22 Burst results for "National Power"

Coronavirus: Pac-12 cancels all non-conference games in football, other fall sports

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: Pac-12 cancels all non-conference games in football, other fall sports

"Nonconference football games won't be happening this fall for U. S. C. L. A and the rest of the pack 12 1 of football's greatest annual rivalries won't be happening this year matchup worthy of the glory of the past. It's us see Notre Dame that long time television staple of NBC sports and all other nonconference games in all sports involving Pac 12 teams have been scrapped this year. As the league follows the Big 10 and adjusting to the reality of the Corona virus Outbreak. Commissioner Larry Scott didn't really underscores the need to be a flexible Nimble and not get blocked in any kind of one position. We needed to keep learning and understanding what what was happening until the latest point where we have to make a decision. One way or another. The Trojans also lose a marquee opening weekend matchup in Arlington, Texas, against National Power. Alabama. The Pac 12 says it hopes there will be athletic events this season, but on Li of the virus situation warrants

PAC NBC Larry Scott Football Commissioner Alabama National Power Arlington Trojans U. S. C. L. Texas
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 2 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Here's Who Really Benefits From The Dominance Of The U.S. Dollar

Odd Lots

07:13 min | 4 months ago

Here's Who Really Benefits From The Dominance Of The U.S. Dollar

"So Tracy. I hate to say that brought this whole crisis. There has been sort of one John of article or one genre of discussion. And I've never really been comfortable with. And that is people making really big picture forecasts or statements about sort of the future of the world. I Yeah I mean it feels like a little bit early to be jumping to discussing the second order effects right like there's so much to talk about right now as these things are actually unfolded. Yeah exactly and of course one of the big questions that's out there and that everyone wants you on and I'm GonNa give it to and I've written about it and I've talked about. It is what happens was sort of globalisation. What happens with future of the dollar the US's Preeminent role in the global financial system? We sort of talked about it a little bit with Adam to talk about it with other Other people as well and it's of course incredibly intriguing to discuss we still We just don't know anything. Yeah I think that's true and it definitely falls into one of those sort of big picture. Things that people are talking about at the moment. And it's something that we've sort of discussed on various episodes before right. Dollar dominance has definitely been a theme for the past year or so on our show. You little skeptical when I was like all. I don't think we should have these big picture. Future conversations. You seem a little skeptical of my now. I get it I mean. I don't think anyone really knows at the moment so a lot of it is speculation but also markets are always looking so I kind of get why people are naturally template to be looking at the big picture topics true. Yeah I guess you'd have to do so anyway. We're not going to make a big. We're not trying to make a big forecast here today. But as we talk about globalization as we talk about the dollar I do think it is useful to at least understand how it got to the current system what the current setup is. And what's actually yeah? Basically understand the the current world order and how we got her. Yeah I think that's a great idea and the dollar is so much a heart of the global financial system that we sort of take for granted. But it's definitely worthwhile to step back for a second and things like all. How did we get into a position? Where emerging markets are all like rushing to issue billions of dollars worth of dollar denominated debt? How did we get to a position? Where all of trade finances basically denominated in dollars. Why has that happened right exactly right and you know. There's a lot of misconceptions about all of this. How TRADE WORKS. Who benefits from the strong dollar or who benefits from the dollar permanent role we often hear of. Us ability to issue dollars as a privilege. But it's not. It's not really that a clear. We talked about this a little bit recently on an episode with met climb but the sort of the preference of different actors within the global economy regarding current arrangement is not as as clean as one might one might right and there is an argument that POPs up every once in a while but having the dollar so enmeshed in the financial system can actually be a negative for the US. And we've seen that crop recently with you know people talk about the Fed being the world's central banker does that sort of constrain. What it can do at times like this even before then so yeah definitely worth talking up okay. So today we are going to talk about that and we have a recent get. We actually talked about talk with him. Several weeks ago about Municipal debt when he is the CO author of a recent essay titled the Class Politics of the dollar system for the website. Phenomenal world is Yaacov Fagin. He's the associate director of the future. Capitalism program at the Berggruen Institute. And we're GONNA talk about how we got to this a the state how the dollar got to the state who really benefits from it. Who gets hurt from it and what it really means to preserve it so knockoff. Thank you very much for joining us. I should note that your co author. Dominick make it unfortunately today by glad we have you. What are you? Start by telling us what you The big picture of what your goal was with his essay. The class all its dollar system in sort of this essay was kind of a really long time coming And I really the person the two peop- The three people. I should probably think the most for kind of this happened are dominic who kind of got us to. Right. It's And the James Institute obviously for publishing yet but there's also someone else in the background of this essay. Is Nils Gilman? Who is my boss at the Berggruen Institute in over the years I've worked with him. We've had this very long conversation about we know. Why does the world use the dollar? And why is it a problem and he you know he's not specialist in international finance and this stuff is really technical and I spent like quite a long time kind of in a conversation with him like kind of pouring this stuff out right eventually told me you need to write this essay up right. You need to write an essay that just gives a literature review essentially of this kind of point of view of what the dollar system is politically. And why it's not necessarily you know very clear cut America versus the world story and so eventually this got written up right and that's the kind of story we're trying to tell is. It's very hard to pin down a national interest in the world that's hybrid as Perry Languid. Say Right it's a world in which there is a private system that's yearly inter mediating on an international level an a national in the system in which nations are essentially creating public goods called units of account right and that this international system mediates this hierarchy is of these units of account just as much as national power dynamics do so lucas through useless. Then talk about. The political system are around the dollar. What is that exactly? So argument is that it's actually class. Right is almost a or at least like social stratification as a kind of Meta politics right that the dollar is actually pretty good for a large cross section of people no matter what their position in the global value chain or where they're located and it's pretty bad for another other across sections again without considering international boundaries. That they are. It's pretty bad for a lot of people no matter where they're located or what part of the global value chain there

United States Berggruen Institute Tracy National Power John Trade FED Yaacov Fagin Perry Languid Adam Associate Director Nils Gilman Dominick James Institute Dominic America Lucas
Trump claims he, not governors, has authority on opening state economies

Glenn Beck

13:58 min | 5 months ago

Trump claims he, not governors, has authority on opening state economies

"Donald trump just tweeted for the purpose of creating conflict and confusion some of the fake news media are saying that it is the governor's decision to open up the state's not that of the president the United States and the federal government let it be fully understood that this is incorrect no no that's not incorrect it is not the president's place out what I think what he's doing here is you notice he's not he's not flexing the muscle of the presidency to close down the country he's leading the governor's very close it down he's he's fighting now for the ability to open it back up because he thinks that governors are going to fight him democratic governors are going to fight him for political reasons I think that is just wrong and you know this is wrong but he hasn't been he hasn't taken that authority to close it down why is he taking that authority to open it back up because he thinks that these governors are going to you know some of these governors little one and in Virginia not willing to open up until the middle of June now maybe that's right but I doubt it yeah I know they are and I know they've closed now the schools in New York all the way toward I think G. June twenty six or something was the end of their school calendar in hand which is not a surprise in New York I mean it's gonna go on for a while there but I think Cuomo said something the effect of looking for closing the schools down that means we're closing everything down the economy's closed down until then so they're looking they are the most extreme part of this different case yeah that's a different that's a different case but you're right it's a big New York is New York yes it's gonna be it's gonna be different you know I I hope hopefully this is just a it seems like he's been holding on to this power for a while in this idea that it's kind of like threat almost ready saying if you don't handle this rationally I'm gonna step in I don't know that he has any power to step in in this situation you know certainly would be challenged and I don't know that it would be constitutional to say you have to be I don't know you overrule the states like that I don't know but he has the power to that he's obviously trying to claim it I don't know if he has I think one of the one of the best parts of the way he's handled this so far is that he's been restrained we were just praising him earlier in the show from for his restraint in trying to grapple sorts of national power hopefully he's not going down that road I don't know how you would do it you can order people to go back to work I don't even without the function of that would work you know you can say I guess you could try to threaten us a good state by saying don't punish people if they do go back to work but I don't know how you I mean I don't think our system would allow for none of this no no none of that would be checks and balances would kick in the president couldn't do that if the governor says Hey we're in a national emergency and the governor has the right their state emergency the governor has a right to declare a state emergency now that could screw with their federal funding you know but I don't think the president would do that unless it was really obvious like he's not gonna screw with the federal funding of New York why would you screw the federal funding of New York unless it was like you know we're keeping it close for the next eighteen months well okay really you're gonna keep the entire state of New York close for the next eighteen months and there are those people that are talking that way I don't think Cuomo is and I don't know any governors that are but I've heard people say you know we should be close for the next eighteen months you know we are talking about rolling blackouts for the next eighteen to twenty four and that might be why he's you know it might be if there's if Dallas all of a sudden starts to have really bad cases to close Dallas down for a little while everybody in this area stay in place you know that that's theirs I don't think there's anything wrong with rolling blackouts as long as we know what the metrics are yeah look there are certain situations that get too bad and you and you you have to do things though I just it's it's going to be interesting to see how long people can take that we keep using this eighteen months I mean you did the corona virus update there's no there's no definitive end of S. right like no not the the idea that we're gonna have a vaccine in twelve to eighteen months doctors are calling it a miracle they've never done it that fast ever they also told us very clearly that we're gonna have an HIV vaccine without all started up we never got one you know it another corona viruses the common cold you have exceeded that I know we don't these are not sure things that will ever get a vaccine I mean probably the better possibility which could provide a shorter term solution of this and is is it realistic that we can hopefully depend on would be a treatment right if one of these things like Haider hydroxy Cork what is obviously been the one talked about the most but there's lots of them there's been some positives about another one that trump is mentioned that I won't one of the anti viral things they had initially designed for HIV wound up being you know having some promising more these clinical studies as well all we need is to find something that will back it off from you know if you're in the hospital with a ten out of ten it can bring it back to an eight out of ten that's really all we need and that sort of thing I think with the with the full power of not only the United States N. you know capitalism and innovation all everybody trying to find the same thing it's really happening around the world as well I'm optimistic we'll get there eventually but it is a you know until we have that people are we can talk all we want about opening up the economy we is that if we look at these numbers like crazy all the numbers are coming out before any government bans were instituted and you saw fifty sixty seventy percent drop offs in traffic to restaurants because people didn't want to die right and until you can convince them they're not going to die it doesn't matter if you quote unquote open up the economy people don't want to go outside right now this is like you know you're not just government since doing this right you're you're gonna it's gonna take a massive and the best ad campaign of probably American history to get us to go back quickly to normal life going to restaurants going in the crowds having parties everything else it'll take a long time some people will do it but I think there's gonna be a lot of people that will stay out of the restaurants for a very very long time unless they they you know cut the you know cut the number of people in there by half or whatever and still then I'm not I don't know I'm not that comfortable I don't know you know I don't know all the people in there and I don't know who's sick and who's who's not say consider it set for a minute until you can come up with a vaccine that we won't be comfortable if you don't come up with a vaccine at least have some sort of way of understanding you've been tested and you don't currently have it or you have the antibodies when that happens then we'll start to normalize again but without those things it's not gonna be normal but we can open the economy back up more than it already is there is a great article on medium and and it was the I don't know six or seven reasons why we should open the economy first one we've already flattened the curve we've now gone from predictions of millions of deaths to hundreds of thousands and now we're predicting about sixty thousand deaths the next one is economic collapse and unemployment is destroying families this one is really really true we'll be lucky if the job losses are not twenty five million and to put that into perspective twenty five million is about the population of the great state of Texas and the great state of Texas is the size of half of the continental US and that's not I mean it's obvious going to be worse than that merry at sixteen it's it's the obviously going to be worse than so and that is that's only the ones that we're counting there are so many problems that come with unemployment the the the fact that you'll have suicides you'll have health problems you won't be able to see doctors as much all of these things that causes massive suicidal tendencies the next one we have not saturated the healthcare system in New York we came close but the rest is pretty good and the reason why we're having problems is because of PP is in and things like that if we can get the mask situation under control if you know we with the federal government ordered five hundred million masks if we can get the mask shortage under control and we can get all of the gallons and everything else that we need for the hospitals if we get the medicine that we need for the hospitals as long as we don't burn our doctors and patients out we we're doing good will be set for the next wave if we're not set for the next wave there is a problem we should be we should be working on that right now a suicide will kill almost as many people as covert aid this year and twenty eighteen there were forty eight thousand recorded suicides for but economic ruin results in a wide range of health problems suicide mental health issues loss of health insurance reluctance to visit doctors in light of the financial hardship increases in a in the substance abuse blah blah blah that is on top of the delay in nod to non covalent care SO forty eight thousand deaths in twenty eighteen how many suicides will it be this year the P. P. limited but now becoming more available and this one is the last point and I this is one I've been ringing the bell on from the beginning of this authority should show clear evidence regarding the benefits of indefinite lockdown we need to see what the parameters are what are you what are you looking for what are you looking at to make these decisions right now we know that the states have been looking at cove it now this this website that was started by a group of progressive activists who were leading a charge against Donald Trump most of the states were using that it's unbelievably flawed the numbers on cove it now are are way way way off children million dead in Texas alone ridiculous kinds of numbers the states were using that website to predict what was going on that stuff is got to stop we need to know what are the parameters what are you looking for in numbers what are the what are the things in the hospitals that you're looking for what what is the number of new infections that says okay we're probably pretty safe I'd like to have a discussion of those things in public I'd like to know what those things are that are open that are keeping us from opening or telling us we should open what are those things and are they saying are they rational and are they scientifically provable this is too big to go off of just somebody's got yeah no it's definitely true and and hopefully were at least a little bit past the top of this right I mean it the deaths dropped yesterday pretty significantly there's part of that is just record brick you know recording in that for whatever reason you know Sundays especially Easter Sunday there's you know people aren't working and don't necessarily read a report every single death if we can get past this week without two thousand over two thousand again because we've been over two thousand a couple times once or twice we get through this week without two thousand it may show that we are past the peak of this which would be really encouraging but really encouraging you know like the trade was great sample which are someone earlier from Detroit about how bad this was I mean Detroit is really in the middle of it New Orleans is in the middle of it there's several cities that are breaking out that I can be is as bad as New York obviously population wise but they are you know on the wrong side of this and it's increasing are getting worse in some cases so hopefully we can at least get past this peak and then week once we get past the like panic of this first moment there's going to be a touch of the period here coming I think to the end of the month where this sort of like organized hopefully rollout of people being able to go back and feeling that they're not going to you know get sick just by going out and doing the basic things they want to do with life hopefully that's

Donald Trump President Trump United States Federal Government
"national power" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"national power" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Controlling more of what you do. You'll see says almost the same thing in private when we as a public use to invest in new technologies, we deserve a return on that investment. And for far too long. We gave money that tesla. We gave money to a ton of people, and we got no return. So what's going to change this time? Celebral? We're going to do another cylindrical. We're going to give them billions of dollars and then watch that money. Get discharged all that money that all those loans discharged in bankruptcy court. So that. The the owners of the company make out like bandits drawing down salaries, while the shareholders end up with nothing and the tax payers end up with nothing on our investment that the public made in creating technologies, and it's about time that we get our do because it's the public that funded and finance a lot of innovative technologies. And that's another. What what were those? The iphone? Smartphones. What? What? Absolutely fascinating to me. How this kind of ignorance passes for I don't I don't know. What? To achieve these aims that they have somehow reversing what mother nature does. A green new deal. According to them. Is going to have to check a number of boxes. Within ten years. She wants one hundred percent of national power from renewable sources. She wants a national smart grid and upgrade to every residential and industrial building for energy efficiency, decarbonising of industry and infrastructure massive investment in the capture of greenhouse gases and green technology is a major export. There are riots going on in Paris right now. Because mccrone is part of his agreement with the Paris climate accord's has imposed massive taxes on the working class in France. And so they've gone to the streets, the yellow jackets have gone to the streets. And well, it's not exactly romance in Paris right now. Not sure I'd want to go. Van jones. The once again self-avowed communist from the Obama administration and now on CNN. Maybe this statement, first of all I just. Just brings tears to your eyes to hear you. Degree it brings tears to the ignorance. And the absolute up ending of a free market capitalist society that has grown the most powerful nation on earth and brought more to alleviate poverty than anything in the history of mankind. To throw it away on these massive government programs brings tears to my eyes to van. It's unbelievable and Bill and Bernie myself in a bunch of other people here, we tried to take this hill and two thousand eight can how did that work out. You did. You took that hill in two thousand eight and we spent trillions of dollars. What did it too? Not a big part of Obama's agenda was essentially the green new deal. I had a job in the White House to try to implement it. Right wing came. After me I had to resign under fire. Then they came after Bill, and we can get it done. But. I think you're going to get it done. And.

Paris Obama Bill tesla Van jones Obama administration White House national power France Bernie CNN one hundred percent ten years
"national power" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stanford University and the author of empire of guns the violent making of the industrial revolution. Welcome to the takeaway Preah. Thank you for having me. So this is a war that claimed millions of lives in terms of the outcome. What was what did this war achieve and did the outcomes match up with the goals of the countries that were involved? So the war absolutely transformed the world, but not in the ways that we're anticipated by the players who I started it in nineteen fourteen. So in one thousand fourteen a lot of the European powers who I joined the war had very nationalistic goals in mind, and it was almost sort of a test of national power and merit. Right. But by the end of the war, it's about lots of other things it's about the remaking of the Middle East. It's about a new form of global governance. It's about the loss of an entire generation. It's about the Russian revolution. And the new. New impetus to anti-colonial movements around the world. It's about the rise of the United States. I mean, a lot of really important outcomes emerge, but they don't need Lee line up with what the players had set out to achieve and it was often referred to as the war to end all wars. And fortunately, it was the first World War, which indicates we had a second. What was the ward end? All war supposed to mean. I think once it became clear that the cost of this war. We're going to be really high the human costs of it became important that we've done this. If we're doing this. It has to be award an award that will settle those questions of those nationalist rivalries, once and for all, but of course, ironically, it was a war that didn't really end. And that produced a piece that didn't produce piece so the British the war goes on well into the nineteen twenties. It doesn't end neatly on our. This day. And I'm wondering one hundred years ago for a many folks would feel completely removed from where we are today. But can you give us a sense of what some of the impact World War One had on our current geopolitical movement in other ways that it's really shaped the world that we live in. So a geopolitical level a lot of the sort of conflicts and tensions and sort of the western approach to trying to manage those tensions in the Middle East come directly from while we want because that war was the end of the Ottoman empire. That was the power that was kind of straddling that homeless meant what we call the Middle East that area for several centuries before in World War One Britain destroys of the Ottoman empire. And what comes out of it is this sort of made up nation state structure. I mean, I it's a series of colonial states colonized states run by the French and the British and then it's eventually these nation states and a lot of the borders. A lot of the kind of government structures and style the support for authority thirteen rulers in those governments a lot of this has been shaped by British and French and American actions in the region since World War One. So geopolitically, I think that's a huge sort of legacy that we're still dealing with, of course, beyond that. There's also the the start of the league of nations the first attempt at creating an institution for international governance and the air to that is the United Nations we have the Russian revolution. Which of course, started the Cold War at a political level domestically. Also, there's so many changes the way the British state governments in many of the participating countries were transformed during the war, and they just developed capacities. And arrange that didn't go away neatly after one this is where we have the birth of, you know, very efficient official propaganda, for instance, state management of economies of entire economies of people and their labor at a new level provision, even for welfare that stay afterwards. So there's a transformation of what people expect from the state. And how the state institutions operate in the colonies of the French empire, the British empire anti-colonial movements become much much more powerful. And with a really strong following pre a safety as a professor of modern British history at Stanford University Preah, thanks for joining us. Thank you for having. Veterans. We want to hear from you. What do you think of Trump's relationship with the military, what should the military through with the president be? My name is V Franko, and I'm from Little Rock, California. As a veteran, I believe the president should stay as far away from our military as possible he has shown no respect.

Middle East Stanford University United States national power league of nations president Little Rock United Nations Stanford University Preah Trump California Lee Franko official professor Britain one hundred years
"national power" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"But here's the deal. They go up against Tennessee this week and I'm paying when I think about Georgia. I'm like, Tennessee. Why is Tennessee on national? Tell. That's that's the question that came to my mind. Well, what about you? Let me let me ask you. Imagine you're the, you're the programmer CBS. Okay, and you got the package every week at three thirty, and you've got to find an interesting game. And I say that because Alabama and Georgia are so far ahead of her one. So your choices are Florida at Mississippi State. Now, listen, that's an intriguing game. If you're like swimming in the SEC water's right on a daily basis only for this reason, Dan Mullen coming back, but floors already lost states already leaks. You can't put that game at three thirty eight. You think anybody New York's going to watch it. So you put George on there and people Georgia, but and you hope they don't realize that Tennessee is absolutely one of the worst teams in the country. They just gassed at home against Florida the other night, and I don't know what to make out of that program. And by the way, it's not even the worst program in the SEC right now that belongs to Arkansas, which is lost already to Colorado state. And North Texas at home in either Arkansas guy told me, hey, that North Texas loss wasn't too bad about four touchdowns it was. I mean, if you wanna lose an overtime to a team that may go undefeated, that's fine. So that's kind of where we are. It's a terrible game. And guess what? Three weeks from now you'll get the Alabama to see game if you if you haven't had enough because there's nowhere to go in the best league. Theoretically in college football, I get a good game. What has happened to somebody's college football programs we used to talk about, I'm thinking about Michigan. I'm thinking about Michigan state that comes to my mind. I just say to myself, my goodness, what has happened and then just to that just popped into my head, but I certainly expected more and I'm not saying they're losing a bunch of games or whatever. I just expected them to be in the minds. I that national championship football picture, and that's not what I'm getting ready if you go back over the years. I mean, Michigan is just been a collection of mistakes, rich rod bust. Yep. Hoke bust. So same thing Tennessee used to be a national power. Peyton Manning went there twenty years ago. They won championships and what's happened is you start you one bad move, and I don't know how to correlate this to the NBA or the NFL because moves are a little of the coaches are in the NFL maybe not as important for the most part. But in college football, the coaches, everything. If you make one mistake and then you call in and you add on that with another mistake, you're paying for it for for five to ten years. And that's why you're seeing the Scott frost and that ship Kelly's in the Willie taggers. And are they going to be able to turn the program and Steven you? You mentioned social media. When I when I grow up in the business, you had four or five years. You had a bad year? No big. My chef ski when four games his first year nobody cared now. I mean, you're midway through your first season. People are saying fire, the guy, there's no patience. And quite frankly, why should there be. I was gonna ask you, should there be? I mean, these guys are making so much money and if they want, if they wanna grab the money, Gus malzahn the coach at army play for the national championship for years ago can shame as Winston, five years ago. He got a forty nine million dollar seven year contract in December. He threatened to go to Arkansas. He was obviously smart. He didn't write and a guy calls him my show Monday after the LSU a week ago, Monday after the LSU we need a fire, the guy you're not gonna fire. The guy just signed a seven year deal, but that there is no patience anymore. And college administrators have a lot of issues. That's one of them. I talked to a couple of athletic directors lately, not the attendance is an issue. Keep your eye on that college students are not going to and why they not going to football games. They'd rather stay home and and and interface on Twitter or Facebook with their friends. They'd rather it's easier..

Tennessee football Georgia Michigan Winston SEC Arkansas Florida Alabama LSU Steven Peyton Manning New York Dan Mullen NFL programmer national power North Texas Gus malzahn
"national power" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"But it's one of fifteen or sixteen different mega-projects in total, not all of them are receiving quite this level of intent of attention. There are continued to be major efforts in semiconductors, aerospace technologies, but I'd say that want them science technology appears to be among the top priorities within this broader agenda. The certainly it reflects this broader a pattern of increased focus on emerging technologies that are seen as critical to China's future national power. And some of this is informed by the historical legacy of China's a recognition that in the past, it was we when it was weaker and central humiliation. It was lagging behind in science and could therefore, as she Jingping highlighted in some of his remarks on the importance of innovation could therefore be preyed upon by foreign powers, the notion that the. China, dream rejuvenation of China, cheating pingers placed at the centerpiece of his rule so far is predicated upon the importance of leveraging science and technology is a means of enhancing national power and ensuring China's rise or in his and his view rejuvenation to its rightful place in the world. Okay. Interesting. So you mentioned the role that you know going to outside talent, sending Chinese students outside universities to gadget, Kate, trying to bring top talent internally within China and the role that's playing in this plan. What interaction does this plan have with the outside world? Are these innovations that we have reason to believe would benefit humanity more broadly or has China's practice generally been to hold these technology? What's more close hold and how easy will they be for other countries to piggyback on if there are any major advances by China, say that's a very good question in one for which I think we'll see the an. Play out in the years to come. And so far a lot of lot of international research in quantum science has been fairly open and clobbered of a lot of it has until recently primarily been occurring in the US and and our allies and partners. But China is a different model. And so far as a lot of their innovation in this field has seemed to be worn dizziness though also enabled by collaboration. So when China launched the world's first quantum satellite and August twenty sixteen was actually not just a Chinese light, a sino-austrian satellite, and that quantum experiments in space science program was undertaken club ration- between the Chinese Academy of sciences and the Austrian academy of sciences, though, perhaps a perhaps less credit was given a Chinese official media to the Austrian side of that then might have been merited but it it did reflect actually a club ration- that was in part driven by the fact that the European Union initially was not willing to fund it. Comparable project. So the amount of funding China has been willing to vote to even longer term experimental endeavors like that, like moods or Misha's the world. The quantum satellite has been an attractor of clever in scientists within China and internationally to participate in projects of this level of ambition, and perhaps perhaps another organization or another nation could have been the first launch quantum satellite even years earlier. If if there had been more of a willingness to fund and support that they're also are continued to be fairly robust club rations between Chinese researchers and other scientists internationally. Some of these clubs are clearly mutually beneficial and the potential benefits of these technologies could be tremendous including the number of the commercial applications. But there are in some cases reasons for concern that the Chinese government sees that sort of engagement as a one way street that it's a intended as a bringing in of. International innovation resources as some Chinese SAT plans, phrase it, or a way to take advantage of capabilities beyond China, whether that be talent or quick -ment and to ensure that it can contribute to indigenous innovation in China. While perhaps in some cases, being less willing to enable the benefits to defuse and be shared beyond China. So for instance, at one point, the Chinese government appeared to be considering policies and their implementation still remains to be seen, but that would limit the sharing of scientific data and research beyond China without prior approval. So if that is the root of China chooses to go of trying to draw and resources from the world to advance its own science and technological development without being willing to enable that collaboration and resulting diffusion of these technological advancements to be reciprocal.

China national power Chinese government Chinese Academy of sciences US Jingping Austrian academy of sciences Kate European Union Misha official
"national power" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"But not me. He. Li Bank ASA major. We got out. Me me. Me. Me baby. Me. Baby me, baby. Me. I'm guessing. Baby baby, baby. Baby, take baby. Gene, baby. If you won't be. Baby, baby. Fellow key. I guess. They say the yellow you to fly. National power one zero five one. Time for the day. The democrat. So like adult. Club. Donkey of the day is a new one. Yes you.

National power
"national power" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on KTOK

"Came out of the dungeon he lives in to speak. It John McCain's funeral. And of course, reading about secularism, and the disenchantment this engagement of young people the idea that, you know, many of them are turning to self loathing saying that we need to do something about the planet because the plants out of control, maybe remove people because they're actually polluting the planet creating climate problems. And this is all programmed in the young people now. This is is a number of things we we've heard of agenda twenty one we've heard of. The codex alimentarius. We've heard of all these things, but many people don't talk about what Kissinger was proposing with the national security study memorandum two hundred which concluded that not only were all these other countries like Kenya. In all these China just giving down the list of all these countries are having population problems, but the United States also was having its population problem and controls that were actually needed to be implemented like birth control and abortion, and all these things that Kissinger had proposed to try and bring down the population of the United States. But he also said here's an idea. Why don't we create a famine? Why don't we starve Americans? Why don't we start certain groups that take advantage of the resources? He said if we we were just a star pro people, and we were just to give them the idea that there's a famine if we were to tell them that water resources are all time low were telling us, certain foods or not a Bill. We raise the prices of food or something natural is destroying the crops. Mike weather or drought or or heavy rains, or you know, you name it. These things are happening now. Compliance with birth control policies. He said there's also some established precedent for taking account of family planning. You say the population growth is a major determinative increases in food demand. He said mandatory programs may be needed, and we should be considering these possibilities. Now. This is back in nineteen seventy four nine hundred seventy five we would food be considered an instrument of national power is the US prepared to accept food rationing to help people who can't or won't control their population growth. Kissinger predicted a return of famines, he said bring back the famines bring back the the lack of food. And it's advantageous to create feminine birth and thus reduce the population star people the debt. He clearly stated that resource depletion would have to appear to be natural. And quite possibly connected to an environmental impact on agriculture give an agricultural yields. And what have we been hearing about crops dying and farms needing help? And and how Monsanto is is destroying crops or foods are not edible fee. This is how the disengagement process I talked about earlier and the threat of what the technocrats are calling climate change on agriculture and food demand is now creating the ideological breeding ground for population control and eugenics directives. Now, I've said this many times it'd be just conspiracy theory. It'll never go that far. Well as an alleged threat. Climate change continues to threaten the well being of the entire planet Cording to technocrats, and it's also adding to the alleged depletion of resources, including food and water. Technocrat's have now stated in recent opinion piece in science, but it's time to take population control more seriously than ever. And as I said earlier, they are no longer hiding the true agenda behind the climate change scare and includes the original thoughts of population control. There were I provided by Henry Kissinger thousand nine hundred seventy four John Bongartz PHD of the population center, and Brian CO PHD of the National Center of atmospheric research argues that greenhouse gases responsible for climate change can be reduced by limiting the number of people who can admit them. Furthermore, from the science journalist says this this is Bogart sake or Baumgart shocking. He says given this current situation in the sensitivity surrounding reproductive rights. The purpose of our science forum. Comment was to get the climate community and in particularly IPCC to take population policies more seriously slowing future population growth could replace global emissions by forty percent or more in the long term. This is what they wrote in the article. He also added that a smaller population would also make it easier for nations to adapt to the inevitable lifestyle ships climate change will bring..

Henry Kissinger United States Mike weather John McCain IPCC national power Kenya China Monsanto atmospheric research John Bongartz PHD Brian CO PHD National Center of forty percent
"national power" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Beata have ideological divisions define the parties, but John f. Kennedy was in the book. He wrote that one appeal. It surprise when he was a Senator he was really influenced by what is his name. I'm blanking on his name, but political scientists who wrote a book called the price of union, which was mainly about the civil war, but impart was all about an argument that a country as diverse and pluralistic as the United States has always been depended on parties as the large collective organizers of conflict in American politics depended on them to contain within them. Each of them, all of the different important social cleavages in society rather than align themselves along those social cleavages. Instead you make sure that these parties are cross cut by all those cleavages mobilizing people, basically based on pragmatic or transactional inducements, like patronage or what you might call a -ffective kind of emotional attachments to. One party or the other, but that the actual policy that gets made is going to be incremental oriented towards compromise. And that the alternative is the alternative that we saw in the eighteen fifties that culminated in a constitutional crisis in a catastrophic civil war. So is that the historical context is part of the belief that we should have these non ideological parties. A hangover seem to gentle a word, but a remnant of the civil war where people saw division between the parties turn into the single deadliest conflict in American history. And so the view that then rippled through American life for another century is it well, we don't wanna do that again, like parties or not a way to organize conflict. Like if that happens, then you might get to armed conflict. I would say to get back to your question of like what they really thought or what the kind of sequence of thinking is in part it had to do with their learning books and scholars who wrote out this argument about what the civil war should tell us about party politics at the same time. I think when politicians particularly successful politicians occupying peaks of state national power in this era, when some of them not all of them, but when some of them are ticketed, this defense of principle lists parties. They were articulating the world around them and championing it because not only were they successful in this era. This was an era of, you know, this was the the American century. This was the postwar era of growth and unprecedented global dominance by the United States. And there's a whole school of historical thought that consensus school in historical scholarship that you know embodied a certain degree of complacency about the idea that yeah, America works and. If it's working, we should look at all the institutions and how they work at this moment and see what's good about them. I think that was an impulse that you see in both in scholarly thought, but also said of vulgarising in the form of politicians saying, hey, things are great. And part of the reason things work are for the very kind of norms of bipartisanship norms of reaching across the aisle and forging basically ad hoc legislative bargains issue by issue. That's what we do as politicians in the mid century, and therefore it's worth celebrating and protecting. So like a lot of things, we tell ourselves story in America that makes us look good. And now I think it is the consensus view or the closest thing that there is to consensus view on this is that the reason we had this unusual party structure where you have liberals in the Republican party. And conservatives in the Democratic Party is that politics was split by race, and in particular by this southern Democratic Party, that acted as a kind of authoritarian ruler of of the American South that had very unusual idiological currents within it, but primarily existed in order to protect the southern way of life against national intrusion and for a lot of stroke or reasons. Obviously, ABRAHAM LINCOLN was Republican and he invaded the south of a lot of his struggle. Reasons was democratic, but it wasn't Idi logically liberal and it was in idiological democratic. It was culturally democratic. And so you know, we're sitting here having this conversation about how the thing politicians do is make cross-party compromise, and they try to embody different conflicts..

Democratic Party Kennedy United States Republican party America Beata ABRAHAM LINCOLN national power John f
"national power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To get to our building and. There's barricades these barricades at the end of the block where people have to show rather going so it's a little difficult Leveque says he's lost. Sixty thousand dollars since his offices were closed off con Edison said it will review any claims that businesses submit for. Their losses and a court filing shows a dozen audio recording seized by the FBI from President Trump's former. Lawyer have been forwarded to federal prosecutors the recordings were gathered last spring during an investigation into Michael Cohen business practice The filing yesterday said prosecutors got the recordings Friday. After Trump and Coen's attorneys dropped their argument that the files should, remain confidential Seventy six degrees cloudy skies going up to a humid eighty five It's morning edition from NPR. News I'm Noel king and I'm Rachel Martin during the Cold War there was a. Real fear in, America and in Europe that the Russians were coming and, in fact the Soviets did roll their tanks. Into Hungary and Czechoslovakia and they turned the Baltics into satellite states but the Cold War is long over and the world. Is a, much different place and so are the threats from Russia. Lieutenant General, Ben Hodges was commander of, the US army in Europe until recently back. In the nineteen eighties he was a young Lieutenant serving in Germany we were all sure. That the Soviet Union was. Going to invade, and conquer western Europe that was what everybody. Expected and in fact the Soviets did have. Plans for, that today they don't have the capability or the desire I mean they look at a a strong NATO of twenty nine nations and. You stack up the the combined military's populations, economies and so on compare that to rush Shas they they realize that they don't have the capacity. To take that, on although Hodges tells me Russia has found other ways, to project its strength well the Russians of. Course have traditionally blended all aspects of national power from the land air and sea forces to cyber now cyber but also. The use, of information economic power and everything so the areas where. They have, particular strength electronic warfare capability, while all of us in the west were. Correctly focused on counterterrorism the Russians continued developing high in electron it warfare capability that allows. Them to jam to intercept. An actually the, target than based on what they are able. To find through electron warfare means but to. What end, it seems implausible that interfering elections and launching cyberattacks could return Russia to the pre Cold War power once had I asked general Hodges. What he thinks Russia's Ultimate, goal is now and how big, a threat that is. To the US and its allies there is, real Russian aggression their goal is to undermine the alliance and to undermine the European. Union does not to conquer all of Europe and so to undermine the alliance it's a mix of misinformation creating divisions between countries excluding those and also to demonstrate that the alliance cannot defend. One of its members how does President Trump fit into that when you think about President Trump's remarks questioning the purpose of NATO is he essentially helping Vladimir Putin achieve his mission Well I would say that the the president. Has not been very helpful with the tensions and the stress that he is put on the. Cohesion alliance but never certainly in my forty years in the army have ever seen? With the? President of the United States put into question whether or not the United States might live up. To its obligations Secondly part. Of the reason that the alliance and other international organizations have been so successful at achieving what they were set. Up to do in the immediate, aftermath of the second World, War his because the, American president, in American leadership who were always there and so it's in our own. Interest that Europe is stable and secure? As for own prosperity does it make sense to you that Putin, would be invited to the White House this fall Not if it's going to be a repeat of of what just happened in Nelson I think it's always good when when heads of state talk to each other Particularly when the tensions are high but the only respect strength and anybody who doesn't believe. That has never read a page of history and Dutton understand who they are so right now The president has got to your needs to. Make it, very clear that we understand that..

Russia Europe President Trump Ben Hodges president Vladimir Putin United States FBI Leveque Soviet Union Edison national power Noel king NPR White House Hungary Germany
"national power" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"The fight for phantom real estate in the way football and baseball kinda lineup the Niners giants while their competition the the sport calendar kind of balances, each other out where the the basketball team you know kind of carries over especially the the amount of games the warriors play heavily in the. Baseball and now with them living right. Down, the street in, the near future there is going to be a massive competition. For the giants have been the Yankees of this area my my entire life and especially the since they started rattling off championships and then the warriors came along and it happened. In warp speed Because they were nowhere near the giants in. Terms of, national power and just name in, history and and everything but the power in which they've come in a. Five year span you might be able. To argue it's, unprecedented what they're doing you have to wonder if the giants have struck out on the Leicester's. And the grandkids obviously Harper's, on a completely different level you watch him in that all star. Game do you think that that will even give Larry a little more juicy and. The giants contingent of we might need to just overpay by fifty million not not the same, result as Barry Zito but same type hopefully you know when they gave Barry way more I think that his next, biggest author, was like eighty four million and they gave him one. Twenty five something like am the giants is gave him four hundred million dollars would it. Be worth it to, them because they're competition now isn't just the dodgers it's the warriors right yeah you know I think that's a great point and I do think that that should fix figure into the giants thinking I mean just as an example just for Me as a sports writer here in the bay. Area writing for the athletic I was so involved with the warriors, for so much you know into the baseball season into you. Know into April may and June that once once they won the title I definitely had. The the conscious feeling of all right. I I gotta I gotta study up I. Got a phone up on the giants here because I really been paying close attention and I think that that's that's probably a lot of fans felt, as well that the baseball yeah the giants, in particular in. This case were, a little bit of an afterthought, until almost halfway through the year because of how much attention a team like the warriors draws, in this. Area and I. Think if the giants want to kind of keep. Up in that constellation they they need? To you know the things you can do you know you, can? You, can win, and you could entertain and I. Think a guy like Harper can help you do both and so I. Do think, that the giants are, danger of Becoming a you know not not nearly as much in the forefront of people lines which which obviously translates into ticket sales and merchandising and all those, financial things translates into real, dollars so, I think yeah in terms of trying to kind of you know, it would be unrealistic to think they could. Keep up. With, the warriors but just to kind. Of maintain their own place in the bay area sporting consciousness I think it's it is. Important for them to have somebody if they can't do it as a as. A team collectively. Then. To at least have, some someone a real star that will draw that will draw eyeballs and media attention and all those good things before I let, you go I want to get your. Perspective on this because Gary was talking about his tiger the most important individual to, a, sport ever with, babe that, we have somebody else with, bay Hamad Ali Ali. Laid probably John through Michael Jordan in. The mix and Gary's point was well there was magic before and. Larry after him Colby and then LeBron but is there anybody That you would, add to that atlas That. Would, add that's, a pretty, good, list yeah you know I think uh Right Swaggie is a team, together but, yeah, no I think I think that's a pretty good. List I don't think it's anyone add add. Tiger you could certainly make the case that he was important to this..

giants Baseball Harper Larry national power Yankees Barry Zito basketball Hamad Ali Ali Gary dodgers Leicester football writer Michael Jordan LeBron John Colby
Michigan's Jim Harbaugh offers scholarship to 7th-grade QB Dante Moore

Carlin, Maggie & Bart

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Michigan's Jim Harbaugh offers scholarship to 7th-grade QB Dante Moore

"This is john feinstein with a cbs sports minute according to the detroit free press michigan coach jim harbaugh has offered a scholarship to quarterback dante jacob more no news there except for this more is it thirteen year old seventh grader this comes after harbaugh previously offered scholarships to a pair of eighth grade in reality this means nothing there's no written commitment on either side and who knows where harbaugh will be coaching when more graduates from high school in twenty twenty three or if the kid will want to go to michigan but the message is a dangerous one elite athletes are already beyond entitled telling a thirteen year old you already believe he's good enough to play the national power can't be a good thing you also have to wonder how the michigan admissions department feels do they have zero say who gets into school apparently there's no rule to stop there shouldn't be common sense should be enough on john how many times has it happened you drive away from home turn the corner and then wonder that i the garage door with alarm dot com you.

John Feinstein CBS Jim Harbaugh Dante Jacob National Power Detroit Free Press Michigan Thirteen Year
"national power" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on WINS 1010

"Wins an attack against syria is underway president trump may be announcement short time ago it is a joint military operation by the us france and the uk underway now against syria president trump says he is prepared to sustain strikes against syria until the use of chemical weapons stops that combined american british entrench response to these atrocities will integrate all instruments of our national power military economic and diplomatic we are prepared to sustain this response until the syrian regime stops its use of prohibited chemical agents the president called the assad regime's use of chemical weapons quote evil and despicable he said it was an evil and despicable act he said they are not the action of a man they are the crimes of a monster he said the goal is to establish a strong deterrent against chemical weapons he also took aim at verbally at iran and russia for supporting equipment and financing the assad regime he said that russia must decide if it will continue down this quote dark path the president also said say a prayer for our noble warriors again an attack against syria is underway there are reports of explosions in the damascus area stay with ten ten.

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"national power" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"national power" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"And he showed really with a sevenman rotation they're good enough to beat anybody people even on the opponents homecourt which is pretty dominant there for the muskateers 95 seventy nine villanova want it and they wanted handily rocks i thought very impressive by nova nj writers really built our program up any here we recruit or your eight look for the guard dynamic that a threat that can shoot they could pass they can handle it they can create off the balance and the he's got as they age and he's got it system and he's made villanova into a national power again and the fbi said balance he has that depth and the big east the landscape has changed a little bit and turns of for what we've known from years fast and furious xavier butler and these two teams that are making some noise dow with villanova and and villanova again this is a team was number one for a good part of the season they dealt with some adversity and in out appears at their starting to hit their stride again and that's a lie realistically there's probably about fifteen teams that can that i have a there are a threat to win the national championship this year i think it's that wide open and probably is wide open as we've seen in a long time of course of the last several weeks is taking uh my top people that come on the show and i give them eight teams against the field and we see how they fair and lee klein and a you know leon climbed from fivestar basketball camps and andy iskoe and brian panish in sports ex michelle they've weighed in and i'm getting others and.

fbi xavier butler villanova leon andy iskoe brian panish lee klein fivestar
"national power" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"national power" Discussed on WLOB

"The main reason and give you other statistics to go along with that uh with the harry truman every president after truman a driven eisenhower kennedy a gene abc of ford carter again hw bush all served in the military the total military service of every commander in chief since the end which is to say of course uh uh a clinton uh uh w bush obama and uh niddle military service is that of the air national power service uh by george w bush simply because we shall no military draft uh in the ah against with 19th seventy seven eighty said about liberte said military service dropped to nineteen percent the last time i checked and on and on which is a reflagged four of the fact that the we have a draft than anything else i think it's also with a function of the cost i mean these costs have become incredible barrier entry as you know with guys you served with i mean these are a lot of management i sir with aren't aren't affluent they're not part of the political class they're not network they need they want to serve and and unfortunately now because of the costs it's just a it's it's impractical for many of them so we're really focused on bringing new in that can that can that can build that pipe why why why should it let's let's make it in 10 20 years where veterans that that are able to uh you know presidents we will talk some more about that when we come back with the right barkat our guest marie gore veteran and a person behind this whole notion of uh uh a super.

harry truman president ford carter clinton obama liberte eisenhower commander in chief national power george w bush marie gore nineteen percent 10 20 years
"national power" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"national power" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Internet for several weeks now a rumor claiming that the national power grid will be knocked out for several days causing panic on social media that is fake news the rumor is false william forced june who wrote the book of course one second after about what could happen if the power grid goes down he's on with us right now bill have you heard about this story to our poorly uh i would bad a i'll current laudrup folks down endow us only a month ago we were chatting about the and yeah there was anger you gotta be misinterpreted as some sort of what why what wanna off why operation exemployees of simulation worst the test going to be the we know it bacon wide our dear waking and would uh and treasury ham radio operators who humpty i know the current yet uh who create a communications grid if be standard primary grid go now one we've been talking about this for years now william what's the latest on that with legislation now we getting any closer to getting the grid fixed put towards doug triggered renewed right syndrome all uh no uh no progress gridlock we ever gridlock congress there was a bill earlier this year guiding committee all right thank you so much have a good weekend where more bad news for scheers sears holdings will close sixty three more stores that includes 45 kmart stores eighteen sears stores around the country the company operates roughly twelve hundred and fifty sears and k mart locations retail it's turning to the internet for so many things what else is going on these days let's check in with the skies of peter davenport from the national you four reporting centre hey peter what do you have this work well good evening georgia alive preface by saying that i hope sincerely that some of the report could have been reported me that i'm going to be talking about tonight her case of mistaken identity because if they're not there killing descriptions of very very unusual events birthday third leg to sir with love firmly 20 per of october thirteen days ago a gentleman who described himself as a retired former senior officer in the us air force was drive in southwest of winstonsalem north carolina they were headed home in the hickory north carolina when suddenly ahead of them a triangular the the.

social media peter davenport officer north carolina national power ham radio william doug scheers sears holdings georgia us winstonsalem north carolina thirteen days one second
"national power" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"national power" Discussed on WDRC

"The world we're going to lead the protectors loses in and tom cotton he says if you look at what the present stone internationally there's nothing really that atypical to it you know the issues here are domestically and with the prison choose to do when centre corker says stuff about the president being unstable the presence i could look past and give mccall he's going to go public and rip senator corker who surprisingly ripped him right back and next the you know democrats is sitting on the sidelines say you gotta be kidding me go what are we witnessing here what is this real with tom cotton that on foreign policy although the president uh torque uh america first but honestly ito the mean to pull out of the rest to the world because he knows that there enemies we have in the world detroit mercy gerdes who were on the words for word i think we'll beard uh a a major positive announced by the president about iran nuclear agreement look producer too president begin the process of renegotiating her pulling out of it up the iranians gone to be able to program and continue to work with nato we regard 13 orthodontist was the end of our alliances with people in europe is very close with the japanese and south korea imf of a deal with north korea so overall i i think in farm policy uh there's been an i mean those positive changed in one sense we're still a greater national power under president trump and good change in another sense and the uh we're getting with our enemies we're going to stroke of joe lieberman senator you are a chairman of the united against the new against nuclear are ron and we know that so for this is the you know i'm not i don't have access to the intelligence but the word is they have not done anything to uh blatantly violate the agreement that sadly is secretaryastate carrie worked out in pursue president obama backed and the senate even though the only forty plus votes did not decertify they teed green light so being that they have and blatantly violated it they got the money upfront and the sanctions relief already is it wise to walk away i don't think the president's going to occur we're rambeau compelled by our name the whole purpose of the organization formed nine years ago nonpartisan group the american diplomats and.

senator joe lieberman europe iran detroit senate obama carrie ron chairman president national power north korea south korea nato producer foreign policy senator corker mccall nine years
"national power" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"national power" Discussed on The World Transformed

"And uh we have to worry about well you know our our current grid i mean we have to put hi hi o of voltage on these are on these lines and then step down to get to you know to power that you couldn't of all of course a lot of energy loss along what what what can be done about that in the future of porter bell i wrote about here yeah i wrote a column a while back on the idea of of developing the first graf hain superconductor power grid there's been some breakthroughs a cambridge university and actually developing but they claimed was room temperature superconductor with graf he may have modified in a certain way and and none of the people and cap can't who state university figured out how to actually massproduced graf pain in those those two things could be indicators i mean there's the devil's always in the detail of will this thing work at full scale and so if you think about these giant overhead power lines being able to you can reduce them down to a single shred almost just a single line can bury under the ground graf pain they can carry just enormous are normal sponsor current through that that's such a game changer i think what we do is we we replace the the national power grid with segment one segment at a time but if you think about dismantling the you know the national grid replacing it with a superconductor power grid that have so much potential to just be a massive gamechanger there.

cambridge university graf national power
"national power" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"national power" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Yeah jio let me to getting some good rubric drudgery she recalled while six kendrick lamar would down tools to their church with him every single our unintentional took it from 30s listen to win all day kent to tickets jay z on his four forty four to our league got no let's go collar 106 to we are going to hook you up with to take get the home understood what he's boards were either october twenty seven and the hina center or december twentyfirst which is the last night of the tour at the forum and we're going to qualify you've heard chance to win this amazing wasn't a lifetime trip pursued a feed jay lee at the metals that's will in new york city heard of the of bridge take national power of risk lemonade that i bet that low forty four to our call one of the things we saw the most of the morning power no such good loved trolls barrowman more with his one and only on morning show coastal powell 106 her number one they call me one because the mimic helmut kohl's the to the global the does the rod maturing com the moment neil way jio built on the red the new mom.

kendrick lamar hina center jay lee national power new york helmut kohl neil
"national power" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"national power" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"For this because the nature of the of the campaign that he ran last year you know he he made insulting his opponents lying ted cruz and crooked hillary is kind of a regular feature and he attacked depressed the the most in the most derogatory terms that is rally that got his crowd stood up and they sort of near regularly threatened reporters who were there and you know um on the basic we campaign got pretty ugly and everybody knows that and i i think that that was the pick up on a trend that i think we've been underway for a couple of years but he certainly accelerated it and now at ticket spread further so if you if you wanna know and can reverse it i mean certainly i think the president has any britain has the ability to affect the climate in which national power us take place and that's true here but other leaders have the ability to do to dwell and i think some of them probably need to step forward and like who would that be well you know you think about leaders of congress you know who have the ability to say looks to stop the tear and may be modelling a different kind of behavior by actually having meaningful conversations with each other about important issues that would be a good thing and there's just too little of that right now but also i think of encouraging people their own parties to keep debate in civilized channels um cannot be intimidated by the shouting that's going on around them i think that that probably not happening very much either we're speaking with wall street journal washington executive editor jerry cyprus piece is called civil discourse in decline where does it end art so we will certainly identified all the problems that we all agree on that what's the solution well you know i was i'm i'm not sure i know but i know somebody who's thought about this an awful lot is bother john jenkins who's the pros hanbo notre dame and who spoke about it a bit at their commencement uh earlier this month and whose the whose discuss.

ted cruz president britain national power congress john jenkins hillary wall street journal washington executive editor jerry cyprus