23 Burst results for "National Wildlife Federation"

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"As well as guns, ammo, and other equipment to pay for conservation. Mike Leahy with the national wildlife federation says that money tends to help the species that hunters and anglers care about, like deer and Elk. There has been this gap in getting enough funding to the species that aren't hunted and fished. A bill that passed the House of Representatives this summer and which has bipartisan support in the Senate would change that. The recovering America's wildlife act calls for spending $1.3 billion a year, a huge increase over existing funding. But it's unclear how the measure would be paid for, and if it will come up for a vote this session. But what he says, if it does, it would also shift the focus towards species that don't get a ton of support right now. Recovering America is a lot of tech brings funding to all wildlife. There is this kind of unheralded crisis in wildlife. And it's a little less well known because it tends to be the less charismatic species. Many conservationists talk about this crisis like flying a plane while slowly removing each bolt, or a game of Jenga, each species lost, weakens whole ecosystems. But Peter patois, the hellbender scientist, sees it differently. If we think about all the unique species on the planet that we go to see on the zoo. We go there to see tigers and lions and elephants and giant tortoises and rare birds. And I think that's the real value of conserving a really rare and unique species. It's a habit there for the future for everybody else to enjoy. He says we should care about wildlife all the time, not just when

Mike Leahy national wildlife federation House of Representatives America Peter patois Senate
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:15 min | 5 months ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I was for sure NPR's Tom Goldman thanks so much You're welcome And you're listening to weekend edition from NPR news Why did the mountain lion cross the road Well that answer might be simpler than how it crossed the road That's the problem that many of Southern California's big cats and coyotes And other wildlife have faced over the years as cities grew in highways expanded California's broken ground on which being billed as the world's largest wildlife crossing more than 200 feet long and spanning over ten lanes of traffic to help animals pass freely and safely themselves Beth Pratt is regional executive director of the California national wildlife federation thanks so much for joining us Thanks for having me Really appreciate being here Well how does this work Do the animals actually like have to push a button to stop traffic and cross or what Yeah we just put a sign up saying wildlife crossing this way and you know They find it You know it's not far off Word gets out in the animal world and we've learned from decades of wildlife costumes what to do to help them get there which is mainly put up fencing to sort of eliminate any other option And we also do a lot of landscaping Help us understand how this problem has grown over the years and might become increasingly difficult for wildlife to get across places Yeah you know when I was coming up in conservation 30 years ago we pretty much the paradigm was You put aside of Yosemite you put aside a wildlife refuge and you kind of create these islands of open space and you check the box We have space for a wildlife and you put the people in other places We now know wildlife large and small need large landscape connectivity to be resilient Just naturally but especially in the faces of things like climate change drought and fire So what you see playing out in the Santa Monica mountains is the population of mountain lions there They have been inbreeding themselves likely to almost out of existence if we didn't do something because they can't get across the freeway to get dates outside their family And we're seeing that same genetic isolation play out though up and down the food chain Should anybody be concerned when you talk about giving them free access That means mountain lions are going to be climbing down from the hills and into swimming pools which I know has been known to happen now and then Actually they already are So angelenos know how to live with mountain lions P 22 is under the Hollywood sign He strolled down sunset boulevard So this crossing actually he's a celebrity in his own right at this point He's the Brad Pitt of the cougar world That's what I call him But yeah we're not lions should be They already are It's not that we're bringing more It's just that we're going to ensure they don't inbreed themselves out of existence And you'll be able to see the results almost immediately I think so They have you know almost 80 to 90% success rates But I've also visited ones where literally they put it up in the deer start using it two days later Crossing in Washington state the deer were trying to use it before it was even done a totally personal question Do you have a tattoo Yes Can you tell us about it Yeah it's a tattoo of P 22 the famous mountain line He's really been our poster puma for this campaign because he is one of the few mountain lions that actually survived crossing two of the three ways in LA the one on one and the four O 5 You know a lot of angelenos can identify with the four O 5 impacting your dating life because you don't want it for you to deal with the traffic and that's what P 22 symbolizes But forgive me I don't know Why the name P 22 Is there P 21 Will there be a P 23 Yeah so P stands for puma which is another name for mountain lion Mountain lions have a number of names so it gets confusing mountain lion panther puma all the same animal He was the 22nd cat tagged in the National Park Service study And they're now up to about a 104 Beth Pratt regional executive director for the California national wildlife federation thanks so much for being with us And thanks for having me Always fun to talk cougars This is in pure news Support for WAB comes from natural body spa and shop offering E gift cards so you.

Tom Goldman NPR news Beth Pratt California national wildlife f NPR Southern California Santa Monica mountains California Brad Pitt swimming Hollywood Washington LA National Park Service
Senate approves Biden land-agency pick over GOP opposition

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Senate approves Biden land-agency pick over GOP opposition

"The Senate has approved president Biden's choice to lead the bureau of land management a longtime environmentalist with a controversial past she's been praised for her dedication to the outdoors but also described as an eco terrorist Republicans sharply criticized Tracy stone manning she's been approved to lead the interior department's bureau of land management on a party line fifty to forty five vote in nineteen eighty nine she was a graduate student at the university of Montana she received immunity from prosecutors and testified against two friends who were convicted of inserting metal spikes into trees in a plot to sabotage a timber sale in Idaho's Clearwater National Forest stone manning had been a top aide to a former governor of Montana anti democratic senator Jon tester who said she did nothing wrong and help put wrongdoers in jail her most recent job has been with the national wildlife federation Jennifer king Washington

President Biden Bureau Of Land Management Tracy Stone Manning Interior Department Senate University Of Montana Clearwater National Forest Sto Senator Jon Tester Idaho Montana National Wildlife Federation Jennifer King Washington
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WBUR

"The eighties, Environmentalists kept losing, they could slow down logging in old growth forests with protests and lawsuits. But In the end, most of it got cut. There just weren't that many laws that protected trees, But there were laws that protected animals. So with the last old growth force on the line, a few conservationists got creative. Aaron Scott from the Timber Wars podcast at Oregon. Public Broadcasting picks it up from here. Environmentalists like to say there is an endangered ecosystems act. But there is an endangered species act. So this idea started percolating that they could protect the old growth forests. By protecting an animal that needed those forests to survive. Fortunately for them, scientists had identified one such animal, the northern spotted owl. The timber industry recognized how dangerous this idea was and tried to nip it in the butt. So it laid on the pressure with politicians, government agencies, even conservation groups like the National Wildlife Federation. The wear. Hauser company had threatened to close all of its lands to hunters and fishermen nationwide. So that was somewhat persuasive because the National Wildlife Federation at that time was mostly Hunters and fishermen. This is Andy Stall. He worked for the National Wildlife Federation, and he was one of the first to want to pursue a strategy saving the northern spotted owl, but his bosses wanted him to drop it so bad they fired him. They fired me on Friday. They rehired me that following Monday, subject to the following constraints You are to make no outgoing phone calls. You're to sign no correspondence. Your to attend. No meetings will continue to pay you to do nothing at all The reasons environmentalists were afraid of going after the.

Aaron Scott Andy Stall National Wildlife Federation Friday Monday Timber Wars Oregon eighties Hauser one first one such animal Broadcasting
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Reveal

"Outlets throughout the eighties. Environmentalists kept losing. They could slow down logging in old growth forests with protests and lawsuits. But in the end most of it got cut there. Just weren't that many laws that protected trees but there were laws that protected animals so with the last old growth force on the line. A few conservationist got creative. Aaron scott from the timber wars podcasts. At oregon public broadcasting picks it up from here environmentalists liked to say there is an endangered ecosystems act but there is an endangered species. Act so this idea started percolating that they could protect the old growth forests by protecting an animal that needed those forests to survive. Fortunately for them. Scientists had identified one such animal the northern spotted owl. The timber industry recognized how dangerous this idea was and tried to nip it in the butt so it laid on the pressure with politicians government agencies even conservation groups like the national wildlife federation. The weyerhaeuser company had threatened to close all of its lands hunters and fishermen nationwide so that was somewhat persuasive because the national wildlife federation at that time was mostly hunters and fishermen. This is andy stall he worked for the national wildlife federation and he was one of the i want to pursue a strategy saving the northern spotted owl but his bosses wanted him to drop it so bad. They fired him. They fired me on friday. They rehired and following monday subject to the following constraints your to make no outgoing phone calls your to sign no correspondence your to attend no meetings. We'll continue to pay you to do nothing at all. The reasons environmentalists were afraid of going after the owl were complicated first off. They were worried that they'd lose. And then they wouldn't have any leverage even if it was just the threat of going to court but in many ways winning was an even bigger fear especially if they use the endangered species act because while the act was passed almost unanimously. The perception was that it was designed to protect big beloved animals. bald eagles. blue whales and things like that. The fear among leading conservationists was that stretching it to apply to things like tiny fish and reclusive birds might get them what they want in the short term but the backlash could lead to the death of the law. There were concerns that the spotted owl was a bridge too far and that it would bring down the whole endangered species act and environmentalism. Writ large would die. But andy.

national wildlife federation Aaron scott andy stall weyerhaeuser oregon bald eagles andy
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Erin's got from the Timber Wars podcast at Oregon Public Broadcasting. Picks it up from here. Environmentalists like to say there isn't an endangered ecosystems act, but there is an endangered species act. So this idea started percolating that they could protect the old growth forests. Protecting an animal that needed those forests to survive. Fortunately for them, scientists had identified one such animal, the northern spotted owl. The timber industry recognized how dangerous this idea Woz and tried to nip it in the butt. So it laid on the pressure with politicians, government agencies, even conservation groups like the National Wildlife Federation, the warehouses, ER company had threatened to close all of its lands to hunters and fishermen nationwide. So that was somewhat persuasive because the National Wildlife Federation at that time was mostly Hunters and fishermen. This is Andy Stall. He worked for the National Wildlife Federation, and he was one of the first to want to pursue a strategy saving the northern spotted owl, but his bosses wanted him to drop it so bad they fired him. They fired me on Friday. They rehired me than following Monday, subject to the following constraints. You are to make no outgoing phone calls. You're designed no correspondence. Your to attend. No meetings will continue to pay you to do nothing at all The reasons environmentalists were afraid of going after the owl were complicated. First off, they were worried that they'd lose and then they wouldn't have any leverage even if it was.

Friday Andy Stall National Wildlife Federation Oregon Public Broadcasting Monday Erin Timber Wars ER first First one one such animal
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Families living on the margins. children should not be hungry. They should have safe secure housing. They should have access to quality education. Some twenty two percent of missouri household with children said they felt down depressed or hopeless in recent weeks. Finally are andrew. Sears tells us about conservation groups who say encouraging more people go hunting and fishing is vital to keeping conservation efforts alive until recently. The number of people who hunt or fish has both in pennsylvania and nationwide and yet most state wildlife management is funded by hunting and fishing licenses and taxes on firearms and ammunition in the keystone state. Those fees make up more than half of the state game commissions revenue. But samantha pedder with the council to advance hunting and shooting sports notes. Participation in hunting has been declining since the nineteen eighty s the lower the number people participating galore fund derive is fine conservation. The loss of a hundred on the landscape is detrimental to conservation in pennsylvania. Petr has been working with artists project of the national wildlife federation to help raise the number of women who hunt and fish. This is my clifford and thank you for wrapping up your week with public. Do servicemember listener supported. Heard on great radio stations across the.

samantha pedder Sears missouri pennsylvania andrew Petr national wildlife federation clifford
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"The ownership the understanding amongst our young people. They have something to be proud of as shown me rapple or whatever as we as buffalo people we will heal as we restore this animal to our communities. Whether that's taking a young person to see the buffalo and take a piece of hair from that awful or is being able take muffler. Burger bustle steak or being able to learn how to tend to hide or be able to go into a ceremony news. Those arts of that buffalo for the purposes of ashdown down from our elders and so the effort is not only about social revitalization because then buffalo as people when it's also ecological restoration off low as a keystone species as a keystone species. They benefit almost every other organism on the landscape from birds do insects and butterflies mammals like very dolls and badgers black inserts. Certain sees need buffalo hair for their age to re soroti to beijing. Temperature also many plants because buffalo or graham annoyed feeders they brasses leave the forbes species to will which increases biodiversity and many those forbes or traditionally used us codes tools and medicines and so that buffalo promotes not only the animal and plant biodiversity but it also makes things available because of their behavior. They create these walls because of the dust bathing behavior in. Its is incredibly important. Water accumulation create ephemeral pools. A water a buffalo has seven times. The haired per square inch is a cow and they have twice the surface area on their teeth and they can control their metabolism so that they can eat less already forage. They don't congregate in riparian areas so lots of their behaviors of buffalo's beneficial to the landscape and if we're talking about ecological restoration as opposed to prioritizing agricultural on public lands are of the clans in the west would benefit of lost mammy as the keystone species to improve the ecological dirty. Yes you're tying. The story of how they annihilated the buffalo populations there's this one really iconic image of this mountain of bison skulls and as you were talking about it. It's like the second time. I've heard you talk about it but it just i still have that same tight feeling in my belly where. I'm just so disappointed but angry. But then now you're talking about how you've been able to reintroduce all of these keystone species within your ancestral lands like that is a really uplifting story. And they're not like you said not very many reservations. That have been able to do that. So how have you been able to do that to help. Bring or restored. The lands to i guess as close as possible to their original state. Prior to colonization is like one or two factors. That have made possible. Were a long way from being where we need to be. But we're taking steps in the right direction. This effort could have never worked without partnership and collaboration. The national wildlife federation is the largest member based conservation organization in the us but only in the last twenty years or so has that organization recognized and prioritized supporting tribes since supporting sovereignty and self determination of tribes. And so the financial resources needed to get to where we are in osler out that there's also organizations like to intertribal buffalo council which is a membership of sixty nine tribes that assists tribes in bison restoration. Those two entities have been incredibly important in this effort witnessing the restoration of Bighorn sheep as a kid. It really helped me understand. What a wildlife restoration efforts. She looked like that is the goal when we capture animals in their habitat and they bring them to their new habitat and let him go now because of that paradigm aching about in terms of buffalo. A wildlife restoration wouldn't work because of their classification as wildlife is buffalo in united states are considered. Stop unless they're in the national parks there sensually still not wildlife because they can't leave the boundaries. There's we centralists offense in. So that's a policy change in that takes some time and effort but in order to get buffalo on the ground and to make some headway in thinking one hundred thirty one years to get buffalo restored on behalf tribe because of that we have to work on that paradigm shift frown people. Who so she shawnee tribe said. Let's start small and will expand from there so we can go and community support more ship round. It's we started on three hundred aged and that is still early. We're buffalo are hundred acres but the next step is to allow them to exist on sixty seven thousand acres that would be a significant increase in the land base. However it's not where we need to be in five or ten years because we have more habitat on this vegetation and what's even available for the buffalo yellowstone. We have hundreds of thousands of acres in the wind river mountains to the west and alberic mountains to the north where we have summer and winter range habitat that would be available for buffalo now in nineteen eighty-four when our game was established. Buffalo were not included in that language likely because the leadership at that time could never seen that we would have buffalo and so today we are working to implement language specific to buffalo conservation in our tribal inquiry into our law so that they can be managed as wildlife but also designated as wildlife under our that law supersedes the state and so there's controversy. There's conflict in terms of that distinguishment but we have the ability to do that. In government the other thing is our law enforcement and so if we are able to expand the sixty seven thousand acres that is currently being raised by cal some some tribal cow operators and so we want to create financial incentives wants individuals so through the national wildlife federation raise money to provide financial incentive for those scattered reasons to change their raising permit to elsewhere. And so that. It's a win win. Not listen the awful would also land raising.

Buffalo intertribal buffalo buffalo yellowstone national wildlife federation united states ashdown beijing graham
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"What can happen right now I'm Suzanne Potter and finally Laura Brow Telam tells us if you're feeling lazy about leaves piling up on your property experts say well, you shouldn't. Even, those leads can help you environment wildlife according to many conservation groups didn't miss a juicy is a natural, the National Wildlife Federation he's as leading some lease stand. The ground is cost effective since he become a natural fertilizer but also leaves in trash are a big problem leaves according to the EPA, make up about thirteen percent of the solid waste but ends up.

National Wildlife Federation Laura Brow Telam Suzanne Potter EPA
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Many trips you make to the doctor. He says for minorities it also depends on whether you feel your community as safe your level of education immigration status whether you're air and water is clean and levels of stress getting more access to the doctor is not going to solve everything. The state needs to address all those other things outside the doctor's office that affect health a higher percentage of non whites also say the state government should address economic and living conditions as public health priorities. I'm Russ Brown. Finally Eric, Glutton's reports. Water is the lifeblood of the West but a warm climate and other factors have put Colorado's lakes, reservoirs and ponds at greater risk for toxic Algal blooms. Bryan Curtis L. With the National Wildlife Federation says a recent rash of Blue Green cyanobacteria blooms and Colorado are more than just an eyesore. They're dangerous for people, pets and wildlife. He says leaders at all levels of government need to confront the outbreaks. Root causes that the climate change whether that be nutrient pollution and we need them to have the clarity of purpose that is on par with the clarity that we want in our water. This is my Clifford for public news service. We are a member illustre supported and online at public news service DOT Org coast time ahead of us. But if we are to be prepared for it, we must I shed our fear of it. I spend. Without fear because I remember. I. Remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember that one hundred years of caught these machines. And after a century of war I, remember that. We still. Remember..

Bryan Curtis L. Colorado National Wildlife Federation Russ Brown DOT Org Glutton Eric
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KCRW

"It difficult for those of us who live on the Gulf Coast gives us less time to evacuate. It also is less time for industry to prepare to shut down things and make things safe before evacuating workers, right. Exactly and dozens of major refineries and facilities that manufacture solvents and even the raw materials that were used to manufacture surgical masks and medical gloves. They were in the path of Hurricane Laura. So When the storm was approaching a lot of those facilities. They shut down as you said for safety, but shutting down a refinery or chemical plant. It often means releasing a lot of extra pollution. Basically, they burn off fuel and chemicals that can't safely sit inside pipes. And so, according to just the preliminary data reported by companies themselves, they released more than four million extra pounds of pollution even before the storm arrived. Wow. What does that mean for the people who live near those facilities? Well, it's really bad. All that extra pollution is bad for the health and safety of people who are already living with dirtier than average air and water, even when there isn't a storm, a lot of public health officials and climate scientists who I've spoken to in the last week they pointed out that Hurricane Laura is a perfect example of how people who are already vulnerable are more likely a little on the frontlines of climate change. Like this is how Mustaffa Ali put it. He was a longtime EPA official networks for the National Wildlife Federation have sacrifices owns a crossed the Gulf Coast, their community color and lower well of communities that are often pushed into Our most dangerous locations, and they're dangerous because they're near industrial pollution dangerous because they're in the path of more and more damaging hurricanes and dangerous Because of the combination of the two when Hurricane slams into industry like it did last week, it releases things that are just bad for people's health. That's.

Hurricane Laura Gulf Coast Mustaffa Ali Hurricane National Wildlife Federation EPA official
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Just wanna thank you for tuning in to a garden America. Hopefully, our program is informative. Think we all learned a lot with our guest each week again? Brian Main, John Bagnasco, Tiger Palafox, and this has just been Good, really good. So far, Tiger in terms of what is going on out there and what we all need to do to preserve wildlife and David. Thank you very much for joining us this morning, and we will be wrapping up here soon. But there was one question that I forgot to ask from one of our listeners, which is very timely right now being in California with the wildfires. She has. And this might seem like a simple questions for is where do the animals go during a wildfire? I'm sure they just go away from it. But at the end of the day, you've removed them from their home. They get displaced. What we're do. The animals go during a wildfire. What happens to these creatures that were in this forest? I wish I had a something we're positive to say about this, but it's pretty horrific. The animals, many of them cannot. Get away. You know a bird to fly away. A bigger animal like a deer can run. But you know, most of our wildlife are small. They can you know they're not mobile. And so many. Many, many animals perish in these horrific wildfires and those that do get away from the flames oftentimes have no habitat to go back to and they starvation and burns and smoke inhalation. You know, And this is a huge, huge problem. These these wildfires are being fueled by our actions by climate change by habitat destruction by a whole host of other things that we're doing, and so again, the National Wildlife Federation and doing a lot of work in those spaces, particularly in California, So if you are interested in supporting that work so we can stop these intense wildfires from happening in the first place. Definitely check out the National Wildlife Federation and look up our California region and there's there's a way that he could get mauled. Definitely, definitely. And so you before the break. I had mentioned there were some great ways to support the organization and our listeners. David believe in posting, You know, I buy. I buy the Christmas gift every year for the grand kids, and I buy a subscription to the Ranger Rick program for my kids and things like that are they've been putting this online. There's a lot of great ways to support it in terms of, you know. Buying Christmas gifts that will then goes for his donations. The Ranger Rick program, just simple donations, you know, you mentioned, you know, there's while wildfire efforts for the organization as well, So you know, definitely. If you go to the website, there's donate. Now there's and then there's other things that you could do and then the books also that you guys have on there's help support. Your organization is well, right, David That's right. And I appreciate there's a shoutout help support our work. We are a national nonprofit organization where a member organization so most of our our funding comes from just regular folks making that $20 donation every year. But you know if you don't want to do that, and just become a direct member Again, giving that subscription to Ranger Rick Magazine goes to support our work buying a copy of my book, which is called the tracking birds, butterflies and other backyard wildlife. The proceeds of that go to support our work you can become an activist you could become involved are you know our policy side of things you can become involved by planting a wildlife garden, which is what we're talking about. Today. There's just so many different ways. That you can get involved in the effort and engage in our programs on the National Wildlife Federation. Whether it's making a donation, sending an email to your elected officials were planning a wildlife garden. It all counts. And you just mentioned sending an email to your elected officials. One of our listeners, Rick just commented on construction in his area, and how You know, city planners should be more proactive in setting of open space and allowing for that, So that's a great way to make that effort is sending the letter to you like that. There's now some organizations. Do you guys have prepared letters already that people can just use for that kind of stuff is well. Absolutely. After you go to our website again and ws dot award on DH you at the very top of the website. There's a bunch of links up there about, you know, taking action getting involved. There's a lot of different ways that you couldn't do that again. And, you know, it seems like it's not a big thing, Tio sort of sign on to a letter from a conservation organisation, but these things do make a difference. And elected officials do pay attention when they hear from their constituents, even if it's through a conservation group on and we also have a sister organization that does get a little bit more involved politically, which is called national Wildlife Action, and definitely Google that and you, Khun again get highly involved in sort of more activist oriented activities Get contacting elected officials. And I love the idea of working locally at that level two and being an activist. You know, we at the National Wildlife Federation at a national organization, you know, we can't get you don't have the bandwidth to get involved in local zoning ordinances and whatnot. But you all can write one of the things that plagues our communities are really militants. Landsea ordinances and Hou rules about you know that you have to have a long and how you know down right? And that is one of the reasons why all the wildlife the butterflies, birds, bees are all disappearance. So get involved locally, and I'll be an advocate for native plants in your community again. You can have beautiful garden spaces that support the wildlife. They don't have to be ugly and weedy and over ground. But if we have to, we're mandated Tomoe and spray everything out of existence.

National Wildlife Federation David California national Wildlife Action Ranger Rick Magazine smoke inhalation America Tiger Palafox Brian Main Rick Hou Tomoe Google John Bagnasco Khun
Sierra Club Denounces Founder John Muir For Racism

Environment: NPR

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Sierra Club Denounces Founder John Muir For Racism

"A historic icon of the American environmental. Movement is in the spotlight John Muir founded the Sierra Club in eighteen, ninety two in San Francisco. The group's current leaders says the ongoing civil rights protests, leading to the dismantling of confederate monuments is causing the Sierra Club to reexamine its own racist history NPR's Kirk. Siegler reports. The group is pledging to remove some of its own John Maher statues. John Muir has long been revered by environmentalists. The California naturalists Biblical love. Wild places led to a legacy of federal wilderness protections, including Yosemite National Park, but mirror was also well known for making derogatory comments about blacks and native people and the modern conservation movement has wrestled for years with these transgressions in a letter to the Sierra clubs members today, current Director Michael Brune said this moment. Moment is a time to reexamine. The clubs own substantial role in perpetuating white supremacy. Bruins says the group will reconsider the views of some of its founders that lead to the modern movement being so white today when it comes to John Muir, we're looking to advance the conversation about yours legacy to look at him in a more comprehensive and inclusive way. That acknowledges his limitations. Limitations and shortcomings, the Sierra Club says it's considering removing some monuments to its founders. Brune is also pledging that the group will reorganize to ensure that a majority of its leadership is comprised of people of Color, and he hopes to spend five million dollars on diversifying their staff and training. The announcement was welcomed by Mustafa Santiago Ali of the National Wildlife Federation. You know it's long overdue. Overdue we have to address the sins of the past. He's one of the few people of Color who's actually in a leadership position in a major environmental group that major sin of the past, many of those folks felt that those spaces those natural spaces, those sacred spaces where meant for white men Ali says the modern day environmental movements lack of diversity in its writ large. Of Communities of color has had major consequences, one example, industrial facilities are often put in underserved neighborhoods and pollution from them as drifting into national parks like those John Muir fought to establish. Kirk, siegler NPR

John Muir Sierra Club Michael Brune Mustafa Santiago Ali Kirk John Maher Siegler Sierra Clubs San Francisco Yosemite National Park National Wildlife Federation NPR Bruins Director
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

The Town Haul

09:07 min | 2 years ago

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish school. So I believe you know similar to Liz. I grew up outdoors playing all the time spending all day in the summertime that we would be out as soon as the sun was up and become home. You know. As soon as it was starting to get dark I grew up camping. You know we would go to the closest national park to win where we grew up was Shenandoah National Park here in Virginia and I still live in this area in that area. So we we go to the park all the time. It's beautiful and so I take my little girl there as well So just growing up. We spent a Lotta time outdoors. I really enjoyed seeing wildlife and spending time and hiking and going to the beach and searching for seashells and that sort of thing when I graduated college. Actually a little bit. Before I graduated college I went on a trip to Andros Island. The Bahamas in it's a family island in the Bahamas and I went to a field station their biological field station and that is where I spent the next six years of my life. After College I worked at the field station. I worked with college. Students and high school high school students helping down learn about ecology and learning field skills in that type of thing and that really helped me really understand value of hands on learning. So you know whenever you education as you know there's sitting in the classroom and learning there is value to that there's also value to being out in the field learning skills. You know the experiential part of that and so. When after that after I left the field station I worked for nonprofit for a little bit in the environmental security sector and that really looked at conflict around natural resources so water timber diamonds was another example and that that was looking at conflicts most likely outside the US. And then. When I started looking for a new opportunity I was really attracted to. Nwf's education programs. We have a very large education program. National Wildlife Federation engaging. Little kids all the way up through adults and so that is kind of what got me hooked at. Nwf and applied for a job on the campus sustainability team. And so I've been here since two thousand three. That's awesome okay so I will let you guys now kind of feel these answer. You know whoever wants to answer white and build upon each other's responses in we're going to focus a lot on education recycle mania but you know the. Nwf Is a massive umbrella brand for a lot of different environmental conservation causes. So I did want to do a little bit of background about the mission. You know the strategic plan the six pillars of what makes the NWF and then we can get into the specs of the educational programs so whoever wants to field kind of the overall NWF mission answer can A. I'll go again and you know the midst of NWF is really to unite ensure that wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world and There's no doubt in all of our minds and these days that our world is rapidly changing whether it's with this pandemic Like we're facing right now or the pack that more than one third of Americans. Fish and wildlife are at risk for extinction or the climate crisis. And of course all of these impacts what the impacts are on any of our marginalized communities so you recently. I just wanted to mention this because I think it's really important and it really sets the stage who I believe. Nwf is particularly right now and our it was CEO Calling Amarah who recently said that we need to be leading this charged with compassion. You know during this time because this pandemic is clearly showing that men. There are many structural inequalities in our societies such as access to clean water food healthcare or the

National Wildlife Federation LIZ Christie Europe Shenandoah National Park Youtube Jones Rubicon Oregon Andros Island Bahamas Lake Champlain Basin Vermont United States Director Greensboro Official Virginia Ceo Calling Amarah
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

The Town Haul

04:53 min | 2 years ago

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today thank you. I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish

National Wildlife Federation Christie Europe Youtube LIZ Lake Champlain Basin Vermont Oregon Jones Rubicon Director Greensboro Kathy Lake Official Partner
Ten years later, BP oil spill continues to harm wildlife, especially dolphins

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Ten years later, BP oil spill continues to harm wildlife, especially dolphins

"Now to New Orleans marking the ten year anniversary of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico marine life there is still suffering the national wildlife federation says dolphins continue seeing much lower birth rates since the spill with alarming numbers of mothers delivering dead or sick newborns a decade later still learn in sick babies and various effects of the toxicity in dolphins Gulf of Mexico restoration director David muses as endangered sea turtles and whales also died at high rates in the years after the spill with ongoing impacts there probably will continue to be facts for quite

New Orleans National Wildlife Federation Director David Muses Gulf Of Mexico Mexico
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on KOMO

"Just because you're stuck at home doesn't mean you can never leave the house in fact you might want to do more than just go out on the porch you want to think about reconnecting with nature that's what the national wildlife federation naturalist David messages he recommends you might have seen him on the Conan o'brien show the Wendy Williams show and the today show he's also hosted shows on Animal Planet nat geo wild David is also an author and blogger he's got a degree in human and natural ecology from Emory University David good morning and welcome the first light good morning thanks for having me David this is national wildlife week it's a big week for folks like you how do you celebrate a week like this well the national wildlife federation has been posting national wildlife week since nineteen thirty eight and really it's a it's a week where we try to get everybody to focus on the amazing wild animals that share this country with us and hopefully get outdoors and connect with nature now in past years we've tried to get people to you know travel and go to the national parks and you have gather in groups outside which is not a good thing to do right now while we're all under the you know quarantine compilation from the the pandemic so instead what we're hoping folks will do this national wildlife week is experience the nature a little bit closer to home because the reality is the natural world is all around us even outside our own doors and in our own neighborhoods and as long as folks are again following other recommendations for physical and social distancing not getting you know in in crowds or getting closer than sixty two people that you're you're not living with its IT is safe and okay to get outdoors I would recommend wearing a mask obviously where wash your hands but it's spring what a perfect time to again just go outside get some fresh air listen to the sound of the birds who are migrating right now look for the early either out at flowers and it in really restore our our hearts and our souls right now when we're also stressed so that's what we're focusing on for national wildlife week this year might be the the time that we needed the most in fact you're saying you just go out and plant a tree just that easy well yes so if folks go to the.

David national wildlife federation Conan o'brien Wendy Williams Emory University
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"I'm not sure how that old necessarily link with my studies but you know for me. I think it's That's able to be separated. I think a lot of people busy people have jobs and not all of them are related to climate change but not everybody can be a climate activist. So that's kind of my mindset going to college and you've been here with US lobby one of about fifteen students here on this Friday morning and I'm getting to be a weekly thing around here where you folks are. Making repeated performance are rather appearance on. I guess somewhat of a performance on Friday mornings and and tell me is going to continue with this throughout the rest of the legislative session. Yeah absolutely. It's an early excited about. I think as as a group youth lobby really believes that were just having a constant presence in the State House is really important make sure I representatives of the legislature really knows that the youth is is serious. We're really serious about this. We're GONNA continue being here. We're going to continue lobbying for climate action As quick as possible so being here every Friday is a major part of that. We mentioned the. You're a student at the Vermont. Common School in South Burlington. Has that school? Been Supportive of you taken these days to come down to the Montvale. Your yeah they really definitely have. I think they're they're super happy to allow me to enable me to come down here to be climate activist and I really appreciate it from them. It's been a lot of fun the What about your folks? Are you thinking about what you're doing? I think my folks I'll really like it. Yeah part of know one of the reasons that I kinda came down this path in my life is my dad has been a lifelong climate activists. he works for the National Wildlife Federation and that was kind of one of my first intros into the world of climate justice climate action climate change. And so I imagine. He's very supportive and Yeah it's been great your sense of what's going to happen to the legislation here..

Common School National Wildlife Federation US Vermont Burlington State House
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Since I was born and it's now come to the point where in a disaster mode because our watery contaminated mckinney says many people have to use rundown coal camp water systems that were never kept up and then abandoned when coal companies folded did. She says the water that runs through these systems when they run it all picks up contaminants putting health and daily living in jeopardy for public news service. I'm Diane Bernardo reported a new interactive map from the National Wildlife Federation called unnatural disasters shows. Climate change in combination with other factors is putting at least one million plant and animal species around the world at risk of extinction according to Ed Perry with the Federation's Climate Crisis Campaign in Pennsylvania Selena figures from last year show some of those impacts are hitting very close to home. It's affected our state. Fish the brook trout and our state bird word rough grouse. He says heavy rain destroys trout habitat and leave standing water where mosquitoes can breed spreading West Nile virus that kills many bird species. He's there are economic impacts from climate change as well. The federation's map says by October there had been ten weather and climate related events nationwide exceeding one one billion dollars in losses in twenty nineteen alone. I'm Andrea Sears. Reporting this is PMS. According to the BBC The central Chinese and he's government is responding to the landside victory for Pro Democracy candidates in local Hong Kong Council elections by stating that the city will always be ruled from Beijing and warning against further protests numerous. US states are trying to impose work requirements on healthy adults in Medicaid. Waivers have been approved in sixty nine or pending and three have been set aside by the cords in Michigan. Healthcare advocates are now suing health policy analyst. Enlist the Michigan League for public policy in Bella. Zehr contends Medicaid should not be altered in a way that makes it punitive or ineffective. Folks are really already working and potentially have very legitimate reasons for why they are not working and this just adds an additional barrier that is not necessary estimates based on how similar work requirements played out. Arkansas show between sixty one thousand and one hundred eighty three thousand Michigan residents could lose coverage Mary. Sherman reporting farming and conservation groups in the Mid West are deeply concerned over the unintended impacts from the herbicide die Cambe regulators in Arkansas recently absolutely relaxed the rules on its use critics say it's damaging vulnerable crops trees and wildlife while they are calling for several changes in the regulations the primary concern earn is with a one mile buffer zone placed on its use Dan showman conservation director with Audubon. Arkansas says dicamba is causing significant damage outside that zone which which he believes should be expanded. There was apparent. I can the symptoms on native plants all across Eastern Arkansas. And a lot of the places where we found that damage damage was within two miles mark. Richardson reporting in Illinois. Observers are especially concerned that native trees are collateral damage from Die Cambe retired Tired Illinois state biologist. Martin Kemper says. They're seeing injuries to Dr Woods. Oak Sycamore and other native trees and plants. We're seeing a serious decline in a health mini trees and we've crossed mortality for some trees. Take a long time to grow any of the oak trees that are being injured are keystone species. They provide declines for. Well I I nest or very important food. Sources volunteers with one monitoring effort Illinois say they've documented more than one hundred cases of off target herbicide damage to native trees freeze as well as wildflowers food. Crops Willie Murphy might be eighty two but the Rochester New York grandmother can still dead lift more than two hundred pounds pounds and works out every day at the local Y.. When a drunk twenty eight year old man broke into her house? Murphy grabbed a table. She told a local news news station..

National Wildlife Federation Arkansas Illinois Michigan Medicaid mckinney Willie Murphy Audubon Diane Bernardo Ed Perry West Nile US Andrea Sears Sherman Die Cambe Mid West Michigan League Beijing
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Run it all picks up contaminants putting health and daily living in jeopardy ready for public news service. I'm Diane Bernard reported a new interactive map from the National Wildlife Federation called unnatural disasters shows climate. I'm a change in combination with other factors putting at least one million plant and animal species around the world at risk of extinction according to Ed Perry with the Federation's nations climate crisis campaign in Pennsylvania figures from last year show some of those impacts are hitting very close to home. It's affected our state. Fish the brook trout. In our state bird rough grouse he says heavy rain destroys trout habitat and leave standing water where mosquitoes can breed spreading West Nile L. virus that kills many bird species there are economic impacts from climate change is well the federation's map says by October. There had been ten weather and climate climate related events nationwide exceeding one billion dollars in losses in twenty nineteen alone. I'm Andrea Sears. Reporting this is P. N. S.. According to the BBC The central Chinese government is responding to the landside victory for Pro Democracy candidates in local Hong Kong Council elections by by stating that the city will always be ruled from Beijing and warning against further protests. Numerous US states are trying to impose work requirements art on healthy adults in Medicaid. Waivers have been approved in six dates. Niner pending and three have been set aside by the courts in Michigan. Healthcare advocates are are now suing health policy analyst with the Michigan League for Public Policy Amber Bellas Air Contends Medicaid should not be altered in a way that makes it punitive or ineffective. Folks are really already working and potentially have very legitimate reasons for why they are not working and this just adds an additional barrier that is it's not necessary estimates based on how similar work requirements played out in Arkansas. Show that between sixty one thousand one hundred. Eighty three thousand Michigan residents could lose coverage judge. Mary Sherman reporting farming and conservation groups in the Mid West are deeply concerned over the unintended impacts from the herbicide die Cambe Cambe regulators in Arkansas recently relaxed the rules on its use and critics say it's damaging vulnerable crops trees and wildlife while they're calling for several real changes in the regulations. The primary concern is with a one mile buffer zone placed on. Its use Dan. Sherman Conservation Director with Audubon. Arkansas says Campbell is causing being significant damage outside that zone which he believes should be expanded. There was apparent. I can the symptoms on native plants all across Eastern Arkansas. And a lot of the places where we found that damage was within two miles. Mark Richardson reporting in Illinois. Observers are especially concerned that native trees collateral damage from diconsa retired Illinois state. Biologists Martin Kemper says they're seeing injuries to dogwoods sick Moore's and other native trees implants. We're seeing a serious decline in the health of mini trees and we've crossed the threshold of mortality for some three. Take a long time to grow any of the trees that are being injured are keystone species. Sleep provide the orange or well organised a very important food sources volunteers with one monitoring.

Arkansas National Wildlife Federation Michigan Medicaid Audubon Ed Perry Diane Bernard Mary Sherman Campbell Illinois Andrea Sears US Mid West Sherman Conservation Martin Kemper Pennsylvania Beijing BBC
Wild turkeys: A conservation (and hunting) success story

Joel Riley

00:38 sec | 3 years ago

Wild turkeys: A conservation (and hunting) success story

"The recovery of the wild Turkey population in North America is booming states like Connecticut in her moderated wiped off the face of the planet in the eighteen hundreds and yet today in other back and almost every state in their historical range tellin Ameriprise it into the national wildlife federation says in the nineteen thirties there were fewer than thirty thousand but today there are over seven million he calls it the greatest success story in wildlife conservation in the country a lot of it coming back to good habitat I mean there's dedicated funding that sportsmen in particular pay find XFX and different quit meant the dense undergoing specifically to conservation programs and so we've done a good job

North America Connecticut National Wildlife Federation XFX
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Bernard reported a new interactive map from the National Wildlife Federation called unnatural disasters shows. Climate change in combination with other factors is putting at least one million plant and animal species around the world at risk of extinction. According to Perry with the Federation's climate crisis campaign in Pennsylvania figures from last year show some of those impacts are hitting very close to home. It's affected our state. Fish the brook trout and our our state bird the rough grouse he says heavy rain destroys trout habitat and leave standing water where mosquitoes can breed spreading West Nile virus that kills many bird species there are economic impacts from climate change as well the federation's map says by October there had been ten weather and climate related events nationwide lied exceeding one billion dollars in losses in twenty one thousand nine hundred alone. I'm Andrea Sears. Reporting this is PMS. According to the BBC The the central Chinese government is responding to the landslide victory for pro democracy candidates in local Hong Kong Council elections by stating that the city will will always be ruled from Beijing and warning against further protests. Numerous states are trying to impose work requirements on healthy adults Medicaid Medicaid. Waivers have been approved in six dates nine or pending and three have been set aside by the courts in Michigan. Healthcare advocates are now suing health policy analyst with the Michigan League public policy. Ember Bella Zehr contends Medicaid should not be altered in a way that makes punitive or ineffective folks are really already working and potentially have very legitimate reasons for why they are not working and this just adds an additional barrier that is not necessary estimates commits based on how similar work requirements played out in Arkansas. Show that between sixty one thousand one hundred. Eighty three thousand Michigan residents could lose coverage Mary. Sherman reporting reporting farming and conservation groups in the Midwest are deeply concerned over the unintended impacts from the herbicide Dyke Cambe regulators in in Arkansas recently relaxed the rules on its use and critics say it's damaging vulnerable crops trees and wildlife. They're calling for several changes in the regulations. The primary concern is with a one mile buffer zone placed on its use Dan Shaima and conservation director with Audubon. Arkansas says dicamba is causing significant damage outside. I'd that zone which he believes should be expanded airways apparent. I Cam the symptoms on native plants. All across eastern Arkansas and a lot of the places where we found around that damage was within two miles. Mark Richardson reporting in Illinois. Observers are especially concerned that native trees are collateral damage from Cambe retired Illinois state. Biologists Martin Kemper says they're seeing injuries to dogwoods Oaks sick. Moore's and other native trees and plants. We're seeing serious decline in the health of mini trees. We've crossed the threshold of mortality for some trees. Take a long time to grow. Any of the oak trees that are being injured are keystone species for they provide declines for for wildlife organised import food sources volunteers with one monitoring effort mill..

Arkansas National Wildlife Federation Medicaid Michigan Dan Shaima Audubon Bernard Illinois Andrea Sears Perry Bella Zehr West Nile Cambe Pennsylvania Michigan League Beijing Midwest Martin Kemper
"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

20:45 min | 3 years ago

"national wildlife federation" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Warning got a good full show lined up for the for you to today we're going to be the later hour of the program talking with Jim Murphy the National Wildlife Federation in the Dave Ramsey show mortar follow the CBS News at the bottom of the hour.

Jim Murphy National Wildlife Federation CBS News Dave Ramsey