35 Burst results for "National Political Correspondent"

Philadelphia's Suburban Battleground: Can The GOP Recover?

Morning Edition

02:10 min | 10 months ago

Philadelphia's Suburban Battleground: Can The GOP Recover?

"Reliably voted Republican. But the suburbs have changed. And last November, Donald Trump lost them in a big way. Now, with the 2020 midterms in view, both parties are wondering what's going to happen when Trump is not on the ballot. NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea reports from the vote rich Philadelphia suburbs. Leads drop in on Chester County, Pennsylvania, It's suburban Philadelphia but a place with its own identity. We have a huge agricultural community. We are the mushroom capital of the world. You could come here for a mushroom festival on New Year's Eve. It's quite fun Democrat Mary in Moscow It's his chair of the Chester County Board of Commissioners. And we have a lot of industry were very big in the bio Pharma life sciences community. We have new technology coming in. So ah, lot of great things happening here. Right Next door is Montgomery County, where lives create? Hey V chairs the local Republican party, she says she's watched these suburbs flip from red to blue some only in the past few years. But she says the shift began long before that, If you look at the trends, this has been happening for many, many years. I think it accelerated over the last couple of years. But when I moved into Montgomery County 21 years ago, it was already starting to change in 2016. Hillary Clinton beat Trump in these suburbs, but not by enough of a margin to make up for trump strength in the States rural areas. She lost Pennsylvania, but Joe Biden racked up huge margins in the Philly suburbs. It was key To his statewide victory. The suburbs are far more diverse than they were decades ago, and many suburban voters had an intense dislike of Donald Trump Republican create A V is hoping some of those more moderate voters come back to the GOP. Now that they don't have trump who people voted against because they didn't Like him as a person. He's gone now. And so people are actually looking at issues now and things that affect them on a day to day basis. The changing politics in the suburbs

Don Gonyea Chester County Board Of Commis Philadelphia Donald Trump Montgomery County Chester County NPR Pennsylvania Republican Party Moscow Mary Hillary Clinton Joe Biden Philly
Biden Takes To The Road To Push His COVID-19 Relief Plan

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Biden Takes To The Road To Push His COVID-19 Relief Plan

"President biden is on the road this week. He wants congress to pass his one point nine trillion dollar covert relief package. And so he's making the case for it directly to american citizens last night. He was in wisconsin for a town hall produced by cnn. and host. anderson. Cooper asked the question. When is every american. Who wants it going to be able to get vaccine by the end of july this year. Npr national political correspondent. Mara liasson is good morning mar. Good morning joe. Biden took a lot of questions about vaccines and also a lot of questions about when schools are going to reopen. How yes school. Openings have become a really controversial issue and a potential vulnerability for the white house. The republicans have been saying that biden is not being aggressive enough on something that too. Many americans is the most important signal of getting back to normal. In addition to the many reasons why it's important for kids and parents to get schools open and one of the reasons that this could be potentially damaging for the white house is that the president's press secretary had set a remarkably low bar of what biden meant by school opening. She said that he wants half of them. Having in person instruction one day per week by the end of his first one hundred days last night biden said that was a mistake in communications. He wants to see k. Through eight classes back five days a week. Here's what he said. We'll be close to that. At the end of the first hundred days you'd have a significant percentage them being able to be opened my rent. My guess is they're going to probably be pushing to open all for all summer to continue like it's different semester days a week or a. I think many of them have five days week. The goal we five days a week. So that's a more ambitious goal. But as biden pointed out is a state and locally controlled thing can set goals put out guidelines. But it's not up to him. Speaking of ambitious he still wants one point nine trillion dollars. There are critics of his plan. There are economists. also who say that's just too much money it seems like biden is saying. Let me make the case to the people who are suffering and explain why we need one point nine trillion. Yes and he did that last night. He pointed out the polls show that many republicans even trump voters are support. The package the package has very very high approval ratings and even though it's not popular with republican members of congress biden also defended the price tag saying. There's a consensus among economists. About spending more rather than less. And you know both biden's treasury secretary janet yellen and the fed chair. Jerome powell have both said that a bigger package is better and if it does spark inflation they can handle that. What's unclear is if the package will get any republican support in congress. Despite those bipartisan talks. You know senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell told the wall street journal that he thinks the first step to unify republicans and of course. They've been badly split. Deeply divided is to unify around to the relief package. This is what republicans did in two thousand and nine. when they opposed obama's stimulus

Biden President Biden Mara Liasson White House Congress NPR CNN Cooper Wisconsin Anderson JOE Janet Yellen Jerome Powell Treasury FED Mcconnell Mitch The Wall Street Journal Senate
"national political correspondent" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Joining us the objections. Republican lawmakers raised on Wednesday obviously didn't stop Congress from certifying Joe Biden's victory. But the entire episode may make a powerful argument for abandoning the institution that makes Republicans competitive and presidential elections in the first place. The Electoral college It's a story by David Seiders, NATIONAL POLITICAL correspondent at Politico. Dave, explain this. Yeah. I mean, I think obviously the chaos and You're either in Washington is dominating the conversation right now, but there's an undercurrent of what was happening. With the challenge to the Electoral College itself. That was kind of remarkable. And I think concerning to some Republicans because It's the Electoral college that that process that allows Republicans to be competitive in presidential races at all. Of course, that's the institution that some of these Republican senators and House members were going after an effort to decertify. Joe Biden's When I would presume nobody on the Republican side, who's saying it's time to do away with the Electoral College? I mean, this essentially is the way Republicans have won the presidency. As of late. Yeah, that's right. He has to go back to George W. Defined a Republican who won the popular vote. So it does seem to be that that their path forward and I don't think that the Electoral College is in its not in immediate danger on. I don't think that these proceedings mean that it will be, but there is a movement and has been for the past. 15 20 years at least seriously to reform the electoral college and advocates of that reformation, which would turn things over to more of a popular vote. The system a twist. Watch this for some encouragement that all of this going on all of the controversy since Election Day. Might give them some momentum. So dive into that a little bit. If you can. What would reform of the Electoral College look like? Because without it as some point out, you would have New York and California essentially of Making many of the governing decisions for the rest of the nation. That's why I think the reporting this to waste Oh, to do away with the Electoral college. You could do it by constitutional amendment, which seems almost impossible. This also long shot but more likely effort is to something called the multi State compact and so about 15 15 States and the District of Columbia have signed on to this agreement over the past. 15 years, uh to the agreed toward their state's electors to whoever wins the national popular vote, and that would go into effect once enough states sign on to reach the number needed to win the presidency. They're not there yet, or close to it. But They think they could do it in the next see if they can get enough legislatures to come around. It could happen, and this could be the impetus. Speaking with David Seiders, national political correspondent at Politico S o. The discussions now and possibilities being bandied about regarding the electoral college. Is this lot of is this a lot of huffing and puffing post election. Does anything actually ever get done on this or what, baby? Yeah, I think it probably happens right now. Expect there is public support for doing away with the electoral college and having a popular vote. Theme. That idea pulls well on and along the public broadly, but it pulls better among Democrats. The Republicans and in elected office is Republicans are largely Opposed to the effort. But this election cycle we saw two states that had been Republican for a long time switch Democratic that's Georgia and Arizona. And I think that if there came a year where, say Texas slipped And I'm not saying that that's gonna happen. But if it did, then I think you would see Republicans start to come around to the idea of doing away with the Electoral College were good, high kind of separately from all this, So you're kind of veteran of watching things in Washington. Wednesday's events. How did they strike you? Well, Just bizarre and you completely unworldly troubling, probably the same way they struck you. I was in Los Angeles school were pretty removed. But even the the TV screen suggested suggested something much different means he's David David Seiders, national political correspondent at Politico 19 minutes now after the hour on this morning, Jennifer Krauchanka, and now.

David David Seiders NATIONAL POLITICAL corresponde Politico Joe Biden Washington Congress Dave District of Columbia George W. House Los Angeles Texas California New York Jennifer Krauchanka Arizona
Mitch McConnell congratulates Joe Biden, Kamala Harris for election win

All Things Considered

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Mitch McConnell congratulates Joe Biden, Kamala Harris for election win

"When Joe Biden becomes president next month, the most important relationship he will have in Washington could be with Mitch McConnell at that point With President Trump out of the White House, McConnell will be the most powerful Republican official. And today for the first time, the Senate majority leader finally acknowledged that Biden won the election for more on how the Republicans are grappling with Biden's victory. We turn now to NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea, Eh? Hey, don Hey, Greetings. Greetings. All right, so let's start by what we heard from McConnell this morning. How exactly did that all play out? So the Senate open for business, and it's very formal, stately way. That's when the majority leader did That thing He didn't do after Biden was first projected the winner or after the votes were certified in state after state. And he didn't do it after the electoral college vote yesterday, But he did decide this morning was finally time. Many millions of us had hoped the presidential election would yield Different result. But our system of government has processes to determine who will be sworn in. On January, the 20th The Electoral college. Has spoken. So today, I want to congratulate President elect Joe Biden. And he also congratulated Vice President elect Kamila Harris. Now in In the past days and weeks, only a few Republicans have been willing to acknowledge Biden's victory. But since the Electoral college voted, that list has grown a bit some key names Dad to the list Star, two of the president's staunchest allies in the Senate, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina in Ron Johnson of Wisconsin. When there's also Iowa's Chuck Grassley. When asked about the election results, he said, it doesn't matter what Chuck Grassley thinks. The Constitution has answered that question for so there

Biden Mcconnell Don Gonyea Don Hey Senate Mitch Mcconnell Joe Biden White House NPR President Elect Joe Biden Electoral College Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Washington Lindsey Graham Chuck Grassley Ron Johnson South Carolina Wisconsin Iowa
Why the Trump campaign continues to fight election results despite court losses

All Things Considered

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Why the Trump campaign continues to fight election results despite court losses

"The presidential election. President Trump lost the election. Counties and states are starting to certify results of Biden's victory. The Trump campaign continues to mount legal challenges, and they continue to fail. But even though his defeat is clear, the president refuses to concede we want to talk more about why and what it might mean for the country. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here for that. How? Tamara? Hi, Mary Louise. The president insists he is challenging the results because he really believes he won. Really, With all the facts pointing otherwise. Is there more to this? I think there is more to it. Donald Trump's brand is about being a winner about never, ever losing. Remember, he's always come out of every loss, like his bankruptcies or failed businesses. Somehow making himself look like a winner. This election is the biggest, most public losses ever suffered. So the stakes for his political future and his ability to continue to monetize his brand are very high. There is a kind of method to his madness. He needs to create this false narrative to be able to walk off the stage without admitting he lost so he can maintain political viability, maintain a firm grip on the base of the Republican Party, especially in case he wants to run again. But there are also real consequences to that. He's his refusal to concede defeat or to accept a peaceful transfer of power to spread these false conspiracy theories are hurting Americans confidence in the most basic element of our democracy, which is free and fair elections. We know from polling that growing numbers of Republicans feel that believed that Trump won the election and it was stolen from him. Another Syrian, making the rounds that I want you to speak to more some of the president's defenders. In fairness, Even some conservatives who don't seem too particularly like President Trump. They have argued Look, Democrats never accepted Trump as the legitimate president. Democrats in their hearts didn't really except the 2016 outcome. This argument goes so. So what is the difference? Moralize and what is the difference? I think there is a difference. He has a absolute right to contest. This is long as he wants in the court. But what happened in 2016? Hillary Clinton did not challenge the legal outcome of the election. She called Trump and conceded even before the networks had called the 270 electoral votes for him. She did win the popular vote, but no one says that Trump didn't win under the rules. Of how America elects its president. He it was the legitimate president. They might not a liked him. He lost the popular vote. But that's different than what's happening now, you know, Trump allies. Even down to some local Republicans in Wayne County, Michigan, actually resisted certifying the results before reversing themselves. Last night, they appeared to be making actual attempts to undermine legitimate ballots cast in Heavily democratic, racially diverse cities. So a lot of Republicans are now saying, Hey, you've got to put up or walk it. Walk away. Don't let the perception settle that you're a sore loser, just trying to overturn a fair election. What is it? Steak for the president here for Donald Trump personally. I think there's a lot of steak, you know, he has mused privately about running in 2024. He's setting up a super PAC that would fund his expenses for that. There also are a lot of consequences for the Republican Party. Is it tries to chart its future? Put aside, all the other Republicans want to run in 2024, which they really can't do? As long as he's out there, saying he might But you know the debate about what is Trump is imposed. Trump has been going on since 2016. But it can't really continuous long as Trump is on the stage. You know, there's that old country music song. How can I miss you when you won't go away? And right now the Republican Party stands for whatever Trump wants at a given moment, But there are also some perils for Trump himself continuing to aggressively contest The results of this election and his allies have been saying Don't look like a sore loser. They're charting a path for him to coming back in 2024, which includes a graceful concession, cooperating with Biden may be giving a farewell address with a kind of MacArthur resc pledge. I shall return you will in the more immediate future. Look ahead with us because one way or another January 20th is coming. President elect Biden will become president Biden. Do we know quite what to expect from President Trump at that point? No, we don't. There are a lot of questions. We don't know what it's like to have an ex president who's not quietly off the stage. That's kind of the final Democratic norm for presidents to gracefully give your successor a chance, a sign of respect for the voters and the outcome of the election. But we have every reason to believe that Trump will be tweeting every day. Even as a private citizen, he might create his own streaming digital platform to as an alternative to Fox Baby who launches 2024 campaign. We don't think he'll weigh in in a detailed way on policy debates, but he may try to maintain his dominance in the media and dominance in the media. NPR's Mara Liasson, Thank you for your reporting. You're welcome.

Donald Trump Mara Liasson Biden Republican Party Mary Louise Tamara NPR Hillary Clinton Wayne County Michigan America Macarthur FOX
Trump Lawyers Pressured to End Role in Election Challenges

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Trump Lawyers Pressured to End Role in Election Challenges

"The president's lawyers are suffering defeat after defeat in their attempts to overturn the election results, and a federal judge says Trump's DHS secretary is in his position unlawfully. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us now. Good morning, Mara. Good morning, Lulu. How does that posture We heard from the Vic Murthy and the incoming Biden administration strike. You sounds like convince her you can work around who you can't and let's not forget executive orders. Well, if they can't get legislation through the Senate, they're going to have to rely on executive orders. Just as President. Trump has But I think that there is a tremendous amount that President elect Biden can do. Just by using the bully pulpit. It's going to be a huge change from a president who poo pooed the wearing of masks at some point said that they were a sign of political correctness. To Joe Biden, who was now sending the message that masks or not a political issue. It doesn't matter what party you are. This is something that you can do to keep yourself and your fellow citizens safe, So I think that there is a lot that they can do. But, yes, it's a Herculean effort because President Trump has focused almost totally on the vaccine and not on public health. He hasn't attended to Corona Virus Task Force meeting in Months. And so the Biden administration incoming Biden administration will be inheriting a huge, huge problem.

Mara Liasson Vic Murthy Donald Trump Biden DHS Lulu NPR Mara Senate Joe Biden Corona Virus Task Force
Former Chicago health commissioner named to Biden’s COVID-19 task force

Bob Sirott

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Former Chicago health commissioner named to Biden’s COVID-19 task force

"Announced his covert 19 task force yesterday. 12 of the 13 positions have been filled with doctors. W G A NEWS nation national political correspondent Dean Reynolds. Mr Biden held a call with his new Covad 19 Advisory council, chaired by Dr Vivek Murthy, a former surgeon general under President Obama. David Kessler, a former FDA commissioner, and Dr Marcella Nunes Smith of Yale University. The purpose of This is to let you know what we're going to do once worn in. And so there's a need for bold action to fight this pandemic. We're still facing a very dark winter. Chicago's former public health commissioner is among the experts joining that task force. Mayor Lightfoot have plotted Dr Julie Morita's selection. Dr Morita obviously knows the city very well. She's a national expert. There's already been some communications with her. Marina was a staff member at Chicago's Health Department for 20 years, she served as the city health commissioner from 2015 to 2019. Also on that task force. Former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel older brother Dr Ezekiel Emanuel. He's also been named to that new board. The FDA

Dean Reynolds Mr Biden Dr Vivek Murthy Dr Marcella Nunes Smith David Kessler Covad Mayor Lightfoot Dr Julie Morita Dr Morita Yale University President Obama FDA Chicago Marina Health Department Mayor Rahm Emanuel Dr Ezekiel Emanuel
Trump criticized by medical experts after leaving hospital to drive by supporters

Morning Edition

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Trump criticized by medical experts after leaving hospital to drive by supporters

"Sometime last week, the president felt unwell. Early Friday morning, The president said he had tested positive for Corona virus. Later Friday, his oxygen levels dropped and concerned doctors administered oxygen. Amid that concern. A helicopter carried the president to the hospital On Saturday, the president's doctor went on live TV and gave the world a fog of misleading information. Some of his statements obscured the facts. We have just laid out. Dr Sean Conley. Sonny assessment even included a statement that the president is quote slightly overweight. He's generally classified as obese. Conley and other White House officials now say he made the statements to the country on TV because off the possible effect on the patient, a single TV viewer inside the hospital. For the moment, the president seems better. And in a highly unusual move on Sunday, the infected president climbed into an SUV and rode out to wave to supporters. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here to analyze all of this. Hey, there, Morrow. Hi, Steve. What is the medical team saying now? But we last heard from the medical team yesterday. They said the president has continued to improve so much that he could be sent home to the White House today. That's different than going home for an ordinary person. Of course, there's a full medical staff. 20 to 30 people in the White House medical unit. But at the same time we learned yesterday that the president's oxygen levels dropped twice, once on Friday, once on Saturday, and that he's now taking a cocktail of drugs that doctors say would be given to someone with a severe case of Cove Inn. We also did hear from the president in a Twitter video last night, and he looked better sounded more like himself. And here's some of what he said. I learned a lot about Cove it I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. So that video was taken right before the president did that drive by that you described to wave to supporters outside Walter Reed. That's something that has horrified some medical experts. They say that the SUV is pretty much hermetically sealed, and he was endangering the lives of the agents who have to ride in the SUV with him. One of them Dr. James Phillips, who's an attending physician at Walter Reed called it insanity. Well, in what ways has the story changed that the medical team in the White House has told Well. On Saturday, the White House physician Sean Conley, laid out this timeline that started trumps diagnosis and treatment earlier than known. But then later he had to issue a statement walking that back. He also seemed to tie himself up into pretzels to avoid lying. At one point, Connolly was asked did the president's oxygen level drops below 90? He said. Well, it was below 94, but it wasn't like they were in the low eighties or something. So I'm not sure what you wanted space. Yeah, a lot of space there, but he did give a very positive impression of Trump's condition. On Saturday, Just moments later, contradicted by an anonymous source from the AP learned was chief of staff Mark Meadows. Later, Conley was asked about this, and here's what he said. I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team president, there's course of illness has had. Didn't want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so, you know came off that we're trying to hide something. It wasn't true. So it's what you were describing earlier kind of audience of one problem Thiss sounds like he was saying what he thought the president wanted him to say. You know, the White House has gone to great lengths to make sure the president does not appear appear in feeble DDE in any way. Made sure that he went to Walter Reed. While he could still walk to the helicopter and the implicit message of that limo ride yesterday. The SUV Reid was that the president is fine. Mara is it normal for presidents to be less than forthcoming about their health? Well, many presidents have been less than forthcoming. FDR was rarely photographed in the wheelchair. JFK had a variety of health issues, which weren't described accurately. But I don't think we've ever seen such an extreme version with as little transparency and as much confusion as this Mara. Thanks so much. Thank you. You're what's NPR's? That's NPR's Mara Liasson. All right. Now let's work through what treatments the

President Trump Dr Sean Conley Walter Reed White House Mara Liasson Morrow Connolly NPR Cove Twitter FDR Cove Inn National Political Corresponde Chief Of Staff Thiss Attending Physician Dr. James Phillips Steve
How Party Leaders Get Ready for the Election in Pivotal Pennsylvania County

All Things Considered

04:06 min | 1 year ago

How Party Leaders Get Ready for the Election in Pivotal Pennsylvania County

"Pennsylvania, a working class area in the northern northwestern most corner of the state. Has long been solid territory for Democrats. Then in 2016, Donald Trump eked out a narrow victory. Now in 2020, the county is again seen as pivotal NPR national political correspondent Don Can you sat down with Republican and Democratic leaders in the county? Jim words. A 41 year old college professor, was named Erie County Democratic Chair two years ago. He wasn't in charge when Trump won here. Still, he's fixated on the numbers just 1967 votes, so a really narrow margin and so for me for the last couple of years, it's been staring at those numbers. There are so many what ifs. What if Hillary Clinton had run a better campaign? What if there had been better turnout in the city of here? But words also gives the trump campaign credit for its use of digital targeting for getting people to make personal contact with friends to find new voters for trump factor in their social media presence in their online presence, and the kind of targeting they did, in some cases with the help of foreign actors and others, it had a very significant psychological role. What says the Democrats goal this year is not to mimic that Trump campaign. It's to build on the enthusiasm Democrats showed in the 2018 midterms and to reach beyond the traditional base. To that end, Erie County Democrats have set up field offices out in rural communities. Words talked as he unloaded boxes of lawn signs from the back of his jeep bed once not jobs. We've made a lot of efforts over the last two years to really talk to connect with rural voters. And these offices or an opportunity to help us put some roots down in places that we should have been for a long time. As for Democratic strongholds, voters are highly motivated this year, he says, and having a woman of color Kamala Harris on the ticket helps boost energy as well. He adds that with co vid driving unemployment up to 14.8% in the county. That should also give some blue collar voters who backed Trump. Last time. Second thoughts now to the GOP effort stickers these, you know, ceramic coasters styles, you know whatever, and hats. We've just gone through. That's county chairmen viral Salman 73, year old retired school superintendent and farmer showing off Trump merchandise at county headquarters. They even have trump 2020 masks despite the resistance of many trump supporters to wear them. Both Republicans and Democrats are having to find new ways to reach voters amid the pandemic. One GOP tactic Trump Boat Regatta Out on Lake Eerie What Salman says they're still doing is much old fashioned door knocking as ever, maybe more if there's a newspaper box out by the road, put it in, but otherwise they go to the door and knock leaves the bag on the door. Somebody comes They stay, you know, way back and with mask on and so forth. Democrats, meanwhile, are being more cautious on that score. Salman says he thinks voters see Trump as better at rebuilding the economy post pandemic. He acknowledges that Joe Biden with his Pennsylvania roots is a very different candidate than Hillary Clinton. There's no Biden equivalent to the lock her up chant at Trump rallies by. I think he's a nice enough older fellow. But look at his record. We've got enough years We've got four or five decades. Is to look at it. It doesn't compare both of these party chairs, no, that Erie County is in play and even with the pandemic, limiting traditional campaigning and providing a powerful political issue, They insist they can still do what they need to do to reach the voters. They'll need to win. Don Gani NPR NEWS Erie, Pennsylvania.

Donald Trump Erie County Erie County Democratic Chair Hillary Clinton Salman GOP Pennsylvania Joe Biden NPR Erie Don Can National Political Corresponde Kamala Harris Don Gani JIM Professor Lake Eerie Superintendent
'I will not take his word for it': Kamala Harris says she would not trust Trump alone on a coronavirus vaccine

Here & Now

03:01 min | 1 year ago

'I will not take his word for it': Kamala Harris says she would not trust Trump alone on a coronavirus vaccine

"Weeks until election day. All the ballots are already going out in some places, including North Carolina, where President Trump is campaigning today. Joe Biden will travel the Michigan and Pennsylvania to campaign later this week. Asma Khalid joins us now NPR national political correspondent covering the campaigns and as with the potential for a Corona virus vaccine in the coming months, has become a campaign issue. President Trump Is demanding that Kamala Harris apologize for indicating in a CNN interview over the weekend that she might not take Corona virus vaccine that President Trump says could be ready by election Day. Listen. I will say that I would not trust Donald Trump, and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the The efficacy and the reliability of whatever he's talking about. But then yesterday, Joe Biden said he'd take the vaccine. If it becomes available. Here. He is cost me the election vaccine. Need a vaccine. We need it now. Oz, but sounds kind of like a mixed message There. Tell us about the vaccine politics. Well, I will say, Jeremy, I think that both Joe Biden and comma Harris have been pretty clear in saying that you know, beyond the rhetoric they've been hearing from the president. They really want to make sure that scientific experts are transparent about the efficacy of this vaccine. And last week biting himself made some remarks where he said, you know, God willing when we get a vaccine, that's good, but he questioned when we get a vaccine. Do we think the public is gonna line up willing to take this injection because he feels like the public has lost confidence in what's being said by the Trump administration. I will say. I think that they're both calling for this idea that is, they're really going to be public buy in for large scale administering of this vaccine, and and a lot of this, Jeremy goes back to the pack fact that for months, Biden has been saying that he feels like the Trump administration needed to be clear about how it was planning. TTO have a wide span spread plan to actually get people to take this vaccine and It comes back to the fact that for months they feel like the Trump Administration has been contradictory their own scientific experts that the president has often at times been giving some advice. Scientifically, that is not really backed up by his own scientific experts. And so will people actually believe what the president does about this? You know, for his part, though, Jeremy that that you know, the Trump administration. President Trump has tried to portray these comments as being ones that are spreading fear. They feel like they're fueling. They say, anti vax or conspiracy series. I will say, you know, historically, both Joe Biden couple hairs have been supportive of vaccines. Their comments are they don't feel like the public will necessarily buy into what the president saying and you look at public polling and The president's handling of the pandemic. It's less than half of the public who believes that he's done a good job.

President Trump Joe Biden Trump Administration Kamala Harris Jeremy North Carolina Asma Khalid NPR National Political Corresponde Pennsylvania CNN Michigan
First Lady Melania Trump reaches out to families suffering from pandemic: "You are not alone"

Morning Edition

03:55 min | 1 year ago

First Lady Melania Trump reaches out to families suffering from pandemic: "You are not alone"

"What can the Republican convention add to the image of a president who's put himself in constant public view for years? Republicans are giving their best answers to that question. Days after unveiling the replanting of the Rose Garden, the first lady used it as the backdrop for a political speech last night, turning federal property to her husband's personal political use. Melania Trump acknowledged the crisis over shadowing the president's reelection campaign. I know many people are anxious and some feel helpless. I want you to know you're not alone. My husband's administration will not stop fighting. Until there is an effective treatment or vaccine available toe everyone NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson was listening to Mrs Trump in the various other speakers and is on the line, Mara. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What stood out for you there about what Melania Trump had to say. What stood out for me was she didn't downplay the situation with the pandemic. She didn't call it an offensive nickname. Like the China virus. She tried to make it clear the president takes it seriously something he doesn't always convey herself, she said. Quote. I don't want to use my time attacking the other side that just divides the country. And she also said, instead of tearing things down, let's reflect on our mistakes. So I think it was a message pretty clearly aimed at suburban women, very key grope group. Many of them have drifted away and Melania Trump was trying to make it easier for them to come back to Trump. These are the people Trump calls Suburban Housewives of America. The other thing that stuck out for me was that she was speaking before a live crowd in the Rose Garden, a place that's not supposed to use for partisan political events, and that raised some ethical and legal concern. And we'll just note that you're speaking before a live dog, which is totally fine with the live time. It's totally fine, eh, So we'll just go on here. I want to note you said the ethical issues she's in the Rose Garden. Mike Pompeo, the secretary of state. Spoke from Jerusalem, he said. It's on my own time. But of course he was on an official trip. How serious are the legal issues? I think this is more of a political problem than a legal problem of the House. Democrats say they will launch an investigation. It's interesting because Pompeo recently signed a memo saying that State Department officials should not speak for or against a partisan candidate. And they shouldn't attend a political convention. But mixing official duties and Partisan politics has become a feature, not a bug of the Trump administration and Trump himself busted through a few more Norm's last night because he conducted two official acts as part of the convention program. There was a video of the president's signing a pardon of a convicted bank robber that pardoning obviously is part of his constitutional powers, and he attended a naturalization ceremony. This at a time when the administration has pretty much stopped Naturalization ceremonies because they don't want to do them on zoom. I want to note that the president ran is an outsider as president, he has continued to pose as if he's not really in charge of the government. That's the tone a lot of the speakers have taken. How is this working? I think they're trying to present us kind of split track message portray him as an outsider. Biden is the establishment but still showcase all the trappings of power. I thought the first two nights of the convention were an exercise in methodically addressing trumps deficits on character, Race Cove it and the economy and I think they painted a pretty effective portrait. It just bore very little resemblance to the Things we see from the president on a daily basis. The tweeting the airing of grievances theater axe on his enemies. So the big question for me is who's watching whose minds are still open to be changed and is the hole that the president has dug for himself too deep. For him to get out of

Melania Trump President Trump Mara Liasson Rose Garden Mike Pompeo National Political Corresponde Official Race Cove Mara China State Department Steve Jerusalem Biden America
First Lady Melania Trump reaches out to families suffering from pandemic: "You are not alone"

Morning Edition

01:48 min | 1 year ago

First Lady Melania Trump reaches out to families suffering from pandemic: "You are not alone"

"Morning. What can the Republican convention add to the image of a president who's put himself in constant public view for years? Republicans are giving their best answers to that question. Days after unveiling the replanting of the Rose Garden, the first lady used it as the backdrop for a political speech last night, turning federal property to her husband's personal political use. Melania Trump acknowledged the crisis over shadowing the president's reelection campaign. I know many people are anxious and some feel helpless. I want you to know you're not alone. My husband's administration will not stop fighting. Until there is an effective treatment or vaccine available toe everyone NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson was listening to Mrs Trump in the various other speakers and is on the line, Mara. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What stood out for you there about what Melania Trump had to say. What stood out for me was she didn't downplay the situation with the pandemic. She didn't call it an offensive nickname. Like the China virus. She tried to make it clear the president takes it seriously something he doesn't always convey herself, she said. Quote. I don't want to use my time attacking the other side that just divides the country. And she also said, instead of tearing things down, let's reflect on our mistakes. So I think it was a message pretty clearly aimed at suburban women, very key grope group. Many of them have drifted away and Melania Trump was trying to make it easier for them to come back to Trump. These are the people Trump calls Suburban Housewives of America. The other thing that stuck out for me was that she was speaking before a live crowd in the Rose Garden, a place that's It's not supposed to use for partisan political

Melania Trump Mara Liasson President Trump Rose Garden National Political Corresponde Mara Steve China America
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But the point alternative fax was a term that would follow Conway during her time at the White House, where she was one of the fiercest defenders of the president and his agenda. Now she is leaving. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us Now to talk about this Samarra high. Mary Louise So Kellyanne Conway issued this statement last night, says she's leaving to spend more time with her family, which usually in Washington is code for some other reason, what is actually happening here. You're right. Usually it is code. But in this case, Kellyanne Conway seems to be the rare public official for whom stepping aside for family reasons is the real reason she and her husband have very different views on the Trump presidency. They have four teenage Children, and in her statement, she said, they deserved less drama and more mama. So in all of the unprecedented things that have happened in the Trump White House, the soap opera of Conway and her family Tensions really has been one of the most extraordinary, right. I mean, I can think of a few marriages in Washington that have been high profile that have been controversial because couples came down. On very different sides of the political fence. What made the Conroys marriage that the subject of just so much fascination so much speculation? Well, they're both conservative Republicans. They're not in on opposite sides of the fence. Except for about Donald Trump. Kellyanne was a Republican pollster who became the first female campaign manager to win a presidential campaign. George Conway is a lawyer. He is has impeccable conservative credentials. He helped develop the case that ultimately led to Bill Clinton's impeachment. But then he became one of the most vehement opponents to Trump. He wrote articles and tweets about Trump's mental state and his fitness for office. He helped lead the Lincoln Project, which is a group of anti Trump Republicans, raising money for Really brutal ads trying to convince Republicans in battleground states not to vote for Trump. But last night, he also said he would withdraw certainly from Twitter, also from the Lincoln Project. He's also going to take a break to devote more time to family matters. And you know sometimes Kellyanne had expressed her frustration with her husband, publicly saying that he was disrespectful to her for criticizing Trump and Trump has often disparaged George Conway, sometimes calling him a total loser. But and here's what's significant Trump never soured on Kellyanne Conway. She was one of the rare people in the White House who was there all the way from the 2016 campaign and who never seemed to stray from his good graces. Although one of the latest twist in this Mara is that one of the Conway's kids their teenage daughter became part of this very public battle. Yes, we usually don't discuss minor Children of public officials. But the Conway's daughter, Claudia, who's 15 years old, began posting left wing anti Trump clips on Tic Tac and Twitter the spring on Saturday, she tweeted that she planned to emancipate herself legally from her parents. She said she'd suffered quote. Years of childhood trauma and abuse. Then on Sunday, she said, she, too, would be taking a break from social Media and tweeted quote. No Hate to my parents, please NPR's Mara Liasson updating us there on the imminent departure from the White House. Kellyanne Conway. Thanks, Maura. Thank you. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. It's 18 minutes after five o'clock, we've still got that big rig stuck on the ultimate past with an accident..

Kellyanne Conway Donald Trump Trump White House Mara Liasson White House Trump NPR Washington Twitter national political corresponde Samarra Bill Clinton Mary Louise president Maura Conroys Lincoln Project Kellyanne
First night of Democratic National Convention focuses on unity and pandemic toll

Morning Edition

01:33 min | 1 year ago

First night of Democratic National Convention focuses on unity and pandemic toll

"This was one message from Democrats on the first night of their national convention. Whenever we look to this White house for some leadership or consolation, or any semblance of steadiness, what we get instead is chaos division. And a total and utter lack of empathy. Former first lady Michelle Obama was last night's headline speaker. There was no applause or cheering. The DNC is over Tool this year That was a pre recorded message. Mrs. Obama was alone in a living room. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson was watching. Good morning, Mara. Good morning. How did it go last night? It was smooth, no technical glitches. It was certainly a convention night produced for this moment, this pandemic moments Sometimes it looked like a very highly produced zoom call. It had a lot more ordinary people in it, then it would have had otherwise, if it had been live before an audience, But in the end, you know, with this election being so weird. It turned out that a lot of things are very normal and happened changed it all. Democrats are asking people to judge Donald Trump by the same criteria any president would be judged by did he keep people safe and prosperous? And last night, the biggest impact was from two totally normal speeches. Bernie Sanders. The ideological opponent, the runner up showing that the party was unified. And then Michelle Obama, who is clearly the most effective communicator right now in the Democratic Party, doing what she did in the last two conventions, which is bring a really emotional message.

Michelle Obama Mara Liasson Donald Trump Bernie Sanders White House National Political Corresponde Democratic Party NPR DNC President Trump
DNC Announces Convention Speakers, Speculation On Biden's VP Pick Intensifies

Here & Now

06:32 min | 1 year ago

DNC Announces Convention Speakers, Speculation On Biden's VP Pick Intensifies

"Of scheduled speakers at next week's Democratic National Convention is out, and it's being parsed for clues as to who's still in the running to be Joe Biden's running mate. He's expected to make that announcement any day now. Meanwhile, President Trump is floating the idea of accepting the Republican nomination later this month on Sacred ground. The Gettysburg Battlefield. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is watching it all. And Mara. You know, some names in the running to be Biden's running mate are scheduled to speak, but not in the VP slot, you know, and I'm just wondering if that's a fool's errand to try to make that meaningful, You know? What do you think about that? And who do you think at this point is thumb Where are may be the most likely candidates. I think the most likely candidates are still that same handful of women, you know, Joe Biden said. He's going to take a woman whether it's Kamala Harris, Susan Rice, Gretchen Whitmer, Karen Bass. Those are the people who have been on the list for quite some time. And and, of course, Gretchen Whitmer is the only white female on that short list. But I think the list has remained the same. Sounds like he's about to make his decision because the vetting committee has pretty much disbanded on DH. It could be as early as today that we find out So what do you think for everybody who's sitting home, you know, got all the names and the lists on whiteboards and, you know, trying to, you know, look at those tea leaves. And should we be looking at the List of speakers. Oh, I think that that that is actually fool's errand, but it's fun and it's going to be over very soon. It could be over today, so go ahead. But I still think you know that of all my conversations with Democrats all signs Seemed to point to Kamala Harris. But with the caveat that Joe Biden hasn't decided, and he often takes his time deciding well, 100 prominent black men signed a letter. Hoping they could make him decide that it would be a black woman because they said to him, you will lose the election. If you don't choose a black woman as a running mate, and this was entertainers, pastors, business leaders, athletes. I'm wondering more. If you think that Biden really needed that public pressure, it would seem in this moment in time. That's the choice. He'd want. Make one of these in class. That's what I think. I think that letter was really aimed. And Gretchen Whitmer. She's the only white person on that list. Everyone else is a person of color or black woman. So I don't think he needed that kind of public pressure. But it does show you that of all the people on the list. There is a backlash brewing to at least one of them in that's Gretchen Whitmer. You haven't seen the same kind of opposition public opposition to Kamala Harris, for instance. Oh, by the way, you're saying Elizabeth Warren is not in the running and I don't think so. Yeah, No, I don't think so, although she's a thought leader in the party, and she certainly has influenced a tremendous amount of his agenda. Of the Democratic National Convention will be all online this year. Wouldn't does that mean for the post convention bounce that the candidates look for Hillary Clinton got well, first of all, who knows Because nobody's ever run a presidential campaign in a pandemic. But most people I talked to assume that the post convention bounce will be very small thiss year for both candidates because they're not having the kind of big Excitement filled crowded conventions like we have in the past that being said the Democrats have had a lot longer time to plan for a virtual convention than the Republicans because they've been scaling. There's back for months. And the big question is, are they about to produce the best four night television show ever seen in history? Or will it kind of be ho hum? Well, and they will be competing in that arena with a president who is obviously trying to make the best television show. What do you make of that tweet that he may accept the Republican Nomination for president from the Gettysburg Battlefield or the White House. Both locations likely to violate ethics rules or just some people's moral sense of what's right to politicize. But you know, this is a president that gave an interview to Fox News inside the Lincoln Memorial, gave an interview at Normandy. What do you think happens here? Will certainly Trump isn't worried about offending people sense of what's right or wrong or any kind of norm. Now there are legal questions. Ethical questions about what kind of federal property you can make a convention nominating speech, your acceptance speech on and I'm sure the White House lawyers will be figuring that out. Is there some part of Gettysburg that he could be on? Without violating ethics rules. It's certainly a lot easier for the president to set this up at the White House, but he's clearly looking for the kind of dramatic backdrop not unlike Mount Rushmore that would give his campaign a boost. Quick thought from you, Mara on the fact that it's been primary season. It's primary day today for six states. The focuses on Minnesota, where the Denver Democrat, the representative Ilhan Omar, Is facing a tough challenge. Other progressive candidates have done very well this primary season. What will you be looking for here, right. She's the only member of the squad left with the primary. The four young progressive women of color and she has a really stiff challenge from an attorney named Anton Melton, Mo. He's getting a lot of money. There's been a certain amount of unhappiness with her. They've been attacks on her first for allegedly making anti Semitic statements. We know that the other members of the squad have not had primary challenges. Rashida to leave beat hers back very handily. So that's what we're watching today for the Democrats. Well, how does he do? Right and very briefly. The unemployed have now gone over a week. Without that additional money from the federal government. The president signed those actions and directives to address this. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow says the money will go out in two weeks. But he doesn't have The power of the purse. Congress does and they're gone. They're out of session. I think everyone's taking a big political risk here for the president to sign these executive orders and then have people not get a bigger unemployment check or still face eviction. I think that that he will be responsible for that and then members of Congress, including the Democrats, they are allowing people to go without thes unemployment checks, which, by the way, have kept the economy going in large part On Then they have stopped negotiating. Good. Not good. Not good. Yeah. NPR national political correspond. Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you.

Joe Biden Gretchen Whitmer President Trump Mara Liasson Kamala Harris White House NPR National Political Corresponde Congress Gettysburg Elizabeth Warren VP Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Fox News Larry Kudlow
Trump takes executive action on economic relief

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Trump takes executive action on economic relief

"This is America right now by the numbers. Some five million people have confirmed Corona virus infections. Just yesterday, 55,000 people tested positive. Covad, 19 killed 1100 people in the last 24 hours, and more than 30 million people are relying on some form of unemployment benefit. Congress has failed so far to agree on a new relief bill. So yesterday, President Trump signed executive orders to extend a number of temporary economic measures, and all of this is happening as we race toward an election in November. We're joined now by NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara. Hi, Lulu. So the president spent a lot of time slamming Democratic lawmakers yesterday and rolled out economic relief that we should say is temporary but aren't Many Senate Republicans dead set against extending these extra benefits. Yes, they are, but they're also supposedly against any president. Usurping Congress is constitutional power of the purse that is the power to tax and spend. But politically for the moment, at least, this is a point for Trump. He gets to say Congress couldn't or wouldn't act. But I did, even though there might be a lot less than meets the eye with some of these executive actions. It's unclear if the unemployment extension will actually happen. And when it comes to the eviction relief, for instance. The memo he signed merely tells federal agencies to quote consider if evictions should be stopped, so maybe less there than meets the eye. Meanwhile, we should note that the pace of the presidential races, of course, picking up and Vice President Joe Biden is giving more interviews and doing more public speaking and Republicans are watching. And they have AH, weaponized some of Biden's answers. Well, some violins, answers have been what we call gaffes. He made another one while answering your question. Lulu on a panel consisting of black and Latino journalists. You asked him a question that would was very important to Latino voters in Florida. You asked him if he would reengage with Cuba. Here's what he said. What you all know, but most people don't know. Unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is incredibly diverse community. With incredibly different attitudes about different things. Unlike the African American community, why bring up African Americans at all, and suggests that they are monolithic in their views. So this is another gas. Biden's recent gaffes are often about African Americans. Remember, he said. If you're voting for Trump quote, you ain't black. They're always unprompted. And it's inexplicable, given the support he has among African Americans, given that African American voters saved his candidacy, But is this a winning strategy for the GOP? Well, look, they depend on Biden making gaffes. They're hoping to use them against him. But the big question is. Maybe this is like 2016 when all of the outrageous things that Trump said that Democrats thought would hurt him. Didn't Biden's poll numbers are pretty steady? Why? Maybe because this race is a referendum on the incumbent, and the big question is, Will it stay that way? Will trump succeed in making this race into a binary choice?

Vice President Joe Biden President Trump Congress African American Community NPR Covad Executive Mara Liasson America National Political Corresponde GOP Cuba Florida
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just yesterday, 55,000 people tested Positive Cove in 19 killed 1100 people in the last 24 hours, and more than 30 million people are relying on some form of unemployment benefit. Congress has failed so far to agree on a new relief bill. So yesterday, President Trump signed executive orders to extend a number of temporary economic measures, and all of this is happening as we race toward an election in November. We're joined now by NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara. Hi, Lulu. So the president spent a lot of time slamming Democratic lawmakers yesterday and rolled out economic relief that we should say is temporary. But aren't many Senate Republicans dead set against extending these extra benefits? Yes, they are, but they're also supposedly against any president. Usurping Congress is constitutional power of the purse that is the power to tax and spend. But politically for the moment, at least, this is a point for Trump. He gets to say Congress couldn't or wouldn't act. But I did, even though there might be a lot less than meets the eye with some of these executive actions. It's unclear if the unemployment extension will actually happen. And when it comes to the eviction relief, for instance. The memo he signed merely tells federal agencies to quote consider if evictions should be stopped, so maybe less there than meets the eye. Meanwhile, we should note that the pace of the presidential races, of course, picking up and Vice President Joe Biden is giving more interviews and doing more public speaking and Republicans are watching. And they have AH, weaponized some of Biden's answers. Well, some violins, answers have been what we call gaffes. He made another one while answering your question. Lulu on a panel consisting of black and Latino journalists. You asked him a question that would was very important to Latino voters in Florida. You asked him if he would reengage with Cuba. Here's what he said. What you all know, but most people don't know. Unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is incredibly diverse community. With incredibly different attitudes about different things. Unlike the African American community, why bring up African Americans at all, and suggests that they are monolithic in their views. So this is another gas. Biden's recent gaffes are often about African Americans. Remember, he said. If you're voting for Trump quote, you ain't black. They're always unprompted. And it's inexplicable, given the support he has among African Americans, given that African American voters saved his candidacy, But is this a winning strategy for the GOP? Well, look, they depend on by making gaffes. They're hoping to use them against him. But the big question is. Maybe this is like 2016 when all of the outrageous things that Trump said that Democrats thought would hurt him didn't bite. His poll numbers are pretty steady. Why? Maybe because this race is a referendum on the incumbent, and the big question is, Will it stay that way? Will trump succeed in making this race into a binary choice? So stay tuned for that. Indeed. NPR national political correspondent As always on Sunday, Mara, Thank you so much. Thank you. The federal agency in charge of naturalizing new citizens is being hit with budget shortfalls, paralyzing backlogs and possible furloughs. With less than three months before the presidential election. All of this is affecting who will be able to vote in November. Shannon doing of member station. You are reports that hundreds of thousands of immigrants are watching their dream of casting a ballot this year slip away. We filled out your form. I think we have all the information that we need. A staff member with Boston based Project Citizenship is consulting with 36 year old angles Olive Arrow over the phone, talking through the final steps of his naturalization application. Thank you very much appreciated. Olivera was born and raised in the Dominican Republic. He said his green card for eight years and applied for citizenship this year, hoping he'd be able to vote in November, expecting to get to like the book, But the timeline is not that good for that, So it's not gonna be possible. The process to become a naturalized U. S citizen takes about 10 months. That wait. Time has nearly doubled since 2016. U. S Citizenship and Immigration Services is facing a backlog and budget crisis. The agency is in charge of processing things like visas. Green cards, marriage petitions. And citizenship applications. USCs created a naturalization press. That's Doug Grand, an immigration expert and senior fellow at the Federation of American Scientists. He recently testified before Congress by Ran's analysis. There are more than 300,000 people who in years past would be naturalized in time to vote but will almost certainly miss out this year. These aspiring Americans are young and old Republicans and Democrats living all across the country would normally be eligible to vote this November but still have another interviews. Yet many of these would be voters live in swing states, 40,000 are in Florida and close to 8000 in Pennsylvania, according to Rand The administration sites, the shutdown caused by the pandemic and more intensive vetting to root out fraud as reasons for the uptick in wait times, But Sarwari dollar Dany, director of government relations for the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Has a different theory. It's not about security. It's about deterring people from becoming American citizens doll. Janey also testified before Congress, arguing this is a strategic effort by the Trump administration to dismantle the legal immigration process. If you look at the policies that have been enacted, they deliberately decrease USC a sufficiency, slowdown, case processing and discourage individuals from applying. And although the claims are that it's for fraud, detection or to weed out Frivolous applications. There hasn't been evidence to that The pandemic did shut down many USCs operations, including naturalization ceremonies. For nearly three months, the agency has resumed smaller, socially distanced ceremonies and about 110,000 new citizens have been naturalized in time to vote. But there's still a huge backlog. And last month, nearly 70% of the agency's workforce received furlough notices because there are fewer immigrants applying for legal status, and the agency relies on those fees. It has a $1.2 billion shortfall that will increase everyone's wait times, says Sarah Pierce, a policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute. A furlough of the majority of UCS. The staff would only add to that. So it would really slow the immigration system to a grinding halt without additional funding. The agency says. The furloughs will go into effect at the end of the month. And if that happens, there will be fewer eligible voters come November. For NPR news. I'm Shannon doing.

President Trump Congress Vice President Joe Biden Mara Liasson president NPR national political corresponde U. S Citizenship and Immigrati executive African American community Shannon Florida fraud Positive Cove Senate Boston based Project Citizensh
Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue as benefits set to expire

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue as benefits set to expire

"Meanwhile, the Corona virus relief package signed months ago is about to expire. Senate Republicans hope to have their proposal ready tomorrow so they can start negotiating with House Democrats on a new relief bill. Time is of the essence. Millions of Americans are out of work and infection numbers continue to grow with the November election just 100 days away. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins me now. Good morning, Mara. Hi Sarah. Eviction protections for some renters have already run out and enhance unemployment benefits. And Friday, how is the current state of the pandemic affecting this latest relief bill? Well, I think was out of the relief bill wouldn't be happening at all. Remember, it wasn't long ago that Republicans thought maybe they wouldn't need another relief bill. But just like President Trump has been bowing to reality, canceling the Jacksonville Republican Convention, changing his tune unmasks, acknowledging that in some hot spot schools may not be ableto. Open in person. Republicans on Capitol Hill are agreeing Now there is a need for another relief bill. You said House Democrats have already passed their own version. Now Republican senators have to figure out what they want. There's been a lot of internal dissent inside the Republican Party. How big should unemployment benefits be etcetera, But Mitch McConnell did say on Friday, he's the Republican leader in the Senate that hopefully we'll be able to pass something in the next two or three weeks. That's not soon enough for a lot of

Mara Liasson Republican Party Jacksonville Republican Conven Senate Mitch Mcconnell National Political Corresponde President Trump NPR Sarah
D.C. bishop 'outraged' Trump used tear gas on citizens for photo op at church

Here & Now

04:34 min | 1 year ago

D.C. bishop 'outraged' Trump used tear gas on citizens for photo op at church

"The White House Twitter account meanwhile posted a produced video documenting the president's response soon after he said this in the rose garden I am here president of law and order and an ally of all peaceful protesters but in recent days our nation has been gripped by professional anarchists violent mobs arsonists looters criminals riders antifa and others as the president spoke National Guard troops were breaking up peaceful protests outside of the White House the president then walked to the historic but boarded up Saint John's church known as the church of presidents to have his photo taken holding a Bible joining us now for more is NPR national political correspondent Mara license and Mara president trump was widely criticized for standing in front of that church including by the episcopal bishop of DC called a charade what was the president trying to achieve and do you think he achieved that and that moment when he I gave their statements I think what he was trying to achieve was sent a message to his base that he as you just heard him say is the president of law and order he also said that he was dispatching thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers in DC so the message was about cracking down not calming down he did say he wanted justice for George Floyd and his family but that was just one sentence he didn't say exactly how he wants to go about that whether it's prosecuting the police officers are setting up a task force on racism and police departments that the speech was very militaristic there have been some polling that showed that his base was slipping and he went back to one of his core messages about law and order and he ran on this in twenty sixteen the unrest in Ferguson and Baltimore helped him win and I think he thinks it's gonna help him again that threat to send the military into states that don't control protesters there's a lot of debate about whether he can actually do that or should he do that is not likely to happen well he can't do it whether he will do it is another question he said yesterday that he strongly recommends that every governor deployed the National Guard a lot of governors have already deployed the National Guard then he said that if you don't establish an overwhelming law enforcement presence I will deploy the U. S. military and and solve the problem now this is a little bit reminiscent of his stance during the pandemic which is I have total authority but the governors have total responsibility I don't think that the president will federalize the National Guard if he does that then he is responsible for quelling the unrest all over the country but I think that he absolutely cam or something called the insurrection act which allows him to federalize the National Guard it's been used before in nineteen ninety two after the Rodney king riots in Los Angeles bought at that time it was California elected officials the mayor of Los Angeles who requested that the U. S. military help yeah Joe Biden gave a speech today in Philadelphia ripping into the president's response to the protests what was his message and and how do you expect this issue to play out on the campaign over the next several months well I think this issue will be a big one in the campaign of course that helping depends on how long the protests going on how long the riots go on but Joe Biden has been struggling to get some air time the president has dominated the media narrative and Joe Biden is presenting himself as the polar opposite of the president and he's someone who will heal the nation he will deal with these systemic problems don't forget what gave rise to these rights was a kind of triple whammy of the pandemic has hit African American communities harder than any other the unemployment in the recession has hit African American communities harder than any other and now this these instances of police brutality so young African American men ages eighteen to twenty five who've been sitting home cooked up locked down for the last couple of months they haven't been teleworking you know they've been suffering from each one of these problems and it was a recipe for violence and Joe Biden says I can fix these problems Donald Trump isn't even addressing them that's Marlize Senshi is national political correspondent for NPR Mar as always thank you thank you

President Trump White House Twitter
Nancy Pelosi Is Trying to Save America's Economy—Again

Weekend Edition Sunday

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Nancy Pelosi Is Trying to Save America's Economy—Again

"As the chairman of the fed said to me you've got to think big you've got to think yeah and I said the same thing to him you've got to think big and in order to think big that's house speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday on what the next coronavirus relief package will look like and there will be a lot of negotiation in the coming days over just how big I'm joined now by Molly ball she's time magazine's national political correspondent and the author of a new book called simply pelo see Molly ball good morning good morning thanks for having me up when policy says that think big she's thinking another trillion dollars on top of the nearly three trillion Congress has already moved up where do negotiations stand at the moment are they haven't really gotten under way hi there's been at this point sort of a stand off with you know the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell making some comments about not wanting to do anything for me or at least not wanting to rush it and then as you alluded to there's also this site is stand off about whether Congress should even come back into session with the Senate deciding it well in the house deciding it won't as so I don't think that they can go she Asians have have really gotten under way I think you see the two sides staking out publicly we're there with the positions I'd like to go she Asians to start from how bruising with the fight B. within her party if the next package doesn't include things remembers one like money for election security and broadband access so far we have seen the fight mostly between the two parties there were only a very few votes against the last package from both the Democrats and the Republicans I and I think that the democratic caucus in the house has a lot of faith in speaker Pelosi and her negotiating abilities meaning that they know she's a very tough negotiator and they mostly believe that she is going to sort of scratch and claw for the very maximum she feels she can get she is a master of maximizing her leverage so when she comes to the caucus and says this is the best I could do this is as far as I could push them I they mostly take her at her work well let's talk about that because you've just written a portrait of Nancy Pelosi and you you know show a woman who is exceedingly good at negotiating with her caucus and very much in control of what's the point you make is that the fight over the affordable Care Act was the defining moment of her legislative career do you think this moment with the pandemic battering the country and trillions of dollars heading out the door may push the ACA out of that top spot I tend to doubt it honestly just because whatever's being done now is fundamentally a response in a relief effort we don't see big policies being enacted that will change society for decades to come and that's how she views the affordable Care Act as the linchpin of her legacy it is very much the way she wants to be remembered is for her pivotal role in enacting you know it's close to universal access to healthcare as we have gotten in the life of this country and that's a goal that Democrats and been trying and failing to get to for the better part of a century so is someone who really sees her lodestar as improving the lives of America's children that's what she always says her work is focused towards and I think she believes that that that bill did more to advance that goal than any other policy she's played a pardon I over her thirty year career there's a dynamic in the house that seems similar to the one that come with experience on the Republican side there was the freedom caucus tea parties who shouted the loudest even though there were more middle of the road Republicans pelo see has the squad to some members who are very far to the left and they get a disproportionate amount of attention is she doing any better in terms of corralling the far left in her party I think she quite obviously is as witnessed by the fact that the house is not come to a standstill on her watch we did see the freedom caucus symbol and before the tea party caucus paralyze the house when Republicans controlled it and the Republican speakers on able to maneuver around them or get them back into the tent the so called squad is for members that is not a very large portion of the Democrats majority and died and and so you know and I think it helps that speaker Pelosi herself comes from if not the far left wing certainly the progressive wing of the party she's a member of the congressional progressive caucus which constitutes the majority of Democrats in the house and so she can go to the most of the liberals and say I'm coming from where you're coming from but we have to meet our our colleagues both the moderates in the democratic caucus and the Republicans on the other side of the aisle we've got to move in their direction if we want to get anything done and since she is always oriented toward results oriented toward getting things done that is always the argument she's going to make it just finally you know she is the most powerful woman ever in American politics why has it taken so long for her to get as you say her do I think there's a lot of larger sort of socio cultural factors that have gone into ice I spend a lot of the book talking about their perceptions of her the negative perceptions of her the way her image has been shaped and molded and I really think that as a culture for a lot of reasons we've only recently come around to appreciating the sort of determined aggressive polarizing figure that she represents she really is a pioneer but for a long time the sort of negative image of her prevailed and I think that she's coming in for reconsideration at this moment in history when we are seeing an unprecedented wave of women's political activism the search turned around and said oh she was here the whole time she was here before we

Chairman FED
Nancy Pelosi's Legacy: Most Powerful Woman in Congress

Weekend Edition Sunday

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Nancy Pelosi's Legacy: Most Powerful Woman in Congress

"As the chairman of the fed said to me you've got to think big you've got to think big and I said the same thing to him you've got to think big and in order to think big that's house speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday on what the next coronavirus relief package will look like and there will be a lot of negotiation in the coming days over just how big I'm joined now by Molly ball she's time magazine's national political correspondent and the author of a new book called simply pelo see Molly ball good morning good morning thanks for having me up when pelo see says that think big she's thinking another trillion dollars on top of the nearly three trillion Congress has already moved up where do negotiations stand at the moment are they haven't really gotten under way hi there's been at this point sort of a stand off with you know the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell making some comments about not wanting to do anything for me or at least not wanting to rush it and then as you alluded to there's also this is stand off about whether Congress should even come back into session with the Senate deciding it well in the house deciding it won't so I don't think that they negotiations have have really gotten under way I think you see the two sides staking out publicly we're there with the position said like that initiations to start from how bruising with the fight B. within her party if the next package doesn't include things remembers one like money for election security and broadband access so far we have seen the fight mostly between the two parties there were only a very few votes against the last package from both the Democrats and the Republicans I and I think that the democratic caucus in the house has a lot of faith in speaker Pelosi and her negotiating abilities meaning that they know she's a very tough negotiator and date mostly believe that she is going to sort of scratch and claw for the very maximum she feels she can get she is a master of maximizing her leverage so when she comes to the caucus and says this is the best I could do this is as far as I could push them are they mostly take her at her work well let's talk about that because you've just written a portrait of Nancy Pelosi and you you know show a woman who is exceedingly good at negotiating with her caucus and very much in control of what's the point you make is that the fight over the affordable Care Act was the defining moment of her legislative career do you think this moment with the pandemic battering the country and trillions of dollars heading out the door may push the ACA out of that top spot I tend to doubt it honestly just because whatever's being done now is fundamentally a response in a relief effort we don't see big policies being enacted that will change society for decades to come and that's how she views the affordable Care Act as the linchpin of her legacy it is very much the way she wants to be remembered is for her pivotal role in enacting a you know it's close to universal access to healthcare as we have gotten in the life of this country and that's a goal that Democrats and been trying and failing to get to for the better part of a century so is someone who really sees her lode star as improving the lives of America's children that's what she always says her work is focused towards and I think she believes that that that bill did more to advance that goal than any other policy she's played a pardon I over her thirty year career there's a dynamic in the house that seems similar to the one that was experience on the Republican side there was the freedom caucus tea parties who shouted the loudest even though they were more middle of the road Republicans pelo see has the squad to some members who are very far to the left and they get a disproportionate amount of attention is she doing any better in terms of corralling the far left in her party I think she quite obviously is as witnessed by the fact that the house is not come to a standstill on her watch we did see the freedom caucus double and before the tea party caucus paralyze the house when Republicans controlled it and the Republican speakers unable to maneuver around them or get them back into the tent the so called squad is for members that is not a very large portion of the Democrats majority and died and and so you know and I think it helps that speaker Pelosi herself comes from if not the far left wing certainly the progressive wing of the party she's a member of the congressional progressive caucus which constitutes the majority of Democrats in the house and so she can go to the most of the liberals and say I'm coming from where you're coming from but we have to meet our our colleagues both the moderates in the democratic caucus in the Republicans on the other side of the aisle we've got to move in their direction if we want to get anything done and since she is always oriented toward results oriented toward getting things done that is always the argument she's going to make but just finally you know she is the most powerful woman ever in American politics why has it taken so long for her to get as you say her do I think there's a lot of larger sort of socio cultural factors that have gone into ice I spend a lot of the book talking about the perceptions of her the negative perceptions of her the way her image has been shaped and molded and I really think that as a culture for a lot of reasons we've only recently come around to appreciating the sort of determined aggressive polarizing figure that she represents she really is a pioneer but for a long time the sort of negative image of her prevailed and I think that she's coming in for reconsideration at this moment in history when we are seeing an unprecedented wave of women's political activism they've sort of turned around and said oh she was here the whole time she was here before we

Chairman FED
"national political correspondent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"National political correspondent at The Washington Post thank you very much for joining us my pleasure this week we also have another major meat processing plant closed due to a coronavirus Tyson foods has had to close down its Waterloo Iowa pork processing plant just as it was re opening another facility in Columbus junction that close on April sixth the plant will be closed indefinitely as the clean install infrared body temperature scanners and plexiglas barriers to protect workers as more plants close around the country their increase worries about the supply chain of me for more on this was speak to Tyler Jack jobs and economy reporter for the des Moines register so each one is changing facility closed on April six get both work processing plants G. seventy in Columbus junction in smaller employees about twelve hundred people some employees began to start missing work some employees began to weep as a virus and eventually he discharging a lot more casting about it sounds a number of people tested positive now all the most recent figure from yesterday the state required doctrine if you people in that county it's a very small county it's about ten thousand people in the whole county and I think there have been two deaths in that county and largely a lot of it has been centered on that case in point there in Columbus junction and then the water is much larger but also across the story it has got twenty eight hundred employees I think the national pork chops Saturday's results will corrupt workers sent the ball across the country so now that the Columbus junction one has re opened what have they put in there to protect the workers that I read from your story they have infrared scanners and a lot of plexiglas everywhere I was panicking destruction for a couple of days this week and just and that was probably about a thousand employees as well as a lot of city officials and other people who are connected to the plant in talking to mayor came into the plants the day before on Monday they open up again the company wanted for the second day you put an electrode scanners again like C. class stations so that workers are supposed to be in between this is the last of a dying touch each other and baby have masks available hand sanitizer across the state has rebelled the workers and they resumed work on Tuesday slaughtering operation and to date they were going to get into the actual processing of the cakes and we talk about supply chain a lot of times it's not just will consumers be able to get their meat and all this is a affects everybody farmers truckers distributors the grocers the supply chain disruptions when these meat processing plants closed down could be pretty big what we're being told that there's no worry just yet last week at the national Research Council was holding a teleconference and they were using words like potential disaster and and things like that an agriculture economist at Iowa state who I spoke with last week said he believed that these farmers could hold on to their pick on their arm or maybe two weeks at that point maybe three weeks maybe four weeks they could try to be creative at a certain point you would start sharing your pics basically you could not afford to keep them and that would be a loss Tyler Jack jobs and economy reporter at the des Moines register thank you very much for joining us.

National political corresponde The Washington Post
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KCRW

"I spoke with my colleague national political correspondent Alex burns about the rule of governors in fighting the pandemic so far we talked about what a handful of early acting governors have been up to as this pandemic has spread across the country and more and more governors have to decide how to approach this how are you seeing that break down I'm kind of governor by governor well by late March this morning I have signed an executive order which institutes a stay at home directive no Maryland resident should be leaving their homes you have sixteen states that are in some form of lockdown today I'm issuing a stay home stay safe executive order for all Michiganders with a population totaling nearly half the country most of the states are pretty blue pretty but there are a couple redder states in their states with Republican governors but for the most part the overarching pattern here is a big states with democratic governors moving fastest but that of course creates a pretty messy and inconsistent approach in the state by state way that's right and some of the biggest dates in the country that don't have cases detected early governors were inclined to act aggressively go weeks and weeks without taking similar steps these are states largely with conservative Republican governors who are closely aligned with president trump Florida is probably the best example of this this is a state governed by Republican Ron DeSantis he's whole campaign in twenty eighteen was about his support for president trump and he doesn't shut down the state for weeks and weeks you know it's just a different situation we're a big diverse state I mean if you look at New York state yeah obviously New York City surrounding areas some of the other places you know they're just in a different different situation but I'm look forward to the guidelines and it becomes very very clear over the course of March and the very beginning of April the Florida is going to have a huge problem on its hands you have identified a bunch of contiguous states in the south where leaders generally Republicans loyal to president trump seem resistant to closing down their state and I wonder why you think that that is the case you know I think some of this is ideological bad Republican governors and particularly southern governors have a different view of whether it's appropriate and when it's appropriate for a governor to use his power to halt business commerce normal cultural life some of these states are more rural states and in much of the country I think even to this day there's still the perception that the corona virus is an urban problem and clearly that is the case that it is an urban problem but it's also clear that it's not just an urban problem and you know in so many of the southern states it really does also boil down to loyalty to the president and partisanship governor to Santa's in Florida is really the perfect example of this so I'm in contact with them and basically you know I've said are you guys recommending this as he for weeks and weeks resists taking more aggressive action to mandate social distancing different situation says pretty much explicitly if the White House told me to act differently the task force is not recommended that to me if they do you obviously that would be something that we carry a lot of weight with me that would carry a lot of weight with me it's as close as we get to hearing a Republican governor who's not taking action say the White House please tell me what to do and so it's not an accident that the Republican governors for the most part who do break with the president are people who are so well established in their home states like Mike to wine or who are leading states that aren't really that conservative to begin with like Maryland and Massachusetts where they may have more political freedom to go their own way then a Republican governor of Georgia in president trump's Republican Party I can also imagine how as a governor of a more world state where the virus is not really usually present there would be a natural inclination not to shut down social and commercial life because many of those states kind of have an institutional social distance you know houses are really far away from each other there isn't density and so it would be natural to wait until the federal government said no no no you need to do this now I think that's really right and I think that sort of magnifying that even further the governors in these states are largely elected by constituencies who are the most representative of the dynamics that you're talking about that the Republican governor of Georgia which is not an overwhelmingly rural state is elected with the overwhelming support of the rural parts of the state so even at the point where you see an outbreak in Atlanta an outbreak in Miami or Tampa or Jacksonville the governors of these states still have to worry about pressure from the business community statewide and from voters who may see what's going on in Miami or Atlanta as largely irrelevant to their own lives and so these governors are really looking to the White House for leadership and direction on what exactly they should be doing we will be extending our guidelines to April thirtieth to slow the spread on Tuesday will be finalizing these plans and providing a summary of our findings supporting data and strategies to the American people right and they got it many of them in the last couple of days is my sense when the president disclose those will really scary models that said this shocking numbers you're talking about deaths even at the low end you were shocked when you see a hundred a hundred and twenty thousand two hundred thousand people over potentially a very short period of time twenty thousand could die and it's not like one by one the hold out states started to lock themselves down the president I just the other day announced they're going to do a thirty day extension for the current guidelines I mean I think it's clear that that represents affected we are national parks that's really how you know so much of this was about partisanship and presidential leadership when the president goes out and says basically best case scenario a hundred thousand people are going to die you see one by one these states flipped almost overnight so so given those circumstances and given the the the unique situation in Florida I'm I'm gonna be doing an executive order today directing all Floridians to limit movements and personal interactions outside the home to only those finally out I wonder about another aspect of this the wool the president typically as the source of calm and comfort in moments like this thinking of course and FDR and his fireside chats that hasn't necessarily happened here it has been instead the governors that's right you know what people have heard from president trump when he has been attempting to calm the country has been a message that this isn't so bad and it might actually be over pretty fast that's a message he has moved off of in the last week what they have been hearing from governors in a time of war we have to make sacrifices I thank each and everyone of you for all that you were doing every single day has been a different kind of candor about just how tough this is going to be and how long it might last this crisis can take.

national political corresponde Alex burns
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

12:54 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"And since you know we are back it's the guy that's in show and I'm very pleased to welcome back to that very show this very show more license national political correspondent for NPR also a fox news contributor Mara great to have you here again happy to be here okay where to begin let's start let's start with New Hampshire okay and your response your reaction your analysis now that were a bit removed from what happened about where this race currently stands I think the race currently stands with one candidate who seems to have consolidated the left lane of the party that's Bernie Sanders and the center lane is filled with candidates and Saqlain has not coalesced around a single alternative to Sanders he's been winning with twenty two percent of the vote twenty five percent of the vote much much less that he got last time remember New Hampshire twenty sixteen a big help Ellery Clinton by twenty two percent two got something like sixty percent of the vote what New Hampshire told us this time is a lot of battled for Bernie Sanders last time was anti Hillary it wasn't necessarily pro Sanders because that both didn't just go to another left wing candidate Elizabeth Warren it went to people to catch any club which are so it tells you that Sanders is the leader he has the most plausible path to get a plurality of delegates just what we see now but the big question is can the center left coalition and one person so let's discuss coalescence first on the progressive side you mentioned Elizabeth Warren she put out at this appeal basically pleading with her supporters earlier saying I need money and I need it now to stay viable through super Tuesday is she don it is done of she can't win somewhere where is she going to win that's a question I mean she was not just competing in New Hampshire she was from Massachusetts message right the candidates have a built in advantage that mediate the share of media market with New Hampshire Bernie Sanders was also a neighbor but not the kind of neighbor that people from Massachusetts are so people really knew Alyssa formed in New Hampshire and made voted for her in fourth place and she also put a huge amount of time and effort into Iowa a massive ground game she came in distant third then really stumbled I mean fourth place in Iowa a in in New Hampshire rather is is really catastrophic for her and that's your point is right I look ahead to the next couple states and then super Tuesday where do you see a you know low hanging fruit to be plucked by Elizabeth Warren to actually know where I don't really see nowhere nowhere I don't see one you've already might want her to stick around just to to eat out SO voters so it doesn't get easier for burning no yes if that was true but I don't think her voters work all going to Bernie I'd like early on progresses decided if we want to choose between two left wing candidates let's choose the guy who's been around the longest and has never wavered in his belief in our agenda may pick Bernie when he started shedding voters remember Elizabeth Warren was once at the top of the heap in the polls when he started hitting voter she showed them to Amy Klobuchar and people to catch so that was pretty interesting this is not has not been a neatly dividing ideological rate is a very important point and I just add one note on that yeah so I saw morning console poll where they asked democratic voters for their second choice right they've got their favorite but if not him or her then who and among Joe Biden's supporters next on the depth chart number two choice was Bernie Sanders and rally for Bernie Sanders again yeah everyone keeps saying well if if these people all get together then they can stop burning and it's just not quite that simple but it is very obvious that the establishment of the party the center left they're getting extremely worried about Bernie Sanders James Carville is out there shouting to anyone who will listen this is a disaster in the making listen to cut five he was Carville on TV there's a certain part of the Democratic Party wants us to be a cult I'm not interested in me and in a call seventy five years old I'm just not a not a very coldly portion only saying the plane began on his face any of this is the Democratic Party and if we go to where the British labor party if we nominate German Coleman is going to be in today I'm scared to death I really am the end of days and of course the Jeremy Corbyn references to Bernie Sanders Bernie firing back in cut for Hey was it all the respect is a political hack who said very terrible Vegas where he was working for Clinton against Barack Obama did you said some of the same things we are taking on troll the Republican establishment call gold and the democratic establishment but at the end of the day the grass roots movement that we are putting together of young people of working people of people of color want real change so Mara one of the things that I heard on MSNBC Chris Hayes made this point we played the clip yesterday in order to win the democratic primary you need to post victories you need to be able to raise a lot of money I need to have a coalition that is broad and diverse he's at right now the only person hitting all three of those is Bernie Sanders and there is a real and I think nasty intensifying divide that starting to to occur and it raises questions about unity moving forward especially if there is I know we always talk about it but it could be real this time a brokered convention when you think about that right well for so when you meet a brokered convention we should define as he means it weird when somebody doesn't win on the first ballot go to a second ballot does mean somebody brokers it in a smoky back room right but I think what is really important to understand is that when most candidates who run to be the nominee of their party are running to be the leader of their party that's not what Bernie Sanders is doing the leader of the party tries to get victories for all Democrats including Democrats down ballot in competitive states and districts those are the Democrats by the way who are deeply afraid of the Sanders nomination because they think he's right be an existentialist of their reelection campaign but Bernie Sanders is running as he will tell you any day of the week to lead a political revolution he's not even a registered Democrat the reason why the Democratic Party let him run in their primaries because he did represent a group of people mostly young people that they wanted inside there tend not out of it they made a real bargain with the devil I mean the question is Bernie Sanders doesn't really care about down ballot Democrats winning most of them say the reason that he would be so bad for them is because he stands for banning fracking in Pennsylvania for instance or a mandatory Medicare for all which means a hundred sixty million people lose their private health insurance so he he has a totally different agenda he's trying to move American politics to the left of the Democratic Party is his vehicle and he said yesterday on television I forget exactly which show he was on he said look come into the convention as I have a plurality I might not have a majority but you know it's unfair did not nominate the person who comes to Milwaukee with a plurality even the rules say if somebody doesn't get a majority on the first boat we go to a second ballot and get two votes on that second ballot super delegates away with they're not they were only done away with on the first ballot but there could be an insurrection and what Democrats worry about this that if Bernie Sanders comes to Milwaukee with the plurality against a fractured field and he doesn't get the nomination because super delegates vote on the second ballot he will lead an insurrection and split the party the totally plausible completely plausible I want to ask you about Joe Biden just because what I've been saying for a long time watching these debates watching some of it his advance I remember shows months ago where I came on the air and I said you guys I kinda like Joe Biden I'm sort of rooting for him in certain ways he does not have it it is painful he can barely finished off sometimes it is tough to watch and the polls just kept looking perfectly fine is bouncing along in first place in the voting actually started and he is totally cratered it's it's like all of that perception spilled out all at once and people are abandoning him in droves but unlike Lisbeth warning the problem that you just described a moment ago that she has Biden at least has a theoretical come back path with no people people of color and then South Carolina you can win South Carolina and then all bets are off for super Tuesday Nov Bloomberg gets bloodied up we'll get to Bloomberg in a second then maybe he gets back into this thing fourth place and then fifth place and his donors starting to get worried and plummeting in the national polls I mean Joe Biden that it is really hard even with the plausible path to see it actually happening because the problem seems to be him yes well you know the big questions better but now I remember doing the first piece before he got in the three questions work could you perform could you raise money and how would you deal with Donald Trump attacking and we have the answer to the first currently yeah and what has to happen is that somebody has to put together a winning coalition and the Democratic Party is African Americans plus white progressives and we'll see if anybody else can can do that in South Carolina and Nevada and Michael Bloomberg decided not to get in till after the first four states I bet now watching it from the outside he wishes he was on the ballot and the bat and South Carolina certainly so Caroline missing a big opportunity he's made some inroads in the in the African American community but he's not gonna be able to get any votes it'll be really interesting to see if the people to catch an amicable terror who are considered to not have much foot in the African American community you know can they make inroads there and does or does Joe Biden win in South Carolina and keep on a kind of hobbling towards Milwaukee let's talk about Bloomberg I did my opening monologue on his candidacy today a hundred and eighty eight million dollars of his own money spent in quarter one alone he is all over TV you can't go to second so out seeing an ad from him online as well he's now has this whole social influencer campaign that he's spending a lot of money on its he's sparing absolutely no expense it seems to be working to some extent I wonder what you think is this is the big unanswered question a huge looming question mark setting aside I think the vulnerabilities he's got on stop and frisk in and race relations in setting aside I think some of the question about his treatment of women those are both big ones when he's actually alive real candidate debating other candidates in actually campaigning not detach but in the thing finally how will he actually respond how will he actually perform we don't know what that's going to look like which is why I think it's a risk you you hear these rumblings about a bunch of the Biden donors and supporters really giving a hard look at Bloomberg saying maybe he's the next one he's so untested Mar it seems highly risky well right now highly risky but we're we're all going to find out is how good a candidate like you said a living breathing candidate is Mike Bloomberg he's not very charismatic he has never been a great campaigner but he has to figure out how to use that kind of anti charisma as permission structure you know I might be short it might have a nasal voice here my position and by the way he's right smack in the mainstream of the Democratic Party he wants a public option he wants higher taxes on the wealthy he wants no more capital gains differential network carried interest meaning he any have very strong support of environmental regulations so he's going to have to convince Democrats and he has to do a lot of repair work on stop and frisk which he is trying to do Khan but one thing about Mike Bloomberg he has invested in the Democratic Party for years he leveled the playing field financially with the NRA he helped elect those forty new you know majority maker house candidates and he does have a small but very passionate based in the gun safety movement all those moms who knocked on doors in Virginia they are Mike Bloomberg validators he's also side from them he's also got these chips that is collected from many many Democrats and he.

national political corresponde NPR Mara New Hampshire
"national political correspondent" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Here with me to analyze what we have heard so far in this first day of the trial and our congressional correspondent Susan Davis NPR national political correspondent Mara liasson and and I want to start with some of the substance I would highly doubt a point that we have been making as this has unfolded which is how little daylight there is between Republicans and Democrats on what happened on the facts were they differ the extremely is on whether this represents impeachable conduct let's hear a little bit of how this has unfolded first we'll hear from chair of the house intelligence committee house impeachment manager Adam Schiff this is him making the argument that the president's actions in regard to Ukraine do represent impeachable conduct it is the presence apparent belief that under article two he can do anything he wants no matter how corrupt outfitted in gaudy legal closing and yet when the founders wrote the impeachment clause they have precisely this type of misconduct in mind conduct that abuses the power of his office for personal benefit that undermines our national security that invites foreign interference in our democratic process of an election it is the tri factor of constitutional this conduct justifying impeachment now the president's personal attorney and member of his defense team Jay Sekulow seized on that notion of a trifecta I'll give you a try back to during the proceedings that took place before the Judiciary Committee the president was denied the right to cross examine witnesses the president was denied the right to access evidence and the president was denied the right to have counsel present at hearings that's it right back to it's right back to that violates the constitution of the United States I want to fact check that with my team here Susan Davis and moral wires and we heard there the president's attorney saying the president was denied the right to cross examine witnesses the president was denied the right to access to access evidence the president was denied the right to have counsel present at hearings when I everything was unfolding in the house sue Davis is that correct no it's not correct it is certainly a spin on what happened but it is not accurate to say that the house impeachment process violated rules afforded to the president what Democrats did do was conduct initial investigation in behind closed doors and closed OR depositions but Republican lawmakers took part in that process at every step along the way they were part of all those closed or depositions now the White House always set a standard that said they should have been allowed in those rooms but that would have been the out liar to allow a White House team into closed door depositions when they were taking possible witness testimony so they've they've sort of set a standard the Congress never said before and said we should have been afforded that that justification is what led the White House to refuse to participate in any of the process going forward when it went before the house Judiciary Committee the White House was allowed to send council there they were allowed to respond to the evidence put into the record and they chose not to referring back to that house invest it in house intelligence committee process the indication is that the White House never wanted to participate in this process from the beginning they were so it's sort of the the decision was made very early on by Republicans to attack the process because they did not believe in the democratic controlled house that they would be given more for more fairness to what they always said was they were looking forward to a Senate trial because the Senate is controlled by Republicans and they were much more eager to participate but now we are seeing that the White House continues to fight things like more documents more witnesses even though they have said in the past they believe they would be given a fair shake in this process now and the president president trump himself continues to maintain this is a hoax this is a win right here different words on different days more life yeah and he one of the other things that the White House said over and over again in its defense is that there weren't enough first hand witnesses there were a few in Gordon son land and other P. at the junior David David Holmes who heard overheard a conversation of the resident there were first hand witnesses but the argument from the White House and from Republicans is you don't have enough first hand witnesses this is all hearsay and circumstantial well the the house Democrats rejoinder was you are letting us see the first hand documentation you not letting us hear from first hand witnesses and that's what today was all about I mean that the Democrats are once again asking for the documents and the witnesses that would fill in the gaps that the White House says is undermining the Democrats case have we made any progress in terms of what either of you have heard and from the president's team thus far one of the one of the central arguments that the White House team has been accepted the president's team has been expected to make is that these articles of impeachment are constitutionally invalid because they never allege that there was a crime abuse of power isn't a crime well that is a that is the at the heart of their argument that abuse of power is not an impeachable offense because it's not a high crime and misdemeanor they are situation never says it has to be a crime that's right they are they are extremely isolated in the legal world on this they're not very with the exception of Alan Dershowitz I don't think that there are is any other legal scholar who says you have to either have to have an actual crime to be impeached or that abuse of power is not a high crime and misdemeanor yeah I think that's right I mean what the democratic argument would be too is that it is the highest abuse of power because the actions that the president took in which they allege that the phone call in and requesting interference in an American election if you undermine the outcome of an election or seek interference and it is the very the the park you'll leave the most impeachable act which is what many of the scholars that they had testified before the house Judiciary Committee argue obviously Jonathan Turley is one of the scholars who took a very different view but part of his view is that Democrats we're moving forward with an incomplete record we know that is true Democrats did move for with articles of impeachment with a whole lot of questions unanswered what Adam Schiff who's the lead impeachment manager has argued is that they could not wait for the courts to weigh in because if you wait for the courts to weigh in on this question of obstruction and witnesses and turning over documents you in effect nullify the impeachment clause because as we all well know the court system in this country can take a really long time they might not get the answers to these questions still well into trump second term or even after he were to leave office and their argument was you couldn't wait for the courts because it involved okay upcoming election it was not looking backwards it was looking forewords and the burden falls to the Congress not to the courts to render the judgment and they argument that this is what this is the exact thing that that the founders and the framers worried about the most foreign interference in American elections yeah absolutely you're you're reminding me Mar that one of the things I was expecting to hear today and perhaps we will hear is this as this plays out is some references to the molar investigation to Russia this is at a point the Democrats have been keen to make that if they see a pattern yes we interfered in the election and president trump in courage to it and that we're seeing the same right with Ukraine Republicans would seek to dispute that right I mean he stood up in twenty sixteen and said Russia if you're listening please find Hillary's emails he said afterwards after the mother report came out that he would not notify the FBI if he was presented with for information from a foreign government about his opponents he not only asked in the phone call with Ukrainian president the landscape to open an investigation into Joe Biden on the south lawn of the White House he said very openly I want you crane to open an investigation into the minds and while we're at it I want China to do the same thing so he is on record very openly saying that that foreign help in an election is fine with him it's something that he actively solicits right the challenge I think the White House has is they have a much more difficult and secure this case to make here but they have the most fun friendly playing field possible that senator Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has is trying to create the rules of the game to benefit the White House as much as possible but for instance one of their arguments against these impeachment articles is that everyone was inferring with the president thought nobody knew nobody had direct first in conversations with them and that may be true but there are two witnesses that they like to hear from who do have direct knowledge of what the president was thinking acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney former national security adviser John Bolton and if the White House maintains other defenses everything was perfect and the president did nothing wrong then they should be exculpatory witnesses that the information they should be able to provide should provoke prove the White House its motives work the White House lawyers have never presented a single piece of exculpatory evidence anything that contradicts the testimony that we heard in the house which is very quick point here if it but just to know John Roberts an exceedingly quiet we've heard very little is that more or less what we were expecting I think so I mean as we talked about earlier you know the last Clinton impeachment trial Supreme Court Chief Justice Rehnquist said afterwards I did very little and I did it very well I mean I think the idea is to be to have a slight a touch as possible if you are the Supreme Court justice so we are not expecting him to weigh in and give guidance on.

Mara liasson Susan Davis national political corresponde
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Being with us what minutes Tuesday stirred by fears that Democrats might fail to patch together the broad coalition necessary to defeat Donald Trump next year the late stages of the democratic primary have taken on abrupt turn David siders national political correspondent at politico to suddenly a contest that has been largely defined by ideology is being re framed around questions of race and identity Dave explain there's been over and over turn to yeah I I think of more forceful discussion of race and gender in the in the primary and it's not that these issues have been undercurrents for months and months they had been but really I think there's been a shift just since the last debate and so the shift has played out how who's saying what this is largely coming from well candidates of color and also from women so Cory Booker Kovalev Heris two stroke of the other candidates who are all struggling so we part of you know this is a you an effort to find a way and I think in the in the primary but it also expresses some fears that people have about the front runners the judge who's rising in Iowa and New Hampshire has abysmal support among black people up so that's a concern that you're worried that people to judge might be the nominee if you're a supporter of Joe Biden while he does have the support of African American do you worry about whether he ends up being the nominee can you make it through you know I was in New Hampshire the super Tuesday states so I think that it's important based on these candidates find trying to find a new angle to crack open the primary and in part based on the still unsettled nature of the primary that really gives Democrats for any number of reasons every cycle is it nasty or could it get nasty how would you characterize it now well I don't know I I've been watching the debate it didn't seem nasty and I think that these are legitimate things to talk about it if you're talking about wanting or needing to have experience as a black person is a woman I think that's a legitimate thing to discuss and I thought it me quote was sars your critique of sexism in politics was particularly sharp last week I thought Cory Booker was effective in this argument and Heris too so at a that's not to diminish the responses I these candidates that they're trying to make the sinks into sections with have legitimate responses as well your booty judge yes say that he knows what it's like to have a in the come from a place where of discrimination being a gay man sigma Dave siders national political correspondent at politico this piece is called to defeat trumpet dems rethink the Obama coalition formula now what will give his money can't be ignored how about former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg how does he fit into this discussion well we saw him what apologize for stop and frisk the other day for for announcing he clearly has some liabilities I think with black voters I I think I mean clearly the jury still out right I have no idea what what polls will say two weeks from now after you spend however many billions of dollars on TV that should be very instructive right now he's a non factor except for that spending whether that spending the moves with dial in some of the super Tuesday states will save you said in your piece less than three months before the Iowa caucuses it's as if Democrats just now realized that their primaries for front runners are all white and the three of them are men it is is that something that's largely discussed among voters you know I'm a member of more than a year ago at the netroots nation conference more than a year ago now that the if that weekend yet calmer hair standing on a stage giving an explicit the sense of what she called identity politics and saying that that term had been unfairly maligned used to keep black people women people for women down so there is that real explicit appeal that same weekend I think that was when Elizabeth Warren said that the criminal justice system is racist front to back there was this emphasis on it then and then I think a lot of people before the debate you know when we see these candidates on stage the distinctions between old and young woman band of black and white really become more apparent and I think because the primary has been so SO policy has the of those distinctions were not necessarily fully explored or or rose to the top of a candidate's minds what were the public's minds because of the heavy heavy influence of policy I don't think we've ever seen a primary this focus on detail policy so that said I'm what happens to the healthcare debate and all this if if the focus seems to turn to race I think it comes back I I mean this is a a week in a a long long campaign cycle then we did get your part it depends on how long public heiress and Cory Booker can keep it going Julian Castro to a to a lesser extent they are they're not doing well right now and and if their campaigns continue to slide that and then this probably goes away I I don't think the policy will be diminished in the long run I think this will be a huge part of the conversation Medicare for all those kind of things heading into the caucuses Dave David siders national political correspondent at politico it's twenty minutes after the hour on this morning Jennifer could shrink is here with more of America's first news sport in a federal judges ordered former White House counsel Donald again to appear before Congress and a set back to president trump's efforts to keep his top aides from testifying the outcome could lead to renewed efforts by house Democrats to compel testimony from other high ranking officials including former national security adviser John Bolton the judge ruled that not even the president's closest aides to receive a subpoena from Congress can ignore or defy can Groeschel compulsory process by order of the president or otherwise began was a star witness in special counsel Robert Muller is investigation and Democrats wanted to question began about a possible obstruction of justice by trump a strong earthquake has shaken Albania killing at least six people injuring more than three hundred and collapsing buildings more people are feared trapped in the rubble the quake collapsed at least three apartment buildings all people slept hours after this quake European monitors say a five point two magnitude earthquake rattled southern Bosnia Hong Kong's embattled leader Carrie lam is refusing to offer any concessions to anti government protesters after local elections set back lamb so she will accelerate dialogue and plans to set up a committee to review social issues that contributed to grievances we have started public dialogue with the community unfortunately with the unstable environment and a chaotic situation I could not do more of that sort of engagement the pro democracy block won a landslide victory with ninety percent of the seats and control of seventeen out of eighteen district councils a federal judge has sentenced a Chinese business woman to eight months in prison for trust passing it president trump's Mar a Lago club in line two secret service agents the judge also ordered that the thirty three year old woman be deported after completing her sentence Lamar Jackson through five touchdown passes and the ravens routed the rams the forty five to six last night for their seventh consecutive victory here's how the second TD sounded on W. B. A. L. mark Jackson will go to a an empty backfield shotgun formation the coil comes in motion to the right Jackson takes the snap blood pressure coming swing to the end zone Hollywood number two Jackson operating almost flawlessly at the controls Baltimore embarrassed to previously solid rams defense by racking up four hundred eighty yards of total offense thank goodness the rams go with that defense for the usually nine guys I think that the issue last night from the minute welcome to the rams mark Jackson.

Donald Trump four hundred eighty yards thirty three year ninety percent twenty minutes eight months three months two weeks
"national political correspondent" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"To speak to an advisor today for the sprawling field of democrats vying to challenge president trump is summer could mean breakout or bust twenty of the twenty four democrats running for president are set to participate in nationally televised debates this week but at this early stage of the primary americans are directing most of their attention to just five candidates it's a story by ken thomas national political correspondent at the wall street journal ken what do we have one of those inflection moments for the campaign there's going to be twenty democrats on stage this week in the first debates if you look back at the first republican debate in two thousand sixteen they drew about twenty four million people so this is going to be the biggest audience for the democratic field and at the end of the month also going to have the end of the second quarter fundraising so after the chew events we should have a much better sense of where the field is headed how it's going to shake out who who will be in a position to go the distance with this many people in the field the stages awfully crowded can you make your points can you score points that's going to be one of the biggest tests for these candidates especially the ones who aren't as well known you're there to our debates so you might get ten minutes total if you're lucky so for the candidates who are at one percent in not really registering was people they're going to have to make a decision on whether they get a great sound by going after president trump that's something that's very popular in the democratic party if they make the decision to take a risk and attempt to contrast themselves with one of the front runners it's certainly something we could see on the second night when joe biden will be debating speak with ken thomas wall street journal national political reporter is piece is called early democratic field splits into two tiers you mentioned that the kind of the five candidates biden sanders warren buddha judge in harris or in different field right now in terms of maybe name recognition or popularity is it make or break time for the other fifteen plus on these two nights i could actually be over if they don't make some noise this is an important step for for the there's they will a lot of them will also have a debate next month vienna july but the problem for these candidates is that the debate requirements get much tougher once we get into september in order to qualify the this group of twenty had hit either sixty five thousand online donors or average one percent in pulling on a number of polls and when they start looking at the qualifications for the third and fourth to be in september and october those numbers are going to actually double and they'll have to achieve both so so you'll have to have an average of two percent in the polls and you'll have to have one hundred thirty thousand donors the one hundred thirty thousand online donors is going to be really difficult for the vast majority of these candidates hit fourteen were able to get sixty five thousand donors to to qualify for the first two debates but a lot of those candidates i think are going to struggle to get an additional sixty five thousand donors so when you talk to some of these campaigns they'll tell you privately that you could be looking at you know maybe eight candidates on the debate stage in september and so if you're a candidate you know like a tulsi gabbard or a james lee or a john hickenlooper someone who isn't as well known you you may be looking at the prospects of not making a debate stage in september and then if you know if you can't get that kind of coverage you know in the fall when a lot of people will be tuning in it may be really difficult to make that move into the upper tier of candidates can thomas national political correspondent at the wall street journal this portion of the program is brought to you by our friends at harry's for the traveling for work for -cation or checking my parents i always packed my harry's razor can't look like a slob at meetings right vacation picks have to look sharpen i certainly don't need my mom asking why i haven't shaved why harry's harry's delivers high quality travel friendly shaved supplies at a tremendous value to keep prices low harry's cut out the middleman the most guys just buy disposable razors but y roll the.

advisor trump president one percent ten minutes two percent
"national political correspondent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"These days gymnastics, fighting was to see a bunch of the gymnast route either one Olympic medal narrowly missed out on the Olympics for generally had careered now competing Keppel years later in their retirement back in the NC double a Wall Street Journal reporter Louise Radnofsky on the new mood at the NC, double A gymnastics championships. She's here later in the hour. More young people, especially those who identify as Democrats say they plan to vote in the twenty twenty presidential caucuses and primaries then did for years ago. According to a new Harvard University institute of politics poll here to break it down is honor mud Honey national political correspondent at USA today. Or what are we learning? Anyway, what we saw at the midterms young voters that eastern the twenty twenty-ninth demographic are saying at this point at least that they're more interested in the upcoming twenty twenty election than they were at the same time or years ago -nificant though, jolt upwards is notable for Democrats lightly down for young Republican voters, but we're looking at about forty three percent of young voters. Overall surveyed say they want to take part in the primaries early twenty twenty that compares about thirty six percent at the same time for years ago. Interesting and do they give a reason why or is it just kind of like the one or two questions survey? It got it. Questions on issues that young voters by the interested in. But I think there's an anxiety motivated largely by what I thought was also of note was that it seemed that environmental issues were related issues were at the top not so much pay get rid of my college debt, for example, or get me some free college, right? Something that Elizabeth Warren talked about yesterday on announced plan. So we away student loan debt provides seventy five percent of American. But yeah, near the top of the list is environment and the voters they. This is foreign policy issue that you know, I it next to you know, terrorism and human rights that they see participating and protecting the environment as being one of the most important goals of US foreign policy speaking with Hani national political correspondent at USA today. And he's written a piece entitled more young people likely to vote in twenty twenty than twenty-six teams escorting to a new poll from Harvard University. It's worth asking to they want to vote in twenty twenty does that necessarily mean they will vote in twenty twenty. No, it's always more people saying they want to vote and the intend to vote than actually show you right now, we have forty three percent saying they plan to take part in the in the primaries and caucuses, but it'll it'll inevitably be much lower. Similarly was quote unquote, historic the midterm elections. When we saw just thirty one percent roughly of young voters show up and that was a twenty five year high. So it could very well. Much like the midterms end up being a higher portion of the electorate being young. But at the end of the day it'll remain awfully low for the overall number of young voters. An older voters will inevitably remain the larger part of the overall electorate. Eventually this generation Z. We'll have some pretty good sway, right? When they step into these places. What'd you say? One in at some point. Yeah. Well, right as a January or February when the Iowa caucuses are one of the electorate will be between eighteen and twenty three and with regards to primaries and caucuses how might that voter enthusiasm matchup against generally election. Or is it a good sign say that the numbers are improving for a primary because you're more likely to vote in general. I don't know that that's the case. Well, I think it's a good signal. If we got good turn out of voters in general, particularly of young voters in in in the primary expectation is that it'll be even higher for the general election because a good segment of our society. Young middle aged and old just don't identify with the political parties and don't necessarily want to have have a part in that in the party's candidates face off election. How much of that by the way is part of that one stat which talked about and I forget what it says specifically, but how younger voters don't really see baby boomers as representing their best interests. I think there is as the poll so there there is this sense that their interests and their concerns aren't being represented by this older set of politicians, and it might explain to a certain extent. This sudden rise of a millennial like Pete Buddha judge who gone from hardly registering the poll now being a top three or four candidate summer. Armor Mahaney national political correspondent at USA today. Twelve.

national political corresponde USA Louise Radnofsky NC Harvard University institute o Wall Street Journal twenty twenty Harvard University Olympics Elizabeth Warren Keppel reporter Pete Buddha Iowa Mahaney Hani forty three percent
"national political correspondent" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, mara. Hi, Ari Biden is the twentieth. Democratic candidate to jump in the race is he the last one are we done? Now. I can't think of another person who would be a major democratic candidate who hasn't gotten in yet. So I think we are just about done and in terms of the shape of the field right now, we see the Joe Biden is at the top of the polls, even though they don't matter that much this early second close second Bernie Sanders, and what's really interesting is there doesn't seem to be an ideological battle going on because seventy five percent. Plus of Democrats say they'd be fine with either Sanders or Biden and an Iowa poll recently showed that they were the second choice of each other supporters. In other words, if you think that there's not much difference between Bernie Sanders, and Joe Biden ideology is not high on the list for Democrats, how President Trump and his allies view Biden. Well, it's interesting the conversations I used to have with White House advisers were the only candidate we worry about. About as Joe Biden. But he'll never get the nomination. He's too much of a centrist the new conversation. With Trump advisors is any democrat who wins the nomination will have to have moved so far to the left to get the nomination that we will be able to disqualify them as a socialist. And there's also I think a lot of disdain for Joe Biden's abilities as a candidate. I think the Trump campaign thinks that he is not very formidable. People have been pretty insulting about him privately, and you can see the president being pretty insulting about him in his tweets sleepy. Joe? I don't know if you're smart enough to get the nomination that video that Biden put out really focused on President Trump, and his reaction to Charlottesville, a lot of Democrats have said that was what the Democratic Party did wrong in two thousand sixteen was focusing too much on Trump, and I should focus instead on what they stand for independent of Trump. How is Biden navigating this. Well, first of all, it's just a video he's going to give a ton of speeches. We're going to see if that's the only thing he ever says. Yes. I think that would be a huge mistake. But we are now into the Trump administration. He has a record that Democrats can say do you like this or not the message Joe Biden said today had two parts one for general election? I'm the strongest democrat to be Trump because he knows that's what Democrats want more than anything else. And the second message because he talked about Charlottesville so much. He is focusing on the base of the Democratic Party that heavily African American. That's what matters in a primary. Okay. So now Biden's going to travel to Pennsylvania next week for his first event. He's gonna visit early voting states like Iowa and South Carolina. What are you looking for as he goes out to meet voters? I'm looking for a couple of things first of all as he gives these speeches a lot of them will be about policy. He has a middle-class speech on Monday in Pittsburgh will he lay out a vision for the future of the country? What are his specific remedies for how to make free market capitalism? Work again to provide broadly shared prosperity to restore economic mobility to basically. Work again for the middle class. That's one thing. I'm also interested to see if he adjusts his retail, politicking style at all he is as we know very Hansie, tactile politician. He got in trouble for that recently. Will he dial that back or will he still be hugging? Everyone in sight NPR's Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you. Those recent complaints about Joe Biden's, unwanted hugs, and touching are bound to be scrutinized. Now that he's officially running for president. And there are many more topics from his past likely to get the same treatment. NPR's? Don gonyea looks at to certain to be on that list. Let's start in nineteen ninety one. Clarence Thomas is a supreme court nominee facing accusations of sexual harassment. Senator Joe Biden chairs the confirmation hearings. He questions Thomases accuser law. Professor, Anita hill you've described the essence of the competition in order for us to determine well, can you tell us in his words what he said he presses her for details. I can member something like you really ought to see these films that I've seen this material that I've seen this woman has this kind of breasted or that you can hear her discomfort Biden. And the all male all white Senate committee face strong criticism for lacking sensitivity and fairness in late twenty seventeen Biden participated in an event with glamour magazine, he was asked about hill. The audio is from glamour TV and wondering if there's anything that you would do differently with regards to Anita hill if given the opportunity. No. Let's get something straight here. I believed in you, do I voted against Clarence Thomas. Then this response to a question about a need a hill. Still feeling she was treated unfairly my message, which I've delivered before is. I am so sorry if she believed that I am so sorry that she had to go through what she went through think of the courage took for her to come forward. More recently, Biden has expressed further regret Patty, solely style worked for him in oh eight when he was Barack Obama's running mate. She is not affiliated with any twenty twenty candidate. She says Biden needs to address that issue full on adding that those recent complaints about to close contact could have been acute to do. So I thought it was an opportunity for Joe Biden to have a bigger conversation. More thoughtful considered conversation about the. To movement solely stole says Biden must publicly satisfy concerns about his treatment of Nita hill, if not he won't be able to move on. And it will dog him on the campaign trail today, the campaign confirmed that Biden has spoken privately with Nita hill in a statement. They said, quote, he shared with her directly his regret for what she endured and his admiration for everything. She has done to change the culture around sexual harassment, Biden will also need to address this issue. But telephones in the state of Delaware are ringing off the hook. This is Florida bait on the nineteen ninety four crime Bill that Senator Biden of Delaware say pass the crime Bill give me a hundred thousand cops Bill more prisons and get on the Bill was a response to violent crime in US cities, but it's mandatory sentences and stiff penalties would lead to increase incarceration, Jamal. Simmons is a democratic strategist these policies. He's really at a negative impact on communities of color because of the number of people who were sent to jail stayed away for so long over the years. The belief that the law unfairly affects African Americans has grown the black lives matter movement giving it new residents this year on the Martin Luther King junior holiday Joe Biden offered a may culpa of sorts for pushing that legislation. I haven't always been right? I know we haven't always gotten things, right? But I've always tried polls show Biden popular with African Americans. The potential problem is with younger black voters who are most likely to be appalled by the nineteen Ninety-four crime Bill Jamal Simmons. They're going to be people who are skeptical of Joe Biden's apology and the timing. But we'll see whether or not they accept him in the end. He says the other side of this is all the goodwill Biden has earned for being such a loyal part of President Obama's team that's real to he wrote with him all the way through tough times can thin. And I think people give Joe Biden a lot of credit for that. It's what happens when your time. In public office has lasted roughly a half century in with thousands of votes cast in the US Senate, and so many speeches delivered other moments from Biden's pass will no doubt get another close look as well. Don, gonyea, NPR news, Washington. Amnesty International says US led forces in Syria, killed hundreds more civilians in the city of rock than the military itself has acknowledged amnesty released a report today with the monitoring group air wars, they focus on deaths during the four-month battle to free rocket from ISIS which had held the city for years and Pierce, Ruth, Sherlock, followed the amnesty researcher in rock last year as she gathered accounts for today's report on one St. in Recco. In almost every home the families who lost loved ones. The bonus fell from the beginning of the neighborhood to the end one after the other. This woman tells us the well ten black when things cleared I found my husband dead in the courtyard. This is one of the accounts NPR hood, along with Amnesty International's, Donatella Rivera. She spent months in Raqqa piecing together, the civilian toll in the lodge city where the vast majority of the buildings have been damaged or destroyed today Rivera reviewed who visit to more than two hundred sites of collision strikes. I interviewed more than four hundred witnesses and survivors looking for for example, Brennan of munitions used by the coalition. So I'd be Trump yards amnesty. Couple Theresa with a massive data project that it worked on with the monitoring group woes. They looked at two million satellite images to identify strikes and studied videos. The battle the US led coalition acknowledges one hundred eighty civilian deaths in wreck, but the amnesty investigation finds that at least one thousand six hundred civilians lost their lives, and what it shows is that it's not just few individual isolated cases. It shows that this is much more than make problem say your to protect a US coalition spokesman told NPR that they take civilian casualties seriously. And we're trying to free the city from ISIS amnesty, faulted the coalition's use of Tillery barrages saying they were quote inaccurate to the point of being indiscriminate.

Senator Joe Biden President Trump NPR president Mara Liasson Democratic Party Bill Jamal Simmons US Senate Clarence Thomas Trump US Bernie Sanders Don gonyea Iowa Barack Obama Charlottesville harassment White House Anita hill Amnesty International
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"National political correspondent Mara Liasson. Mara. Hi, Ari Biden is the twentieth. Democratic candidate to jump in the race is he the last one are we done? Now. I can't think of another person who would be a major democratic candidate who hasn't gotten in yet. So I think we are just about done and in terms of the shape of the field right now, we see the Joe Biden is at the top of the polls, even though they don't matter that much this early second close second Bernie Sanders, and what's really interesting is there doesn't seem to be an ideological battle going on because seventy five percent. Plus of Democrats say they'd be fine with either Sanders or Biden and an Iowa poll recently showed that they were the second choice of each other supporters. In other words, if you think that there's not much difference between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. Ideology is not high on the list for Democrats, how do President Trump and his allies view Biden. Well, it's interesting the conversations I used to have with White House advisers were the only candidate we worry about is Joe Biden, but he'll never get the nomination. He's too much of a centrist the new conversation. With Trump advisors is any democrat who wins the nomination will have to have moved so far to the left to get the nomination that we will be able to disqualify them as a socialist. And there's also I think a lot of disdain for Joe Biden's abilities as a candidate. I think the Trump campaign thinks that he is not very formidable. People have been pretty insulting about him privately, and you can see the president being pretty insulting about him in his tweets sleepy. Joe? I don't know if you're smart enough to get the nomination that video that Biden put out really focused on President Trump, and his reaction to Charlottesville, a lot of Democrats have said that was what the Democratic Party did wrong in two thousand sixteen was focusing too much on. Trump, and they should focus instead on what they stand for independent of Trump. How is Biden navigating this. Well, first of all, it's just a video. He's going to give a ton of speeches. We're going to see if that's the only thing he ever says. Yes, I think that would be a huge mistake. But we are now into the Trump administration. He has a record that Democrats can say do like this or not. The message Joe Biden send today had two parts one for general election. I'm the strongest democrat to beat Trump because he knows that's Democrats want more than anything else. And the second message because he talked about Charlottesville so much. He is focusing on the base of the Democratic Party that heavily African American thatt's. What matters in a primary. Okay. So now Biden's going to travel to Pennsylvania next week for his first event. He's gonna visit early voting states like Iowa and South Carolina. What are you looking for as he goes out to meet voters? I'm looking for a couple of things first of all as he gives these speeches a lot of them will be about policy. He has a middle-class speech on Monday in Pittsburgh will he lay out a vision for the future of the country? What are his specific remedies for how to make free market capitalism? Work again to provide broadly shared prosperity to restore economic mobility to basically work again for the middle class. That's one thing. I'm also interested to see if he adjusts his retail politicking style at all he is as. We know very Hansie tactile politician. He got in trouble for that recently. Will he dial that back or will he still be hugging? Everyone in sight NPR's Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you. Those recent complaints about Joe Biden's, unwanted hugs, and touching are bound to be scrutinized. Now that he's officially running for president. And there are many more topics from his past likely to get the same treatment NPR's, Don gonyea, it looks at to certain to be on that list. Let's start in nineteen ninety one. Clarence Thomas is a supreme court nominee facing accusations of sexual harassment. Senator Joe Biden chairs the confirmation hearings. He questions Thomases accuser law. Professor Anita hill, you have described the essence of the competition in order for us to determine well, can you tell us in his words what he said he presses her for details. I can member something like you really ought to see these films that I've seen this material that I've seen this woman has this kind of breast and or that you can hear her discomfort Biden. And the all male all white Senate committee face strong criticism for lacking sensitivity and fairness in late twenty seventeen Biden participated in an event with glamour magazine, he was asked about hill. The audio is from glamour TV and wondering if there is anything that you would do differently with regards to Anita hill if given the opportunity. No. Something changing I believed in you. Do I voted against Clarence Thomas? Then this response to a question about a Nieta hill still feeling she was treated unfairly my message, which I've delivered before is. I am so sorry if he believes that I am so sorry that she had to go through what she went through think of the courage. It took for her to come forward. More recently, Biden has expressed further regret Patty, solely stall worked for him in oh eight when he was Barack Obama's running mate. She is not affiliated with any twenty twenty candidate. She says Biden needs to address that issue full on adding that those recent complaints about to close contact could have been acute to do. So I thought it was an opportunity for Joe Biden to have a bigger conversation. More thoughtful considered conversation about the me to move. -ment solely stole says Biden must publicly satisfy concerns about his treatment of Anita hill, if not he won't be able to move on. And it will dog him on the campaign trail today, the campaign confirmed that Biden has spoken privately with a need a hill. In a statement. They said, quote, he shared with her directly his regret for what she endured and his admiration for everything. She has done to change the culture around sexual harassment, Biden will also need to address this issue. Well, the telephones of the state of Delaware are ringing off the hook. This is Florida bait on the nineteen ninety four crime Bill that Senator Biden of Delaware say pass the crime Bill give me one hundred thousand cops build more prisons and get on the Bill was a response to violent crime in US cities, but it's mandatory sentences and stiff penalties would lead to increase incarceration, Jamal. Simmons is a democratic strategist these policies. Really at a negative impact on communities of color because of the number of people who were sent to jail stay away for solo over the years. The belief that the law unfairly affects African Americans has grown the black lives matter movement giving it new residents this year on the Martin Luther King junior holiday Joe Biden offered a may culpa of sorts for pushing that legislation. I haven't always been right? I know we haven't always gotten things, right? But I've always tried polls show Biden popular with African Americans. The potential problem is with younger black voters who are most likely to be appalled by the nineteen ninety four crime Bill Jamal Simmons. They're going to be people who are skeptical of Joe Biden's apology in the timing. But we'll see whether or not they accept him in the end. He says the other side of this is all the goodwill Biden has earned for being such a loyal part of President Obama's team that's real to he wrote with him all the way through tough times, they can thin, and I think people give Joe Biden a lot of credit for that. It's what happens when your time. In public office has lasted roughly a half century in with thousands of votes cast in the US Senate, and so many speeches delivered other moments from Biden's pass will no doubt get another close look as well. Don, gonyea, NPR news, Washington. Amnesty International says US led forces in Syria, killed hundreds more civilians in the city of rock than the military itself has acknowledged amnesty released report today with the monitoring group air wars, they focus on deaths during the four-month battle to free rocket from ISIS which had held the city for years. NPR's Ruth Sherlock, followed the NFC researcher in rock last year as she gathered accounts for today's report on one St. in Raqqa in almost every home there were families who lost loved ones. The bonus fell from the beginning of the neighborhood to the end one after the other. This woman tells us the well ten black when things cleared I found my husband dead in the courtyard. This is one of the accounts NPR hood with Amnesty International's Donatella Rivera. She spent months in Makah piecing together, the civilian toll in the large city where the vast majority of the buildings have been damaged or destroyed today Rivera reviewed Hawaii busy to more than two hundred sites of collision strikes. I interviewed more than four hundred witnesses and survivors looking for for example of munitions used by the collision. So I'd be Crump yards amnesty. Couple Theresa with a massive data project that it worked on with the monitoring group woes. They looked at two million satellite images to identify strikes and studied videos. Of the battle the US led coalition acknowledges one hundred eighty civilian deaths in Raqqa, but the amnesty investigation finds that at least one thousand six hundred civilians lost their lives, and what it shows if that it's not just a few individual isolated cases. It shows that this is a much more than make problem say your to protect you a US coalition spokesman told NPR that they take civilian casualties seriously. And we're trying to free the city from ISIS amnesty, faulted the coalition's use of Tillery barrages saying they were quote inaccurate to the point of being indiscriminate.

Senator Joe Biden President Trump president Mara Liasson US Democratic Party Anita hill NPR Bill Jamal Simmons US Senate Clarence Thomas Bernie Sanders Trump Iowa Don gonyea Charlottesville Barack Obama harassment White House Amnesty International
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:05 min | 2 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Mara. Hi, Ari Biden is the twentieth. Democratic candidate to jump in the race is he the last one are we done? Now. I can't think of another person who would be a major democratic candidate who hasn't gotten in yet. So I think we are just about done and in terms of the shape of the field right now, we see the Joe Biden is at the top of the polls, even though they don't matter that much this early second close second Bernie Sanders, and what's really interesting is there doesn't seem to be an ideological battle going on because seventy five percent. Plus of Democrats say they'd be fine with either Sanders or Biden and an Iowa poll recently showed that they were the second choice of each other supporters. In other words, if you think that there's not much difference between Bernie Sanders, and Joe Biden ideology is not high on the list for Democrats, how do President Trump and his allies view Biden. Well, it's interesting the conversations I used to have with White House advisers were the only candidate, we worry ab-. About is Joe Biden, but he'll never get the nomination. He's too much of a centrist new conversation. With Trump advisors is any democrat who wins the nomination will have to have moved so far to the left to get the nomination that we will be able to disqualify them as socialist. And there's also I think a lot of disdain for Joe Biden's abilities as a candidate. I think the Trump campaign thinks that he is not very formidable. People have been pretty insulting about him privately, and you can see the president being pretty insulting about him in his tweets sleepy. Joe? I don't know if you're smart enough to get the nomination that video that Biden put out really focused on President Trump, and his reaction to Charlottesville, a lot of Democrats have said that was what the Democratic Party did wrong in two thousand sixteen was focusing too much on Trump nation focus instead on what they stand for independent of Trump. How is Biden navigating this. Well, first of all, it's just a video he's going to give a ton of speeches. We're going to see if that's the only thing he ever says. Yes. I think that would be a huge mistake. But we are now into the Trump administration. He has a record that Democrats can say do you like this or not the message Joe Biden Senator had two parts one for general election? I'm the strongest democrat to be Trump because he knows that's what Democrats want more than anything else. And the second message because he talked about Charlottesville so much. He is focusing on the base of the Democratic Party that heavily African American. That's what matters a primary. Okay. So now Biden's going to travel to Pennsylvania next week for his first event. He's gonna visit early voting states. Like, I wa and South Carolina. What are you looking for as he goes out to meet voters? I'm looking for a couple of things first of all as he gives these speeches a lot of them will be about policy. He has a middle-class speech on Monday in Pittsburgh will he lay out a vision for the future of the country? What are his specific remedies for how to make free market capitalism? Work again to provide broadly shared prosperity to restore economic mobility to basically. Work again for the middle class. That's one thing. I'm also interested to see if he adjusts his retail, politicking style at all he is as we know very Hansie, tactile politician. He got in trouble for that recently. Will he dial that back or will he still be hugging? Everyone in sight and peers Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you. Those recent complaints about Joe Biden's, unwanted hugs, and touching are bound to be scrutinized. Now that he's officially running for president. And there are many more topics from his past likely to get the same treatment. NPR's? Don gonyea looks at to certain to be on that list. Let's start in nineteen ninety one. Clarence Thomas is a supreme court nominee facing accusations of sexual harassment. Senator Joe Biden chairs the confirmation hearings. He questions Thomases accuser law. Professor, Anita hill you've described the essence of the competition in order for us to determine well, can you tell us in his words what he said he presses for details. I can member something like you really ought to see these films that that I've seen this material I've seen this woman has this kind of Bressan or you can hear her discomfort Biden. And the all male all white Senate committee face strong criticism for lacking sensitivity and fairness in late twenty seventeen Biden participated in an event with glamour magazine, he was asked about hill. The audio is from glamour TV I'm wondering if there is anything that you would do differently with regards to Nita hill if given the opportunity. No. Let's get something straight here. I believed in you, do I voted against clears Thomas, then this response to a question about a need a hill. Still feeling she was treated unfairly my message, which I've delivered before is. I'm so sorry, if she believes that I am so sorry that she had to go through what she went through think of the courage took for her to come forward. More recently, Biden has expressed further regret Patty, solely stall worked for him in oh eight when he was Barack Obama's running mate. She is not affiliated with any twenty twenty candidate. She says Biden needs to address that issue full on adding that those recent complaints about to close contact could have been acute to do. So I thought it was an opportunity for Joe Biden to have a bigger conversation. A more thoughtful considered conversation about the me. To movement solely soil says Biden publicly satisfy concerns about his treatment of Nita hill, if not he won't be able to move on. And it will dog him on the campaign trail today, the campaign confirmed that Biden has spoken privately with Nita hill in a statement. They said, quote, he shared with her directly his regret for what she endured and his admiration for everything. She has done to change the culture around sexual harassment, Biden will also need to address this issue. But telephones of the state of Delaware are ringing off the hook. This is floor debate on the nineteen ninety four crime Bill that Senator Biden of Delaware say pass the crime Bill give me a hundred thousand cops Bill more prisons and get on the Bill was a response to violent crime in US cities, but it's mandatory sentences and stiff penalties would lead to increase incarceration, Jamal. Simmons is a democratic strategist these policy. These really at a negative impact on communities of color because of the number of people who were sent to jail stayed away for over the years. The belief that the law unfairly affects African Americans has grown the black lives matter movement giving it new resonance this year on the Martin Luther King junior holiday Joe Biden offered a Mayock culpa of sorts for pushing that legislation. I haven't always been right? I know we haven't always gotten things, right? But always tried polls show Biden popular with African Americans. The potential problem is with younger black voters who are most likely to be appalled by the nineteen ninety four crime Bill Jamal Simmons. They're going to be people who are skeptical of Joe Biden's apology and the timing. But we'll see whether or not they accept him in the end. He says the other side of this is all the goodwill Biden has earned for being such a loyal part of President Obama's team. That's real to he rode with him all the way through tough times, they can thin, and I think people give Joe Biden a lot of credit for that. It's what happens when your time. In public office has lasted roughly a half century in with thousands of votes cast in the US Senate, and so many speeches delivered other moments from Biden's pass will no doubt get another close look as well. Don, gonyea, NPR news, Washington..

Senator Joe Biden President Trump Trump president Mara Liasson Bernie Sanders Democratic Party Nita hill NPR US Senate Don gonyea Barack Obama Bill Jamal Simmons Clarence Thomas Charlottesville harassment Anita hill White House national political corresponde
"national political correspondent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:45 min | 3 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Radio. I'm Peter Barnes with Bob moon, the race for the twenty twenty democratic presidential nomination may be about to get a front runner. Sources tell Bloomberg the former vice president Joe Biden has told some supporters that he's making plans to jump into the race. Joining a diverse field of candidates vying challenge, President Trump for more on this. We bring in Bloomberg news, national political correspondent a hill. Kapoor. So he'll it sounds like Joe is in Ed. Sure sounds that way. The former vice president gave a little bit of a hint a little slip of the tongue when he was speaking. He talked about running in present tense and then quickly corrected himself and talked about it as a hypothetical now Joe Biden is leading an early democratic presidential primary. Polls a recent CNN poll out shows him ahead of the entire field with twenty eight percent of registered voters in that survey. Just ahead of Bernie Sanders at twenty percent behind him. Harris. A twelve percent beta rock with eleven percent. And Elizabeth Warren would six percent. And so it looks like Joe Biden is going to be able to raise quite a lot of money. There's no doubt about that Biden has been in the Senate for thirty six years. He was vice president for eight years. He has a deep connection to the democratic donor base on a lot of resources from which to Paul. So he'll be able to raise a lot of money. He will likely have longevity. If he does run his challenge is going to be something very different than they should have money. Speaking of longevity. What about his age that is going to be one of his challenges now that necessarily by itself won't be a deal breaker, but it's one of many factors that he has to contend with based on the fact that the Democratic Party is becoming younger it's becoming more reliant on minorities, African Americans and Hispanics and Asians. And Joe Biden represents an older generation that looks less and less like the democratic base. So yes. He is seventy six years old now he's turning seventy seven in November of this year. So, you know, that's one of many factors. What about the question that the party may have passed him by in terms of its progressive beliefs. Right that that is probably going to be his single biggest challenge. He took a lot of votes in his thirty six years in the Senate that seemed fine at the time of this was during the Reagan era when Democrats were moving to the right to try to appeal to a larger section of the American public, and the Democratic Party has moved very sharply away from that at this point. He is supported things like the crime Bill and the nineteen ninety is a very emphatically endorsed it that does not look good today. I think by modern standards, he cast a vote for the Iraq war and the early two thousands, which progressive voters are going to be skeptical of so many things in his record that he's going to have to explain including by the way, the Anita hill here. Hearings during the confirmation of now supreme court Justice Clarence Thomas. He was the judiciary committee chairman, and there are many progressives who criticizes handling of that situation say he didn't give her enough do. So he's going to have to answer for a lot of these things. Now, he's riding high in the polls. It's not clear where he's going to be one of these things come out and once he has to answer for them. Let's also remember that Joe Biden claims to be a politician who represents the working class the kind of voters that went for Trump in two thousand sixteen he could be somebody who gives Trump a run for his money. And that's why there are people in the Democratic Party who view him as an asset who view him as potentially the likeliest candidate in their field to defeat President Trump. He does have a history of appealing to the types of voters who have moved away from the Democratic Party, specifically non college educated white voters and rural voters who you know, who moved strongly in the Republican column and that trend has. Accelerated by the rise of Trump who did very very effective at appealing to them. So yes that is one that is one. Strength that Joe Biden would bring to the table, at least in the eyes the Democrats who care about electability, but the flip side to that is can he excite the younger generation of Democrats that the, you know, the new age progressives were very active, and who are younger they are more progressive than Joe Biden, and they come from more diverse backgrounds. So he'll thanks. That's a Bloomberg news, national political correspondent hill. Kapoor. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Peter Barnes with Bob moon. Bob. Now, we go from Biden tibedo, let us turn to John McCormack, Bloomberg news money and politics reporter to talk a bit about the upcoming presidential campaign, and how much money is being raised by one candidate in particular. On. Doc. The former congressman from Texas raised a little over six million dollars in the first twenty four hours of his presidential campaign. And so that's sort of set the benchmark so far of candidates have gotten in this race. Bernie Sanders was just behind him at like five point nine or six million dollars. Sanders is believed to have the best fundraising list among Democrats anywhere in America from carryover from two thousand sixteen presidential bid where he, you know, really mastered this online fundraising, but I also dealt a huge list as part of his Senate bid in Texas last year where he raised more than eighty million dollars. And so he he was flexing online fundraising muscle and put up a pretty big number on on the scoreboard enough to you know, he he was already a very credible candidate. But raising that kind of money in that short amount of time. Well, well further. Bolster his credibility. Does he have any more credit within the Democratic Party? Well, that's that's to play out over the coming months. I I don't think it's really answerable at this point. He is believed to be more moderate than a lot of the democratic activists, and sort of the democratic base, which is meaning further till left, it appears, you know, in recent months. So you know, he he's also sort of being vague in a lot of his answers. And it was one thing. I saw him out on the campaign trail was that he just didn't answer some questions. He spoke very eloquently sometimes for minutes on end when somebody asked him a question. But oftentimes there wasn't an actual answer that question. It's almost like he's trying to sort of stir national conversation national debate on some of these issues and trying to play the role of moderator and any says what he's really trying to do is listen to the voters and hear what they had to say in almost sort of shape himself into the mall that they want. I think that's you know. We can get by with that. You know, the first weekend you're out on the campaign trail it gets harder. The longer you're out 'cause you're gonna be asked tougher and tougher questions from voters and from the media, what are the specific issues that he is talking about one thing that he said very specifically was that he does think the minimum wage should be raised nationally to fifteen dollars an hour. But it should be done over. The course six years that was about as specific as he got his position as sort of Medicare for all or universal health care seemed to be sort of fluid and and somewhat different from what he had said during the during his Senate campaign where he came out in favor of single payer, and he seemed to be sort of stepping away from that a bit John. Thanks. That's Bloomberg news money and politics reporter, John McCormack. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on.

Joe Biden Democratic Party Bloomberg Senate vice president President Trump Bernie Sanders national political corresponde Kapoor Peter Barnes Bob moon John McCormack reporter Elizabeth Warren CNN Iraq Justice Clarence Thomas Anita hill
"national political correspondent" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. The president visits Ohio today. This is one of several states vital to his reelection chances. It's a state where he promised residents that industrial jobs would come back, and he's now lashing out on social media after a high profile auto plant closed in Ohio NPR, national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Good morning, Steve. How does the president seemed to view Ohio? It's clearly on his mind a lot. He's been tweeting slamming GM management slamming the union for the closure of that Iconex Chevy Cruz plant in Lordstown, Ohio. He's been demanding that it be reopened or soul to someone who will reopen it after the wall bringing back manufacturing jobs to the rust belt was probably his most important campaign promise, he actually went to Ohio in two thousand seventeen and stood up and said all those jobs that have left Ohio. He said, quote, they're all coming back. Don't move don't sell your house. You can almost imagine the democratic campaign ad that can be made about that. Because it didn't happen. Well, I got a chance to talk to some Lordstown auto workers a couple of months ago, and they were now in that very position of trying to think about could they sell their house. Could they get out of there could they move if they had an opportunity to do that. So sounds pretty bad for the president in this highly symbolic case. But isn't the big picture a little bit better than? This one case would suggest absolutely there's been growth in the manufacturing sector. The problem is that for the president's reelection purposes. People have to feel it in the places that matter the states, he needs to win like, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. And the irony is that the steel and aluminum tariffs that he's put on have hurt the very rust belt industries that he's trying to revive. Estimates are that Ford and GM have each been hit with a one billion dollar cost from those tariffs and GM even cited the tariffs when it announced the decision to close that Lordstown plant so that is somewhat similar to the side effects of the trade war with China, which is hurt. Farmers people in agriculture workers, which are very red very Republican, very Trumpy. Right. Absolutely. So is there any evidence? Given what you said that his political base that has been so strong for him is abandoning him in any numbers at all. Well, not not in a big way. We did see in the twenty elections some slippage in the mid west the Democrats want a Senate race in Ohio and swept Michigan Pennsylvania, Wisconsin in the elections. That's not necessarily a predictor of twenty twenty. We do know that in Ohio, according to the morning consult poll his approval ratings have dropped nineteen points since he was elected there. Now forty five percent approve fifty one percent disapprove a tiny bit better than nationally. But reelection campaigns are not a referendum on the president alone. They are a binary choice. Oh, and the president will have any number of opportunities to use the bully pulpit as they say and also to make the election about his opponent, whoever that turns out to be. That's right. So the president is not actually going to the Lordstown plant that has closed as he no he's not he's actually going to a plant in Lima Ohio that makes military tanks. I guess that's the one part of the economy. He has a lot of control over military spending. But it also would give him a check. Chance to explain the national security reasons that he put tariffs on steel and aluminum. Okay. We'll be listening for your coverage and the coverage of the rest of the NPR's Mara. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson on Sunday in Thailand that country will hold its first general election since the military seized power in twenty fourteen coup. Few expect the vote to be free or fair. In fact, critics say the election could cement the military's role in politics for decades to come. Michael Sullivan starts his report in Bangkok..

president Ohio Steve Inskeep Lordstown Mara Liasson national political corresponde GM Rachel Martin Wisconsin Lima Ohio NPR Senate Bangkok Michigan Ford Thailand Iconex Chevy Cruz Michael Sullivan Trumpy
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of cake. Good morning. Time is five thirty four. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. The president visits Ohio today. This is one of several states vital to his reelection chances. It's a state where he promised residents that industrial jobs would come back, and he's now lashing out on social media after a high profile auto plant closed in Ohio NPR, national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Like morning Mara. I Steve how does the president seemed to view Ohio? It's clearly on his mind a lot. He's been tweeting slamming GM management slamming the union for the closure of that iconic Chevy Cruz plant in Lordstown, Ohio. He's been demanding that it be reopened or sold to someone who will reopen it after the wall bringing back manufacturing jobs to the rust belt was probably his most important campaign promise, he actually went to Ohio in two thousand seventeen and stood up and said all those jobs that have left Ohio. He said, quote, they're all coming back. Don't move don't sell your house. You can almost imagine the democratic campaign ad that can be made about that. Because it didn't happen. Well, I got a chance to talk to some Lordstown auto workers a couple of months ago, and they were now in that very position of trying to think about could they sell their house. Could they get out of there could they move if they had an opportunity to do that. So sounds pretty bad for the president in this highly symbolic case. But isn't the big picture a little bit better than this one case would suggest absolutely there's been growth in the manufacturing sector. The problem is that for the president's reelection purposes. People have to feel it in the places that matter the states he needs to win like, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. And the irony is that the steel and aluminum tariffs that he's put on have hurt the very rust belt industries that he's trying to revive estimates. Are that Ford and GM have each been hit with a one billion dollar cost from those tariffs and GM even cited the? Tariffs when it announced the decision to close that Lordstown place. So that is somewhat similar to the side effects of the trade war with China, which is hurt farmers people in agricultural areas, which are very red very Republican, very Trumpy. Right. Absolutely. So is there any evidence? Given what you said that his political base that has been so strong for him is abandoning him in any numbers at all. Well, not not in a big way. We did see in the two thousand eighteen election's some slippage in the mid west. The Democrats want a Senate race in Ohio and swept Michigan Pennsylvania, Wisconsin in the elections. That's not necessarily a predictor of twenty twenty. We do know that in Ohio. According to the morning concept poll, his approval ratings have dropped nineteen points since he was elected there. Now forty five percent approve. Fifty one percent disapprove a tiny bit better than nationally. But reelection campaigns are not a referendum on the president alone. They are binary choice. Oh, and the president will have any number of opportunities to use the bully. Alpert as they say and also to make the election about his opponent, whoever that turns out to be right? So the president is not actually going to the Lordstown plant that is closed as he. No, he's not he's actually going to a plant in Lima Ohio that makes military tanks. I guess that's the one part of the economy. He has a lot of control over military spending. But it also would give him a chance to explain the national security reasons that he put tariffs on steel and aluminum. Okay. We'll be listening for your coverage and the coverage of the rest of the NPR's Mara. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson on Sunday in Thailand that country will hold its first general election since the military seized power in two thousand fourteen coup. Few expect the vote to be free or fair. In fact, critics say the election could cement the military's role in politics for decades to come. Michael Sullivan starts his report in Bangkok..

Ohio president Steve Inskeep Mara Liasson NPR national political corresponde GM Lordstown Lima Ohio Rachel Martin Wisconsin Senate Ford China Chevy Cruz Bangkok Thailand Michael Sullivan Alpert
"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"national political correspondent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Seven the nays are Twenty-three voting present one. So we're busy with our legislative work despite what they might be in the press. A little bit of a surprise here. Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio has announced he will not run for president that last item surprising because it runs very much counter to the trend. These days we have national political correspondent Mara Liasson with us now. Good morning Mara. Good morning Lillo so lots of headlines there, but let's start with the democratic primary field. It got a little bit smaller this week. That's right. The democratic primary field is still very big. But it is not continuing to grow by leaps and bounds. As a matter of fact this week there are four Democrats who decided not to run this weekend. And right before it, Michael Bloomberg Sherrod Brown as you just mentioned, Jeff Merkley of Oregon and air, colder, the former attorney general, and they are not gonna run. But everyone I've talked to believes it is almost certain that Joe Biden former vice president will get into the race soon. It's hard to make need categories out of this very large sprawling field of Democrats. I think what you could say is that the centrist lane the lane filled with people who think that they can appeal to the four most important states, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan and Ohio got a little emptier this week. But also in that lane is the former governor of Colorado, John Hickenlooper Amara, he raised a million dollars in his first forty eight hours, which I have to say, I was surprised by does that tell you something about where in the pecking order, he is I don't know if it tells you that. But I think what it tells you is that almost every viable democratic candidate is raising a tremendous amount of money as soon as they announced Bernie Sanders raised about ten million dollars. I think what it tells you is how much enthusiasm there is in the Democratic Party. They want to turn out to vote as they did in November of two thousand eighteen they want to open their checkbooks. They wanna turn out to see these presidential candidates. They wanna win. They wanna beat Donald Trump and everyone I've talked to is expecting record breaking turnout for the primaries next year. Well, meanwhile, on the hill Democrats were. Busy trying to do two things. Investigate and legislate. That's right. They were trying to do both of those things trying to find the right balance. They passed HR one the anti-corruption Bill. They also continued to investigate the Trump administration, and they don't want the investigations to over shadow the legislation because even if it can't be passed in the Senate or signed by the president Democrats want to lay down a marker for twenty twenty and say, this is what we do if we had control of government, right? And they're trying to get that message across. But there is something getting in the way of that. And that is more controversial comments from Representative Ilhan, Omar. That's right. The Democrats have a lot of internal divisions. And that is threatening to overshadow the mess. The legislative message that they wanna fight. The latest was how they got tied up into knots about how to condemn comments by Ilan, Omar, many Jewish members of congress Democrats felt that she went beyond criticizing the Netanyahu government in Israel, or the Trump administration slavers support of that government. Or even a packs, the Jewish pro Israeli lobby's power, many Jewish members of congress share her criticisms of those things, but they felt she went beyond that and revived an old anti-semitic slur about how American Jews people who support Israel are loyal to a foreign country. So in the end, they came up with a resolution that condemned anti-semitism, but also Islamophobia and other things it got unanimous support from Democrats. But what was interesting there it also caused splits in the Republican party because three Republicans voted against that resolution, despite the fact that their leadership didn't want them to do that. Right. And now we have a split in the Senate and the Senate right among the GOP. That's right. This week. The Senate is going to vote on the president's declaration of a national emergency to get funding to build the wall at the border four Republicans are going to vote against that. That means that the resolution will pass. But in the end, the president will veto it. And there are not enough votes in congress to over. His veto. But it shows you the Republican opposition to the president on this issue shows you that even though Donald Trump's grip on the party is very strong. It's not complete. That's NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you, the discussion of antisemitism. And what constitutes it has come at a fraught moment for American Jews? We wanna hear how you're feeling these days if you're Jewish and following the conversation, give us a call at two two two one six nine two one seven or right? It's a write us.

president Michael Bloomberg Sherrod Brow Senate Donald Trump Mara Liasson national political corresponde congress Democratic Party Republican party Ohio John Hickenlooper Amara vice president Omar Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Ilan Israel Jeff Merkley NPR