22 Burst results for "National Wildlife Federation"

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Many trips you make to the doctor. He says for minorities it also depends on whether you feel your community as safe your level of education immigration status whether you're air and water is clean and levels of stress getting more access to the doctor is not going to solve everything. The state needs to address all those other things outside the doctor's office that affect health a higher percentage of non whites also say the state government should address economic and living conditions as public health priorities. I'm Russ Brown. Finally Eric, Glutton's reports. Water is the lifeblood of the West but a warm climate and other factors have put Colorado's lakes, reservoirs and ponds at greater risk for toxic Algal blooms. Bryan Curtis L. With the National Wildlife Federation says a recent rash of Blue Green cyanobacteria blooms and Colorado are more than just an eyesore. They're dangerous for people, pets and wildlife. He says leaders at all levels of government need to confront the outbreaks. Root causes that the climate change whether that be nutrient pollution and we need them to have the clarity of purpose that is on par with the clarity that we want in our water. This is my Clifford for public news service. We are a member illustre supported and online at public news service DOT Org coast time ahead of us. But if we are to be prepared for it, we must I shed our fear of it. I spend. Without fear because I remember. I. Remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember that one hundred years of caught these machines. And after a century of war I, remember that. We still. Remember..

Bryan Curtis L. Colorado National Wildlife Federation Russ Brown DOT Org Glutton Eric
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A Santiago Ali again. His vice president, Environmental justice, climate and community revitalisation at the National Wildlife Federation. EPA is also weakening controls on mercury, and let's talk about that. It's a big victory for Trump donor Roberti Murray, but it may not be all that good for the environment to put it mildly. What definitely isn't good for the environment. You know, it continues to cause these huge impacts and course, the work that I did for over two decades was focusing on our most vulnerable communities. Communities of color. Lower wealth, white communities and indigenous brothers and sisters and these rollbacks that continue play a big role in the chronic medical conditions that many of the folks who live in the sacrifice zones find themselves dealing with And because of these chronic medical conditions that also makes them more vulnerable to cope in 19 infections and death, so each time this administration rolls back or weekends The basic protections. If we're gonna have real tall, we should understand that In many instances, the things that we're talking about, just give people the basic protections so to take that away. That means that you do not necessarily value those lives who are going to be disproportionately impacted by the choices that you're making, literally, saying that profits are more important than people. Well, I think it's axiomatic that in the work you've done through the years, both in Democratic and Republican administrations, you've said on a number of occasions that you've never seen hurt like this in terms of the impact on communities of color and vulnerable communities. Including poor white people. Exactly. Yeah, I mean, it's amazing that this administration does so many egregious actions even though they know the science whether they support science or believe in science. We know without a doubt that we've got 100,000 plus people die each year prematurely from air pollution. But yet they've continued to roll back those basic protections that are necessary for us to continue to shrink that number on because of the actions that they're doing. If anyone is ever at a basic level of education, you would understand that is going to increase the vulnerability of individuals and therefore increase the amount of folks are getting sick. And the amount of folks who are going to lose their lives. And yes, that is happening from where I come from in Appalachia to inner city neighborhoods as well before 81 7 in Detroit, which is the most polluted zip code there, or in cancer Alley. In Louisiana running from New Orleans, the Baton Rouge founded by freed slaves, and they've had to deal with a number of these different types off fossil fuel burning facilities, petrochemical facilities without there being any riel. I thought to how these people's lives are going to be impacted either positively or negatively. And unfortunately with all the actions we've seen, there has not been yet one positive action for those that we label is our most vulnerable communities. Those environmental justice communities. Well, I know you gave congressional testimony back in October on all of this, especially on the effect of fossil fuels and Some statistics that were alarming in the testimony. People die prematurely from air pollution more than from gun violence. And you've got about 13.4% of African American Children in the United States who have asthma supposed to, but 7.3 of lights. In other words, we're talking about zip code healthier, tied to race and poverty. And the reality is that the Trump administration as well, let's put it a zit is exacerbated that exacerbated too pretty dramatically. Without a doubt, you know, Unfortunately for those of us who are students of policy or students of history, we understand that systemic racism has played a significant role in many of the impacts that we see both in housing and transportation and the environment and course on the medical side. This administration has now filled those injustices with steroids, making them much more impactful both in the moment on in the future, Because then we have to, you know, began to dismantle. You know all of these negative actions that this administration has put into place you mentioned asthma. We've got 24 million folks in our country of as with seven million kids. And disproportionate is African American and latte..

African American Children Trump vice president Santiago Ali National Wildlife Federation EPA Roberti Murray Louisiana Appalachia New Orleans United States cancer Alley Detroit
Sierra Club Denounces Founder John Muir For Racism

Environment: NPR

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Sierra Club Denounces Founder John Muir For Racism

"A historic icon of the American environmental. Movement is in the spotlight John Muir founded the Sierra Club in eighteen, ninety two in San Francisco. The group's current leaders says the ongoing civil rights protests, leading to the dismantling of confederate monuments is causing the Sierra Club to reexamine its own racist history NPR's Kirk. Siegler reports. The group is pledging to remove some of its own John Maher statues. John Muir has long been revered by environmentalists. The California naturalists Biblical love. Wild places led to a legacy of federal wilderness protections, including Yosemite National Park, but mirror was also well known for making derogatory comments about blacks and native people and the modern conservation movement has wrestled for years with these transgressions in a letter to the Sierra clubs members today, current Director Michael Brune said this moment. Moment is a time to reexamine. The clubs own substantial role in perpetuating white supremacy. Bruins says the group will reconsider the views of some of its founders that lead to the modern movement being so white today when it comes to John Muir, we're looking to advance the conversation about yours legacy to look at him in a more comprehensive and inclusive way. That acknowledges his limitations. Limitations and shortcomings, the Sierra Club says it's considering removing some monuments to its founders. Brune is also pledging that the group will reorganize to ensure that a majority of its leadership is comprised of people of Color, and he hopes to spend five million dollars on diversifying their staff and training. The announcement was welcomed by Mustafa Santiago Ali of the National Wildlife Federation. You know it's long overdue. Overdue we have to address the sins of the past. He's one of the few people of Color who's actually in a leadership position in a major environmental group that major sin of the past, many of those folks felt that those spaces those natural spaces, those sacred spaces where meant for white men Ali says the modern day environmental movements lack of diversity in its writ large. Of Communities of color has had major consequences, one example, industrial facilities are often put in underserved neighborhoods and pollution from them as drifting into national parks like those John Muir fought to establish. Kirk, siegler NPR

John Muir Sierra Club Michael Brune Mustafa Santiago Ali Kirk John Maher Siegler Sierra Clubs San Francisco Yosemite National Park National Wildlife Federation NPR Bruins Director
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Table and help to find their future. How can we put all of those programs together to do good work in some of that may just need to be teed up for the next administration so. Obviously, I'm an eternal optimist so i. think there's another chance at it I. Don't think this is the only chance we have. I just think we're not going to be able to get the big thing done well. That's depressing, but not unexpected, not certainly certainly not on. Domestic there. Yeah I don't know some expected it's. Actually just a genuine travesty. I mean for those folks are paying attention I mean I one after a speaker Pelosi pretty hard and politico and. Like I, think that I think what she's doing here is absolutely you know mortgaging our future to get Biden elected, and that's her choice. I mean like I get the politics of the moment, but the whole thing is just fraught, right? We're basically in a situation where you've got folks account Amarah. Who are like writing? op-eds from National Wildlife Federation in New York Times around how? How we should stand up a conservation corps. You've got a lot of great ideas coming around the transom that you talked about oil and gas workers. We're not doing any of it right instead. We're trying to figure out a way to get people an extra six hundred dollars, a paycheck for unemployment, and we're not even asking people to rise occasion to do more to help their. Their country right and we're in a situation where you know after you parse through all sorts of weirdness in the jobs report were probably at twenty percent unemployment now, and it's just it is frustrating, right and I get it. I get it like the worse things get the more likely it is. That Biden gets elected. Why just why not just leave everything really bad, but it is. Is just heartbreaking to see the politics. Play out this way. Yeah, I know it's frustrating, but remember she also really needs to hang onto the house. And if you every time, she put something out all the Republican scream, green new deal, and so it it causes people who are in her district swing districts a lot of heartache, so she and she's a fine line to walk. Walk we also. She's not the only leader out there. Mitch McConnell won't do this. Trump will not do this the reason. I'm thinking that we could get something done on infrastructure is that the president cares about infrastructure? And if he thinks there is some way they can get jobs created then he'll do it. He doesn't want to have anything that's even marginally tied to the green new. New Deal so if he can if he can hook his hat onto the Barosso bill, which has a climate change piece in it like. Maybe that's going to be all. We're going to be able to get done, but Nancy Pelosi isn't the only one out there. That makes a difference I don't know if that's true, I mean like when you think about how we got screwed over. Over in December on the tax credit bill for the energy storage tax rates CETERA. It's because she wasn't willing to make deal. The reason I get so passionate about this. Not because I don't understand the arguments, you're making intellectually totally get them, but you and I. Both know that we have like six hundred thousand and brothers and sisters who are out of work right now that could. Could be really doing a lot to make a difference and you know they're not being called action. They're not being put to work. And it's just heartbreaking and like I think we can. On the one hand say intellectually. We get the game that she's playing fine. Whatever and the other hand be super frustrated by the fact, that like were pond in some big.

Biden Mitch McConnell Nancy Pelosi National Wildlife Federation New York Times Trump president
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Town Haul

The Town Haul

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Town Haul

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish school. So I believe you know similar to Liz. I grew up outdoors playing all the time spending all day in the summertime that we would be out as soon as the sun was up and become home. You know. As soon as it was starting to get dark I grew up camping. You know we would go to the closest national park to win where we grew up was Shenandoah National Park here in Virginia and I still live in this area in that area. So we we go to the park all the time. It's beautiful and so I take my little girl there as well So just growing up. We spent a Lotta time outdoors. I really enjoyed seeing wildlife and spending time and hiking and going to the beach and searching for seashells and that sort of thing when I graduated college. Actually a little bit. Before I graduated college I went on a trip to Andros Island. The Bahamas in it's a family island in the Bahamas and I went to a field station their biological field station and that is where I spent the next six years of my life. After College I worked at the field station. I worked with college. Students and high school high school students helping down learn about ecology and learning field skills in that type of thing and that really helped me really understand value of hands on learning. So you know whenever you education as you know there's sitting in the classroom and learning there is value to that there's also value to being out in the field learning skills. You know the experiential part of that and so. When after that after I left the field station I worked for nonprofit for a little bit in the environmental security sector and that really looked at conflict around natural resources so water timber diamonds was another example and that that was looking at conflicts most likely outside the US. And then. When I started looking for a new opportunity I was really attracted to. Nwf's education programs. We have a very large education program. National Wildlife Federation engaging. Little kids all the way up through adults and so that is kind of what got me hooked at. Nwf and applied for a job on the campus sustainability team. And so I've been here since two thousand three. That's awesome okay so I will let you guys now kind of feel these answer. You know whoever wants to answer white and build upon each other's responses in we're going to focus a lot on education recycle mania but you know the. Nwf Is a massive umbrella brand for a lot of different environmental conservation causes. So I did want to do a little bit of background about the mission. You know the strategic plan the six pillars of what makes the NWF and then we can get into the specs of the educational programs so whoever wants to field kind of the overall NWF mission answer can A. I'll go again and you know the midst of NWF is really to unite ensure that wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world and There's no doubt in all of our minds and these days that our world is rapidly changing whether it's with this pandemic Like we're facing right now or the pack that more than one third of Americans. Fish and wildlife are at risk for extinction or the climate crisis. And of course all of these impacts what the impacts are on any of our marginalized communities so you recently. I just wanted to mention this because I think it's really important and it really sets the stage who I believe. Nwf is particularly right now and our it was CEO Calling Amarah who recently said that we need to be leading this charged with compassion. You know during this time because this pandemic is clearly showing that men. There are many structural inequalities in our societies such as access to clean water food healthcare or the

Rubicon town hall National Wildlife Federation Leonardo Dicaprio Foundation Executive Director NBA Jones CEO partner official
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

The Town Haul

09:07 min | 1 year ago

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish school. So I believe you know similar to Liz. I grew up outdoors playing all the time spending all day in the summertime that we would be out as soon as the sun was up and become home. You know. As soon as it was starting to get dark I grew up camping. You know we would go to the closest national park to win where we grew up was Shenandoah National Park here in Virginia and I still live in this area in that area. So we we go to the park all the time. It's beautiful and so I take my little girl there as well So just growing up. We spent a Lotta time outdoors. I really enjoyed seeing wildlife and spending time and hiking and going to the beach and searching for seashells and that sort of thing when I graduated college. Actually a little bit. Before I graduated college I went on a trip to Andros Island. The Bahamas in it's a family island in the Bahamas and I went to a field station their biological field station and that is where I spent the next six years of my life. After College I worked at the field station. I worked with college. Students and high school high school students helping down learn about ecology and learning field skills in that type of thing and that really helped me really understand value of hands on learning. So you know whenever you education as you know there's sitting in the classroom and learning there is value to that there's also value to being out in the field learning skills. You know the experiential part of that and so. When after that after I left the field station I worked for nonprofit for a little bit in the environmental security sector and that really looked at conflict around natural resources so water timber diamonds was another example and that that was looking at conflicts most likely outside the US. And then. When I started looking for a new opportunity I was really attracted to. Nwf's education programs. We have a very large education program. National Wildlife Federation engaging. Little kids all the way up through adults and so that is kind of what got me hooked at. Nwf and applied for a job on the campus sustainability team. And so I've been here since two thousand three. That's awesome okay so I will let you guys now kind of feel these answer. You know whoever wants to answer white and build upon each other's responses in we're going to focus a lot on education recycle mania but you know the. Nwf Is a massive umbrella brand for a lot of different environmental conservation causes. So I did want to do a little bit of background about the mission. You know the strategic plan the six pillars of what makes the NWF and then we can get into the specs of the educational programs so whoever wants to field kind of the overall NWF mission answer can A. I'll go again and you know the midst of NWF is really to unite ensure that wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world and There's no doubt in all of our minds and these days that our world is rapidly changing whether it's with this pandemic Like we're facing right now or the pack that more than one third of Americans. Fish and wildlife are at risk for extinction or the climate crisis. And of course all of these impacts what the impacts are on any of our marginalized communities so you recently. I just wanted to mention this because I think it's really important and it really sets the stage who I believe. Nwf is particularly right now and our it was CEO Calling Amarah who recently said that we need to be leading this charged with compassion. You know during this time because this pandemic is clearly showing that men. There are many structural inequalities in our societies such as access to clean water food healthcare or the

National Wildlife Federation LIZ Christie Europe Shenandoah National Park Youtube Jones Rubicon Oregon Andros Island Bahamas Lake Champlain Basin Vermont United States Director Greensboro Official Virginia Ceo Calling Amarah
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Town Haul

The Town Haul

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Town Haul

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today thank you. I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level <hes>. And really pushing forward the work that we do with <hes> schools <hes> and other informal education opportunities and community <hes>. My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime <hes>. Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know <hes>. Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon <hes>. And then pretty much. Except for one other job with <hes>. The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF <hes>. And you know my my passion for this work. <hes> I <hes>. I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents <hes>. Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning <hes>. We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this <hes>. Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS <hes>. We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish

Rubicon town hall National Wildlife Federation Leonardo Dicaprio Foundation Executive Director NBA Jones CEO partner official
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

The Town Haul

04:53 min | 1 year ago

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today thank you. I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish

National Wildlife Federation Christie Europe Youtube LIZ Lake Champlain Basin Vermont Oregon Jones Rubicon Director Greensboro Kathy Lake Official Partner
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Town Haul

The Town Haul

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Town Haul

"It's because of that that I'm also the host of the town hall. Rubicon becomes first podcast where we share sustainability stories from the industry's influencers and the biggest brands. Jam packed with tips tricks and needed no info for those that want to do better for the planet but may not know where to start. We are covering it all last year. We spoke to some incredible people who are doing some incredible things for our planet the Executive Director of the Leonardo Dicaprio Foundation the CEO seven generation cleaning products and one of the brains behind environmental sustainability in the NBA. This season were kicking it up a notch. Don't forget to download and subscribe on Itunes spotify or iheartradio. So that you don't miss a minute and if you can't catch us on your commute or you don't download directly don't stress. You can check out our website at Rubicon global dot com slash townhall podcast for recaps reviews and all things townhall everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today.

Rubicon town hall National Wildlife Federation Leonardo Dicaprio Foundation Executive Director NBA Jones CEO partner official
Ten years later, BP oil spill continues to harm wildlife, especially dolphins

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Ten years later, BP oil spill continues to harm wildlife, especially dolphins

"Now to New Orleans marking the ten year anniversary of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico marine life there is still suffering the national wildlife federation says dolphins continue seeing much lower birth rates since the spill with alarming numbers of mothers delivering dead or sick newborns a decade later still learn in sick babies and various effects of the toxicity in dolphins Gulf of Mexico restoration director David muses as endangered sea turtles and whales also died at high rates in the years after the spill with ongoing impacts there probably will continue to be facts for quite

New Orleans National Wildlife Federation Director David Muses Gulf Of Mexico Mexico
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Coast of Oregon and Northern California then moving east and changing to snow in the mountain west. More than two million Americans live without running water and basic indoor plumbing. According to a new report by water access group dig deep. The the report finds that lack of clean water his vulnerable communities in the country particularly hard including the Navajo nation in the southwest and coal regions in McDowell. Dowell County West Virginia McDowell. County Resident Linda mckinney. Says people there have struggled for years for this basic human need facing polluted unreliable reliable running water she says. The impoverished region doesn't have the tax base to fund improvements. I'm sixty three years old and it's been going on since since I was born and it's now come to the point. where in a disaster mode because our water is contaminated mckinney says? Many people have to use rundown coal camp water systems uh-huh that were never kept up and then abandoned when coal companies folded. She says the water that runs through these systems when they run it all picks up contaminants putting health and daily living in jeopardy for public news service. I'm Diane Bernard reported a new interactive map from the National Wildlife Federation called unnatural. All disasters shows climate change in combination with other factors is putting at least one million plant and animal species around the world at risk of extinction according to Ed Perry with the Federation's Climate Crisis Campaign in Pennsylvania figures from last year show some of those impacts are hitting very close to home. It's it's.

Linda mckinney National Wildlife Federation McDowell Dowell County Diane Bernard Northern California Ed Perry Oregon Pennsylvania
Wild turkeys: A conservation (and hunting) success story

Joel Riley

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Wild turkeys: A conservation (and hunting) success story

"The recovery of the wild Turkey population in North America is booming states like Connecticut in her moderated wiped off the face of the planet in the eighteen hundreds and yet today in other back and almost every state in their historical range tellin Ameriprise it into the national wildlife federation says in the nineteen thirties there were fewer than thirty thousand but today there are over seven million he calls it the greatest success story in wildlife conservation in the country a lot of it coming back to good habitat I mean there's dedicated funding that sportsmen in particular pay find XFX and different quit meant the dense undergoing specifically to conservation programs and so we've done a good job

North America Connecticut National Wildlife Federation XFX
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KTRH

"I don't wanna lawsuit against me. What would the lawsuit be based on? Oh, maybe she might claim something like defamation or something like that. Well, any I if I recall correctly, you have a law degree defamation is a very hard case to prove against a public figure. But it's easy to just get somebody in court and goes in them forever and core. Well, she can you for in court, whether you call her whatever name you call her or not. Well, the the the validity of her claim has nothing to do with whether she can do she and quarter. The point is she needs to be removed because she's mentally not not. She's not all there. Are you saying she's nuts? Yeah. I'm saying she's nuts and saying she see now, I mean, anybody can look at her for five seconds any doctor could watch her on video for five seconds to tell you that. She's she's completely bonkers. This. This woman is is she's gets a friend. Nick. She's got a wok. Schizophrenia. Well, I I went to college psychology. And she claims that she she claims walls. Don't work me Walser. Giving their bad and she's got one around to room compounds. So that proves that she doesn't know what she's talking about Doug decided to get together mission group, and we're going to go help her move that. Well, she says is so detrimental to her at her house. Any sheep? She might have a bigger problem with you trying to remove the wall residents than calling her names. Well, I've heard her say it was bad it needed to go down. Was she talking about somebody else's wall? That would be a double standard. Now. Wouldn't it? Is that a rhetorical question? Yeah. I mean, everybody knows the answer to double standard. Mark you down as not happy with the speaker at this point because I'm just marking check in which box. Yes. She can Mark me is not happy with the speaker. Anything else? I think that Doug. I've heard w Joe still several different stories. I've heard him. I've watched him on video of what he stated of risk quotes on AL dot com. And he said and millions insisted he the voters of Alabama support. A while they want him to vote for some kind of sensor while I think a sense would be good because you can see through with a big tall anchor sense. Would they signed with me that would deter ninety nine percent? You don't want any wire on the top because that would hurt the wildlife. It would harm the birds to no wire on the top. No, especially barbed wire. Out seen. Pardon? What about concertina? Oh, I've seen pictures of birds and bats tangled up in barbed wire, especially Berge, and I don't wanna hurt Burs upright a bird sanctuary. My sale. Sort of sad by national wildlife federation. Title enough. If you want to make a real short since that would be a temptation to put wire at the top because otherwise people would jump over it tall enough. Just a regular anchor sense. Oh. You know, what the? Oh jumpers do help. What's the maximum? You can do with poll job. Personally. An inch taller than that. Let me ask you this. If you were building a wall. That was high enough that the only people could get in. Would be the world's greatest pole. Vaulters why not build that minus an inch? And then the only ones that would get in. We could put on the Olympic team. Is there that good? They'll get in without having to jump any sense. What if we was to bust up bottle glasses and put it on the top glue that down? Now, you don't want anything that's going to hurt the bars. But it's tall enough. You don't need any what why are any can how dumb does a bird have to be to come and lay in coming in and land on busted up bottle. Well, if they are getting hurt on barbed wire, they could get hurt on anything. That's sharp. So. Brain. Well, I love birds. But if we do too tall, I reckon a bird fly into it. Well, see it in fly over it. Well, why wouldn't they see the barbed wire? I heard an old chicken here, and I had to tell the chicken had enough system to fly over the saints and they're selling flying to it. He used to fly up to the top. And he would purchase player. He was cute. What happened to him? Hide it, but my German shepherd guide him. Oh, well, why don't we just put German shepherds on the wall? Then. Yeah. You could put a bunch of dogs out there. But that would take a lot of dogs. I'm sure we could breed them. The dogs would help every little bit helps there's not any one thing. It's an algorithm of a combination of things a certain order. What is the order dog.

w Joe Doug Berge Walser national wildlife federation Nick Alabama five seconds ninety nine percent
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"Animals, which would give mining companies more power in these fights. This is the corporate agenda. The Trump administration's pursuing often without much scrutiny while his administration veers from crisis to tweet. This is also an agenda that Trump campaigned on. He said he was more worried about destroying businesses than destroying the environment. Environmental protection. What they do is a disgrace every week. They come out with new regulations to make the environment will be fine with the environment. We can leave a little bit, but you can't destroy businesses. These changes are not immediate. They're coming down the pike Trump giving less than sixty days for comments from the public on these changes Congress working to overhaul the law before the midterms. Now, Republicans put a big critic of the EPA in charge of the natural resources committee names rob Bishop. And he said that all the laws ever pass, which include hits like the fact that it's a crime to injure a government owned lamp. It's legal to sell ham Turkey. It has to be called Turkey ham or say, alcohol, prohibition. There's been many laws out there, but here's what he says is the most inefficient law ever. The Endangered Species Act quite frankly, is the most ineffective and inefficient piece of legislation that we have in the history of this country. It doesn't work. It does not meet its goals. It never has, and it never will. If you look at its goals, national wildlife federation reports more than one hundred species of actually been saved under the law. The whole debate sounds familiar. It is when lawmakers last decided to deal with this environmentalists and fact checkers noted the law benefits, many animals and preservation. Saved from extinction America's symbol it rescued from hunters Florida's wildness and restored to the west coast ocean majesty. In fact, a report card shows while the peregrine falcon leads the list of one hundred forty nine species better off today. So contrast, the Republicans today to teddy Roosevelt who famously said, we're heirs to the most goal orien- heritage people have received, and each one must do his part if we wish to show that the nation is worthy of its good fortune Roosevelt kicked it all off and president, Nixon and other Republican and acted the Endangered Species Act nineteen seventy three. Ecus all across this great land has a stake in maintaining improving environmental quality, clean air and clean water. The wise use of our land, the protection of wildlife and natural beauty..

Trump teddy Roosevelt national wildlife federation rob Bishop EPA Congress Florida president America Nixon sixty days
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"The title is it's on post grad problems dot com. And it's welp. I got my penis cod. In my zipper over the weekend. So that's that's where you can read that that happened. Yeah. Okay. Next segment we're running low on time, so I'm gonna breeze through this baby animal of the week. It's called the pica PI k. a.. Pulled up on Google look at the pictures while I talk you little bit and you become a little bit more knowledgeable about the pica too small mammal, short limbs. Very round body rounded years. No external tail in our remember that. I said that right, no external tail the pica resembles its cousin, the rabbit, but was shorter ears. It's a little Raby, but would like mouse ears. It's an interesting combo. They live in mountainous countries in Asia, and there's two species of pica in North America. Very common. In the rocky mountains, they love rocky terrain. They love these mountain regions from central British Columbia to south central California east to Colorado. The found at the interface between meadow habitats and open rocky terrain. The pike has one of the longest tales of all lag amorphous. But their tail, as I mentioned earlier, no external tail. That's because it's hidden in their thick fur. So it looks like they don't have a tail at all. Now, what's the point of having tale if you're not gonna show it off, I don't know. That's something you'd have to ask the pica. I don't have the answer these pike is they live in colonies. But even so within their colonies, they defend their own little territories who some info information from the national wildlife federation, although pikers live in colonies. They're very territorial over there din and surrounding area. They will give off territorial calls to define the boundaries between each pica neighbor. They make their dens among rocks. And just as another note, even though they live near each other males and females, they lead totally solitary lives except during breeding seasons. Pike is mate once in the spring and once in the summer. But other than those two times to bone, solitary. They make a lot of noises. One of them is this shrill whistle that they'll throw out when they're diving into a hiding place because they've spotted a predator such as a hawk or eagle to warn other pike as it around. It's got this like chirping morning that it does. It is earned it. The pike is nickname the whistling hare. It's also sometimes called the rock rabbit. These pike is spent a great deal of time gathering flowers and grasses for winter. They don't hibernate. Instead, they spend warm months gathering vegetation to help them sustain through Colorado's harsh winters. It's not full on hibernate is just collecting..

Pike Colorado Google national wildlife federation North America British Columbia Asia California
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

05:15 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Interchange

"So in a fake solutions or no solutions, I, I mean, they're both pretty annoying to the folks that work on five machines seriously, ticked issue. Seriously. They wanna see us come up with durable bipartisan solutions to this. And it is, I think both sides make it worse. When Democrats talk about in a political way, makes it worse. When Republicans dismiss it in a in a divisive way, it makes it worse. So a lot of people are making it worse. I think in a conversation like this, it's very easy to simplify the environmental left just like it's easy to simplify the right there are plenty of people within the environmental movement who adhere to free market principles who are not necessarily liberal or if they are, they are more than happy to reach out to the right and you interact with a ton of these groups all the time. You know, many of them are very well meaning, how would you describe the environmental movement terms of the people that it's that it's often characterize as like a leftist movement, but I think it's pretty diverse within the environmental community more diverse than it may appear given their influence on democratic. Politics. So that's a, that's a great point, and it's very true and. Kill the, the national Audubon society. The national wildlife federation, environmental defense fund, the nature conservancy. You know, these are conservation and environmental organizations that really do work to try to advance bipartisan solutions. End are open to market based in free market approaches to solving big problems and they, you know, they deserve respect for that. And I think you know, depending on the political moment that you can sometimes veer towards or be pulled by the Sierra clubs Elsie vs NRDC's Greenpeace kinda thing over toward the left because there's definitely pressure to do that from the most active base of environmental politics, which is progressive, politically, active, progressive Americans, and they tend to be pretty lefty. The active. Base of environmental movement at this moment, and it's because you know, some of those other groups have turned into functionally corollaries for the Democratic Party. So it is hard to maintain that independent says a that, that that focus on the environment and on conservation on the founding missions of these organizations when there's a lot of pressure to move over to the left. I mean for right now, for example, you know, you got a lot of good Republicans that are strong on environmental issues that are strong on climate change their climate realists that are searching for solutions than in there in tough general, election fights, and it's. Neely at some environmental groups that are focused on helping those vulnerable Republicans because they understand that having a bipartisan in, oh, having bipartisan policies are the only way to make sure they're durable, and it's that these Republican members are very important. And then there's other folks that see the, you know, the Trump administration has hallowing out some of their most important protections in rules and regulations in the for them. They see flipping the house is the most important goal for the political arms. So they're gonna go after those vulnerable Republicans, and they're going after like some great environmentalists there, but they're doing it to flip the house in. You can justify that from an environmental perspective, but it it really functionally mix the, you know, acting as corollaries of the Democratic Party. And I think a lot of Republican voters can understand that. Namic intuitively that the environmental movement to to a large extent has become part of this basket of progressive groups that the sustain the Democratic Party and it makes you feel a little bit not, you know, not at home or not welcome in that in that community because you're, that's not that doesn't comport with your worldview. That's not who you are. What influenced the shift in the Republican party the most when it comes to climate change and I'll give you my opinion. I mean after two thousand nine when Americans for prosperity space, put a flag in the ground and said, we're going to spend money to kick out of office anyone who talks about climate change, and then we saw, you know, some other major Republican donors follow suit. That seemed to be the moment. Where everything changed or the Republican party. So it does seem to me to be. Almost entirely a money issue. No, but but that that there that wasn't a caused right..

Democratic Party Republican party national wildlife federation nature conservancy national Audubon society NRDC Neely Elsie Greenpeace
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Dancy animals i know in europe in europe they ha i've seen pictures of they when they build their freeways modern freeways and things build these overpasses for animals which are very vast very wide all glean so that they can go to and fro as as required not get hit by the traffic in anything and they're they're amazing feats of construction evan we we call those agility compensates i like it i'm going to i'm going to reach out to beth pratt at the national wildlife federation until her foundation and tell her you've been doing it all wrong don't call them wildlife crossings way more press if you call them vitually compensator oh my gosh it would call him in star trek anyway jay tell us about nasr's hammer hammer time what he was going to say details on nasr's project hammer hyper velocity asteroid mitigation mission for emergency response this was published in the journal acta astronaut ika and the project was started by nasa lawrence livermore national laboratory to investigate a spacecraft concept in case asteroid ever threatens the earth which is a wonderful idea their plan includes diverting or blowing up and he threatened asteroids i think that's pretty obvious and even though there is a very low probability of this happening over the next few centuries nasa feels it's worth building a solution just in case so the facts are that asteroid do pass by the earth all the time and most of those that that do enter the earth's atmosphere burn up and those that make it to the surface of the earth or typically small and do minimal damage every once in a while you'll see video on youtube where.

europe national wildlife federation nasr youtube Dancy beth pratt jay lawrence livermore national la nasa
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"His deal is that public way doesn't really exist his deal the like public landbased louis any public way and it was traditionally grazed by livestock people is basically like a collaborative ownership between the grazer in the government and there's no real such thing as public land as we understand it now hiddink's it's all a sham and it is this coming out of the basis of that goes out of the hague industry okay but it's not like a lamb has no value and tell it is cultivated type of thought yannick as i think he i think he comes out of that angle k i like i want to get i wanna had contact them and have him on um you know like i like even if he's right i don't really care right i don't like well you someone said you know i've looked and looked and looked and it turns out that uh you should be able to enslave other individuals i've i've studied the constitution it turns out if you read it the right way the way i interpreted you there's no problem with you going over to your neighbor in enslaving him at gunpoint its legal i will be like oh okay sweet undergo and in enslave my neighbour now right like i don't really care because it was still be it just like you know what i mean or big raikov russianbuilt fides there might be true i'm not gonna do that robots like to talk to the guy at uh sabanilla said there is a bunch of groups involved in that and uh i gotta go down there and and uh can't take a quick tour the place when zinke visited and and uh it's sweet country in there so you had a looks he oh yeah yeah had alexi now did you go down that were you like in the company of uh the various political figures who were gathered downer yes yep yeah so uh i was invited down through in a really a bunch of mutual friends a all of us um and uh the national wildlife federation new mexico chapter um has been a big part of that um back country hundreds niang where's um.

yannick sabanilla zinke hiddink alexi national wildlife federation mexico
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Think about demolishing those properties and have banned working where the forest service for example to set up markets further wood products that are the result of demolition and then they are also looking at how they can set up markets for some of the other building materials like brick and concrete they know we could may be used that experience to inform how we think about recovering products after disasters when you say just real briefly when you say markets who would get the money from those from the sale of those well in the case of baltimore i would invite you to talk to their office of sustainability so i think if the local government owns property and then they would be demolishing the building and they would receive the funds as far as i understand thank you caro for what you do every day to make the planet a better place national wildlife federations climatesmart communities program is an example of the kinds of programmes that are so important today especially with our ageing infrastructure and what new york times columnist thomas friedman calls global weird ing where the weather is just really strange the capone is this stand out for me in the climatesmart program are first of all the rise of what car calls natural based approaches like sand dunes that protect the city or town from the ravages of sea levels using natural resources not manmade resources not a you know a physical wall or something but a wall of sandhu that's pretty cool the second thing the stood out for me is the tool kit that the national wildlife federation developed for city planners and sustainability folks to use to simply speed up their own processes and customize them for the.

baltimore thomas friedman sandhu national wildlife federation new york times
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Funded how to cities what's the practical side of making these things happen so the city's scale is actually the right scale to be thinking about climate adaptation actions because they have direct control over so annoying landuse they are developing comprehensive plans and cities themselves are developing either a climate mitigation plans so plans targeting on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions but there are also developing plan set are focused on how they can prepare for it and respond to the impacts of climate change and so they actually have a number of tools at their disposal so for example into of sr california they are creating greater setbacks and buffers around coastal wetlands because they've identified their vulnerability and know that they can actually provide some flood protection for development as i recall you said that you were developing the national wildlife federation was putting together a tool kit for cds which i think is quite brilliant actually because that was a big question i had was sharing all these great best practices could you tell us a little bit about the tool kit and when it would be available in to home so i am national miler federation we've actually developed a lot of what we call climatesmart conservation resources one of them as a guide to vulnerability assessment three develops for the number of federal agencies and academics and an ngo partners i we actually received an award from the department of interior for that guide which are really excited about but there was an outgrowth of our existing climatesmart work we're putting together a guidebook that is designed to help the cities and towns understand what types of nature based approach as they can use in order to be more resilient from the impacts of climate change and then we're providing examples of things that cities can do that prioritise naturebased approaches to prepare for that in fact there are those impacts and then we give examples of what some cities across the country are already doing as a person had worked for a local government and worked.

greenhouse gas emissions climate change california national wildlife federation
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Welcome to green connections where we help you live green or green and earn green i'm john michaelson find us online on green connections radiocom annan talkers radio network like us on facebook and follow me on twitter john michaelson who is helping you live green work rain earned green we want to hear your ideas for the people that are catching your attention as we face all this extreme weather no matter where you live and the natural disasters and destruction that often accompany them it's important to talk about what cities are doing to have a more resilient infrastructure is your community falling apart from a big storm remember the images of hurricane sandy these disasters have prompted city officials to take action to protect their cities better and make them more resilient we're communities can get back on their feet much more quickly we all want that one person who is on the cutting edge of helping cities with this planning is car reeve who leads the climatesmart communities program at the national wildlife federation i sat down with kara at the national council for science in the environment conference this week about what cities are doing let's listen to my conversation with karmi caro first of all you lear climate smarts programme sounded really fascinating and i'm wondering if you could give us a short description of what that is and how it can benefit cities sure so climatesmart communities program at national wildlife federation as focused on working was cities and towns across the country to help them identify what we call naturebased approaches to help them prepare for and respond to the impacts of climate change and so an example of a naturebased approach would be mean coastal areas we know that sea level rise and storm surge in coastal flooding is already happening and that you know we will it be experiencing those impacts into the future and so naturebased approach would be to think about the vulnerability of coastal wetlands try to enhance them and restore them and and even think about how they might migrate inland and make sure that were allowing further managed to retreat how much to these cost howard.

john michaelson facebook national wildlife federation kara karmi caro climate change howard twitter
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Wow In the World

"In fact inflammation go like he dropped one of those little crystallized packets of pick lemonade at that point the flamingos your yellow because they always rapidly yola neighbor today's you mix it up and then the flamingo's drinking and became pink because the x or jungled you've got there wasn't a mixed up plo is that the actual scientific explanation for why flamingos are pink twelve both percent sure that's that's a pretty high percentage oh i think we need to get to the bottom of this for real david for next spurred why are claiming goes think hey everyone this david mizzou giusti with the national wildlife federation when filming was our young the actually have kale grace feathers flamingos are filter feeders swishing their beaks back and forth through the water filtering out tiny crustaceans shrimp molluscs and algae filled with the nutrients coq betacarotene the the carotene is also thousands of brightlycolored foods is carrots tomatoes pumpkins in sweet potato so as the young birds digest their food they actually absorb absorb the beta carotene and their feathers turned pigs difference looming go species a different parts of the world have different diets and some that he'd a lot of beta carotene turn it all those deep rig in colour while others that get less of it can be almost bite so in the case of flamingos the old saying you are what you is visibly true that's incredible thinks david.

national wildlife federation david mizzou