36 Burst results for "National Science Foundation"

Fresh "National Science Foundation" from Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

01:10 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh "National Science Foundation" from Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Welcome back to coast to coast. Lionel Friedberg with us, Of course, talking about his Life with a shaman. Of course, his book is forever in my veins. How do you believe that shaman knew these things? Lionel. I wish I knew George. They're obviously tapping into Reality or a level a realm that I have absolutely no understanding and even people who studies them today and I have friends who are very, very involved. In trying to study their methods. Not only how they get their medications, but how do they do this? This incredible psychic on the supernatural stuff? There is no way of knowing how they do that. And if you ask them They just tell you my ancestors speak to me. The bones speak to me. We tap into another room. It's the ancestors who guide him and they are Turkey tuned into a world that you and I can tune into idea. You know, it's it's extraordinary. And it really is. It opens my mind. I think the most important thing about it is that it makes me realize how unbelievably complex and amazing The world really is and we live in a universe that we don't fully understand. The cosmos is a very, very strange and extraordinary shapes. And these guys who live in mud huts in the middle of nowhere The things that some of the most sophisticated people in universities and scientific institutions can't explain. It's extraordinary. I know you know some of the things that this woman told me like, For example, there's this great beast when they when the When the hunter shot the elephants, their heart the herd. Uh, went crazy and there was there was a female elephant with a calf and she decided to charge and she came charging towards me because I was right behind the guy who tried to shoot the elephant and were it not for the White hunter, the leader of the expedition. I would have been dead because he shot that elephants sheet and then they're smart. They know, of course. And the other hand dropped about six ft. Away from me. Um, And we're not for that. You know, I would have been dead. It was only that night at the camp and I was sort of nurturing a drink, and I suddenly thought How did this woman will see that? That's the great beast she talked about. You know, the white um 1991. I did a show for PBS with the National Science Foundation. We went down to Antarctica to do a show about called secrets from a frozen worlds. No one ice and Yeah, and you know, one night I went up on the top top dick and I was looking around making my notes. And I said he's tried to describe this world tonight and all I could say was, it's like living in a big, white, translucent egg. There is no color here from Horizon to horizon. It's white and again. It struck me and this is like three or four decades after that woman had told me the story. This is what she foresaw. How did she do that? How did she know that? How could she possibly have foreseen all of those? Those things? You know, the most evil man in the world that she talked about? I did a serious on the history of aviation. And I interviewed a pilot who flew a delivery flight of a brand new airplane all the way down Africa from Germany in 1934. He's that you're talking about Hitler, too. Yeah, and he was actually turned out to be It was personal pilot. He was still alive. Oh, my gosh. And I interviewed the guy at his home near Munich. And he was almost 90 years of age. And when I interviewed the guy, you know, he told me about his entire story and his closeness to Hitler. It was incredible is like being talked about six degrees of separation. This is one degree. You have any idea when Hitler was like at that time? He must have known, but he was a sweetheart of a man. His wife That was his third wife. They were lovely people There were, you know extremely nice to me and to my crew. They gave us food and it was drink and whatever else I ran, but at the end once the interview was done about that delivery flight back in the city's he brought out only photograph albums, and it was like looking at the inner sanctum of the third, right. Because he was in all of these photographs, and there was hitting all of these photographs of all those major players, and he described every event and everything. And he said to me, you know when, when he married his first wife. Hitler gave him his wedding party in Hitler's in the early thirties. Before the war, you Hitler buffaloed a lot of people exactly. He became chancellor in the city three So the delivery flight took place and study for and by then human Hitler. Then a U. S. Bankers backed him. Uh, Hey, we know that I mean, there's so many stories to do with that guy, right? There we go. If we start and covering all of that the termites nest that you uncover in that Is another whole ballgame altogether. So how did that woman again for see that and tell me that you would meet a man who was very, very close to the most evil man who ever lived. It was unbelievable. Everything that that this little old lady in her mind had. Thank you for all of this stuff. You know what the thing when she said about the great water will try and kill me. I did a science show on a research ship in the southern Ocean and we got caught in a storm at sea. Well, we nearly overturned in the ship. Again. She was right. She said. The big water will try to kill you. It was phenomenal. What this woman for so about my life, you know, she even told me how many times I'd get married. I've been married twice. She told me that She told me how many kids I would have a spot on about everything in the course of all of this. How many shamans have you met? And? And did they tell you the same things they have? I have probably met a to least 150. Oh, Mark, um And I went. I didn't ethnographic series in the seventies, and I make a lot of lots of Sherman's. But one of the things that this little old lady had told me as well was the day will come when you are going to get very, very sick. You're going to get very ill. The only way you are going to find a cure. To go back to the place where you were born. I didn't know what she meant about that. And so let's cut way cut forward, jump ahead to 1996. I'm sitting here in L. A watching television one night with my wife and the kids are doing their homework. My wife looks at my ankle since you said Why you why your ankle's swelling tonight? Well, two weeks later, I had a biopsy and I was diagnosed with kidney disease. My gosh, she foresaw that. And she said the only way you're going to get you going to be able to kill yourself is to come back to the land to your roots. She called. It was her description back to South Africa. I at that time, I didn't know when. When I got ill. I mean, I had some of the best doctors in the world here in L a course and I had a fantastic in the front. I just done I had a great You know, a primary care physician, but I wasn't getting.

Lionel Friedberg Hitler South Africa Munich Lionel George National Science Foundation PBS Germany Antarctica 1934 Africa 1996 1991 Mark Twice Third Wife One Degree First Wife L. A
"national science foundation" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"And we're fortunate to have with us today. Irwin gancheng donny. Deputy assistant director computer and information science and engineering at the national science foundation. So high irwin and thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me a pleasure to be here. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background your current role at national science foundation. I know you've recently taken on an additional one as well and maybe just explain what. The national science foundation is for some of our listeners. That may not be familiar with it. Sure happy to do that again. For having me kathleen in ron. It's a pleasure to be on this podcast today. So as you said Money and for the last five and a half years or so. I have served as the deputy for the computer and information science and engineering director at the national science foundation. So you might hear me over the course of this podcast Accidentally say size ci se. That's short for the acronym of art director the computing and information science engineering director. And as you sort of alluded to kathleen in the last few months. I've actually gone on detail to the office of the director of the national science foundation. Serving as an acting senior adviser there specifically focused on translation innovation in partnership. So i'm coming to you really Perspective in this podcast today. But i've taken on sedition role in a package sale of more about bad if the opportunity presents itself to So as you may know as some of your listeners may know the national science foundation is really a research funding agency within the federal government so in particular we support research and education in all areas of science and engineering from astronomy to biology chemistry to mathematics. Physics social won't be april sciences as well really any discipline of science and engineering and technology and mathematics and is a funder of that in the federal government. Now we have a vast. We have a budget of about eight point. Five billion dollars in the current fiscal year fiscal year twenty twenty one and the vast vast majority of about ninety three percent goes out the door in the form of grants cooperative agreements primarily to colleges and universities throughout the us but some also small businesses. That are just starting up as well

irwin australia Mika kathleen welsh norway Ronald uk two hundred episode ron today Jones lord tim clement Tim clement jones four years national science foundation Irwin gancheng donny first time cog colin episode two hundred
Interview With Erwin Gianchandani, Deputy Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Erwin Gianchandani, Deputy Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

"And we're fortunate to have with us today. Irwin gancheng donny. Deputy assistant director computer and information science and engineering at the national science foundation. So high irwin and thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me a pleasure to be here. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background your current role at national science foundation. I know you've recently taken on an additional one as well and maybe just explain what. The national science foundation is for some of our listeners. That may not be familiar with it. Sure happy to do that again. For having me kathleen in ron. It's a pleasure to be on this podcast today. So as you said Money and for the last five and a half years or so. I have served as the deputy for the computer and information science and engineering director at the national science foundation. So you might hear me over the course of this podcast Accidentally say size ci se. That's short for the acronym of art director the computing and information science engineering director. And as you sort of alluded to kathleen in the last few months. I've actually gone on detail to the office of the director of the national science foundation. Serving as an acting senior adviser there specifically focused on translation innovation in partnership. So i'm coming to you really Perspective in this podcast today. But i've taken on sedition role in a package sale of more about bad if the opportunity presents itself to So as you may know as some of your listeners may know the national science foundation is really a research funding agency within the federal government so in particular we support research and education in all areas of science and engineering from astronomy to biology chemistry to mathematics. Physics social won't be april sciences as well really any discipline of science and engineering and technology and mathematics and is a funder of that in the federal government. Now we have a vast. We have a budget of about eight point. Five billion dollars in the current fiscal year fiscal year twenty twenty one and the vast vast majority of about ninety three percent goes out the door in the form of grants cooperative agreements primarily to colleges and universities throughout the us but some also small businesses. That are just starting up as well

National Science Foundation Irwin Gancheng Donny Computer And Information Scien Kathleen Irwin RON Federal Government United States
Quantum technology and implications for security in todays computer infrastructure

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

04:41 min | 2 months ago

Quantum technology and implications for security in todays computer infrastructure

"Welcome to the cybersecurity weekly podcast. I'm jay lewis podcasting from singapore today joining us today. We have a very special guests from switzerland who is based in zurich. And he's a doctor khumalo. Got the donnie. Who is the security researcher. We've could ask security so thank you very much for joining us today jane. I'm very happy to be here with you today. To be honest to it's quite difficult. Also for ricardian super announced. So don't worry about that. So so the first question. I think many of our listeners will be quite keen to know is is quantum computing a high. Because when you read the news and media nowadays we see a lot of investments that have been announced by governments for example the us national science foundation and the department of energy announced. I think with more than one billion over. The next five years in quantum information systems and russia and germany also not far behind announced close to seven to eight hundred million investment china as well spending time billion on the effort. In the private sector's google and ibm are also spending in excess of one hundred million and even bangs like j. p. Morgan is also looking at developing quantum lonzo banking but on data hen. Also some in saying that quantum states are not reliable stable or quite understood well enough to replace the traditional classical computers and some believe that they will never be able to do so. So my question to you is is quantum computing a hype well All these people you mentioned are very smart so if they spend all this money it must be true right now. Kidding apart we have seen tremendous tremendous advancements in this technology in the in the latest ears. So just put it into perspective. So people started discussing about quantum computing. Already more than fifty years ago but it became interesting. I would say nineteen ninety-four with the discovery your applications for cyber security now. At the beginning people were thinking. Okay this is something very interesting from a theoretical point of view. It will never be real. You know it's it's kind of Would be something like Science fiction like however then after that we have seen continues continues progress on the on the research and development and we especially in the last few years we have weakness a situation from you know we can be really controlled. One beat of quantum information to prototypes. That are actually working. So they are still prototype so they are still not powerful enough to tackle Real world problems. But i wouldn't call it to hype this point so from my personal point of view. The trend is quite clear. So you mentioned the difficulties. In controlling information and the related technology so from from a theoretical perspective the technologies well-understood now. There is engineering challenges into building. Something that is working but this is the case we any brand new technology. I mean justice I transistors. They were big bulky. They were barring city You remember the famous quotes like sixty four. Kilobytes of memory should be enough for an anyone. That's right so like every new technology. There is challenges. So what i see is that from a technological point of view the the tuition is progressing much more rapidly than many expected to ten years ago. Now the question. Everybody's asking his okay. But when are we going to have computers. That are not prototypes anymore. That are something that can solve real world problems My impression is that we are very close to the point but there is a difference in what you consider useful because a lot of people say like okay when we'll quantum computers break cryptography. Well i i think that's not a good measure of progress for quantum computer because quantum computers can do much more than that.

Jay Lewis Khumalo Us National Science Foundation Zurich Department Of Energy Switzerland Singapore Jane IBM Russia Morgan Germany China Google
Modern Oracles and Astrology

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:03 min | 3 months ago

Modern Oracles and Astrology

"Welcome to kids myths and mystery signer host. Kit chrome with this podcast. I begin a month long examination of modern oracle's and their methods of divination last friday. I mentioned how not all forms of designation demand a psychic or even a sensitive one. Such form of discrimination astrology as common popular astrology is today is complex but as mentioned does not rely on the reader having psychic abilities instead relies heavily on planets and stars. Initially you might scoff at the idea of pulling any kind of prophecy from the heavenly bodies. But let's take a look at the history of astrology. Mayan astrology is a variation of mesoamerican astrology. One of the most forward thinking kinds of astrology of times. Mayan calendar's comprised of twenty day signs and thirteen galactic numbers. Making two hundred sixty day. Calendar year the mayan study of the moon planets milky way son was some of the most accurate pre telescope astronomy in the world. Mayan astrology goes back to around the fifth century bc. Then we have england stonehenge. Gerald hawkins work on stonehenge was first published in nature magazine in nineteen sixty three following analysis. He had carried out using a harvard. Smithsonian ibm computer. Hawkins found. Not one or two alignments but dozens. He had studied one hundred. Sixty five significant features at the monument and use the computer to check every alignment between them against every rising and setting point for the sun moon planets and bright stars the position say would have been in in fifteen hundred bc so has astrology around for a while no doubt but let's go back to present to find out how astrology works. Here's a simple answer. Astrology works on many levels at the simplest level. It is not unlike a complex clock the uses the motions of the planets in a similar way to the movement to the hands on the face of a clock. Now let's dig a little deeper. Astrology is the belief that the alignment of stars and planets affects every individual mu personality and environment depending on when he or she was born. Astrologers print horoscopes and newspapers that are personalized by birthday. These horoscopes make predictions in people's personal. Lives describe their personalities and give them advice. All according to the position of astronomical bodies a survey conducted by the national science foundation found that forty one percent of respondents to their poll. Believe that astrology is very scientific. This begs the question astronomical bodies affect our lives. Solar flares cost electro magnetic disturbances on earth. That can disrupt satellites and even caused blackouts. The position of the moon costs us ocean tides. If you're a fisherman that position of the moon can have a significant effect on your livelihood. The solar wind causes beautiful aurora and sunlight itself is the main source of energy for our planet. Still the question. How is strategy as a tool of divination astrology uses a set of rules about the relative positions and movements of heavenly bodies to generate predictions and explanations for events on earth and human personality traits. Some used astrology to generate very specific expectations. It could be verified against outcomes. What does science have to say about astrology. Simply that it's not scientific yet. Hundreds of thousands of people have been influenced by designation nation provided by astrologers millions across america. No there astra logical sign and read their horoscope in the newspaper. Daily get this j pierpoint morgan. One of the world's greatest fight answers was suspicious of accepting planetary advice but ended up applying astrology to all of his personal affairs. John adams famous second president of the united states refused to sign the declaration of independence until the exact moment planetary indications were most auspicious. And this will really get ya jay. Jacob stout jeff pierpoint morgan and seymour cromwell comprised a bracket of three successive presidents of the new york stock exchange who utilized astronaut. Advice implanted their operations. They scoffed at this. However upon the arrival of the wall street crash these men had been warned by their astrologers and thus averted disaster disci- support astrology is a form of give nation. No has astrology affected millions of individuals over the centuries the answer is a resounding yes

Gerald Hawkins Oracle Hawkins Harvard IBM England National Science Foundation Pierpoint Morgan Astra Jacob Stout Jeff Pierpoint Mor United States Seymour Cromwell John Adams JAY New York
An elegy for Arecibo

Science Magazine Podcast

04:33 min | 4 months ago

An elegy for Arecibo

"So air cbo. We've been calling this a post mortem which is pretty depressing. What's the status of the observatory. Now the observatory is still open but its main reason for being which is this enormous radio telescope which three hundred and five meters across is no more. It had a instrument platform suspended above it on cables that collapsed on or december and effectively destroyed the telescope and this is the culmination of a number of structural failures that happened to the telescope in twenty twenty. Yeah that's right. The first bowl broke in august. This was own auxiliary cable which had been added in nineteen ninety-seven when they added new instruments to this platform above the dish. So it needed more support so they added extra cables and it was one of these new ones not one the ones from its original construction which was fifty seven years ago or fifty eight. Now i guess and that cable pulled out of its socket. The soccer is the structure of the end of the cable that allows it to be attached to something and they just pulled out. We surprised everyone. No one expects a cable to fail in that way you went into a suspension while they investigated and ordered new cables to replace. Does hilary cables of which are six and then a second cable broke and then it was already perilous situation and the national science foundation which owns the telescope decided. It was too dangerous. The structure was not safe for people to work on and so they decided to have to be m decommissioned but before that could happen only a couple of weeks off to the second cable broke. More cables broke the whole thing. Came crashing down yeah. There's some kind of striking video of that. They're on the internet taken from a drone. I asked you before the interview if you've ever visited this site and he said no very sad about that now. I'm not going to get a chance to see it you know. It was a very spectacular instrument which was very beloved of astronomers and puerto ricans in particular but also filmmakers. You know it was used in two feature films. And i think the x. files as well used it as a backdrop. I always think of contact. This is such a striking image The way they show it in that movie and this is obviously a platform for a lot of science. What are some of the big accomplishments some of the highlights from astronomy at no. It's an interesting co scoop. Because it was used by lots of different sorts of scientists it was originally designed to be used as a radar instruments to look at the upper atmosphere so would send out pulses of radio waves and then receive the signal that was bounced back off the sphere. Which is upon the upper atmosphere where the air molecules are ionized by the sun. This is the first instance of its use and it wasn't even really for it was more for defense than anything else. The pentagon was looking for ways to track incoming ballistic missiles which you know in the late fifties and sixties was very new issue for them and so they built this telescope to try and understand the ionosphere better to see whether warheads trails that they could track them by. And that didn't really work out. And so it transitioned into being a a scientific facilities so people have continued using it to look at the ionosphere to this day. But they've also used things. Nasa used the radar to track objects in space that are near the up and could be threatening such as asteroids and also to look at other planets. It's been used to map. The surface of venus be seen with a normal telescope because it's surrounded by clouds and it can look far as saturn and then astrophysicists could use it to look at much more distant objects such as pulsars. Which are little dead stars that out a very regular metronome signal in radio waves and gas in galaxies in between the planets and it has a hundred uses and some of which made it very famous. People have won nobel prizes with work that they did. Don't aris the

CBO National Science Foundation Hilary Soccer Pentagon Nasa
"national science foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:16 min | 5 months ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It already kind of gone away? Oh, no. Yeah, It's sticking around. And I think we're going to get some more tomorrow, actually. Wow. All right. It's gonna be a white Christmas for you guys indeed. Hey, So, So, Rob, you have an interesting background. You You really didn't come from plants and Indoor gardening. You know where Where did you get your start with this whole kind of plant crazed. Yes, sure. And, um, just like listening to the talent of your conversation is really interesting and impressive to me because I feel like outdoor gardeners and people who have been doing it for years and years and years have But you're like rich in specific and kind of contextual knowledge of things like You know you're saying like if it hasn't rained in the last week, and they're starting to grow its very responsive to the environment. My background is Largely academic right after college. I got a National Science Foundation scholarship, too. Research and design vegetated infrastructure. This is like a large scale vegetated systems that go in cities and act like infrastructure, so they absorb storm water. They keep the crime it a little bit cooler. There's a kind of from the main main one. So then Four years doing that. I got my PhD in civil infrastructure but kind of civil engineering. But service like ecosystem ecological engineering is kind of like the sub field. Uh And then I went on to do a post doc at the Earth Institute. Where I started to look at green space is a little bit more holistically. So for each like green space in the city. They have kind of a different thumbprints of ecosystem services like green roof. They collect stormwater. They keep it calm, and they might provide habitat for birds. Mm. But then something like a community garden. Also like provides food for people provide recreation, and it's doing the storm water and cooling and habitat creation. So I was sort of in that world and realized that Um gardening and food. Really It is a way that was plants to provide even more benefits to us as a society. On At that time. I was sort of like, you know, we're gonna become a professor with a gun and he was my on mate like co founder attended a lecture. I was giving them like Bradley for coffee afterwards and pretty quickly. He convinced me that The food system in our country in the world is just a bigger problem that storm water management in terms of sustainability. So are our current. I'm sure you guys know this, but then current food system is like a leading cause of climate change. And Cleary's issues, extension water use. So you sort of was like, OK, The car was on board for for plants as foods now where I wanted to focus my energy, and we found a bunch of studies that showed That if someone just has a kind of a brush with gardening, so they just have to grow one baseball fan, especially Children, one tomato plant outside of that single experience, there's so much more likely to make Food choices that are better for themselves better for the planet and running mates. Favorite quotes is like if I said you have a hamburger at McDonald's Hamburger was made I don't know how likely it is that you're gonna go back and buy another one. Yeah. Um yeah, that is true. My background. And now I can't start urban me Whitney. And And it's so true, because I mean, you know, once somebody has been introduced to that, you know, homegrown tomato homegrown strawberry homegrown basil. You start to realize the store bought Products in the change in flavor or the you know, change in consistency and things like that. And you know it is so true, but you don't realize that until you actually do it. So like you're saying, just take that 11 simple thing, whether it be a basil or partially or cilantro or men and, you know, put it in someone's hand. And they're like, Wait a minute. This is meant and you're like, Yeah, this is this is meant when you grow it yourself. This is what it tastes like, right? Yeah, totally. I mean, it's it's great that Produces one of those things where Being local of being fresh. Pick it being in season. All those things are like other environmentally, but We find that that's like, not big enough motivator for most people feel like they actually taste way way better, and that's kind of people. I got him following their own hedonism and desires, and it's like Oh, and it's the toppings to be more sustainable. That's a much easier sell. Yeah, I'm like do this because Good for the planet. You know what else Rob? Rob, I think is also presentation. And people wonder. Well, you know, I grew this How come he doesn't look like it does when I bite from the grocery store in the produce, And that's something else, too, because they do a lot to those fruits and vegetables to make it look good and enticing to buy. But maybe your peppers not gonna be that big. Maybe they're not going to be shiny, but they're getting taste better so again, presentation and grocery stores versus what people grow at home. I think for the novice could be confusing, right? Yeah, definitely on then. We do find like The more traditional we have all sorts of like flavored kid s. So we have something like culinary classics, which is just got More standard varieties, and that's definitely the most popular and that's not like basil parsley, where, like it looks pretty close to what you get in a grocery store. Um But I also think that like first time gardeners no matter what they grow, they're going to be excited about and eat it, even if it doesn't look Like the tomato there, you still say.

Rob National Science Foundation Earth Institute baseball Cleary Bradley professor co founder
The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

Frank Beckmann

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

"Boxes, Tanya J. Powers explains Wired to this week, Antarctica was the only continent in the world that did not have any reported cases of the Corona virus. That's no longer the case. Hundreds of scientists and researchers live there. And now three dozen people at a Chilean bass have tested positive for covered 19. The U. S National Science Foundation told USA Today that it's Antarctic personnel stations don't have contact with Chile and stations. Those who live in Antarctica have tried hard to keep the virus out because it's a remote region where medical capabilities are limited and people shelter from the elements in close quarters. No other country that has people in Antarctica has reported any cases there. Tanya J. Powers. Fox News. The people The number of people following

Tanya J. Powers Antarctica U. S National Science Foundati Usa Today Chile Fox News
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 5 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
Herbaria with Director of the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium, Dr. Barbara M. Thiers

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:04 min | 5 months ago

Herbaria with Director of the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium, Dr. Barbara M. Thiers

"An honor to have you. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Okay name is barbara tears. My title is patricia k. Holmgren director of the william. Linda steere herbarium of new york botanical garden herbarium. The garden is the second largest in the world. It has almost eight million specimens and it has been in active force implant research. Since in founding the institution the late eighteen eighteen hundreds. And what we do there is we add specimens to this survey. Remember here we also make them available as loans or as we allow people to come visit. And we also are digitizing the specimens at a fairly fast clip with thanks from funding over the last decade. Or so actually more from the national science foundation. So that's my job. I have a staff about thirty people and one of the things i do in. That job is a fair. Bit of public outreach. In the way of giving tours of the herbarium over the years to writing people local students to the general public houses. Our collection isn't like a museum in that it's open to the public. The this all behind the scenes so we let the public in occasionally but really just for a few days at a time and also then for people who might wanna help right about or support our herbarium. So it's through really through the the the tours that i'd given over the years that i began to really think about the herbarium and how to talk about it in a way that would interest people because on his face. It's a collection of dead plants and it doesn't sound very exciting however i've been really heartened that Especially in recent years. Maybe with a heightened understanding or appreciation of the environment of worry about climate change that. There's been a lot of people have been a lot more interested in this aspect of science. It's not the glamorous part it's where we store the research results you know that others have published upon and we have to store them forever. it's never ending. They absolutely have to be maintained. Forever and It's it's hard to do that. It's hard to keep the funding to keep the staff. It's hard to keep the collection up when you have so many but it's it's an absolutely crucial aspect of the scientific process. This is where the the the documentation of the plant. Biodiversity research is located in terms of my background. I sort of grew up in a herbarium. My father was actually a psychologist studied. Fungi and started their barium at san francisco state university and all my childhood weekends were spent either collecting mushrooms or it was the season than Often to get me out from under foot from my under my mother's feet my father had become to the herbarium on a sunday afternoon and help him do things. Like lou label. Simple jobs it. I got more complicated. And he gave me a little bit of money for it. So i was. I was happy to do it. And i did that for years. I enjoyed in good. I became a teenager and i was so interesting. And i i didn't I didn't want anything to do with our barium or my parents or anything but Somewhere my college years. I actually found my way back. I just seem to me that my father and his colleagues his students all just could hardly wait to get up and go to work and make new discoveries every day. They were so passionate about what they did. And i hadn't really come across any other community where people have that kind of passion and i wanted to be part of it so The focus of san francisco. State was on fungi. Although there were people working on lichens and other groups but one group nobody was working on. Were the liver words. The had paddock's thought they were too hard and apply they're not a terribly rich flora in california so they weren't always even very easy to find but they intrigued me so i began to kind of teach myself What could i made a lot of bad identification. But i graduate but i grew to really love these little organisms. They're they're tiny. They're beautiful all sorts of falls structures to their leaves and so forth. And you just feel like when you look at the the microscope you just kind of entering a miniature world Which is just full of beauty. And then i went on to grad school. I was able to convince someone to let me study with them. rather famous man rudolf schuster who wrote the mammoths treatment of the bryant of the hypocrisy north america. He was actually a horrible mentor. But that's okay. I still got my degree. And i was lucky enough to get a post doctoral position at the new york botanical garden. Right out of grad school. Once i was there i knew i never really wanted to leave. So that's that's kind of story mike.

Patricia K Linda Steere Herbarium Of New York Botanica Holmgren National Science Foundation Lou Label Barbara William San Francisco State University Paddock San Francisco Rudolf Schuster California North America New York Botanical Garden Mike
Footage released of collapse of huge Puerto Rico radio telescope

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Footage released of collapse of huge Puerto Rico radio telescope

"Newly released footage captures the collapse of what was once the largest radio telescope in the world it was a sound to sadden the heart of stargazers everywhere the National Science Foundation released footage of the Tuesday collapse of the damage radio telescope in Arecibo Puerto Rico the closing of the telescope had been announced in November after cable snapped and gashed the reflector dish and damage the receiver platform then on Tuesday the nine hundred ton receiver platform fell onto the one thousand four wide reflector dish more than four hundred feet below the telescope nestled in the mountains of Porter Rico attracted tourists and played a key role in astronomical discoveries for more than half a century observatory officials said they were saddened by the situation but thankful that no one was hurt I'm Jennifer king

Arecibo National Science Foundation Puerto Rico Porter Rico Jennifer King
"A huge loss": Huge radio telescope in Puerto Rico collapses following damage

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

"A huge loss": Huge radio telescope in Puerto Rico collapses following damage

"Observatory in Puerto Rico has collapsed photos show this morning on Twitter, the huge radio telescope collapsed into its dish. The telescope has been an incredible research tool for astronomers around the world. It's best known for its roles in Hollywood movies, though, like contacting, But James Bond's GoldenEye, the National Science Foundation and the University of Central Florida did manage the telescope badly damaged in recent hurricanes.

Puerto Rico Twitter Goldeneye James Bond Hollywood National Science Foundation University Of Central Florida
The Long Legacy Of The Arecibo Telescope

Short Wave

05:56 min | 6 months ago

The Long Legacy Of The Arecibo Telescope

"So let's step back for a minute edit and get a better sense of how the telescope has been used over the years. Tell me about what it does. What kind of projects it's worked on. So one of the really neat things about the The observatory that's very versatile. Scientific instrument most telescopes radio. Telescopes don't have the ability to send out light. They only capture late at the observatory. We can send and capture late when an asteroid coming by. We're pretty much a flashlight that we turn on we send out to. It comes back right. We can tell you how far these objects are down to a meters unbelievable add narrate and we care about where these asteroids are going to be because what if one day this thing comes around and gets too close to earth if we can let people know this is going to happen next year we can actually prepare for it like dinosaurs. They didn't have a space program so they can get to prepare for anything. That's true we do have that on the dinosaurs. We don't have much. But we have out of cbo and we have the direct understanding of asteroids because i also think just from an outsider's perspective like this telescope does really play a role in our cultural imagination. It contributes to our sense of off. You know about the universe. Like i think i remember in the seventies it was used to deliberately beam a message into space. You know like hey. We're here like i mean it really has like not only these scientific contributions but these cultural contributions it's like an it's an inspirational place. You know oh yeah. I love marvel. I'm love marvel comics. And things like that and i was watching. Although i'm a little old doesn't matter. I was watching a cartoon about the avengers and the avengers were flying off to the odyssey observatory to save it. Who was that still in the cartoon. Oh my gosh so yes it really is you know. It's not like one of those fields of science or scientific tools that really stays in academia right. It provides a broader context for understanding. The universe for non-academic says well which i think is is really special and important. It's like bench because of its versatility. It gets to be part of not only applied science but just part of typical day to day life. You may not see it. But it's there in cultural context. It's there you know saving your life making sure this asteroid is not coming towards you. It's really cool so it sounds like at this. Recent damage has big implications in terms of slowing down a lot of research. What kind of research are we going to be missing out on right now with it down well for personal perspective. I actually had some observing runs. We're gonna come up in late. September through october where we were going to be studying mars with radar this year mars was going to be the closest it was going to be and also observable from the osce observatory until the year twenty sixty seven so it. This year was literally a once in a lifetime. Opportunity to observe mars with other. See all twenty twenty twenty twenty worst year ever. Yeah okay so the damage that happened. This year isn't the first hurdle for the observatory right hurricane. Maria damaged the observatory twenty. Seventeen you you were working there right like. Tell me about that experience. Su twenty seven one hurricane. Maria came by not only was. I was still working at. The observatory actually stayed at the observatory. That's where i went for shelter so i got to see the winds combined and the damage For me one of the things that like hit me the most or make me realize the damage the most after the hurricane when we went outside. And when you look across the telescope and it's in the middle of a beautiful rain-forest greenery everywhere and that day after the hurricane when we went outside there's there is no green left it just nothing just brown. Everything was brown. The trees were dead. You see all the way down to the soil. It was impactful in the sense of. Wow this is the damage of the hurricane. Awesome packed full as a puerto rican. Who's used to seeing their island. Be beautiful and green selling costs high. Like that's gone all gone in day. That's tough that you know it starts being Quite a bit less about the science at that point. Oh very quickly. I mean after the hurricane when there was no utilities at all on the island we still had a couple of generators so people from of see what would drive up. We pump water for them and they leave with a bunch of water the to drink water. Well so okay. Let's let's let's talk a little bit about the funding struggles right because there have been ongoing funding struggles for the telescope. Break that down a little bit for me yes. The telescope which is owned by the national science foundation has had some funding struggles in that the budget that is used to operate. It has been going down. And it's gone down from anywhere from about fourteen mil per year with the expected current contract. They could go all the way down to two million gotcha into and so what will that mean for for the telescope and the people that work on it. So as there is diminishing funds going there They'll be less available time for people to go explore go observe pulsars and find the first evidence for gravitational waves which won the telescope a nobel prize in physics and nineteen seventy-three. It's

Hurricane CBO Maria Osce SU Brown National Science Foundation
Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

"A huge telescope in Puerto Rico that's been featured in films like the James Bond movie goldeneye is slated to be shut down the National Science Foundation says it will close the telescope at the renowned Arecibo observatory in Puerto Rico it's considered a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it for celestial observations the thousand foot wide radio telescope drew ninety thousand visitors year as long served as a training ground for hundreds of graduate students in August a cable broke and tore up one hundred foot hole in the reflector dish and damage the dome above it then in November a steel cable snapped causing further damage and the telescope is considered to be at serious risk of collapse I'm Jennifer king

Puerto Rico Arecibo Observatory James Bond National Science Foundation Jennifer King
Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

"The National Science Foundation says it will close the huge telescope at the renowned are Cibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. It's a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it to search for planets, asteroids and extraterrestrial life. The foundation says. It's just too dangerous to keep operating the single dish Radio telescope. Given the significant damage it recently sustained in August and auxiliary cable broke and tour 100 ft hole in the reflector dish and damaged the dome above it. Then, a couple of weeks ago, one of the telescopes, main steel cable snapped.

Cibo Observatory National Science Foundation Puerto Rico
Iconic Arecibo Observatory faces demolition due to damage

The Dana Show

00:26 sec | 6 months ago

Iconic Arecibo Observatory faces demolition due to damage

"The search for planets, asteroids and extraterrestrial life is about to suffer a loss. The National Science Foundation says it will close the huge telescope that's operated for 57 years. At an observatory in Puerto Rico used by scientists worldwide, contributing to Nobel Prize winning research and featured in at least two movies, the agency says snapped cables and recent structural damage make it too dangerous to continue operating. The 1000 FT wide dish,

National Science Foundation Puerto Rico Nobel Prize
Gender Discrimination and Harassment at Sea

Short Wave

09:51 min | 7 months ago

Gender Discrimination and Harassment at Sea

"Now if the mosaic expedition sounds familiar to you, it might be because back in December we aired two episodes on the research being done. But today we're turning away from the research and focusing on Chelsea's reporting. The Mosaic Expedition Gender Discrimination and harassment and how they're an all too common reality for many field scientists. I'm Maddie Safai and this a shortwave from NPR. So on October eighth a few weeks. Into the mission a meeting was called and it was led by this communications manager, with Awa, the German institute kind of spearheading the mission like who was there and what was that meeting about. Right. So that meeting was held by Katharina Vice Tweeter who was a Manager and she held that meeting with all of the journalists who were on board the ship at that time, and so at that point, there were four of us all women, and so we all sat down and she kind of told us. I want to just clarify. The rules of the new dress code that was announced yesterday at the General Meeting, and then she went on to tell us you know this is a safety issue and there are a lot of men on board this ship and some of them are going to be on this ship for months at a time, and this is a safety issue something that needs to be taken seriously and so. I should say she did not come out and say we are concerned that. Men On this shipper going to harass you or assault you if you dress a certain way so but it was heavily implied by this. Multiple Times telling us there are many men on board the ship and you need to not wear tight fitting clothing or revealing clothing. Yeah. Yeah I mean, what did you take from that? Like when you walked away from that meeting what did you take from them? Well what we took from. It was that there was a risk of harassment or something worse. You know if we didn't dress more modestly on board the ship. And, we really were alarmed by this because we started wondering. If. There had been some incidents that had prompted the change in the rules and what was this bit about a safety issue was there some threat to the safety of the women on board and what? Exactly? was that threat and so we were you know, of course irritated. By by implication that we should have to change the way we dress because there are a lot of men on board the ship, but we were also alarmed. Yeah I, mean when you wrote about the dress code meeting, you noted that it came after some problems with harassment that had already sort of percolated on the ship. That's correct. Although at the time we actually were not aware of that. So as I reported the story that that came out in my reporting later, there had been a an incident in which some women on board the ship reported to the cruise leader that that they had been harassed by men on board the ship, and then you know there was a meeting, it was brought to the captain and the men were prohibited from further contact with those participants and and it was never made widely known. Anybody else on board that ship that there had been an incident like this And so nobody knew about this at the time, the dress code was announced. So you know we all Kinda had this suspicion about a safety. What exactly does that mean? was there some incident but I did not find out that any incident had occurred until much later. And this wasn't the only incident of gender-based discrimination while you were aboard. Right you wrote that the dress code kind of became a symbol of these inequities, but there was other stuff going on to. That's correct. So there was the harassment incident that occurred shortly before the dress code was enacted, and then later on, there was an incident in which. A group of Were kind of called together. Asked to volunteer basically to participate in a work assignment and the work incitement involved a helicopter ride over to. The Polar Stern, which was the main research vessel participating the expedition and. Helping to unload a bunch of boxes and supplies and that sort of thing and so. The group volunteered for this work assignment, originally consisted of both men and women and then later on the cruise leader removed the to women participants from that assignment and replace them with men and I'm told that this event also sparked a lot of resentment among the women who were familiar with the incident, and so you know I asked crews leader later about this incident and he said that he did this to comply with a German law that dictates How much men are allowed to lift on work assignments versus women are allowed to lift on work assignments but it was a little odd because he sent me the law and I looked at over and the way he described the work assignment and the amount of weight that was going to be distributed among the people participating those weights should have actually exceeded the weight limits for both men and women. So I could not get really a clear justification on why only women were removed from that work assignment and again people who are involved with that situation or who were familiar with that situation we're upset by that as well. Yeah. I mean, Chelsea, this isn't just the mosaic right in your reporting. You discussed a twenty eighteen study by the National Science Foundation about the prevalence of sexual harassment and you noted according to the study the. Two biggest predictors are settings where they're more men than women and I'm quoting environments that suggest a tolerance for bad behaviour I mean is this the situation that you saw when you were reporting on the Mosaic Mission? Right? So I spoke with various experts on a gender and policy in field science and in polar science and they all kind of pointed to leadership on these expeditions. That's really a primary factor in kind of environment. Is it going to be you know for the women participating in these expeditions and so it's really important from what I've been told by these experts to have a leadership that is prepared to deal with issues of sexual harassment or discrimination. If they should come up leadership that's trained to deal with these kinds of issues that's train to prevent these kinds of issues from coming up in the first place. Leadership, that sets very clear rules and boundaries at the start of an expedition for what will be tolerated and what will not be tolerated and I think that really does speak to what went wrong on academic fed off. You know there was a dress code that was enacted midway through the cruise. It was a surprise to everybody it was communicated in a really kind of vague and distressing an alarming way. Harassment incident that arose that was kind of it'd be swept under the rug a little bit at the time may or may not have influenced the dress code. So. Yes. I think this really all speaks to kind of a lack of preparation to prevent these kinds of issues arising in the first place and from dealing with them in the proper ways when they do arise. Yeah. Yeah and you know Chelsea I'm wondering what is the response to your piece? Ben So far since you wrote. The response to the peace has been mainly very positive so far. So I've heard from a lot of scientists researchers both in polar science and in other fields. Who have been very supportive and who have said you know this is an issue that happens all the time that's very common but that needs to be talked about more and so you know it's very important to kind of bring these issues into the light and. It has been. It's it's not been great to hear that there are so many other people who have had similar experiences. You know that's that's disappointing and distressing to hear but you know. But a lot of people have said you know this, this is very common and it's good that we're starting to talk about this more do. Yeah. I mean you mentioned Chelsea some moments of solidarity from the participants aboard the most recent being this unified statement responding to your article signed by the large majority of Grad, students on board. Did this. You know inspire any hope for you about the future of the this type of field research. It did absolutely, it did that statement basically said that it was disappointing to see rules and policies on board. The ship that might imply that women should have to change the way they dress to manage the behavior of men or policies that might limit women's involvement in fieldwork, and so you know the students know in their statement that they were. You know grateful for. The opportunity to go on the expedition into work with leading polar scientists in the field. But this was something that that was not acceptable to them and you know it wasn't courage to read that statement and to just kind of see the interest in the concern about these kinds of issues from you know what's going to be the next generation of polar scientists and I do think that this is something that will hopefully Garner a little bit more attention inspire some change in the future.

Harassment Chelsea Mosaic Expedition Gender Discr Katharina Vice Tweeter Maddie Safai Communications Manager NPR Multiple Times National Science Foundation Assault AWA Garner German Institute BEN
"national science foundation" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:38 min | 8 months ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"University helped biomedical engineering Professor Terra Alvarez launch a startup that may revolutionize vision therapy. Our start up through N J. T is called ocular Motor Technology Way created. Virtual reality vision therapy in a head mounted display, so it's gaming and basically sugar coating the therapy so that Children and young adolescents don't even realize they're doing therapy to accomplish this. We need biomedical engineers, which air here on campus computer scientists, artists, people that are into story development, and then we're collaborating with a lot of the large pediatric medical centers. This idea of a startup culture is extremely Important to not just enjoy it and the National Science Foundation but also to us as a societal hole. And J T. New Jersey Institute of Technology. Learn more at NJ dot edu Not completing high school is one of a social thing, but it was an academic thing. I came out in the 11th grade. Nobody was embracing you. Kids were cruel. It was very difficult to be gay. Even though all these years have passed. I still had that longing to have my diploma. The hard part was Determining that I was gonna do, But I definitely didn't do it alone at age 30 With the help of her mentor, Carisa finished her high school diploma. Have a mentor Maria. She convinced me to continue my education and finish what I started to get my diploma. Just never judges. She's a true role model. If you're even considering getting your high school diploma, go get it..

Carisa Terra Alvarez J T. New Jersey Institute of T Professor National Science Foundation Maria
Do Americans Trust Scientists

After The Fact

04:01 min | 8 months ago

Do Americans Trust Scientists

"So much of the public focuses on discovery and they. Scientists going to influence their life scientists. Of course, love the search does that explain maybe just a little bit of the dichotomy I use I think sometimes feel between scientists in the public. View that actually people are quite fascinated by. Approach that scientists take in they're quite curious about it I i. think many of the of the television shows, for example, in books about science or or very very attracted to people and can help bring them in to science and even become scientists themselves. I don't really take a do view of things concerning trust I think trust house to start with the scientists themselves they have to really be. Truthful about their exploration about what they discovered they have to try to be bias free and politically in free free politics and free of self-aggrandizement and just want to pursue the tree. We were President of one of the best engineering schools in the country and have been involved in education but your role at the national science. Foundation. And now your role with the science philanthropy alliance a little little. Bit More of a cheerleader with FBI. Correct way of saying some of this in terms of trying to let people understand the need and support for basic science and our society. Yeah I think you always go back to your roots in at high school. I was cheer. So I think there are definitely a large group of people who liked cheer and that's a very, very important to do, and of course, it demands a different kind of skill set but there's a step beyond cheering. That is just incredibly important to do what I call move the needle to really make things change at sociologically culturally there are many many disparities that abound and they affect science as well as every other field of endeavor and Jake. It's important for institutions like the National Science Foundation's to. All sorts of approaches to to blossom into encourage them scientific discovery come through many many different approaches. And by the way I've Kurd a number of times that Isaac Newton did his greatest most prevalent work during a pandemic. So crisis can also bring about the environment for making a great discovery. You were the chief scientist at NASA. That's pretty cool. What did you take from that role and how did that guy your thinking in the broader scientific community? I really want to be a researcher and that's it. I wanted to explore science deep league. In particular attracted to the cosmos. And Mike Goodness on. There's just some mysteries that it offers and so I was very very focused on that I didn't want anything to take me away from that and so when I was giving the invitation invitation to join NASA as its cheat scientists asked various close friends and colleagues. If it was a good idea, all my department heads around the country who knew me? said, what about idea will take you out of your research because they knew empower engaged wasn't that but then I talked to some of my female colleagues like a colleague who headed the history of science? Department. At Penn State University and my mother who obviously knew me well, if people like that said, well, you can't talk about how important it is that women. and. Underrepresented minorities go into science, and then not take the opportunity to do something about out to have a platform where you can be a role model for that when you can actually affect changes in that.

President Trump National Science Foundation Mike Goodness Nasa FBI Isaac Newton Penn State University Jake Researcher Scientist
The International Scientists Getting Pushed Out

Short Wave

03:58 min | 9 months ago

The International Scientists Getting Pushed Out

"I. There was a travel ban has been chaos and confusion at airports around the. World. Tonight. Seven muslim-majority countries. Here's the map and then the trump administration froze green cards for new immigrants. Until the end of this year, the announcement came at a late night tweet president trump saying he intends to close the US to immigrants. Then some Chinese graduate students and researchers were singled out on May twenty ninth president trump announced a proclamation to suspend entry to graduate students and post doctoral researchers who attended universities affiliated with. Chinese military. So I was I was kind of psychologically prepared Emmett. Don had heard the rumors of what might be coming next. He grew up in Turkey and came to the US for his PhD Twenty Ten and is now working as a post doc in the physics department at UC Berkeley. So it wasn't a shock when in June, the administration blocked visas for a wide variety of jobs including the H. One B. Visa. which is what a lot of tech workers and scientists like met were hoping to get I. Try to be more in peace with uncertainty, and this is what I've been trying to do for the past couple of years. It's been a struggle for me to do his research in the United States. One time he got stuck outside of the country for nine months because of a visa issue rate before he was supposed. To, start his job, and then now met has an approval for an H. One B. Visa and was just one step away from getting it activated when the executive order came down and that makes any kind of life planning really hard. It's unfair to my spouse to through the same thing for my own career choices. For instance, we are unable to really contemplate having children at this point with all of this. because. We don't even know where we're going to be living in the next year in addition to figuring out his own situation met has been organizing with his post doc union to help other international scientists deal with the confusion and fear caused by the visa ban. He's heard lots of stories a researcher wanting to visit her elderly parents in New Zealand but worried about leaving the country and not getting back in another researcher who did travel out of the country this spring and so far has not been able to come back. We have been very active in creating spaces where people can share their stories can help each other out share information and just be connected to each other because. It is really difficult to handle as an individual that's not something we get taught in school. It's a lot to deal with it sucks up a tremendous amount of emotional energy and time and Matt says, of course, it's taken a toll on his research. I. Have to sit down from my computer and do my research every day, but there's a there's a world of uncertainty there every day some new policy comes out and it makes it difficult to focus a recent National Science Foundation report found that nearly thirty percent of people in science and engineering jobs in the US were born outside the country basically a lot of science in US depends on scientists born outside of it. Which is why memo finds the visa. Ban especially. Maddening I. Think it is really absurd gut majority of research is funded by the federal government, which then turns around and blocks people from coming into the country and doing that research. Today in the show the rationale behind the June visa bans and how policies like this or affecting international scientists and scientific. In the

United States President Trump DON Donald Trump Federal Government Researcher Emmett National Science Foundation Uc Berkeley Turkey Executive Matt New Zealand
Nebraska Teachers Are Piloting a Climate Science Curriculum Using NASA Data

Environment: NPR

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Nebraska Teachers Are Piloting a Climate Science Curriculum Using NASA Data

"An NPR survey of American teachers last year found that eighty six percent believe schools should teach climate science. The teachers also said they had trouble finding good tools to teach it a NASA. Climate scientist is working with Nebraska School to develop a curriculum that lets students get their hands on the same tools. Leading researchers use BECCA Castillo of net news reports sciences clear that. Earth's climate is changing mostly caused by human activity but there's still a lot of skepticism about it and how to teach it in public schools. Global warming is a hoax is junk science. This is Paul Meyer a former school board member in an Omaha suburb in two thousand seventeen. He was asking the State Board of education not to add climate change to education standards. I had one of my goals was to make sure that our kids were taught in an honest and truthful manner. I do not want them brainwashed or indoctrinated with falsehoods sentiment like that frustrates climate scientists like NASA's Marc Chandler who uses sophisticated computer models to predict. What's going to happen to the climate and the next ten twenty or even a hundred years whenever there's a tool that most people don't understand can pull out the whole card of. Oh it's just those geeky scientists doing something that none of us understand so a few years ago Chandler started talking with his friend Cory Forbes a science education researcher and professor at the University of Nebraska Lincoln Forbes. New Public School. Teachers had a hard time helping students understand. Climate Science Forbes says the two wrote a proposal to develop climate science curriculum and got a grant from the National Science Foundation. We're focused on pudding. Authentic scientific tools in the hands of teachers and students which is not something that they typically have access to the curriculum is designed to teach students about climate change by giving them access to the same computer models. Marc Chandler is using at NASA officials. Phones Wave Gonzalez. They're trying it out in classrooms like Mary. Burke Maros in Lincoln Nebraska. She helps the teens and her Earth Science class work with a web based interface called easy. Gm that stands for global climate. Modelling Chandler built it so anyone could operate and understand the complicated modeling process. What do you think I WANNA use for? Climate variable for the Sun snow and ice cover more than a thousand Lincoln public. School students have used the program over the last three years. Mara says there's no agenda other than asking students to reach their own conclusions. It's more of A. Go inquiry process where rather than just kind of being given the information the notice wander and start driving their own questions. Morrow who's been teaching climate change for the past decade previously had to develop her own lessons as she went along. She says her students respond much better to hands on projects like easy. Gm It allows the students to do things that are way above the capacity of normal classroom. So it's really exciting. The team developing the climate modeling curriculum is recruiting more Nebraska. Teachers for summer workshops on how to use it in their own classrooms next school year. I'm so excited that you all Nebraska or doing this. This is so exciting. Andreessen Rica's isn't education researcher. Who helped the National Research Council develop next generation science standards being used in twenty states and I think teachers are hungry for this kind of work. They're really hungry for this created curriculum. There's just not a whole lot models out

Marc Chandler Nasa Nebraska School National Science Foundation GM Scientist Nebraska Researcher Lincoln Nebraska University Of Nebraska Mary Becca Castillo Morrow Lincoln Forbes NPR State Board Of Education
Mainframes: Timesharing

Command Line Heroes

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Mainframes: Timesharing

"You can't tell g story without telling Dartmouth College Story. Dartmouth was really the Institution Matt. Handed time sharing to Ge as both use of those computers and as a way of doing business dartmouth at a very young mathematics department in the late fifty s and early nineteen sixties and several of the faculty including John. Kennedy and Thomas Kurtz had experienced in computing and saw computing as a way to attract really bright math and science students to the college by Nineteen. Sixty two you. They were ready to propose time sharing to the National Science Foundation to get funding to actually build a campus wide and eventually New England Wide Computing Network. That was efficient for the user. They really thought that computing would be a necessary skill for their students in the coming decades. And they saw time sharing as the form of computing that would enable all of their students to gain computing experience and that was revolutionary. That was something that was really not done anywhere else. At the time even at a place like mit which also implemented time sharing or Carnegie Mellon the users were primarily the scientists and engineers whereas at Dartmouth which was a liberal arts college. The users were nearly all of the student bodies have regardless of area of study or previous experience. When Kennedy and Kurtz who were the math professor's leading this project review proposals and really it was the two twenty five in combination with the data net. Thirty that. They saw the way to implement time sharing. They knew the two twenty five would quickly be upgraded. There were already plans for the two thirty five but it was really that combination of the Dana Net. Thirty which could be used to sort of stop the clocks so to speak and enable communications between users and the mainframe to twenty five or to thirty five that the Dartmouth people sort of latched onto in the early nineteen sixty s mainframe. Computers are so expensive that G. E. TO twenty-five computer cost about two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Actually as delegation from DARTMOUTH WENT TO G in Phoenix hoping to create a partnership with G. E. saying we the faculty and students. Dr Will Create this time sharing system for you if you give us a two twenty five an Edina net thirty for free. Ge declined that offer but they did give the college a substantial discount. I believe it was a sixty percent discount on the machines. General Electric delivered the two twenty five and the data at thirty two dartmouth in March of nineteen sixty four and two undergraduate students acquired responsibility for actually programming and implementing time sharing using those two computers. Their names were John. Itchy and Michael Bush so Jon. Hagey acquired responsibility for the two twenty five and Michael. Bush had programming ownership on the demon at thirty so they had to figure out how to make their respective machines communicate with each other and they took ownership of those responsibilities in not the machines were known as McGee and Bush and the young men were known as two twenty five and thirty. The two of them took this terribly. Personally it wasn't John's machine and Mike's Machine it was John and Mike who were not responding and they would stand at opposite ends of the room and yell at each other at the top of their voices so I think that's the soul of that machine as these two college students who are so immersed in their enthusiasm for making time sharing work that they become the machines and their personal efforts actually enable literally hundreds of thousands of not millions of other students to access competing in the nineteen sixty s via basic time sharing once it was implemented and New Hampshire those students. Some of them actually went to explain what they had done to the GE engineers and very soon after that GE started marketing time sharing as best and a feature of its computers. Ge sells off. Its ME frame. Business in one thousand nine hundred seventy but it retains its time sharing business for at least another decade well into the nineteen eighties and continues to provide time sharing service to individuals and businesses around the world Over the course of several

Dartmouth Dartmouth College Story General Electric John Michael Bush Kennedy Thomas Kurtz New England Wide Computing Net Dana Net Carnegie Mellon National Science Foundation New Hampshire Professor G. E. Edina Mike Phoenix Mcgee
"national science foundation" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Brains On!

"You're listening to brains on but was serious about being curious seines on supported in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation Okay Medica Rochambeau whoever wins this gets to try out the cheese ray. I sweet beams of Gouda here. I come ready. Oh Yeah rock paper scissors yeah mark. Did you tree no that. Wasn't you whatever let's try this again. Yeah One more time rock paper scissors tree okay. I definitely heard tree. Trees is beat rocks because trees can eat sunshine rocks. Can't I think the voices coming from the window they'd be paper because paper is just old trees and old never beats young behind the Binz on the window sill. It's a sapling in a pot and trees be scissors because when we are big and mighty nothing could get through US trees win. I don't think that's how the game works exactly also a talking sapling. Oh please you guys have talking bugs on your show all the time are you. You really surprised good point sapling good point plus Sanan has been experimenting with giving voices to inanimate objects. He's been paranoid that the staplers are plotting against him and he wanted to get Intel from the water cooler so what's going on tiny tree the name of subpoena. I'm just photos synthesizing and pondering the big questions like if I was only in the forest I fell down. Would I make a sound daycare l.. Allow of course I'd make sound and sound like this ow ouch that hurts someone call tree doctor. Hey you're pretty funny. Molly is literally about to do an episode about trees right this very minute it. We should totally of you on me. I possibly talk about psych. I can talk about anything I have so much to say want to hear my thoughts on ponies versus puppies or the best kind of not. I'm a big fan of the figure eight but a timber cakes premier China tree because let's get you to the studio. Okay you guys go ahead. Let me just put this cheese ray way. I'll get you just turn the copier into Cheddar oops..

Sanan US National Science Foundation Molly Intel
"national science foundation" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

Rooster Teeth Podcast

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

"Baby you paid for it. Was it really gosh. Made possible by generous grant from the National Science Foundation national. Maybe that's why I said, good luck with your rentals. Maybe he knew you're going. The time traveller when was Orientals loss. Probably hundreds was probably the last time, it was using acceptable capacity. If I had to guess use that term to describe rugs. I think oriental goes with things things in Asian goes with people. That's what I believe. That is correct. But I don't think anybody uses or what about a robot? This guy that that's been really undergrad since those dogs from Massachusetts started going around, Boston dynamics, the Boston dynamics one. Yeah. Oh, the thing that thing opening the door full pulling it back in Crete fuck up. Yeah. Holding it with foot. Yeah. Hate that. Yeah. I don't teach. It'd be the last thing someone season their life one day that dog opening a door and sticking its leg into open the door. Yeah. That sort of black mirror metalhead. Oh, yeah. Wasn't that a dog a little dog thing even the Veloce Apted inputs foot in the door? No. It was like that was a clever girl and it had like a lever door handle. That pushed in like that was stacked that raptor getting in the door. This thing is like everything's working against it. Well, people don't like the Wilson is blue. People overreact to shit every week. There's some overall I feel bad. I feel that the internet is so vocalist point that I feel bad for anyone wanna make anything shocking for me. Which expects post not blue and people were throwing shit fit. Because he's the genie and he's supposed to be blue. Damn once he wasn't always blue in Aladdin the regional. But then he comes up blue. 'cause everyone's bitching about an hour. Especially genie's blue in Aladdin, the Disney one the Disney want as well also yet, but he can make he makes himself into a man at one point doesn't he? No genie, ever, not blue this JD. Sometimes no, I'm getting knows over your what? Yeah. He's kind of like skin coast. Oh. Forever. The damn sense. Why he's sometimes, you know, put it, but he made himself pollutes faith. Like, they did the Disney thing that they made a green junior read one. That's not accurate. That's awful, you know, or if they'd like they recast Simba as a leopard people would be upset by that. Like, you know, they grow king of the jungle but Lipitor not king of the jungle either. By the way, we'll know lines live in jungles just fill the king of it there too. Good to live in the jungle live in the nice part of the managing remotely. They should ever be remaking certain movies like especially a lot in bullshit. Never keep making everything the beauty and the beast remake. You didn't. So much fucking money Barbara that was green lit every live action that tation of every movement. Here's the thing. All see them. All because I'm a slut for Disney. Title flip for Disney. Perfectly quiet when she said I like things stuff with a new interpretation. And you get the Dow Jo- because you one you watched it. I don't like, but the remake the matrix commission. How good the burly brawl would be today. No. That does not hold up. Very well did so much. Well, yeah. But the first movie that it's so much to make it practical the they wouldn't do that. Again. They wouldn't do time slice again. Probably second third one could stand for reboot. And I I would take a reboot of there's there's a couple of things in the first one that look rough. They need to be updated. Go into that universe. Gillet other people go into the data matrix. There was some good stuff in the NHL. Yeah. The thing going into his bellybutton looks like shit and all this stuff people sometimes like when Neo possess that one agent you like big like it looks like a the cover of an animal software box. I think is mental mental like terrible glitch photo photinia. Well, yeah..

Disney National Science Foundation Boston NHL Crete Massachusetts Neo Dow Jo Barbara one day
"national science foundation" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Security Now

"Came from a US government's backed Radio Free Asia six hundred and thirty five and a half thousand came from the similarly US backed SRI international. Five hundred ninety four thousand from the Swedish International Development cooperation agency SIDA. Five hundred and forty eight thousand from the US NSF the National Science Foundation. And the State Department, which as we noted financed towards initial development and has sustained the project through its first years by covering most of it costs has been reducing its involvement in tour funding in two thousand fifteen it was in for two hundred thousand it went up a little bit in two thousand sixteen to two hundred eighteen but in two thousand seventeen was down to one thirty three. So at the same time the last year the tour project what raised a record four hundred and twenty five thousand seven hundred and nine from its users, which is more than twice the funds. It raised from users in two thousand sixteen but so far this year's is looking a little bit bleak at only ninety five thousand so far as I think we've mentioned in the past Mozilla has been a good partner with tour. They've pledged matching funds for. For user donations and overall Mozilla independently of that has stepped up boosting its contributions from twenty four thousand five hundred in two thousand sixteen to a hopping more than half a million five hundred twenty two thousand one hundred eighty eight thousand last year, and they are expected to be a top contributor in twenty eighteen as well. So yea for the Mozilla foundation for for doing that and duck duck go also contributed twenty five thousand to the tour project in two thousand seventeen just because they wanted to support that. It's also tore project has also received in-kind service donations such as free, cloud computing free hosting a.

US Mozilla Radio Free Asia Swedish International Developm SRI international National Science Foundation State Department partner
"national science foundation" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Brains On!

"I w I c o dot com slash brains on you're listening to brains on where we're serious about being curious brain John supported him part by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Hello. I'm usa. Nice to meet you who I'm ISA past the source sauce. Hey isa. What are you doing? I'm trying to figure out what I would sound like when I'm older, maybe like this. I'm isa. I'm thirty seven I work in sales. I know something we could try hold on hold on. Here. It is the kinda creepy voice manipulator, Why's it kind of creepy because it can make me sound like this. And I like the bench press refrigerators do you mean next? This is my Russell bears for a living with the bears, and I are friends we can also go. Hi, check it out. I'm Ali, I'm annouce, and here's my L. Sun gate. Do I am enough. And I liked to dance. Do do do do. Can reporting for duty. I write a mass school actually in shoebox, see fun, but kinda creepy. Let's keep it with just in case we need it later in the show. Speaking of which. That the song. Keep on listening. This is brains on from American public media. I'm Ali blue. And my co host today is eleven year old ISA from Nyack New York. I ISA I'm Ali today. We're talking about talking specifically our voices ISA. You got us thinking about this. When you sent us a choir of questions, do you? Remember all of the questions about voices? You had. Yeah. Can you tell us a couple of them? I wondered how people's voices sounded different and how animals sound different to from people so many questions, really. That's great. We like when people have a lot of questions. Well, you are not the only one interested in voices. We've heard from a lot of listeners, but. I'm Jackson from Reno Nevada. And my question is have is your voice box make you speak. My name is Ben on from Ohio in I want. To know why boys angles voices are different. My name is anti from Stu, Germany. And my question is why. Change us. We get older. My name is Morley. And my name is Anthony. Saskatoon canada. Is when we talk. How does this sound of our voice get made high many, MS Libby Netherland, Colorado wire people's voices different by. Wow. That's a volcano voice questions. Indeed. Let's start with the basics here to help. Do that is Amy Shah. She's a speech and voice expert and professor at Stockton university..

Ali blue National Science Foundation John Amy Shah Libby Netherland bears Morley Nyack New York Ben Anthony L. Sun gate Reno Nevada Saskatoon Stu professor Stockton university Ohio Colorado Germany eleven year
"national science foundation" Discussed on Flash Forward

Flash Forward

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Flash Forward

"Okay. Here's the thing we're meant to believe. Again. I'm just repeating what I'm reading right now, but this is what they're saying. We're supposed to believe that this infection is brand new Dame out of nowhere. These scientists want us to think there was simply no warning, no signs, not a single case that made anybody say, hey, wait a minute. Now this is kind of weird and now now we have what thousands of cases. Again, there's something about all of this that the longer it goes on the more incredulous I am at it. When you realize the depth the planning the the number of people involved here, what's the budget for the National Science Foundation? Again, eight billion dollars, and I'm supposed to believe that this was a complete surprise. Now I can imagine there are people in the audience saying you're over thinking this. They're just idiots. They're just bad at their jobs. You know, scientists are full of it. You know that they, they take the money and they score a little way and it's a wasting. Yes, yes, certainly, that's true. Most cases, but this listen, I, I just don't buy it. I don't buy it. There is something more going on here. Something they don't want you to know. We're talking about literal mind control here, and you expect me to believe that not a single person and the government knew about it, please. The cat's gotten on the bag and they're just doing damage control. Blood donation in the United States has screeched to a halt as the outbreak continues to worsen the FDA originally mandated that all donated blood be tested for him. But since the mandate several cases have been reported of the virus being spread via blood donation in the wake of the transmission donation has been paused, completely, and experts. Worry that blood banks might soon dry up completely. Next..

National Science Foundation FDA United States eight billion dollars
"national science foundation" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"At how rates and gender pandering corrupt the university and undermine our culture. I I have to wonder about this. If it's really as bad as you say, it is domestically that everybody's playing this game in the private sector, which I have to wonder if they really everybody is because it would seem to be those who don't play by this game would would automatically become out winners. I would think shareholders really would care about that. But internationally. There's no such move toward this kind of illegally correct nonsense. This is a great way for the companies from the United States in this highly competitive twenty-first-century to get their butts had to drill on a silver platter. I mean, there is a real world out there, and it doesn't play by these rules. It's very worrisome, Jim. And if Trump really wanted to level the playing field between the US and China he would immediately. Airlift in a few boatloads of gender Sierras to Chinese universities because they are real relentlessly ruthlessly marriage Socratic, they obviously have other problems with regards to corruption, but you can believe that they don't give a damn what the gender composition is of their advanced labs, in computing or genetic research, and and to the extent that we allow ourselves to be diverted from the disinterested pursuit of science into politics. I mean, we've seen this already happened with war. You would think that you know, war matters and that the idea of putting females into combat unit, which not only requires the lowering physical standards inevitably. But introduces the. Irrelevant. The the the the poison of EROs into units that must be coherent. And and be able to trust each other. You have people, you know, getting into fistfights over females in Iraq. You would think that war would be also one of those things that would be on identity politics. It's not the reason we have females in combat unit is simply to qualify. Females for four star general status in the Pentagon. It has nothing to do with improving our war making abilities and everything to do with gender politics. The same holds true in science. You would think that that would be a bright line. Imagine no line across which people do not cross. But in fact, it is being crossed as hard as it is to believe that. But again, I, you know, I write about this in the book what's coming out of the National Science Foundation and out of all colleges is to impose. And and and many of our big tech firms. There was a suit filed against YouTube because one of the recruiters was told do not interview white males for entry level engineering positions interview. Only females and so called underrepresented minorities, which are blacks and Hispanics. Other words, don't bother interview any Asians either. No, asians. No. They don't count for diversity. Another great chapter title chapter. Eight of the book the diversity delusion the fainting couch at Columbia, the fainting couch. Really? Really? I mean, you have females on college campuses today. Completely reenacting a Victorian ethos that makes males the guardians of female wellbeing. Bales who were drunk have responsibility for themselves and for the females females who were drunk are exempt of any decision making that might prevent them from getting involved in a drunken hookup with a guy. They barely know Columbia University put together a so-called sexual respect initiative that everybody on campus had to participate in that pedaled, just the usual left wing ideology about rape culture. Completely. Putting an imprint watch or on this drunken promiscuous hookup culture and a graduate student who I know who was studying actually a serious subject on at Columbia. That does not even he's so worried about his academic future that he would not even allow me to identify the major figure in western civilization that he is researching. But he said what the the significance of this Columbia's sexual respect initiative. Is that dissenters like may are losing the right to be silent and withdraw. He's a religious conservative and believes actually if you can if you can point this in the once central proposition that it is best for a male and female who were in love to wait until marriage before having sex. He is no longer allowed to hold that view quietly to himself, but was re- required to participate by watching videos or attending slut walks things like that. Reeducation centers in in in in communist countries. You do not you're not allowed freedom of thought you you must conform or else. George orwell. You were merely a few years too early. One eight six six five O, JIMBO back in a moment, by way, three hundred twenty nine pounds. I was a heart attack waiting to happen. I got Andro four hundred it makes me not so hungry. I started noticing more energy they notice my belly was starting to shrink. I started seeing weight come off eighty pounds. I went for three thirty to forty five four fifty six year old guy to lose that much weight. It took some brother, I feel great. I feel like I was when I was thirty five years old that was Reuben now. Listen to a Josh says about Andro four hundred all time man that stuff really works. It was insane. I've heard the commercials for a decade. I think I'm just gonna try it. My pants are falling off it really works about suits last year for my new job at their falling off of this is the same guys..

Columbia United States YouTube National Science Foundation George orwell Jim Pentagon Trump Columbia University Iraq Reuben graduate student Bales rape China Josh Andro three hundred twenty nine poun forty five four fifty six year
"national science foundation" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"From the National Science Foundation so you're funding? Was dependent on. Your working Chinese scientists yes absolutely one. On the government wants you to collaborate and the other arm of the government, says it's across. This yet He faced eighty years in prison What was that like. It put a lot of stress Davies trust Sometimes become. Strikingly, unbearable Toll I remember pleading with my family Let's Not. Fault If we hold on The truth If we fold Four months after she's. Arrest his lawyer Peter Zeidan bird pointed out the inconsistencies to the US attorney's, office in Philadelphia three weeks later they. Dropped the case Zeidan Burg sees disturbing parallels with, Sherry Chen's case how does she? Get in trouble the story started when she, went to China To visit her parents, she had a somewhat happenstance meeting with. A former classmate of hers vice minister in the water ministry the vice minister, asked Jen how the US pays for. Dam repairs did you think there was anything I, don't know secretive about that information? Now across my mind I is say Craig When Chen, got back to Ohio she asked her boss for publicly available. Information which she did send to her former classmate she also searched this government database since she wasn't a regular, user Chen borrowed a password from her colleague sharing, passwords was, common in the office she. Never sent information from the database to China but federal prosecutors charged with illegally. Accessing and stealing restricted information prosecutors also charged her with. Lying about the, password, Chen initially, denied that a colleague had emailed. It to her but she remembered after investigators showed her the Email her. Colleague Ray Davis initially forgot to he wasn't charged with miss remembering, or failing to remember giving her. The password he only remembered, it when they showed him the Email. And he said literally oh God? That was almost a year ago I. Forgot, all about that, wasn't that sure is Reaction as well it was why the disparate reactions from the. Government you know the fact is Sherry Chen as a. Chinese American and, her, colleague was, Caucasian and with Sherry everything she. Did they thought that his somehow nefarious or. Somehow Corrupt was forgetfulness and they said yes ally but other is nominal you'll come forgetting something for me. Is the crime. Chen faced forty years in prison for lying. About the password and accessing the database the week before the trial Zeidan Berg took his case to. Carter Stewart who was the, US attorney for the southern district of Ohio the next day Stewart dropped the charges in two thousand. Sixteen we found the Justice department had one convictions in at least fourteen cases related to. Chinese economic espionage in the previous four years it, had lost, a case at trial charges were dropped against five Chinese-born scientists who are American, citizens.

Sherry Chen Ray Davis Zeidan Burg Zeidan Berg Peter Zeidan US attorney Ohio China National Science Foundation vice minister Jen Carter Stewart US Davies Justice department Philadelphia Craig eighty years Four months
"national science foundation" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Kind of high level of course the tools of the time we're not would not allow that right away but that was the that was the driving force and this technology was built by military contractor so right away you had a military designed for this technology or an intent the reason why it was being funded as a pentagon project and then you had it actually being built by military contractor and so already there's this private public aspect to it right from the very beginning that plugs into the military district complex and plugs into corporate america in that plugs into you know empire management in in the age of the cold war and so yeah it's it's it's there and look the internet was privatized starting late eighties and and finish the mid nineties and that was a very specific process that actually very people know about so the national science foundation was essentially tasked with bringing the arpanet right these this military network that was to connect attached to military research to transfer to civilian sector and the way that it did that starting late nineteen eighties was to was to essentially behind closed doors without really public debate come up with a plan that would fund national internet perspective and then but design it in a way that as soon as it was commercially viable that is as soon as there were enough customers out there that could sustain a business model for internet service providers the national science foundation which is agency would privatize it too and so that's exactly what happens starting in beginning late eighties and including nineteen ninety five when it was when the national science foundation finally got out completely of of the network but the internet has the internet as we the foundation of this civilian internet right was actually another government network called the nsf net the national science foundation network that was completely funded by the federal government and privatize and it was that was explicitly that was that was a plan and i even you know in my book i even talked to a guy who you know who.

national science foundation pentagon
"national science foundation" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Here & Now

"Yousef pigment of the mole dr subramanian joins us from oregon state university where he's a professor of material sciences and where we understand several years ago you accidentally discovered what you're calling yimin blue again it's here now dot org as you were looking for computer material in two thousand nine ground from national science foundation discovered it exotic materials which find useful in chronic like computers so in fact the project is nothing to do with discovering colored pigment so you put together three elements as we understand it again to try to find something that was maybe what a semiconductor or something that could be used in a computer you put it in the oven to bake it pull out this what i mean how would you describe what you i saw well i asked my then graduate student to to three competence on this week it remarks lead which is white indium oxide which is yellow manganese oxide which is black next morning i was in the lab and he pulled a sample of the furnace who those three hundred degree fed 'em height and i was shocked because the came out brew the beginning i thought he'd be a mistake i thought it'd be like brown or black then i ask him to repeat the experiment and we could again the blue brew is the most difficult color to make before it extremely stable so we had me really excited and we find this to be the fuster neum looping in two hundred years it's been described and i'm i'm reading in bloomberg as so radiant so fantastic almost extraterrestial the ripest vanu shean blueberry cleaned polished and glowing from within so suddenly you're a sensation in the color world but let's back up talk about why it's so hard to make pigment we know that much color doesn't exist we see blue eyes but there's really no blue in the is it's the way the light reflects we might see blue in nature but it's not like you can take a feather that's blue and grounded up and get blue talk about white so hard to make pigments though few blue pigments on to the mankind now for example most of the blue uc in nature let you blue.

Yousef oregon state university national science foundation bloomberg dr subramanian professor of material sciences graduate student three hundred degree two hundred years
"national science foundation" Discussed on Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

"Only give a shortlist of things tax month were cardi b tax me actually went towards so that she understand and twenty fourteen in i spent three hundred eighty seven thousand for ravitz to receive swedish massages to see if it helped illness the national science foundation spent eight hundred fifty six thousand teaching mountain lions how to walk on treadmills and the national science foundation also spent three engine thirty one thousand to see how many times hungry people tried instead have voodoo dolls when hundred cardi b side and at the risk of being held liable for my next statement i think people order those three study should also be stabbed with the same knife for hungry people or at least use of budo dog created in their likeness i wonder i'm tired of this she this leads out of what i just now said now you latch on cardi b as a representative for tax policy what i'm saying because cardi b's spoke out about taxes in about her tax money being taken away in about what is being spent on because now because servative movement is like oh says something about texas that's good and did you see the second part of it on the second part of it she says if you own me any money hold that shit until next year like next year the tax nice yeah that was the second bar was like if you okay she's learned she's learning real quick.

national science foundation representative texas cardi b
"national science foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is presented by the national science foundation i'm she metzner when they lose agrees kqed provides a source of news that s well rounded and diverse in all the more we know about each other the schlogl our connections can be kqed keep the conversation going all breakthrough after months of insults and threats president trump agrees to bilateral talks with north korea on robber kosta inside the president's highstakes diplomatic gambled tonight on washington we i've played to first from that his leadership and his maximum crush the policy together with international solidarity both toss at this juncture president trump prepares for a historic facetoface meeting with north korean leader kim jong un can the dealmaker convinced the dictator to dismantle his nuclear program the president seems cautiously optimistic writing in a tweet great progress being made but sanctions will remain until an agreement is reached comedian being planned plus the longstanding rules of global trade are offended as mr trump signs off on new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports ignoring opposition from republicans white house advisors and us allies japan calls it regrettable china harmful in south korea says the tariffs are unjust the president remains defiant the actions were taken today are not a matter of choice there are a matter of necessity for our secured we discuss it all with kayla taush of cnbc peter baker of the new york times kimberly atkins of the boston herald in monte rajoo of cnn this year's washington week funding is provided by their leadership his instinctive they understand the challenges of today and the technologies of tomorrow so golden veterans we call them part of our teeth.

new york times cnbc japan mr trump facetoface kqed cnn monte rajoo boston herald kimberly atkins national science foundation peter baker kayla taush south korea us kim jong un washington president
"national science foundation" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"One one the universe he has installed a unique toilet in urinal any campus engineering building name at converting human urine into agricultural fertilisers the split bowl toilet was debut tuesday at the g to brown building on the universities and arbor campus is designed to sense out ways to tweet treatment plant but the urine will be routed to holding tank the national science foundation is sailors the project is part of an effort that will examine the technological requirements andsocial attitues related to urinebased fertilizers i'm inmates ukpabi one it is valentine show the westwood one radio met worth borders of border water to water our next guest ed plein is an investigative journalists and author he's got a new book out called all out war plugged destroy donald trump uh and some of the more slow see as saying this book is it hiv finally commissioned a second dossier in order to in trump's quote unquote and headlines on the line to chat with us about an ad how are you i'm great great i was uh cronje around the internet and i see that representative brad sherman of california says it he's going to force a vote on impeachment before christmas force of vote on impeachment i yeah lots of luck would that exactly exactly but it just shows you that there are these people who are absolutely out donald trump and the red sherman and people like him are just the tip of the iceberg let's talk about this you see in the book with hillary commission to second dossier tell us about that philly's asked her not ask but told her of former campaign aides to.

national science foundation donald trump brad sherman california philly arbor campus valentine westwood ed plein representative christmas hillary
"national science foundation" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Brains On!

"Have you seen shafts on cooking shows you use suwito and think that looks really fun now jewel suwito let you do that at home to get yours at visit chefs steps dot com slash jewel and use the code brains to get fifteen dollars off for a limited time that's chef steps dot com slash j o u l e offer code be r a i n s jewell perfect food every time have you seen shafts on cooking shows you use suwito and think that looks really fun now jewel suwito let you do that at home to get yours at visit chefs steps dot com slash jewel and use the code brains to get fifteen dollars off for a limited time that chef steps dot com slash j o u l e offer code v r a i n s jewell perfect food every time you're listening their brains on where are serious about being curious brains on is supported in part by a grant from the national science foundation wrongful death younes upon billions of them are up this programme to bring you want an update on looks like there's more these particles than we thought there are actually small particles and adam surrounding us quite plumbing update the passing through us right now heart fears overtook momentous rhetorically to my mother relax atoms are nothing to be scared about they helped make up everything around us they're great in fact in today's show we're going to take a closer look adams and beyond you're listening to reins on for american public media i'm molly bloom in with me today is ten year old mary pool from atlanta highbury poll i today we are looking at some pretty tiny particles like adams and we're going to get even smaller to figure out this question hi my name is spirit on and from tasks new mexico met question is.

national science foundation molly bloom adams mexico atlanta fifteen dollars ten year
"national science foundation" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"national science foundation" Discussed on Here & Now

"Unprecedentedly steep cuts to science funding in federal agencies like the national institutes of health like the national science foundation and the department of energy and so many others so the scientific community is very worried and i think we all should be worry because scientific research takes a long time many of these nobel prizewinners this week are being honoured for no discoveries that they started making forty years ago with the gravitational wave observatory for example it took forty years of continuous effort supported by the national science foundation to get to this discovery that's really revolutionized our understanding of our place in the universe and it's going to take that kind of continued sustained support to make the discoveries of the future what if a member of congress who is in favour of these cuts makes the case that private money should be used for the scientific research has that reasonable or no um i think it's not reasonable to expect private companies to invest in longterm basic bluesky research companies do invest a lot in research and development in the united states they invest in applied research or development that will bring the discoveries that come out of our labs to the marketplace in the form new products and services and technologies but it's a no companies interest to make investments in basic chemistry basic biology because the returns are too far away and there to diffuse for a company to capture that's why over the past seven decades the federal government has invested in basic research and companies have invested down the road in research and development to take advantage of the discoveries that come out of the basic research the federal government supports.

national science foundation gravitational wave observatory congress united states federal government forty years seven decades