for women a threat to the existing power structure joined with labor and with leftists fighting for protectionist workplace laws to hinder the amendment. Eleanor Roosevelt agreed with them, and the ERA stalled. Nevertheless, in 1943, after two world wars, and with women pouring into the labor force, or already there, the amendment was reintroduced. This time it was called the Alice Paul amendment, and to reflect language in the 15th and 19th amendments the new version stated equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Period. Again, pretty clear, pretty simple. Still the left and the right remained fairly united in opposition. By the 1960s, young women who had been active in the civil rights movement and the anti Vietnam War movement, I was one, began politically to examine their own our own lives, and shake off the dust of what we called the male left. They began to organize as citizens and politicians started to react to the power of women's voices in new ways. Mainstream groups joined the call for the ERA, and this time they began to include organized labor. Phew, you say, yes, it was passed by the Senate and the House, and on March 22nd, 1972, the proposed Twenty-seventh Amendment of the constitution was sent to the states to be ratified. But Congress placed a 7 year deadline on the ratification process, as it has sometimes done with other amendments. Well, the ERA hit the ground running. And got 22 of the necessary 38 state ratifications in the very first year. But as opposition began to coalesce the pace slowed. All through the 1970s, ERA opponents like Phyllis Schlafly right wing leader of the eagle forms stop ERA movement, played on the fears that had generated opposition way back in women's suffrage days. She and her followers claimed that the amendment would deny a woman's right to be supported by her husband either in marriage, or in terms of alimony. That women would be sent into combat, that contraception use an abortion rights would be required, that same sex marriages would be upheld that unisex bathrooms would be mandated and that the ERA would destroy the family. States rights advocates said the amendment was a federal plot, and businesses, particularly the insurance industry, strongly opposed the measure which they believed would cost.

Alice Paul lucretia Mott national women's party Seneca falls Amelia Earhart United States Eleanor Roosevelt ERA Vietnam Phyllis Schlafly Senate Congress House
"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Paying attention to how things work and being bold when things get step back. We really do associate with Alice Paul Alice Paul was kind of a reluctant suffer Just in some ways. She grew up in New Jersey. She was a Quaker. She had learned the sort of values of equality in a general way. But wasn't it all involved in the American suffrage movement, largely because after that split over the 15th movement, the 15th amendment movement really languished. It really lost followers. It lost momentum, not many states have been added to the rolls. And even though the two factions did come back together in the 18 nineties, a lot of time was lost. And when they came back together, they agreed to follow that state by state strategy. Um and Uh, Anthony and Stanton and and Stone as Lucinda mentioned lived to a ripe old age, but by the turn of the century by the first couple of years, the 20th century they had all died. And so this movement was in trouble. Uh and Alice Paul wasn't interested until she went to England, and she went to England for grad school, and she was radicalized by Emelin, pancreas and her movement there now. England did also have a kind of slow and steady movement. But the Panthers movement was really militant. The faction of the American movement that Alice Paul will go on to found the National Women's Party is called Militant. They had nothing. Nothing on the bankers, Um the bankers were intentionally throwing bricks through windows and slapping policemen in the face. At one point, they tried to set the prime minister's house on fire. They were not playing around. The American women never broke glass. So this just sort of shows you the difference. This is a headline from a London newspaper. Trouble expected in London tonight. Suffragettes determined to force their way into Parliament movement after dark. Miss Pinker says the women will certainly break into the house. It was completely expected. This document on the other side, By the way, I just love it's an ad from an Edinburgh and newspaper. Very glazier. Suffragettes may break windows. I'm the way, boy, but back in. So if you've got to break through your window, call James Caldwell and he'll help you out. By the way. Very briefly. Suffragists up for jet. Uh, the word to suffer Gist. The British press made fun of the British activists by calling them suffragette. That's it was meant to be patronizing, right? You cute little suffragette and just like Lucy Stone with the disappointed woman, Um, the British activists took that name suffragette and wore it with pride and co opted its power. So most properly. The word is suffragist suffered jet refers to the British movement, even specifically the militant wing of the British movement. Rebecca Boggs, Roberts, the suffragists playbook. So Alice Paul takes these tactics and she infuses them. When she comes back to America in 1910. She really wants the American movement to use some of them. And the first thing she does is pitched this idea of a parade down Pennsylvania Avenue. Now there have been celebratory parades down Pennsylvania Avenue. I'm sure you've seen those pictures of the Army of the Potomac. But this idea of taking a cause a march on Washington. That was the suffragists idea. And you know, it's now so common that we just think of it as a traffic headache, But it had never been done before. In this way. The idea of a political march through the corridors a federal Washington from the exact from the legislative branch to the executive branch. That was Alice Paul's idea. 1913 parade. Um, which I will talk about great lived, if given happen opportunity, So I'm going to restrain myself because we have lots of cover today. Um, it did not go at all as planned. So again, an event that was planned down to it's last minute. But then this massive crowd blocked Pennsylvania Avenue and so for perspective here in this picture we're standing at about 13th Street. You can see the capital in the background. The large building on the variety it was in the post office is now the Trump Hotel. That's the man the evidence. A really broad street, right? Um it's got really like wide sidewalks, and there's no daylight between these men and they are men. You can see all those bowler hats. They weren't there for the suffrage parade. They were there for the winter. Wilson inauguration the next day. And they behave very badly. They blocked the street. They spit on the women that called them names. They trip to them. The police did nothing to get this crowd back. In some cases, the police joined you in the name calling and the spitting. Um, but again. How familiar is this image now? Right? This is the march for our lives in the wake of the market. Cameron Douglas shootings. Now, this is a friendly crowd. But this is the same picture 100 years later, right? So once you start seeing these parallels to tactics that suffered just invented you kind of can't unsee them? Another big one picketing the White House, right? No one had ever done this before. 1917. This was the National Women's Party idea. And so not only is picketing the White House now incredibly common. This is an image from this summer when there were so many black lives matter, protesters that they started adding their signs to the fence at the White House had put between the historic fence and Lafayette Square. But also what What are these women doing? They're making a message. Go viral. This is the 1917 equivalent of a tweet. Alright, Sure, it reaches the people who are standing in front of the White House in Lafayette Square. But it reaches many more people in a picture in a newspaper..

Rebecca Boggs James Caldwell New Jersey Alice Paul Lafayette Square National Women's Party Lucinda 1910 Anthony Lucy Stone England Pennsylvania Avenue America Stone 20th century Stanton Roberts 1913 parade Washington Edinburgh
"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"She was even disappointed marriage because instead of being able to marry for love women were too often forced to marry a man for money. You better believe she was disappointed Woman. This would go on to become one of her most successful speeches, and she would use it again and again. It was the 19th century equivalent of going viral. You can sort of see the parallels today with women embracing phrases like nasty woman and she persisted. That's certainly far from the only way that suffered just influenced activists today. And that's where I'll pick it up. Thank you. Lucinda. Um Rebecca Boggs Roberts, co author of the book The Suffragists Playbook. It is Amazing, actually, Why don't you start seeing how many contemporary activists borrow tactics from the suffrage movement, and sometimes they do it absolutely on purpose, And sometimes they do it without knowing the history. But it's everywhere. And there are very obvious examples like the women's March of 2017, which coincided with the inauguration. Um, just the same way the women's march of 1913 did. We even had matching hats and that was very specifically in homage to the suffrage movement. But there's so many other places where contemporary activists are using tactics that the suffragists either invented or perfected. And we turned to associate those with the 20th century part of the movement and Alice Paul and the National Women's Party, and that's absolutely true, and I'll get into that in a minute. But I want to give props to Susan B. Anthony, because in the 19th century, she was really pushing the envelope of the tactics that a social movement clear years and considering at the time, it was pretty transgressive for women to even be speaking in public, as Lucinda said, the way that she Embrace some of these attention grabbing tactics. Um Is, you know, continues to be a big part of her legacy. First of all, she was always very recognizable, right? Um, she always wore those really old fashioned buttoned up Victorian black dresses, but she often had a red scarf around it. The scarf is here in this caricature. Um, she also was almost always photographed from the side because she had a wandering eye and she was self conscious about that. Um, but she crafted her image pretty carefully. And so in the wake of the civil war, when the suffrage movement split, because, as Lucinda mentioned, so many of them were abolitionists when the 15th amendment enfranchised black men and no women there were Suffrage is like Lucy Stone, like her husband, Henry back well, like Frederick Douglass and Julia Ward Howe, who said will take the 15th amendment has written and then we'll fight for women. Next. Um, and there were people like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who said We cannot support the 15th amendment. If it enfranchise is black men and no women. And they split with each other, and they formed competing organizations and to give you a sense of sort of the radical moderate continuum here. The Stone Blackwell faction and the American Woman Suffrage Association published a newsletter called The Women's Journal. And they pursued a state by state sort of slow and steady strategy to get suffrage past and Anthony and, um Sandton with the National Woman Suffrage Association. Their publication was called the Revolution, and they went straight for a federal amendment. They wanted the big prize right from the beginning. But even within those big strategic differences, there were tactical differences. So, uh, the American Woman Suffrage Association, As I said, was going state by state they wanted to appease Southern states who felt that the reconstruction amendments have been federal overreached. They wanted to go slowly. They wanted to build coalitions they wanted to build credibility. Whereas Anthony and Stanton not so much, um so, uh, excuse me. Anthony voted in 18 72. It was totally publicity stunt she assumed should get turned away at the polls. She didn't She actually was able to cast her ballot. So then what do you do right? Like, firstly, that didn't quite work out the way you expected it to. And you see this all the time with contemporary activists? How do you turn an event towards your advantage? If it didn't go the way you planned and As it happened. She was arrested a couple of days later, But the men who came to arrest her wanted her to just sort of quietly report to the courthouse and Susan B. Anthony wanted no part of that right. She held out her wrist. She wanted the handcuffs. She wanted to be dragged off to jail. She wanted the visual of this, You know, proper buttoned up old lady being led away by Sheriff's, um they wouldn't can't cover but they did make her come with them right there. She insisted that she would not just report later. And then her trial was so many instances of men underestimating this woman, you know, they thought that should be Cowed. They thought that should be silent. The judge, it was a fox. I mean, she was convicted before she even got in the courtroom. But the judge made the huge mistake of saying Does the defendant have anything to say for herself Because that then unleashed one of the greatest speeches of the entire 72 years. Suffrage movement. Um, so Susan B. Anthony was the pioneer of turning a story around for yourself. Milking the press for your own gain. And and that tactic, the sort of, um doing something attention grabbing and then milking that attention, no matter whether it is positive or negative is something you continue to see in the movement and in other movements now, I mean, I think now, about this summer when black lives matter, activists were in Lafayette Square in front of the White House and the square was cleared, um, so that the president could go stand by ST John's Church. And there were weeks of reporting about that, right? Who ordered this square to be cleared? Well, that law enforcement was there. What tactics did they use? This is this massive Washington post video investigation where they use satellite imagery and, you know, zoomed in on the emblems on different law enforcement officers uniforms to try to Figure out what happened that night and had You know, curfew just expired and the protesters just went home. It wouldn't have been a story for a minute. Um, and it was the protesters who continue to keep this in the news. Even though the protests had not gone the way they anticipated. Rebecca Boggs Roberts in an event hosted by the U. S Capitol Historical Society, the book the Suffragists playbook. So there are 19th century roots to this tactical. Make sure you make the press work for you Make sure you craft an image that works for you. This is something that we think of as an artifact of the instagram age. But the suffragists were really good at paying attention to how things look and making sure they looked at the way you wanted them to. This is Frank last. So he's illustrated newspaper with women in Wyoming voting. Wyoming was the first state Where women could exercise the franchise. I will never say by the way women were given the right to vote. First of all, they were different, given anything they thought like, how for it, but also there was had the right to vote. They were American citizens. It was just that the men in charge finally recognize that fact. So Wyoming was the first and the fact that these are nicely dressed, polite ladies, and there's a child with a picnic basket and all feels very safe. That imagery was really important. Because the anti is you can be sure we're trying to define the image of suffered just to right. There are million cartoons like this, where there's some hapless man covered in babies and dirty dishes while his carefree wife strides out of the house, you know, leaving him, uh, to fend for himself while she goes out to vote. This is an anti suffrage cartoon, and it's considered terrible, right. What is she doing? Leaving him? What those babies. So if you don't craft your image yourself, someone's going to do it for you. And that's a really important last. And for an activist in any cost. Um, of course, this whole notion of.

Julia Ward Howe Elizabeth Cady Stanton Lucy Stone Frederick Douglass Susan B. Anthony National Woman Suffrage Associ Lafayette Square Rebecca Boggs Roberts U. S Capitol Historical Societ National Women's Party Lucinda Stanton 19th century Henry Alice Paul Anthony Sandton 20th century American Woman Suffrage Associ Wyoming
"national women party" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"national women party" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"On which and it's quite easy to run but we keep loading floated through twenty twenty and do that. Is it multimedia. Yuck it has. I mean this guy radio. It'll it'll even have radio and podcast put up. How did you decide what to include. You said you got twenty five thirty papers and you chose five. What what would what were you looking for. And how to decide what to looking for unexamined issues issues where we could bring a fresh idea. Then so those five papers came that magazine. The journal came out and then we thought oh we would take it to. A publisher and publisher wanted us to do all new essays. So that book has just come out. That's called front pages frontlines. It's academic need to be really clear about that. And it includes twelve essays only three which original journal and so they're all brand new and deal with many of the under examined subjects including african american women in the movement. We have like four pieces that deal with that subject. Who is the audience for the platform. Who is the audience for the academic journal. I guess is targeting academic course but who is the platform for who was frontlines front page for a pages. Fan lines is reread. it's for scholars. I kind of core people were interesting. Subject in a deep deep and noted footnoted indepth southlake has actually the platform suffrage. The media's for everybody so if you want you can find links to academic material if you wanted to stop it's more fodder exhibitions on there so it's for everybody. It's for a teaching tool. It's for every possible. Use to make the subject and i gathered. You can search by name of people and things like that. That's great perfect so Before ask you about the a your career advice. I want to ask you a little bit about the issue of men and we talked a little bit about this but There were male legislators who had to give women the right to vote one st at a time and as i understand it was neck and neck in the last eight in tennessee. You wrote a you wrote you know in the suffrage sense you talk about that did did was. How did they focus on focused on. We talk about the the mail publishers etc but talk about the male lawmakers in how the women persuaded cajole begged whatever it was the male lawmakers to pass either so many ways to talk about how to finally come to pass after seventy years. I mean how we finally together. And i think there was a confluence of forces that made this happen. So some people tell you that it. It was alice paul and her national woman's party in their education and their silent sentinels their protests and hunger strikes in their jailings etc. Sound disagree with that. Someone say it was Wilson's finally coming round. Finally and why. Wilson come around because new york had voted for need forty four seats in congress. Suddenly there was critical mass in congress where there was a way to counter the opposition from the south. That was important but also very important was world war one that and the sacrifices that women making were so heartfelt and saw important losing their psalms they were doing war work at an extraordinary level that it was at this point. Very hard to say. You're a citizen. Can't have the right. Citizens did the protests in front of the white house against nixon against wilson where he was resisting this a role as i said. I think all of these things played a part but there was so much. Opposition within the movement itself about what else pollen crew were doing and especially at the time that was trying to pass suffrage a state.

five papers alice paul congress twelve essays five twenty twenty Wilson twenty five thirty papers one st tennessee african american world war one forty four seats nixon wilson four pieces three new york white house cajole
"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"If you will the equals. To their husbands and their father's state laws disenfranchise them in an end run around the spirits of the 15th and 19th amendments. Registration numbers reflected the effects of these laws, and in the fall of 1920 black women presented themselves to officials, but many found that the books were closed. What was going on One example from King County, Delaware. Reports were that black women turned out an unusually large numbers in the judgment of the journalist, but officials refuse them because they failed to comply with the constitutional tests. What was going on in Delaware in many places. Black women were breeding presented with text of the U. S constitution being asked not only required up only to read that portion of a portion of the constitution, but then to interpret that Portion of the Constitution. When I teach this to my students, I challenge them to on their feet in under the scrutiny of me standing in for the reluctant official to explain, for example, the Electoral College it isn't easy to do and many black women Do not succeed in overcoming these kinds of hurdles in 1920 still Black women were voting. The first waves of black women voters were unleashed in individual states that had made women's suffrage the law in California, starting in 1911 in Illinois, in 1913 in New York, in 1917 black women were already experienced Voters by 1920. Um, and even more managed to register and cast ballots in the fall of that year in the wake of the 19th amendment. How did they do that? One example from ST Louis, Missouri, where black women came together under the auspices of the Phyllis Wheatley branch of the Y W. C. A name for the 18th century poet. There. They ran a suffrage school and taught one another How to pay poll taxes how to pass literacy tests how to grapple with be grudging officials. They even managed to attract men to the suffrage school who thought that perhaps 1920 represented a moment in which they might reclaim the voting rights that they had lost decades before. Black women turned out in ST Louis, and the papers reported that nearly every woman in the city registered that season black women came to represent somewhere between intent. 10 and 20% of new voters, and the stakes were high in ST Louis, a city where local officials were using Referenda to impose housing segregation for the first time by law in the city of ST Louis, Black women are turning out not only to realize their own personal ambitions not only to further women's interests but to contribute to the struggle against Jim Crow, which now had decided set of consequence at the ballot box. In a city like Lewis. From early October. Professor Martha Jones on American History on C Span radio. Her book Vanguard. Another example. Offer this afternoon comes from Daytona, Florida, and they're suffragist club leader and educator Mary Cobb soon Um, had run a very effective voter registration effort in 1919 1920 throughout the state of Florida to get black women registered when the 19th amendment took effect. No Basu Moon, who ran a school in Daytona for African American girls learned that the wave of violence and intimidation that had overtaken the state of Florida by fall of 2020 was going to visit her very close to home. The Ku Klux Klan announced that it would gather on election even 1920 in Daytona. Indeed, they appeared unless on horseback In full regalia. They burned a cross and then marched to the grounds of Bethune's Girls School. Today's Bathroom Cookman University in an effort to intimidate But soon her faculty and the African American women in Daytona who had been part of the voter drive there. The next day, black women did turn out and we learned something about the extent of their organization in their tactics because they turned out together in large numbers at the polls. This is understood to be a tactic that will, if not repel, discourage the sort of violence that clan Members had threatened the night before Esopus soon on. Dreher Patriots have a kind of success in the fall of 1920. But the violence in Florida persists. It persists to such a degree that the plan again will visit Mrs Mrs Mrs within in school on Election Eve in 1922, and by that fall Um, uh, Black Americans in Florida will regretfully concede that unchecked violence and intimidation unchecked by the 15th and the 19th amendments, um, has kept them importantly away from the polls. So what of black women to do in the fall of 1920 as they looked out across the terrain of the nation on DTIC in, um, the incompleteness of the work of the 19th amendment, the patchwork Um, that is voting rights for black women, even after a Federal Amendment Let's visit Holly when Brown, who 1920 was the president of the National Association of Colored Women, the largest political organization to represent black women in that year, more than 300,000 members across the country how liquid Brown had been an educator and elocution ist, a club leader. Who had led the W suffrage Department during the years along the road to the 19th amendment. In the fall of 1920 Alley, Quinn Brown is now president and charged with leading black women's through a new political challenge. What comes after a amendment to the Constitution of the W resolves That what is demanded? What is required now is federal legislation that would give teeth to the terms of both the 15th and the 19th amendment. Dread would combat and undo the state laws that were continuing to keep black women from the polls. This is the objective that Hallie Quinn Brown and the women of the CW set. Out for themselves, and now they have to chart a way forward. How frequent brown is. I think it's fair to say appreciator of the capacities of the leaders within organizations like the National Association, Um, the American National Women's Suffrage Association, the National Women's Party who had led the campaign for ratification of the 19th amendment, and then When Brown goes so far is to call on Alice Paul. She wants to be a part of the celebrations that Alice Paul is planning on that will mark the ratification of the 19th amendment. She wants black women to be there. And as importantly, she wants to make a proposal to Alice Paul, one that would lead to a linkage between black and white women's organizations. That would work toward the federal legislation that Hallie Quinn Brown and the women of the N A. C W um are after, um eloquent Brown and a delegation of black women will call on Alice Paul in the winter of 1921 during what turns out to be the last meeting of the National Women's Party, and she will ask hole for just that. In a political alliance that will continue the struggle for women's votes that will work toward women's universal votes through the winning of federal legislation. And what we know, of course, is that I was called Paul will decline that she will fold up the business of the National Women's Party and importantly, move on by 1923 to call for unequal Rights amendment to the Constitution of a cause that is still live. In the subject of much struggle and activism, even in our own time, But this turn of events leaves African American women, too. In essence, build a new movement for women's voting rights, one that they will partner, um in with African American men. Um, it is a movement that will continue to on the one hand work the ground game of women's politics, perhaps best exemplified by the work of African American women in the city of Chicago, who will not only become important Republican Party operatives but will use their power at the ballots to see to it that for the first time since 1901 in 1928 on African American candidate obstacle to priest will be elected to Congress and head to Washington. Black woman learned how to use the voting power that they have To to change the outcome, particularly on the local and state level. They will be part of the legal campaign waged. Importantly, by the end of a laced pipe. That campaign that will bring it into poll taxes. Toe whites only primaries to Grandfather clauses. Um, this effort both lobbying and litigation on the part of the end, double a C P will be a critical part of this story. And these are the women. These are the seeds of women's work that continues into the modern civil rights era. The courageous, profoundly dangerous work that we associate with women like Fannie Lou Hamer and Diane Nash, Septima Clark and Ella Baker. The work at the grass roots the extraordinarily arduous work that requires not only the ascent But the assembly the risk taking of thousands of black Americans across the American South. It is that campaign that will force the hand ultimately of Congress and the President Lyndon Johnson, and will give us a voting Rights act in 1965. It is that moment..

Hallie Quinn Brown National Women's Party Alice Paul National Association of Colore American National Women's Suff ST Louis Daytona Florida Um president Congress Delaware Mrs Mrs Mrs Ku Klux Klan W suffrage Department Phyllis Wheatley King County
"national women party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Paul, the founder of the National Woman's Party. It was scheduled for the day before the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson. This's a celebration of a new president in the first president from the South since reconstruction, and the parade would've fucked that. Black suffragists. We're asked to march in the rear. And if you look at a movie like HBO's iron jawed Angels, for example, this fall Ida Wells Barnett from the Chicago delegation. You'll see that there is one incident of a black woman who tries to participate in the parade. And that black woman is Ida B. Wells. I'm told you expect Negro women to march in a separate unit. At the back, and the way that the story goes, is that she has a confrontation with the parade organizer, The Quaker suffragist Alice Paul. And she decides to disobey the segregation order and go on ahead and insert herself in her Illinois delegation. We have one agenda. Suffrage at another issue. We don't stand up now what happens to Negro women? When you finally get the vote? They'll keep us out of the polling place any way they can have. The colored groups have agreed to the compromise. Not perfect, but we've got to be practical, dress up prejudice and call it politics. I expected more from a Quaker. How much with my peers or not at all. Parker says. This story is true. But the way it's been told you might think Welles was the only black woman who refused to be segregated. The truth, she says, is much more interesting. Alice Paul did indeed try to keep black women out of the parade because she wanted to court white Southern women and was interested in making a national movement but did not think of black Southern women support as being included in that. So instead, what happened is that African American women who asked her if they could participate, got to know and then eventually got well, You could do it as long as you stay in the back, but they decided to organize to protest. So they sent many petitions and telegrams to the National American Woman Suffrage Association and basically said, You know, she can't do this. You can't have a parade where Rickon. American women are segregated like that, And there was so much of a backlash that even up to the day of the parade, there were debates about this, And what happened was that on the day there were multiple places and sites of contest station where black women were asserting their right to be part of it. Married church. Teryl was one of these women, she was enlisted to help marchers from the Delta Sigma Theta sorority from Howard University. That's a historically black sorority, but they wanted to march with the groups of other college women not to be segregated in the back. And then the National Association of Colored Women was invited to join the New York delegation. All of the states were from the beginning. Marching in the back because that's what the processional chart meant. So technically speaking Mary Church, Terrel and the and a CW marched at the back. In the.

Alice Paul Ida Wells Barnett National Association of Colore National American Woman Suffra National Woman's Party Woodrow Wilson president HBO Welles founder Mary Church Chicago New York Teryl Terrel Parker Illinois Rickon Delta Sigma Theta Howard University
"national women party" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on KCRW

"Benefit of around $540 a week. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. U. S constitution is hard to change on purpose, And that means every amendment is the end result of a campaign of advocates come together to push through round after round of cajoling and Marching, eventually voting to change this country's founding document 100 years ago. Today was one of those moments when Tennessee ratify the 19th amendment. Making it the law of the land that the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. That's the actual text. A lot has changed about political campaign since suffragists were fighting for their rights, But a lot has marketplaces. Kimberly Adams first reported for us last year, hasn't Suffrage anthems like Daughters of freedom can bring to mind images of women in white marching for equality of hunger strikes and sacrifice. Korean McConnell He is a political science professor at George Washington University. We don't tend to teach about the suffrage movement as a major, well funded organization in American political history. But it wass the National Women's Party had hundreds of donors from all over the country. Joan Murray Johnson is author of Funding Feminism and says the group Wass recording gifts from 25. Cents a dollar all the way up to Mrs Alva Vanderbilt, Belmont's $76,000. And when wealthy widow Miriam Leslie left a million dollar estate to the cause in 1914, the suffragist did what interest groups in Washington due to this day. Hired a bunch of lobbyists to counter dismissive messages.

United States Mrs Alva Vanderbilt Joan Murray Johnson Mitchell Hartmann Miriam Leslie professor Marching Wass Kimberly Adams George Washington University Tennessee National Women's Party Washington Funding Feminism Belmont
"national women party" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

10:28 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"The toll free number and folks are more than welcome to check in with us for the next few minutes anyway. Then we're going to start another segment and set of interviews it around Ten. Fifteen here on the Graham show. All about the hundredth anniversary of women's suffrage in the United States of America, I. I've been reading up a little bit of on this on the savage suffrage movement. and. You know the thing I it keeps striking me is is that it's kind of shocking that for the first one, hundred and fifty years of our of our. Nation's existence we. Did. Not. Have Women didn't have the right to vote 'em sort of. That sort of strikes me as what? Why Is it Dan for new fan? We have. Yes. Hello. Good Morning Dan. Hi. You know. With just in response to the folks that get so mad about. These flags and signs saying black lives matter. My question is, do they really believe that we have given black lives? Equal Value Up till now. I mean there's never been any question in this country white lives matter you know never the day the White Man's sit on Chore His Life Mattered. In. A little bit later on like a few hundred years his women partners started the matter a little bit. You know and not until not until yet at black lines really mattered and I think the stats bear that out. You know the numbers of blacks killed by cops the number of blacks and Carson did number blacks stopped you know we stop we more black motorist in Vermont than white motorists and yet the percentage of those black motorists that have contraband or you know should have been stopped is much lower than the the rate on the weight drivers so. Black lighters have not mattered in this country. And so this is a statement saying we need to equalize the playing field and so for white people to somehow take offence at this, I just. I find that blows my mind and I just can't find that to be a legitimate legitimate respond. Well I I hear what you're coming from Dan I think that the It's a nice sentiment. Say All lives matter? I don't really object all all that unless unless it's being expressed as some way to diminish or negate the statement that black lives matter and the and the and they sort of newness and freshness. So that statement it's only come out really in the past. Few years and. and so if you're if you're trying to diminish that statement, the black lives matter by saying, Hey. Yeah. But all all lives matter. Then I think the I mean you really have to look at the motivation of the of the person. Using the using the slogan but. Because obviously, all lives. Include has sort of logical subset include black lives. So when you say all lives matter, you could make an argument that yeah I I'm I'm including black because black labs obviously are included in all lives but I think. The way here's a way it breaks for me. I mentioned this a while ago I think it bears repeating, which is that spent a long time in in the news business and and Sometimes writing headlines as part of my work. And I never wrote a headline said Don. Expected tomorrow because that really wasn't news. And the The thing here is that if you say all lives matter well, let's pretty obvious. Everybody understands that that's not really news either the news unfortunately to some people is that black lives matter and in particular. And So that's why that is getting a big mentioned today's because there's A. Not. Everyone shares that understanding that black lives are among all the lives that matter. All lives matter was the slogan that was chosen to really hammer home that black lives in my life. That would be one thing but unfortunately, all lines matter which agree it's a wonderful settlement. We we should all agree with that. I think we do. But right now It's it's almost code for saying we don't we're not really down with the idea that black lives matter. So unfortunately because of the context and and the societal sort of pressure right now, we have to take a what should be perfectly denied wonderful statement at all as matter and conceptualize it and say well. Yes. That's true. Technically. But in this particular time and space that is being used as a code to try to denigrate idea that black lives have not mattered and our it's high pastime that the new matter. All Right Dan. Well, thank you for the call I. Appreciate you checking in with us. Of Family Stone. would be fitting intro to the next segment of our program today. This month marks the th anniversary of the effective date of the nineteenth amendment to the US Constitution saying that women would have the right to vote. August. Twenty six exact date. It's an especially exciting moment for members of my extended family. My family's my father's aunt betty swing later known by her married name Betty Gram swing was one of the leading and most militant activists in the fight to pass women's suffrage. We have three of her descendants with us. This morning to talk about all that and I wanNA. Welcome. Pamela. Swing resident scholar at the Women's Studies Research Center Brandeis University. Outside Boston. Her daughter. Anna plotkin swing is. A great granddaughter Betty Swing. She's currently a Masters Student at Smith College School for social work. In Northampton Massachusetts. Danielle Graham is my niece in San Francisco area she is with. Founders. Pledge, which is a philanthropic philanthropic group. Three of you welcome very much. Welcome to the show and thank you very much for joining me. Start our discussion. With, Pam, swing who's done quite extensive research into the life of Betty gram swing. One of the as I mentioned leading suffragettes What have you found out about betty gram swing what motivated her to get involved in the suffragette movement? So she. Grew up in a family actually that Advocated for woman rights she and her sisters would go to suffrage meetings. HOW IN PORTLAND? Oregon. but for a long time, she wasn't really ready to commit herself to the movement. it took Alice Paul's National Woman's Party with their activist approach to picketing the White House and on trying to really use some more militant action that took for betty to finally get involved and she and her younger sister Alice. Nineteen seventeen hopped on a train from New York City Rebecca was actually in musicals on Broadway they have betrayed winton toying along picket line on November tenth nineteen seventeen, and that was the start of her getting into the suburbs movement and she never looked back. While and That demonstration in November of one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen. If I recall reading that led to a series of arrests, including of, of Betty Alison they were set to. A work camp in Virginia is that right? That's what there were sent to the. workhouse where unbeknown to them or there was thirty two of them ended up the workhouse and the Superintendent Whittaker. Was Tired of having suffered just sent there and he hired a bunch of men to beat them up. You can look it up online. It was called the night of terror and was truly awful women were. Tossed into jail cells and hit their head, and we came unconscious and one of them had a heart attack and betty analysis actually escaped being harmed, but they were very much there and then they all went on an eight hunger strike. So very dramatic way for Betty and allies to join the suffrage movement. Yeah that was a sort of a baptism by fire or something. Pretty pretty incredible. And and. Betty stayed involved in these in these efforts. longer Alliston Alliston. Develop some health problems I guess as a result of some of the. Some of the things that happened. Very, Nick. During the hunger strike and I think she decided that this wasn't her she instead went into journalism and with an activist in that way on Betty became a national organizer for hours pause. Party National Woman's Party and she was actually instrumental in getting some of the states to ratify the amendment and neither the lesser known stories she was sent to New Jersey. Fierce opposition against the amendment because jumping ahead now to. Nine, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, one hundred years ago right now and she managed to get passed by one vote. similarly, in West Virginia she and some other suffer just for their and they needed one more vote and the state legislator that agreed vote to be that one vote within California and they chartered a train for him that came across the country headed towards West Virginia and people would get up in the middle of the night and wave at the train as it passed their stations because the newspapers were covering this whole. Thing that was happening and they met him at the station and lift off to the State House so that they could get the vote passed there too. So. There's a lot of stories about what he did in the suffered..

betty United States Betty Swing Danielle Graham Betty Gram Betty Alison West Virginia America Alliston Alliston Dan National Woman's Party Boston Virginia PORTLAND Carson New Jersey resident scholar Don Nick State House
"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:43 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"First, the National Women's Party was Juggling a little bit for money and donations at the time. So Alice Paul actually stayed back in Washington, D C and wanted to raise money and get more donations, says she couldn't support the efforts in Tennessee, so she was felt like she could play the role as the fundraiser. And the other reason was that Sue White had been born in Tennessee and had Roots in Tennessee, and what Alice Paul correctly concluded was, it would be better to have Tennessee women advocating and directly interfacing with legislators down in Tennessee, rather than outsiders even carried Chapman Catt, who was very involved in Nashville, stayed in her her hotel room at the Hotel Hermitage. She did not interface directly with legislators who were deciding how to vote on the 19th Amendment. She had her Supporters from the National American Women's Suffrage Association who were actually had Tennessee ties doing that for her, and we talked about Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony both. Of course who were pioneers in all of this. How old were they? At the time? What role did they play? Yes, unfortunately, both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and other earlier supporters of the women's suffrage movement were were not alive when this happened. Had died earlier in the 20th century. So the women's suffrage movement really is an example of three generations of the movement. The movement of Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton's for journal Truth, those women and then the next generation, which would be of course, the Carrie Chapman cats and the others that were involved at that point in time, and then the third generation is the Lucy Burns and Alice Paul Generation. I would be Wells Mary Church, Terrel, who are a little bit younger, so three generations really of activism and women to get the 19th Amendment over the humping over the hurdle to make it part of the Constitution. And we have a photograph of Lucy Burns, who was as you mentioned in the Occoquan Workhouse, which is located in Fairfax County in Lorton, Virginia, and she was housed there again for basically disrupting society. Correct. That's correct. She was actually the American suffragist Lucy Burns, who spent the most time incarcerated the most time in prison than any other American suffragist. She was jailed on six separate occasions, but her sentences were quite long. So she served more time in prison than anyone else. And that's a great photograph of Lucy Burns that you have a theocracy Juan workhouse, it was likely a staged photograph. These women were very resourceful. They would have some Who was sympathetic to their cause, take their picture when they were imprisoned, whether it was in the D. C jail or in the workhouse in Lorton, Virginia, and then they would have that photograph taken to the outside and then, of course, published in newspapers all across the United States to draw more support and more sympathy for their cause. They were really masters of political spectacle of imagery, and they knew that that was an effective way to Garner more public support all across the United States Back to phone calls in Silver Spring, Maryland. Gail Thank you for waiting. You're on with Colin Sugen. Hi. Good morning. I I know you spoke earlier in regards to African American women. Marching alongside even though they weren't necessary. They thought that possibly they would bring harm to the demonstrated demonstration. But I was wondering if you were familiar with a book. Bye. Martha Jones, a presidential professor at John Hopkins University, call Vanguard birthright of since birth, right citizens on that speaks. She speaks about after the Africa the role that African American women played in the suffrage movement and also are having heard you spoke about Hallie Quinn Brown. She wrote a book called Home Fun Heroes in 1926 in also are African American women going to be represented in the celebration. Thank you. Yes, great question, And you're absolutely right. Martha Jones Book Vanguard. I can't recommend it enough. Martha is the expert on African American women Black lemon in the suffrage movement and black woman in the history of American politics in general, So I heartily recommend that book and also anything else that Martha writes. Yes, absolutely one of the things for the commission whenever we We're first organizing and talking and planning for the centennial celebration. One of the things we wanted to Dio. It was to tell the full story of the women's suffrage movement, and that is an inclusive history, which would include the stories of African American women, native women, Chinese women, other women who were involved in the movement who typically in maybe previous anniversaries, or previous commemorations weren't Really fully given their dio and the truth of the matter is, you can't really understand the history of the women's suffrage movement because it's an American story. You really can't understand it without understanding the role that the important role that race played at various times in the movement. It's just impossible if you're if you're not Taking the role of race seriously, and you're not including that in the analysis or the history, then you're not telling the full story of the American women's suffrage movement. So absolutely, that is part of our initiative. And I would say that if you go to our website women's vote 100 dot org's We have a terrific blog's Siri's. It's called the soft buffs and you will see all kinds of information and profiles of various women who played roles in The women's suffrage movement, including the role of black women this week marks the start of two weeks back to back political conventions. Let's go back to the 1920 because the Republican convention held in Chicago, of course, nominating Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge. The Democrats meeting in July of 1920 in San Francisco. They nominated James Cox and Franklin D. Roosevelt is vice president in 1920. And my question did this issue play out in either party convention back then? Yes, absolutely. It did. At the Republican convention. There was AH lot. There's a lot of photographs and images of the national woman's party, including Alice Paul herself, actually going to the convention and protesting outside the convention. You might ask Well, why were they protesting at the Republican convention because Republicans historically were more supportive? Of women's suffrage earlier than then the Democratic Party will the reason Wass that they were marching towards trying to find this elusive 36 state to ratify and there were two states that were potential potential ratification possibilities, but they were both headed by Republican governors, and that was Vermont and Connecticut. And so what they did was go to the Republican convention and protests outside to try to get Warren Harding to strong arm or force or convince those two Republican governors to take up women's suffrage in the state Legislature and call a special session because they thought correctly that if the special session was actually called that the state legislators would would vote for the amendment, they and they also want to make sure that suffrage was included in the party platform. They were successful in having suffrage included in the party platform. They were not successful in convincing Warren Harding to put the pressure on those two governors to have them take up suffrage, the suffrage debate in state legislatures. They also went to the Democratic Convention. As you mentioned in San Francisco and the main goal, there was to make sure that the 19th Amendment and support for women's suffrage was included in the platform, and they were saying Zestful there..

National American Women's Suff Elizabeth Cady Stanton Lucy Burns Susan B. Anthony Alice Paul National Women Tennessee Martha Jones Warren G. Harding Lorton Virginia San Francisco Democratic Convention Democratic Party Washington United States Nashville Chapman Catt Sue White Hotel Hermitage
"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

09:35 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"There were numerous arguments. There was opposition from many men as you might imagine, But there was also a number of anti suffrage, women's organizations as well. Really. What it was was that a lot of men and women viewed women's role as being head of the family being involved in some civic organizations, the private civic organizations. They did not view women as having a roll in the public sphere. And many women who are opposed to suffrage thought of women did have the right to vote and moved into the public sphere into government into politics into voting that they would lose their power and authority within the private sphere in the family, and those women simply didn't want to give up that status. It's hard for us to understand. But at that time period 100 years ago, there wasn't really the conception that women could play a role in both spheres that women could be have powerful positions within government, but also play a role within the family and the private sphere that wasn't really viewed as being a an alternative for the women in the anti suffrage movement, they thought of it is either or Call in show Good is the senior vice president of the White House Historical Association. She also serves as the vice chair of the women's several Centennial commission. Our phone lines are open and we're dividing the phone lines. Regionally, both here on C Span's Washington Journal and those watching on C SPAN three American history TV to 027 for 8000 for those of you in the eastern, half the country and if you're out West Mountain Pacific time zones to 027 for 8001 suffragists. Versus suffragettes. There's a difference. That's a great question, and it's one of the first things you learn when you start to study. The women's suffrage movement suffered jet is a British term and the reason why I came into being was in the early 19 hundreds, a British journalist for the UK mail wrote a very negative article about the British women who were advocating for the right to vote. And he came up with the term suffer jet, adding that e t t e to the end of it to make them sound small and diminutive at is really a way in which to say that the worthy efforts are to be minimized of these particularly individuals. Well, what the women advocating for the right to vote Britain did was they espouse that term? They took it on. They made it their own. They made it their own power. Earful term. Alice Paul, who was an American living in Great Britain at the time and became part of the British women's suffrage movement, really didn't like the term suffragettes. She thought it did make women seem diminutive and not as powerful as they should be. So when Alice Paul left Great Britain and returned to the United States and became a leader in the women's suffrage movement in the United States, she said it would on Lee ever be. Suffragist and never suffer Jet And when she created her own publication for the National Woman's Party, it was called the suffragist. So when we talk about American women who advocated for the right to vote, we use the term suffragist When we talk about British women who advocated for the right to vote. The correct term is suffragettes. Tennessee becomes the 36 state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U. S Constitution 100 years ago this week. What happened next? Well. Women did vote in the 1920 election. They voted probably the turnout. We can estimate somewhere between 33 36%. Of course, women's turnout increased over time, and by 1980 the proportion of women voting in the United States surpassed the proportion of women of men voting in the United States 100 years ago. One of the editorial cartoons with the captions Sky's. The limit is women look at the right to vote what that means for them politically and, of course in 2020 on African American women on a major party ticket, the third time that there's been a woman on the ticket since 1980 for your reaction? Well, I think it's all in the continuum of history. That's why like that cartoon so much. It shows women moving up the ladder. Certainly we have seen a historic nomination with vice president candidate Kamala Harris. And she really stands on the shoulders of many women that came before her. Not on ly the suffragists. But many black women who advocated for the right to vote thought for the right to vote even after 1920 up until 1965. And, of course, all the women who have served as its members of Congress and have ran for president as well. Let's get your phone calls. Carol is first up from Oregon. Good morning. Welcome to the conversation. In lane. I'm really enjoying this conversation. I'm a daughter, American revolution and we talk about these things when we have our meetings, and the one subject you just happened to mention was the African women. But there was one thing that I think you would like to point out. That was the fact that When the African women wanted to join the other women's group. They actually kind of said Well, you might hurt us a little bit, but they still went on. And like you said, still got their right to vote. So if you can hear a little bit more of that, now really great. And thank you very much for bringing this up. I just love all this. This is great. Thank you. Carol, Thanks for the call. Yes. So African American women, unfortunately, were often shut out of leadership positions in the two major women's suffrage organizations in the United States. That's the National woman's party run by Alice Paul and the National American Woman Suffrage Association run by Carrie Chapman Catt. They could be involved. They spoke. They were members, but they were not powerful within these organizations and institutions. However, that didn't mean they They stopped advocating for the rights of all women to vote. In fact, they formed their own clubs their own organizations and were heavily involved. Some African American women even ticketed and protests that in front of the White House is well on Alice Paul would call upon them to do so. There's gotta Patrick. Next journeys from Louisville, Kentucky. Good morning. Important. I just wanted to, uh reveal story, William. Back in 1992 93. I knew a lady named Lucy Stevens. He was suffer, suffer and suffer edge If I'm saying it, right? I apologize for that. Three ways. Tio found myself homeless back then, and I was about 51 52 years old. An Isis here on the street every morning walking Teo Neighborhood grocery store if she would carry a soccer groceries. I say Hello. Listen, seeing our unis mind she would this she would be so spry and she's she would talk this way. You're talking on TV. Now She's very large, very intelligent. And she was she was a Caucasian murder. And, uh, She is a little lady that about five foot five about 100 maybe 100 105 £110. And she was just a sweetheart. And I just wanted to relate that she would talk about her times when she was a young woman when she was when she was in that In that movement. And Oh, I really I was breast istan over. She was just a wonderful, savory person, and I just want to reveal Patrick. Thank you calling show, get any reaction or comment. I think this is part of the reason why we have the centennial celebration celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment is really to recall the stories of these women. There may be a little bit of a mythology, I think with the women's suffrage movement, if it's pot at all in American history or civics classes, it might be something like women advocated for the right to vote. They politely held their signs. They don their parasols and pantaloons and before you know Oh, it they were granted the right to vote. And that's not really the accurate history that we're trying to tell at the women's Suffrage, Centennial Commission or at the White House Historical Association. These women really had to fight hard for the right to vote. The movement lasted 72 years from 18 48 to 1920. And there were a lot of bumps along the way. There were a lot of men in power who told them no, and they figured out a way they would go back, re strategize and figure A way to come back at it again. So I think it's a tremendous point in American history that we can all learn from. But why did it reach that crescendo from, say, 1912 1913 until the summer of 1920? Well, there's a number of reasons I mean, other countries were starting to grant women the right to vote Eso there. There was a worldwide pressure that this was coming and then also in that particular era World war one ended up Actually helping women in the United States because women participated in the war effort as nurses and then also taking over his jobs for men who were deployed over in Europe..

United States Alice Paul National American Woman Suffra White House Historical Associa Carol senior vice president vice chair Centennial commission Great Britain Washington Journal Suffragist West Mountain Pacific UK National Woman's Party vice president Tennessee Britain Kamala Harris Congress Sky
"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Headed by Alice Paul called the National Woman's Party in 1917. Alice Paul starts picketing the White House wear at war in Europe, and a lot of people find this. With the air of jingoism pervading the society. It's very controversial thing. So there's this this tension over tactics and I wear this pin. This is a jailhouse door pen that was made for all the suffragettes suffered just who went to jail for the right to vote and To me. It's a meditation on the difference between moderate and radical and makes me sort of ponder which one is more effective at bringing social change. Maybe all of these things contribute maybe the fashion ability of the gilded ones and the mainstream legislative appeals of the mainstream suffrage, activist and The radicals may be pushing us further than our comfort zone. It's one of the one of the enduring questions. Alright, I'm about to turn it over Teo to the audience. Why do you think, though, that that essentially these women were for gotten first along? I don't. I mean, I'm not aware of that. Maybe they were written. I don't know that the answer to that. I think I don't know. I would be curious what readers think about why To me. They're compelling figures as I mentioned not just for their substantive role, but for their delightful excesses, So I don't I don't know why they've.

Alice Paul White House Europe Teo
"national women party" Discussed on Here's Something Good

Here's Something Good

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on Here's Something Good

"Each day. We aspire to bring you the good news. The silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere everyday. We just need to look for in share it. Here's something good for today. Whenever. The most famous women in American history are named Amelia earhart always makes the list in fact in nineteen thirty seven at the time. Her plane disappeared over the Pacific. This record breaking aviator was as big star as Greta Garbo. During the nineteen thirties. Of Countless magazine articles, newsreels songs books. She endorsed products ranging from Kodak film to Beech Nut Gum, and she still a popular icon Amelia earhart routinely shows up on magazine covers from Ms to National Geographic movie. Still get made about her. So this is the perfect time to celebrate her life. Today is National Amelia Earhart Day, which would also have been her one hundred twenty third birthday. So. Who was this woman who inspired so many? Born July twenty, fourth eighteen, ninety seven in Kansas, Emilia never worried about sticking to the roles defined for women in her day as a girl, she played basketball, took an auto repair course, and later attended college in Nineteen Twenty. She signed up for Flying Lessons and shortly after her twenty fifth birthday in Nineteen, twenty two. She bought her first plane. A bright yellow secondhand biplane called the Canary in nineteen, thirty two erhard made headlines by becoming the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She was only the second person after Charles Lindbergh to accomplish that feat. Now, her approach to life could be summed up by one of her quotes. Women must try to do things as men have tried. She said when they fail. Their failure must be but a challenge to others. Her fame was huge in June of nineteen, thirty seven, when she said out with her flying partner Fred Noonan to become the first woman to fly around the world. The pair left for Miami and more on their final leg of the journey over the central Pacific when they're playing lost radio contact. President Franklin. Roosevelt ordered a major two week search, but Erhard Newnan were never found. Amelia. EARHART was more than a glamorous aviator historian Susan ware told PBS she didn't just fly for herself. She flew for women. She deliberately pushed this message to encourage women to follow their dreams and to do what they wanted. If she were alive today, Amelia earhart would undoubtedly call herself a feminist. She was an avid supporter of the National Women's Party and in nineteen, thirty two, she lobbied President Hoover on behalf of what was then known as Lucretia Mott amendment. The Eagle Rights amendment. She also helped establish the ninety nine a women's. Club. The organization is still around with more than a hundred and fifty chapters in the US and Canada. Amelia earhart lived a life of purpose and meaning when that continues to provide a beacon for women today. So? Here's something good for today. We can all take inspiration from the life of Amelia Earhart, even if we never get behind the controls of a plane, her advice still resonates one of my favorite things from her is the most difficult thing is the decision to act. The rest is merely tenacity, and she was unapologetically herself. She dresses. She pleased she did as she pleased, and she never looked back and she said quote. Decide whether or not. Not. The goal is worth the risks involved. If it is, stop worrying and keep her example in mind whenever you see a woman breaking barrier, the Navy just announced its first black female jet fighter pilot NASA says will walk on the Moon in twenty twenty four. This line of fearless American women goes back to Amelia Earhart, so let's say thank you to her on her one hundred and twenty third birthday..

Amelia earhart EARHART Greta Garbo Erhard Newnan Charles Lindbergh National Women's Party Miami Kodak Fred Noonan Pacific President Hoover Susan ware President Franklin Atlantic Ocean basketball Beech Nut Gum Lucretia Mott Kansas NASA partner
Alice Paul: Feminist, Suffragist, Political Strategist

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:03 min | 2 years ago

Alice Paul: Feminist, Suffragist, Political Strategist

"Are feminists. Today was a suffrage. Est Women's rights activist and political strategist. She brought a more militant fight for the vote to the. Us and steered the Movement for an equal rights amendment. Let's talk about the One and only Alice Paul Alice. Paul was born on January eleventh. Eighteen eighty five in Mount Laurel. New Jersey to William and tasty Paul. Alice was the eldest of four children and was raised in very comfortable surroundings. The Paul Family practiced the quaker faith. Alice leader cited the quaker belief in gender equity as formative in her strong drive towards promoting women's equality. Her mother tasty also had a major impact analysis later work tasty was a suffragette and a member of the National American woman. Suffrage Association herself. Alice attended swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in biology. While there she participated in a variety of extracurricular activities she was a member of student government and she played field hockey tennis and basketball. She was also a celebrated poet classes. Commencement Speaker in one thousand nine hundred seven. Alice traveled to England to work at the would brook settlement while there. She met Christabel Pankhurst. We talked about last week. Christabel introduced Alice to England suffrage movement. It was more militant than what Alice seen in the US. The British women fought under the motto. Deeds not words and took the words to heart. They smashed windows and went on hunger strikes among other tactics. Alice joined the 'cause later saying she broke more than forty eight windows and was imprisoned. Multiple Times Alice returned to the US in nineteen ten and got to work pushing the more radical suffrage agenda. She brought back from across the Atlantic in nineteen thirteen. Alice organized a suffrage parade. Woodrow Wilson had just been elected. Alice plant her march for the day before his inauguration purposefully stealing attention away from the President Xi succeeded in making the suffrage movement front page news but she also made the very problematic decision to ask black women to March at the back of the parade. She failed to appreciate the importance of the diverse movement instead focusing primarily on white women. This is a mistake. She would go onto her. Pete throughout her life in one thousand nine fourteen. Alice founded the National Woman's Party. She was incredibly good at rousing attention for her. 'cause members of the National Woman's Party were the first people to ever pick it in front of the White House during nineteen seventeen. They picketed six days a week after women won the right to vote with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in nineteen twenty. The National Woman's Party had to decide what to focus on next? Alice was lobbied to work on. Expanding VOTING RIGHTS. More broadly instead. She turned her attention to expand women's rights. Outside of the electoral sphere in Nineteen twenty-three Alice wrote the equal rights amendment to the US Constitution to guarantee equal rights. To All American women. She actually went to law school. In order to be qualified to write its language the was introduced in Congress continually until it finally passed in Nineteen seventy-two still the amendment hasn't officially been added to the US Constitution. Because until recently it lacks ratification from the required number of states. Today it's actually the closest it's ever been the ER as tale is a long and wild story that warrants. Its own whole podcast in fact. We've made one. It's called ordinary equality and it's available wherever you listen. Alice passed away on July ninth. Nineteen seventy seven. She was ninety two years old Alice. Paul fought tirelessly for women's legal progress and equity in the US. She's not a perfect hero rather she's a leader who changed the course of our country's history while also having her fair share of flaws

Alice Paul Alice Alice Leader Alice United States National Woman's Party Suffrage Association Christabel Pankhurst Paul Family New Jersey Us Constitution Woodrow Wilson Swarthmore College Mount Laurel England Basketball Atlantic Congress Pete
"national women party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"national women party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg law with June Grasso from Bloomberg radio this year's the hundredth anniversary of the nineteenth amendment and the American civil liberties union but you may not know the name of a woman who co wrote the equal rights amendment and co founded the ACLU crystal Eastman a new biography make change that any parents and the author of crystal Eastman a revolutionary life joins me now when you look at crystal Eastman and what she accomplished in so many areas why is it that her name is not really well known today well I think one of the reasons really the main reason that crystal if it is not so well known today is oddly enough paradoxically enough because he would go active in so many different areas Eastman I really look at her as a kind of early model or a window intersectional activists that is to say that she was a committed to multiple movements he identified with multiple social justice movements at one time and she never really prioritize one over the other always was trying to bridge these multiple movement to try to bring them together under one vast emancipatory rubric and that in practice ended up making her you know something of an iconoclast or a gadfly in almost every different movement every different organization to which he was committed to talk about socialism and internationalism and maternal ism with the feminist he talked about grief and she talked about class with the international if and the anti war activist and she was always kind of bringing up these issues trying to bring together all these different groups to ally themselves around the ways in which they were all on equal although this was a unifying vision a very hopeful vision it is sometimes worked to invite people to divide loyalties and I think that over time you know what happens to historical memory and what happens when scholars and others are constructing narrative is it makes it complicated it makes it difficult to you know kind of figure out where she stands as a consequence I think she has I found in my research that she's been sort of moved the margin of every organization and movement in which she was actually you know and think Mexican boys and a leader and lowly in some cases aged out of those histories of those movements and others organization Virginia was just the thirty eight states to ratify the equal rights amendment yes she co authored it tell us about her involvement with the equal rights amendment and what led her there even was a founding member of the national woman's party which after the vote was one nineteen twenty is is the organization that you know the crafted the equal rights amendment he was the first person that Alice Paul and Lucy burns contacted on the advice of a Jane Adams to start the organization and she remained one of the most outspoken voices particularly in the founding years nineteen thirteen nineteen fourteen of the national woman's party and she you know went on to do more work in the anti war movement during the war years and then later went on to publish and co published at the liberator magazine after the war in nineteen eighteen but returned to the fold return to kind of primarily working on suffrage and women's issues after nineteen twenty when the but with one and the ERA was was really that an effort by the organization to put forward as single unifying piece of legislation much like a separate amendment lies that could solve the myriad problems of any quality that women face in every aspect of their lives but it was very controversial one of the main reasons was that in removing and proposing to remove all gender differences from the law it would be radically all of the labor legislation that many progressive women and labor women had worked for decades to try to institute the eight hour day and other protections for women labor and as a consequence of Hans Blix progressive women and many former suffragists from the national woman's party from the ERA Easmon always believed that the ERA was a unifying document was a document that would protect all all women because she you know she felt she articulated as I talk about this a bit in the book that if the law distinguishes along the lines of gender for any reason even as a protection even as a privilege then the law could decide to distinguish along the lines of gender for any other reason and that he felt would ultimately a problem that the feminist movement could not tolerate could not allow you know and interestingly enough in the current debate about the ERA there now is significant distrust of quick decisions and legislation that has instituted a lot of equality instituted what many callers call a defacto ERA many feel that we have now you know since the nineteen ninety two so keep to the courts and legislatures you know what P. E. R. A. might have done had it finally been ratified before the original nineteen eighty two deadline but many feminine there now articulating you know in support of the ERA some of the questions the problems that Ethan articulated coming up on Bloomberg long we'll talk about how crystal Eastman.

June Grasso Bloomberg
Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

The Electorette Podcast

09:51 min | 2 years ago

Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with amy. aaronson author of the New Book Crystal Eastman. A revolutionary revolutionary life. And if you haven't heard of Crystal Eastman you're probably not alone. She was one of the Most Progressive Communists of early twentieth century and she was also branded. The most dangerous woman. In America Crystal Eastman was an uncompromising feminist. She was also an early advocate for workers rights and a self branded socialist and anti militarist militarist. The two other important facts about crystal Eastman's life. She helped to write the equal rights amendment crystal Eastman was also the CO founder of the ACLU. So one of my very first questions about crystal Eastman's life is why she faded from history. Why there's so little information about her? So here is author Amy Eareckson explaining why she thinks that is. I think the main reason that crystal Eastman has kind of disappeared from or is obscure in historical record is because of what really was kind of intersectional mindset an intersectional outlook in her activism. What I mean by that is that Eastman Smith involved herself in multiple movements in many of the major social movements of the twentieth century and believed that they were all all linked together and worked throughout her career to try to link them together all under one kind of vast emancipatory rubric? She she believed saved and she she recognized that there you know there were. There were commonalities. Among various forms of oppression and she she tried tried to kind of straddle multiple movements and bring them together in order to combat. You know all of those common sources of oppression and inequality At once so she spent a lot of time talking about socialism anti imperialism and also you know maternity and maternal ism with feminists earnest's. She spent a lot of time talking about feminism and pacifism with Socialists and with revolutionaries and one of the outcomes outcomes of this was that Eastman always seemed to be kind of straddling so many different movements at once that her voice often it seemed insurgent or challenging from within each individual movement. Many of her colleagues felt that they weren't sure where she stood because she was trying to straddle so many different movements at once because when she talked to save feminists about socialism. It seemed like a challenge from within. Yes in and so. This cut complicated her status and her stature within the the movements that she was affiliated with within the movements that that she she built her life on at the same time as her radicalism and her activism challenged her standing in the more mainstream same political and social environments where she was radical so she was already challenging to more mainstream views but because of that she you know she needed needed stronger a stronger sense of belonging I think clearer sense of standing within the protest movements the leftist movements that she collectively saw as her political home. And so what happened was she. You know kind of fell through the planks of history. She fell to the planks of historical. Memory she we didn't have clear consistent connections with organizations With a single organization right or a single 'cause she didn't have clear and consistent alliances this is or relationships to various mentors. who were recognized the things that that signal stature and make someone intelligible and make someone visible double in historical memory? She kind of challenged complicated at every turn and precisely because she you know tried to connect them All to a larger vision of change that they all shared and so in some ways it was kind of I think a tragic irony that her her inclusive vision seem to divide people and seem to divide people's loyalties but in other ways it's also kind of a fascinating story of how we tell stories as how and why we remember people that I think has a lot to tell us about our current intersectional environment for forming coalitions to pursue the same social change that she and others have been pursuing for a century. You know in counting so is it over simplistic to say that. She was possibly a victim of her own own prolificacy like she was so prolific involved in so many movements that she wasn't known for single thing or was it that and making some hostility because she was seen as kind kind of an insurgent and lots of these movements. I wouldn't say hostility but I would say that you know. She challenged people. She challenged. Organizational hierarchies and in leadership at you know in various organizations and so there were some leaders She had quite a run in with Alice. Paul for example Particularly after the vote was one John when the militant wing of the women's movement the National Women's Party was starting to figure out. Okay what comes next. It was in that period before the rise of the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment nineteen twenty-three that they were you know searching for okay. What's our next approach and Eastman wanted a very intersectional kind of transnational feminist movement and Paul wanted a much more focused targeted women's campaign? Just much like the you know. The suffrage movement that they had just successfully completed pleaded so for some leaders. There was that you know that sense that they were being challenged from a colleague For others it was the fact that you're kind of intersectional perspective active As well as her movement to the left after the Russian revolution seemed to radical and seemed to push the organizations that she was associated with in more radical directions than many of the progressive leaders in those organizations were comfortable. That's unfortunate you know. She reminds me of reading her story. And you know kind of the motion all day of it. And the Ark of her life. She reminds me of not Elizabeth Rankin but there. I can't believe I can't remember a name. The very first woman who ran for president. who was ooh Toria woodhall awesome? She's scared the crap out of people what it's just something about her demeanor. It's hard to tell from a book you know but just something about it. Just kind of reminds me of that similar kind of radical woman radical feminist. Get around that time. And you know crystal was just unafraid. she was so bold and she. She asserted her freedom. She really you know she. She claimed a freedom and claimed a world that even while she was trying to create it so she was an in kind of a kind of a real sense woman ahead of herself or ahead of her time. You know I know. That's kind of a cliche as historians. You know we're we're not really supposed to say that What struck me about her early on? You know what would I I think stuck with me From my graduate school days till almost twenty years later when I finally you know sat down to to try to write the book was the sense of a woman who was just calling ahead of herself and you know and in envisioning and reaching four And you know and actively demanding and trying to live live in a world that was much closer to mine than it was to hers. And you know I found that's just so compelling it's visionary I think she was a gripping person go find her story gripping because of that right she had some really really progressive stances and you know you mentioned a few feminism and she was also I think a socialist. She called herself a socialist right. Yes and she was four reproductive rights. Yes very much. So why was she branded. I WanNa go through the historical arch- of her life a bit later. But why does she branded the most dangerous woman in America. Well I need most of those claims about who came in her. Most radical or revolutionary period after the Russian revolution revolution in nineteen seventeen. She and her brother Maxi sman much better known than she is a radical writer and editor of the Masses magazine. The two of them together published the Liberator magazine which started in Nineteen Eighteen Shortly after the Russian revolution and it was called the Journal of Revolutionary Progress and it became very quickly the kind of center of reporting and information about revolutionary movements worldwide in connection with that period in her politics. Um which I can explain to you a little bit how. She kinda volved into that radicalism from her more progressive earlier activism in connection with that. She took very forthright arthritis very bold. Very outspoken stances in favor of the Bolsheviks and herself traveled to communist Hungary and she was the first the American reporter to do that and reported very enthusiastically at least initially about her hopes that the a similar revolution would come to the United States and would indeed sweep the world would become a global revolutionary movement. And of course this you know this kind of radicalism. She was not alone in it particularly on the left after the Russian revolution many colleagues from a number of different movements also celebrated revolution however You know it still was. That was not a mainstream extreme view. You know even on the left it was not a mainstream view was a radical view and It was very threatening to people especially in the the body of a woman and the voice voice of someone who was so afraid to speak about it. And the voice of someone who had such stature in more mainstream political political movements and more mainstream political

Crystal Eastman Eastman Smith Jim Taylor Skinner Amy. Aaronson Amy Eareckson Journal Of Revolutionary Progr Writer And Editor Aclu Paul Hungary Liberator Magazine Elizabeth Rankin United States Co Founder America President. National Women's Party Reporter Maxi