5 Burst results for "National War Garden Commission"

"national war garden commission" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:15 min | 6 months ago

"national war garden commission" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Thank you. Sponsor. Yes, Thank you. Okay. So, of course, perhaps Obviously the idea of people who are not farmers by trade growing small, edible gardens at home to supplement the food they buy from people who are farmers. That's not new. That's not a new shiny idea. Germany, for example, started a movement of gardens for the poor. In the 18 sixties, the burgeoning industrialization and urbanization without the proper like agricultural infrastructure had created this, this lack of access to good fresh food in these growing urban areas. Um, these are still around today. They're sometimes called Schreiber Garden for physician Moritz Traber, who campaigned for them also sometimes called allotment gardens. Some of the first widespread urban gardening for sustenance movements in the United States, though, happened, starting in 18 93 with the coming of the panic, which was this massive Economic depression. Lots of folks, especially in big cities were unemployed and we're hungry. Over in Detroit, then Mayor Hayes in Ping Gry. Didn't look it up. But that's a great name. Hazan Pingree started what he called a potato patch program where in the city allocated vacant land, two families for growing food. Than three years, 1700 families have covered 400 acres with food gardens. It helped that a lot of the unemployed were recent immigrants who have been farmers over in central Europe. Other cities picked up the Detroit plan to like New York City and Philly. There were also school gardens that sprung up during the progressive era. That's 80 93 1920, though. Yeah, they really got started after the turn of the 20th century, And these were these thieves, gardening programs for urban kids. And these gardens were thought to build strong world character. Keep kids out of trouble. Improved health make areas more beautiful and also Americanized immigrants. In the US when we say Victory Garden what we typically are referring to what we're thinking of our public and private gardens planted during World War one and World War two. Some historian specifically pinpoint one businessman in particular, Charles a Land trip pack. Your portly got the idea before the war, suggesting it as a way to lessen stress on American food ways. After riots broke out in New York due to food shortages, Yeah, 1916 was ah, year of crop shortages around the world. And and so a lot of a lot of folks again, especially in urban areas were hurting. Once World War One was underway. Pack organized the National War Garden Commission, though they were not officially affiliated with the U. S government and the government was not a fan of this impact believe that media messaging was the way to accomplish more widespread gardening. He allegedly came up with the idea to call these gardens Victory Gardens himself. Yeah, And that was as the war was coming to an end. They were called War Gardens or Liberty Gardens through through the end of World War one. War garden sounds so much more intense garden Garden of War, tomato of blight. That's like what it is. Ah, I'm imagining to, uh How neighbors opposing neighbors comparing their gardens to throwing some shade like what you got growing over there. Either I know is popular in some games to garden competitively, so no sure. Yeah. More garden would really up to it if we called it that So these victory gardens went up everywhere. Churches, parks, playgrounds, backyards, as the name suggests, they served not only as a way to relieve stress put on the food supply, but as a way to rev up patriotism and support for the war effort. It was a way to make people at home feel like they were doing their part. Soldiers of the soil was a popular phrase. Mm hmm. People they really got into it. Yeah, yeah. President Woodrow Wilson appointed Herbert Hoover to head the U. S. Food Administration during World War one and this position made him responsible for exporting importing, purchasing and storing food. So in 1917 just after the U. S entered World War one. Whoever helped launch the U. S School Garden Army on a national program that lauded of God in for every child and every child in a garden, um and on And this is where that soldiers of the soil thing came in that this was marketing. To youth, encouraging them to grow their munitions plants there. Oh, my God. They're gardens everywhere, producing as much ammunition or food as possible. Like garden furrows were called trenches. It was a whole thing. Um and, uh It was successful. There were 1300 school Gardens just in Los Angeles. Wow, urban and suburban communities like Got into it. Some 2.5 million kids were involved all told. Saying, And it wasn't just kids. Some three million families planted food gardens in 1917, and that number rose to over five million by 1918 there there was just a lot of propaganda. Um, uh, tear in your reserves and preserves. Uh, every kitchen, a canning factory and Back up the cannon with a canner. Uh, yeah, yeah, I got an L O l o home. Production of food was worth some $525 million, though, So all of that good, good pun writing was come coming in handy. Well, it is so funny to me that and I'm not immune to it at all. You get a good name. You turn it into like a game for kids, which trenches and get your munitions play it. It's amazing to me how effective that is. Yeah, and yeah, and and on everyone, not just Children. Just Yeah, yeah. Like, Oh, munitions plants. That's clever. Get me the tomatoes. Yeah. Yeah, I would have been in there and through strong messaging. Do the American people around consuming last while producing more rations were pretty much avoided during World War one. This whole consume. Less idea was nicknamed who've arising And was promoted by entities like the National War Garden Commission. Said commission tried to keep the spirit alive. Postwar. One pamphlet from 1919 said Prevention of widespread starvation is the peace time obligation of the United States. The war garden of 1918 must become the victory Garden of 1919. But but farm production on D economy where we're pretty good for a couple years after, and so, so home gardening like this dropped off a bit. Rights. But then World War two was a different story because America was recovering from the Great Depression. Soon after the U. S joined World War two, the U. S Agriculture secretary started espousing the benefits of Victory Gardens, although there was some federal resistance to it at first, especially early days, like, um the thought being novice gardeners would waste valuable resource is However, people were so into they remembered war one. They remembered this call to participate and the interest was just there. People really, really wanted to do their part or feel like they were doing their part and Victory Gardens were part of that. And you know, as we set the messaging was so It works so well, remembered it. So even if you have government officials being like, actually don't do that. Well, yeah, but I remember what we once had my trenches and my munitions.

Moritz Traber United States Los Angeles New York Hazan Pingree Herbert Hoover New York City National War Garden Commission World War one U. S School Garden Army World War One 400 acres 1919 U. S. Food Administration Detroit Philly World War two 18 93 US 1918
"national war garden commission" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:25 min | 6 months ago

"national war garden commission" Discussed on WTVN

"For growing food. Than three years, 1700 families have covered 400 acres with food gardens. It helped that a lot of the unemployed were recent immigrants who have been farmers over in central Europe. Other cities picked up the Detroit plan to like New York City and Philly. There were also school gardens that sprung up during the progressive era. That's 80 93 1920, though the Yeah they really got started after the turn of the 20th century, And these were these thieves gardening programs for urban kids. And these gardens were thoughts. You build strong world character. Keep kids out of trouble. Improved health make areas more beautiful and also Americanized immigrants. In the US when we say Victory Garden what we typically are referring to what we're thinking of our public and private gardens planted during World War one and World War two. Some historian specifically pinpoint one businessman in particular Charles a land trip pack. He reportedly got the idea before the war, suggesting it as a way to lessen stress on American food ways. After riots broke out in New York due to food shortages, Yeah, 1916 was ah, year of crop shortages around the world. Old and so ah, lot of a lot of folks again, especially in urban areas were hurting. Once World War One was underway Pack organized the National War Garden Commission, though they were not officially affiliated with the U. S government. The government was not a fan of this impact believe that media messaging was the way to accomplish more widespread gardening. He allegedly came up with the idea to call these gardens Victory Gardens himself. Yeah, And that was as the war was coming to an end. They were called War Gardens or Liberty Gardens through through the end of World War one. War garden sounds so much more intense garden Garden of War, tomato of light. That's like what it is. Ah, I'm imagining to, uh How neighbors opposing neighbors comparing their gardens to throwing some shade like what you got growing over there. Or either I know is popular in some games to garden competitively, so no sure. Yeah. More garden would really up to it if we called it that So these victory gardens went up everywhere. Churches, parks, playgrounds, backyards, as the name suggests, they served not only as a way to relieve stress put on the food supply, but as a way to rev up patriotism and support for the war effort. It was a way to make people at home feel like they were doing their part. Soldiers of the soil was a popular phrase. On people. They really got into it. Yeah, yeah. President Woodrow Wilson appointed Herbert Hoover to head the U. S Food Administration during World War One. And this position made him responsible for exporting importing, purchasing and storing food. So in 1917 just after the U. S entered World War one, whoever helped launch the U. S School Garden Army, a national program. Lauded. Ah garden for every child and every child in a garden on dis is where that soldiers of the soil thing came in that this was marketing to youth, encouraging them to grow their munitions plants there. Oh, my God. They're gardens everywhere, producing as much ammunition or food. As possible. Like garden furrows were called trenches. It was a whole thing. Um and, uh, it was successful. There were 1300 school gardens. Just in Los Angeles. Wow, urban and suburban communities like Got into it. Some 2.5 million kids were involved all told. Saying, And it wasn't just kids. Some three million families planted food gardens in 1917, and that number rose to over five million by 1918 there there was just a lot of propaganda. Um, uh, turn your reserves and preserves. Uh, every kitchen, a canning factory and Back up the cannon with the canner. Mm hmm. Yeah, yeah, I got an L O l o home. Production of food was worth some $525 million, though, So all of that good. Good pun writing was come coming in handy. Well, it is so funny to me that and I'm not immune to it at all. You get a good name. You turn it into like a game for kids or trenches and get your munitions play it. It's amazing to me how effective that is. Yeah, and again and on everyone, not just Children. Just Yeah, we're like, oh munitions plants. That's clever. Get me the tomatoes. Yeah, I would have been in there, uh, on through strong messaging. Do the American people around consuming last while producing more rations were pretty much avoided during World War one. This whole consume. Less idea was nicknamed who've arising and was promoted by entities like the National War Garden. Commission. Said commission tried to keep the spirit alive. Postwar. One pamphlet from 1919 said Prevention of widespread starvation is the peace time obligation of the United States. The war garden of 1918 must become the victory Garden of 1919. But but farm production on D economy where we're pretty good for a couple years after, and so, so home gardening like this dropped off a bit. Rights. But then World War two was a different story because America was recovering from the Great Depression. Soon after the U. S joined World War two U, the U. S Agriculture secretary started espousing the benefits of Victory Gardens, although there was some federal resistance to it at first, especially early days, like, um the thought being novice gardeners would waste valuable resource is However, people were so into they remembered war one. They remembered this call to participate and the interest was just there. People really, really wanted to do their part or feel like they were doing their part and Victory Gardens were part of that. And you know, as we set the messaging was so It works so well, remembered it. So even if you have government officials being like, actually don't do that. Well, yeah, but I remember what it was. I had my trenches and my munitions players, I would help out Oh, I heart radio is the number one destination for podcast Discovery. Find this show and more on the free I heart radio app. Use traffic and weather for Columbus Use radio 6 10 W.

Herbert Hoover New York City U. S School Garden Army Los Angeles New York U. S Food Administration Philly World War One 400 acres 1919 National War Garden Commission 1918 World War one US $525 million 1917 World War two 1300 school gardens U. S government 1700 families
"national war garden commission" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"national war garden commission" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"At the time. The gardens of the palace of Versailles that the English were emulating. A precise, pristine, tortuously manicured affair that took forty years to complete and cover eight hundred acres twice the size of the Principality of Monaco. The Industrial Revolution changed the world in a lot of ways, the least of them bringing half of the world's population into cities where people couldn't grow their own food. Large cities like London Paris and New York, and later the major cities of India and China became dirty and polluted because of the industry, inadequate housing and lack of healthy open space. Gardening as an institution shrunk so farming, aided by new machines and technology got bigger. At the turn of the nineteen hundreds food production was at an all time low in both the United States in Europe. Food prices in America's sword. People were encouraged to go meatless and weightless to ameliorate the. A few weeks before the US entered World War One the National War Garden Commission was formed to encourage people to grow their own food, so the crops of the large farms could go to the soldiers. Enter the Victory Garden. Propaganda posters encouraged civilians, too so the seeds of victory by planting their own vegetables and local organizations like women's clubs and chambers of Commerce help to spread the word. Newly minted. Carter's provided with instruction pamphlets on what to plant their area when and hell. People latched right onto the idea. Knowing, people would have food that they would then need to preserve. The government began distributing booklets on canning and drying. Even children were encouraged garden. The Federal Bureau of Education initiated the US School Garden Army Program. Encouraging the children to be soldiers of the soil. In. One, thousand, nine, hundred, nineteen, alone more than three million new gardens planted. Rising to more than five million in nineteen, eighteen, which generated an estimated one point, five million quarts of canned fruits and vegetables. And, that's just in the US. Over in Britain, they had the allotments land assigned citizens to garden on many of which family still maintain a century later. You can hear more about them in episode one. Oh, four making do. Victory Gardens became important again a generation later when we as a species had a war after the war to end all wars. Eleanor Roosevelt even planted a victory garden on the White House lawn. This time rationing became a major part of people's dinner tables. But if you grew something yourself, you could eat as much abilities. Throughout both wars, the Victory Garden campaign served assist successful means of expressing patriotism, safeguarding against shortages on the home front, and easing the burden on farmers, working to feed the troops and civilians overseas. He was also a major boost, morale and Camaraderie. Were all in it together. And I think that feeling is part of why so many people are gardening right now. If you've got a garden going whether you've been doing it for twenty years, or it's your first time trying. Even, if it's just a window box in her apartment post, a picture of it on social media and tag the show facebook and Instagram your brain on facts and twitter at brain facts pot. And people who have been posting pictures of themselves with their copy of the your brain on facts, book I love each and every one of them. Please keep it up and if you have a minute to spare, we could do with a couple of reviews over on Amazon or good reads, it is the basis for most people's purchasing decisions these days. And be sure to tell me what your favorite fact was when you're done reading the book. And don't think I've forgotten about my fabulous quarters at Patriotair. Dot Com slash your brain on facts. In this past month. We have been joined by Paul. Small. And Charles and also seen Eden End Jennifer increase their pledges, all of which are hugely appreciated and remember that for the duration of the covid crisis. All membership levels are receiving all rewards. From. Kids books to that Super Bowl ad a few years back. If you ask someone to picture a farmer, it's the same archetype every time middle aged man plaid shirt, slightly leathery skin. If you ask them to picture a gardener. It'll be a matronly woman with a warm satisfied smile. Both these archetypes will undoubtedly be white. This isn't a narrow margin of demographic disparity. Ninety eight percent of rural land is owned by white farmers. Black farmers are one week four percent of the US farmer population, but one hundred years ago, it was more than ten times that. Ownership of land by black farmers has dropped from over forty one million acres to just over four. And this depletion didn't just happen out of the blue. The Atlantic slave trade stole not only the lives and labor of people, but also their agricultural knowledge. South Carolina became a thing. Thanks to their rice plantations. Fields couldn't be worked by machines. Thanks to the expertise of the people traffic there from the Senegambia region of West Africa. They also applied their knowledgeable hands to Okra. Millet Cowpeas and sorghum, many of which they brought with them. Have you ever wondered how the enslaved people brought seeds from Africa under those circumstances. It's not like they had an opportunity to pack. Well in way they did. Some women knowing that their families could be taken soon would breed seeds into their hair to ensure that have them with them to support their families and keep their traditions alive. Even after the post emancipation promise of forty acres, and a mule crumbled under the weight of President Andrew Johnson's stunningly blatant racism, black farmers were relegated to share cropping a system that made the white landowner richer while driving the black tenants farther into inescapable debt. A lot like the payday lending system. We have now accept food. It would take until the early nineteen hundreds for black farmers to be able to buy land of their own, usually in small parcels, a few acres at a time. These limitations didn't limit the intellectual curiosity of the farmers who pioneered methods that are still in use today. Remember hearing about George Washington carver elementary school, the man who figured out a hundred different things to do with peanuts, none of which were grind them up and pair them with Jelly. He sought ways to use peanuts to make them more financially worthwhile crumb, so he could convince gardeners and farmers to plant peanuts as part of crop rotation. Peanuts and other legumes put nitrogen back into the soil after it's been taken out by Mona crops like corn, cotton, and tobacco, thus improving the soil. CARVER also developed a system for spreading his research directly to the community through workshops and demonstrations, a system that would later become the US Department of Agriculture Extension Program ever read a gardening book or Google Gardening Question, and it tells you to call your local extension agent. that. All started with George Washington carver. Black farm ownership peaked in the nineteen twenties. Unfortunately that coincides with the rise of the second incarnation of the ku-klux-klan. They couldn't have black families able to support themselves. That just wouldn't do. They drove plant people off their land through terror or stolen through legal chicanery. During the twentieth century, the price of open land rose dramatically moving self sufficiency.

United States Victory Gardens Victory Garden Peanuts palace of Versailles George Washington carver National War Garden Commission Principality of Monaco US School Garden Army Program Europe US Department of Agriculture E Eleanor Roosevelt London Paris George Washington carver eleme South Carolina America Carter
"national war garden commission" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"national war garden commission" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"He's reborn right or is he just rising he rose okay yeah that's the No Way the member number might worry about the tents yes he is risen that's right not he was not he has risen or hazard dot had Brad grammar present tense he's currently alive that's why I guess it is using god's teacher was that didn't correct his grammar good are odd I don't know okay yeah yeah self taught talk about guards okay let's talk about gardens so there's an article in The New York Times about victory gardens which is something that started during World War one and continue through World War two so in nineteen eighteen the national war garden commission that was a real thing sent out a pamphlet and it said prevention of widespread starvation is the peace time obligation of the United States the war garden of nineteen eighteen must become the victory garden of nineteen nineteen so they were pushing people to be self sufficient you know just in case you couldn't get anything at the store anymore you had to be able to grow your own stuff so this also had to do with the influence outbreak of nineteen eighteen are you seeing where we're going with this the similarities that we're seeing here so same thing happened in World War two and at one point according this article between home school and community gardens forty percent of the country's fresh vegetables were being being grown just by average Americans twenty million Americans were growing all of this food is forty percent yeah that's incredible I know because they set up these pamphlets and they really pushed it and people were told like you have to do this for your country this is the kind of patriot patriarchy nel patriotic patriotic it could have been both I don't know probably a bunch of dudes sent those out of it so now we're kind of feeling the same thing people are going to the grocery store they're seeing a lot of empty bins were vegetables used to be and all kinds of food and some people are saying well I better get back into gardening I should probably grow my own food likely it's spring right now it's around the time when people are starting to get their soil together and do some of the seed planting so in the article they said that seed companies are seeing a surge in sales but one thing just to warn people of is that gardening is hard it's not where you just plant you have to do a little research then you have to wait a long time I mean in this climate you won't get your tomatoes until August you know they're going until September so the York times had an article in nineteen forty three all about this because a lot of these twenty million people had never gardened before Anil one of their food didn't grow and they're like I don't do this anymore and so they wrote the first year is the hardest in millions of gardens were abandoned because people are so frustrated by the results I would be I have a if if it's the opposite of a green thumb a black thumb like I yesterday I had a friend come to my house and give us flowers she she dropped off some flower she is a business and there if she's about to not have any work so she she went around to some of our friends and and dropped off these beautiful bouquets I I stick it in the toilet a jar no no there's a lot are in there I know I didn't put him in water and then my girlfriend gets home a couple hours later and she's like you tell me like you have to put flowers in water immediately and I'm like I I I would die if it was up to me to grow my own food yup but you'll eat other people's food so you're part of the system yeah I'm a scavenger I I mean I like we I I've grown tomatoes quite a bit of ground peppers a fair bit I've been wanting to make a raised bed in the front yard because I mean I'm not a big lawn person that we got one it's tiny yeah posted stamp but I might as well have a garden there so it's actually it's kind of cool that people are doing that a little bit more the problem of course also is just how much you get predation from squirrels and rats there's all uneasy this year we got a well Nunes with rabbit rabbit and automation is is significant so I mean it's it's it isn't easy to write but what you get it down it's actually really super satisfying so I have applied with the P. patch system here in Seattle last year was my first year and for being a new gardener it was really helpful to be a part of that community because there's always people there and I'm not good at learning by reading on the internet that's just not enjoyable for me so every time I was near my garden some elderly person would walk by and just give you a tip that you never asked for it was always useful right so this year I'm really bummed because we can't be together in the garden right now because of coronavirus entertaining can you still go to okay you got one of the times yes interest to your own plot but it's very very communal usually we would have a public every Wednesday and we would come in there's like a bunch of the beds are we grow a lot of food for the food banks so without having the advice from them I'm dreading it because I have to read some stuff now online like I don't know what to plant and it just doesn't seem as fun but I'm gonna do my garden I mean a victory garden yeah let's talk about beans B. if your magical fruit so this article in The New York Times also a boom time for the bean industry if you've gone to the store you've probably seen that it is hard to get beans right now specifically garbanzo beans have been really hard to come by and so they interviewed a bunch of bean farmers who are like people like peas yeah it's like but Nerdist nerd is suddenly the homecoming king and he doesn't know how to handle it mark my favorite part of this article is each person because they they'll introduce one being Bryson and write a paragraph and then another being person and every single one of them consistently is like what why do people care about these things all the sudden it's like the Oscar speeches they lied to me only like a fuel cell bill yeah so they interviewed a guy from Pullman Washington Tim McGreevey and he's been in the pain business for more than thirty years and he says he's never seen anything like this before he said it's like my best dream but also it's very depressing because of the reason why there's a guy named Steve Sando he runs an heirloom beans supplier called Rancho Gordo that all of us who are deep in the food world like Rancho Gordo was like you really have to order these beans and they're supposed to be really good and bother Bob but he says that he used to be the loneliest man at the farmers market until now so he was getting before this happened on average a hundred fifty to two hundred orders a day now they're getting more than fourteen hundred orders a day so they can't keep up with it because they don't have the staff for this they probably don't have the beans either so they have people working around the clock and then go away which is a really popular brand beans their sales are up four hundred percent they just delivered twenty four million cans to retailers being so so the reason for the being boom is what people are buying beans because they keep yeah you know get their company can they have protein you can make a lot of stuff and they're good pantry items and the dried ones really last forever in this article they said that they found some lentils and any dips into I'm still good yeah really yeah yeah that that actually was a while back there's a big Scientific American did a story on that it is it is it because they're actually they are different but they were still in pretty reasonable shape and you could still sprout landed yet they could well they did in fact yeah in some cases they also found ancient two thousand year old dates that were still viable and and they re planted them I think in Israel to begin these heirloom dates that they said are actually kind of a different date at that particular point that they were eating but it's kind of nice to know exactly what people ate while many many years ago I mean in the apocalypse everyone's going to be farting yeah okay gas is going to be a Sandusky guarantee that's going to be the best part of your day the dog in the house right now only eating beans there was this eat a peanut butter sandwich man it's big being it's been trying to catch him yeah Tim Tim McGreevey yeah he's big beans as the payment technically Elysium it is it is it pronounced that we've only heard lagoon that was very front of you I think I think France is losing but I don't know it could be this I don't like to buy French people this is America what do you what do you what do you call it motorcycle list of Mike okay gotta go okay that's it it's been really fun you guys hang out the hook a pleasure pleasure question mark that's Rachel bell goodbye but he will be back in tomorrow.

Brad
"national war garden commission" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"national war garden commission" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Fifty years gets run going tomorrow right I'm not here yet that's right I'm going about his auto service and get my oil changed wow rubbing your face yeah member I dumped all the oil what I heard but he's open I had a brief spell it right out if you drive it over without any oil in the car no I done didn't bear gutters sorry Bugis Bugis are service writers sorry but he's not a service center they only have fifteen locations now because the other thing shut down all right Hey Rachel the supply anxiety brings back the victory garden and I think this is lovely although gardens don't tend to do too well in the in the early spring around here yes well yes John victory I ha well I don't know so there's this article in The New York Times talking about victory gardens which they were started in nineteen nineteen the national war garden commission that was something that was established send up this pamphlet that made gardening a civic duty so they said quote prevention of a widespread starvation is the peace time obligation of the United States the war garden of nineteen eighteen must become the victory garden of nineteen nineteen and so they really ask people the hustle they said Hey any space you have fire escapes rooftops empty lots Saturn and say like I use to talk back in the nineties Ralph tops fire escape see empty lots backyards Bucky's auto center city sorry say this bucket C. I just put out a cigarette with my tall red stiletto high heel my access press I'm having a good of a time so yeah so they're like everybody have a guard you have to be self sufficient now wait till you see this Tyra also in nineteen eighteen and influenza outbreak more Americans died of the flu than they did in the battlefield I got a famous Syrian it's nothing's gonna chaotic set for your love what I'm improvising okay okay yeah sorry you're supposed to yes yeah do not suspect we would call the block on the block so in World War two they did the same thing in a way that makes your time still here Tom is still there after I left what time is what made a sandwich shop he's right right well you never said that he was here so I thought maybe he was having a day off no no no no no okay are you showing your yes your film the water slash love story thank you so much we tell your the ending so World War two here we are check it out there's another war the whole world that it and at that time they said yeah we need the gardens again so between home school community gardens forty percent of the vegetables and fruits grown in the country were done by Americans regular twenty million gardeners so this is coming into play now because a lot of people are going to the grocery store they're seeing empty cells but also where's all the broccoli I went the other day there was one limp carrots that's the name my new band sorry limp biscuit anyway people are starting to do some gardening you're right it's just the beginning of gardening season not much to do now but now is when you would get your soil together so it's actually a really good time to start so seed companies are saying they're seeing a surge in sales before I let you talk one more thing in nineteen forty three the times had to run a story The New York Times to say the first year is the hardest because people were so upset when their guards in girl how they thought they would because none of these people knew what they were doing and guards don't always turn out how you think they're gonna say they the social pressure or it is plastic you see what your neighbors are doing so then you do it so if you saw your neighbors are doing you know buying clout to blow shortcut cracker cocaine white horse or smack no if you were to see that your neighbors are buying so instead of you okay we're going to make those yes I used to go to when I go to home depot working on some other project you see the lady pushed by you with her cart full of like tomatoes and there's all sorts of extra things like you know what I should do that it would all be interesting at it seems hello good intentions you set up your garden but then it's like Ford Asia forgot to water and then you go out there and then it's all sort of shriveled over yeah I'll never be a good guard and it takes forever here you have to wait until August for tomatoes months and months and months go by but it's but the world was United on World War two and people belt they did this because they did not want to have to ask their friends or neighbors for food so what percentage of forty percent of Americans were making thirty percent yes yes well twenty million Americans forty percent of food so I'm bummed out because I have a P. patch plot say about Tubbs Fazal but I got one last year and so I am being grown coffee beans in there like a rock B. as John I haven't eaten for three weeks of this card is not for me so last year when I was new to the garden and I didn't really know what I was doing it's so great to be a part of this P. patch which for people that now it's a community garden because all of these older people who've been gardening for forty years they just want to tell you everything so I would be in there just you know raking and they come by and you like it was like it was like insider trading like they just kept telling and I loved it because I did it yeah I made all of my decisions based on things they told me well now you know they're sending out emails saying you can go to your garden please do but you can't gather there anymore so now I don't have anyone to get advice from and I'm worried that my cards that can be very good this year then you have to sign up for the patching did you were you waiting before before other people in order to get the thing my friend got us the patch and she claims she was on the list for six years yeah see you got to know somebody right Tom yet no anybody's in that patch world neat no I don't yeah separate cell I tried hard to try to have wanted to manage in the latest is a three year waiting line well it's worth getting on the list because then in three years I'll get to have a garden know what you could do is go down the middle that you dig somebody else up more of like out of body situation I think it's getting better you have to talk about beans yet do it guess what boom time for beans while you're in the mood I just ate a lot of beans maybe that's why so speaking of empty cells I think a lot of people have noticed one of the items that has been missing besides toilet paper is a lot of the Camden the dried beans because they keep forever they have protein blah blah blah so this article is talking about the fact that these guys have who have been growing beans for decades are like well you guys you're like your what no one buys the beans ever and they're all shocked and surprised it's like the nerdy S. guy in schools like I'm home coming your phone this guy Tim McGreevey he is from where is he from summer in Washington Paul man he said he's never seen anything like this before he's been doing this for thirty years and Steve Sando who runs this heirloom beans supplier Rancho Gordo who all of our US food dorks we all know and we cherish Rancho Gordo but he says he used to be the loneliest guide the farmers market now he's gone from getting about a hundred and fifty orders a day to fourteen hundred orders a day that brand Gloria that you see a lot of their sales are up four hundred percent there's a problem because some people don't know how to cook the dried beans yes yeah also think about this everyone's quarantine cooped up eating beans no thanks more more yeah I don't know that wow learn the answer beans and.