35 Burst results for "National Party"

"national party" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:35 min | 2 months ago

"national party" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Could the voting age in New Zealand be lowered to 16, the country's Supreme Court has ruled that not allowing 16 and 17 year olds to vote amounts to age discrimination and to tell us more. I'm joined now by a doctor Andrew mycock as political scientist from the university of Huddersfield and president of the children's identities and citizenship in Europe association. He's based in Manchester, which is where he joins me now from a very good morning to Andrew. Good morning. So the voting agent New Zealand is currently 18. So how is this challenge come about? Well, it's launching come about by a group of young campaigners called make it 16 and they have been advocating for lowering the voting age to 16 for about 5 years. That hasn't picked up a significant amount of political or public support. And so in the end, they chose an option of going to the Supreme Court and making a legal challenge that on the basis of human rights, it was denying 1670 year olds their rights to vote, so it is the historic decision and as much as this is the first time that we've seen June campaigners across the world, take a legal route rather than a constitutional route for a parliament. Because this is normally a protest which then demands a change in the law. So tell us how different this legal approach is. Well, they've had to be tenacious and they've had to really think hard about how they campaign. Because it's been a very technical campaign, and as much as they've had to learn the law and they've had to basically work out, you know, the fact that they have a human right legislation, which is universal across the world, but also in New Zealand. And the fact that they've actually won this victory has made in many ways the political elites in New Zealand look a little bit archaic and outdated. They've been rather sort of outflanked by these young campaigners. And yet at the same point, they find themselves probably in the same position. They did before the court case, which is that they need the support of parliament, the New Zealand parliament to get this legislation through. Now, Jacinda Ardern, the country's prime minister has said that any change to electoral law of this nature requires three quarters of parliamentarian support. What's the likelihood of that happening? In the current climate, quite limited. The Labor Party support for votes at 16 has been rather tepid at best. You know, they have signed up to, but they've never really pushed it as a policy. And the national party in ACT New Zealand, which the two parties on the right of the political spectrum in New Zealand are both opposed to this. And there are post to it on rather logical reasons, which is that it's highly likely that it's 16 and 17 year olds are in franchise. They're more likely to vote for what so called progressive parties. IE the greens or labor. So in some ways, I think that the interesting point about this court case is that it's likely to harden political opinion in New Zealand and make it possibly even more difficult to bring votes to 16. Are you surprised by that? Well, I am in some senses and I think that one of the things that I've been doing in my research over the last decade or so is looking at the process of how the voting age is lowered. And typically it's lowered either through an act of parliament by a government in power, we looked at particularly in Austria, that's the case. Or that there's some kind of accord that's signed between different political parties and in Scotland, the voting age was lowered to 16 for the 2014 independence referendum. And that was in accord between the conservatives and Westminster and the Scottish national party in Hollywood. Here, I think the challenge is that in many ways, going through the legal route does provide a certainly a greater profile for the issue. And I think that one of the things that they make it 16 campaign of in successful is raising the issue in New Zealand politics. And yet the problem is is that this falls into a much broader debate, a sort of culture war debate in some ways about the age of politics, a politics of age, and there is this tension between those parties that are on the right that seem to sort of feel that younger people or maybe more woke or more sort of liberal in their attitudes. And they're worried that if you lower the voting age, then that dilutes their own influence in politics. So I suspect that although this is a significant victory that in the longer course of the idea of bringing boats at 16 in New Zealand, it might actually make it a longer term project. The fact remains is that New Zealand is not quite sure how to describe it. It's a country which is usually quite happy to explore ideas like this. If we see no change in the lowering of votes in the voting age in New Zealand, what does that mean for other young people's movements across the world who want to change the vote? It's a really good question. I think in some sense, you know, there is a momentum building across the globe in terms of votes is 60. This is not the same as when the voting age was lowered to 18. We've done some research looking at how the voting age was lowered to 18 in the United Kingdom. And then its effect internationally. It was like a domino effect. We've not seen this Austria the first load the voting age to 16 in 2008, and yet we haven't seen a successive following of that same domino effect. And I think that that highlights that these debates are very much about different national circumstances. For example, the Republic of Ireland had a constitutional convention in 2013, which they agreed to lower the voting age to 16, still nearly a decade later, that hasn't happened. And we've seen it in the United Kingdom, although the voting age had been lowered in Scotland and now in Wales to 16 for national local elections that doesn't yet seem to have had an effect on the way Westminster thinks about this question. So in England and Northern Ireland, young people who are 16 or 17 don't get the vote. So I'm not quite sure that the New Zealand case will stymie or in some ways stunt the move towards votes 16. We're starting to see momentum in the United States and in Canada and in Spain. So there are other countries where this is a live issue. But I think it will raise questions about the actual process of how you lower the voting agent to what extent you need to bring together political opinion and public opinion on this issue to make sure that there's an acceptance that 16 and 17 year olds are part of the electorate. Doctor Andrew Mike, thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24.

New Zealand Andrew mycock children's identities and citi Supreme Court New Zealand parliament Jacinda Ardern university of Huddersfield parliament Manchester Labor Party national party Andrew Scottish national party Austria Westminster Scotland ACT Hollywood United Kingdom
China's Xi Jinping Envisions a Third and Indefinite Term

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 months ago

China's Xi Jinping Envisions a Third and Indefinite Term

"Something suspicious is happening in China, there is something it's the National Congress, is that right, or it is, it's kind of the big CCP meeting walk us through what's happening here. Okay, so this is the coronation of Xi Jinping as chairman for life of the CCP. With the national parties conference is, it's a 5 year held every 5 years summit for the CCP. So there's only the 20th one, right? So that means if we can all do math out there, that means it's been a hundred years since they've been doing these. So the 20th party Congress, Xi Jinping has really got his leadership, his elites, his allies, the people that are on his side in every single key position now of the Politburo, the Politburo standing committee, the palaver expanded committee. He is across the military across every single member of the secretariat. It's all of his loyalists, the generals they're all in place for shape. And what he's done is essentially become the new chairman for life of China. So coronation. Now, I called this out in newsweek, I predicted this all the way back in January, January 31st of 2022. And Charlie, you might remember that if you go look at the China hand and the China experts and this whole area, they'll say, well, you know, Xi Jinping is not as strong as everybody thinks he is. We think there's different factions within China that are able to take him down. We think that if the Olympics don't go well, they might, you know, he might fall flat on his face. But Charlie, that wasn't what happened at all as a matter of fact. And in my piece, I predicted that the factions within the CCP are nowhere near. I mean, they've got Jiang Zemin, the guy's like a 100,000 years old, and they say that he's going to be the face of the opposition. The old toad, they call him. This is the guy, by the way, who was behind the crackdown to Tiananmen Square. That's one of the reasons he got the job. And so when you look at what's going forward with this, my gripe with a lot of it is that a lot of the experts and see this on the right and the left, they keep telling you that the CCP is about to collapse. The CCP is about to collapse, but that's actually not what's happening.

Xi Jinping CCP China Politburo Standing Committee Palaver Expanded Committee National Congress Politburo Charlie Newsweek Congress Jiang Zemin Olympics Tiananmen Square
Newsom Slams Red State Governors on D.C. Trip

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:59 min | 7 months ago

Newsom Slams Red State Governors on D.C. Trip

"Parents the headline that is straight out of. The book of the absurd. This is the largest book in the America today. Newsom, this is the LA times Newsom slams red state governors on D.C. trip. Spoke stoking speculation about his future. Now, let me tell you something, folks. If I've ever seen presidential material. It is Gavin Newsom. Governor Gavin Newsom said he's frustrated with Republicans and Democrats. He's tired of conservatives criticizing California and rolling back right. And he's irked that his own national party is in fighting harder in the culture war.

Gavin Newsom Newsom La Times D.C. America California National Party
"national party" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"national party" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Com. Neil said, there is a cliche that I wish you to help me with. A lot of cliches are based on fact. You said that the Hispanic community in many cases is waking up. They realizing, oh my gosh, I'm a conservative, therefore I should be voting for Republican candidates. From my estimation, I'm not a member of that community, so I could be completely wrong. I look at the last 30, 40 years. And I see a GOP Republican establishment that seemed to write off this community. It just didn't bother investing money or time and kind of said, well, you know, the Democrats have that locked in. So we're not even going to try to do outreach. Is that a fair assessment? Well, you know, I've come to work alongside the GOP and different levels. There's been the local party that I've worked with and local chapters of their party where I was their go to trainer back then with the ROI and everything that had to do with strategic community engagement, voter registration. And then there's the state party and then there's the national party. So I mean, wherever you go, there's some great people involved in the party. And in other areas, you go, it's like, eh, there's a lot of power struggles and fights and infighting and lack of diverse outreach. Some Republican parties, local chapters are very effective and they've engaged with the Hispanic community and a beautiful way. Others not so much. Honestly, I can compare the GOP to any other organization institution or the church itself, you know, there are churches that do it right, and there are churches that do it wrong, right? So it's hard to just generalize, even with the GOP because in a lot of facets of the party, there are great people involved. I believe that it's time for a revival for the body of Christ and the Hispanic faith community to get involved with the party to the point where we can lead the party from within. And I think that would be a great way to go unless we all start a new party. Yeah. You're.

GOP Neil national party ROI
"national party" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"national party" Discussed on WBUR

"South Africa for centuries Its object is to regulate life between black and white to eliminate friction between the two groups and to ensure the safety of the white polarity I'm joined today by the former head of the BBC's South Africa bureau Milton and cozy Milton and cozy grew up in the timeship of Soweto and experienced firsthand the realities of the apartheid regime Milton can we start by explaining exactly when apartheid became law in South Africa It officially came in 1948 when a political party known as the national party the NP won an election where they legislated racial segregation laws And prior to that colonialism for hundreds of years leading up to 1948 was still in place So it was not really the beginning of racial discrimination in 1948 It was just legislator then So for instance if you look at the formation of the African National Congress it was in 1912 That was preceding 1913 land act in 1913 the South African government decided that black people can not own land So the people who are first directly affected by racial segregation laws were actually the upper and middle classes because those are the people who were landlords who had farms who had to be huge tracks of land and they had tenants on them and that's how they made their money But in 1948 it was cemented into a proper written law that black people should be inferior to white people in their own country of Beth Signs of separation are everywhere on public and private buildings At this place Africans must queue to get their passes They must carry them everywhere If the police.

Milton South Africa Soweto national party NP BBC African National Congress South African government
"national party" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Go up, right? So for me, I'm just like, I'm just gonna jump in and just experience stuff and just try as much as possible. I feel like you are someone who seeks to point out injustice among many other things. But to shine a light on it, do you remember the first time you saw an injustice that got under your skin? Yes, I was on a bus going to school and I experienced racism. There was racist chanting 'cause the BNP, the British national party. Remember them? They were standing in whatever local elections in my area. And then I experienced this racist abuse on the bus and I started up a organization promoting multicultural awareness in Essex and I toured schools around Essex with these assemblies and I got funding from the council to buy books and videos and provide workshops for young people who may not have black people and Asian people in their classes who still needed to understand more about culture and awareness. So that was like the beginnings of all of this. And when I say authentic journalism, that at no point hand on heart, did I ever consider a job in journalism prior to being on YouTube and thinking I really actually enjoy this. What role can I do if it's going to continue this? I didn't even think there was available to me, but I wish I had because I could have obviously angled towards it earlier on rather than going through medical school interviews. You still like one of the youngest ever BBC correspondents, right? So yeah, but it's also just about it's about the effort that it takes to do something and then completely switch to do something else. I would have loved not to say like journalism is easy but there's yeah learning about synapses and cells and all of that. I loved it..

Essex British national party BNP YouTube BBC
Mitch McConnell Just Smacked Down the RNC

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Mitch McConnell Just Smacked Down the RNC

"Mitch McConnell, I haven't looked at my cut shit yet. They didn't get up early enough to help Dwayne with this this morning. Here's Mitch McConnell, cut number 17. Well, let me give you my view of what happened January the 6th. And we're all we're here. We're here. We saw it happen. It was a violent insurrection. For the purpose of trying to prevent the peaceful transfer of power after a legitimately certified election from one administration to the next. That's what it was. With regard to the suggestion that the RNC should be in the business of picking and choosing Republicans who ought to be supported. Traditionally the view of the national party committees is that we support all members. Of our party, regardless of their positions on some issues.

Mitch Mcconnell Dwayne RNC National Party
"national party" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on WTOP

"The view of the national party committees is that we support all members Of our party regardless of their positions on some issues We'll talk to axios just ahead Ten O 8 call Michael and son today and get a $49 furnace tuna Michael and son Traffic and weather on the 8th and when it breaks bob imola and the traffic center Well it is the time of night when we have the work zone setting up on 66 We also have something else on 66 eastbound at the fairfax county Parkway listener found a broken down truck block in the right lane And then before the beltway there is a work zone and you're getting buy in two lanes to the right Westbound 66 approaching the beltway you get by one lane to the right past the work zone and then before the manassas rest area two left lanes are getting by and they've set up on the outer loop beltway approaching 66 blocking the left lane They do have a work on setting up on the interleukin early to boulevard You should have that down to a single lane once they have that all in place On three 95 and 95 no incidents or delays things are good to go In Maryland on 50 out to the bay bridge on 95 and the Baltimore Washington Parkway between the beltways and up and down two 70 nothing in your way Can't find the new car you're looking for try a Fitz way used car next to a new car a 5th way car is best visit fit small dot com for reliable pre owned vehicles you can trust That's the Fitz way Bob himler company TLP traffic storm team fours Matt riddle cooling off pretty quickly this evening with diminishing wins and staying mostly clear overnight tonight lows will range to the low 20s in the countryside to the low 30s inside the beltway and in those colder areas and patchy fog will be possible so that could be some freezing fog mostly sunny for tomorrow one season will be warmer low to mid 50s and makes the clouds and sun and.

bob imola Michael national party fairfax county Bob himler bay bridge Matt riddle Maryland Baltimore
"national party" Discussed on Rear Vision

Rear Vision

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Rear Vision

"That we can get down to level terms with those competitors I just mentioned. During the 1980s, Australia was hit by the neo liberal economic wave that swept through the western world. Australia's economy was transformed by deregulation, especially under the hawk Keating government, which stripped away old forms of protection. That speaker was Ian McLaughlin, president of the national farmers federation, addressing a rally of 45,000 farmers who marched through Canberra on the first day of bob hawke's tax summit in July 1985, and it wasn't just farmers who were under financial pressure. In the 1950s and 60s, industries established in country towns had blossomed behind Australia's tariff walls, but these would not survive the opening up of Australia's economy. Or country towns had many industries, food processing was a classic example of country town capitalism, soft drink manufacturer would be another. But even things like white Woods manufacture often took off in regional centers. So Australia had a booming consumer economy of the 1950s and 60s. And of course, the country towns of Australia were doing very well. But they were very dependent in many instances at least on government support. Deregulation agenda that really began with the hawk paid in government. Received pretty hard pushback from rural areas. You saw the rationalization and privatization of services and you saw a breaking down of what country people would regard as a contract between metropolitan and rural places and people. But there was this sense because it was a labor government conducting the policy reform. There was this sense of holding our collective breaths, if you like that, oh, maybe on the other side of this, the coalition will ride in and re in state restore some of the policy settings. But of course, John Howard and his government and Tim Fischer really doubled down on the deregulation agenda. And brought about their own changes in rural areas. And I don't think it's an accident that in the Howard government is when you're starting to see more rural independence pop up. So there's this sense that this isn't the coalition that we remember from pre poor Keating days. This is a very different coalition and what is it doing to the pillars that we considered to be the basic tenants of rural policy? And so I think that breakdown of what rural people would see as an agreement between metropolitan and country Australia, really starts the breakdown of the national party center of identity. The method may be unsophisticated, but the premier undaunted by criticisms from within the national party has begun the march to Canberra in earnest. Policy is vintage Joe. Today at Bethany, the talk was of eliminating the AC TU, the Labor Party in the Democrats, and he said he was not concerned with any effect that Joe movement was having on the coalition. I've seen it for the last three years. I've had all this business of working and working and working for other parties who can't perform who can't win. So I said, on the principle, if you want a job well done do it yourself, let's just exactly what I'm doing. We can't leave the 1980s behind without mentioning one of the most curious episodes in Australian politics, the attempt by Queensland national party premier sir Jo berki Peterson to become prime minister of Australia in 1987. We're really supporting the myth of Queensland being different here, but it is particularly in relation to the coalition because the country party and then the national party from the 1920s was the dominant non Labor Party in the state. And the liberals and their forerunners were the minor party. And that was particularly continued through the 1980s. In other states that the national level, the country party was always very clearly a small party relative to the liberals. But in Queensland, it was different. And I think you had a particular style of party organization and leadership in the Joe era. One might say a sort of messianic kind of thinking started to take hold. And Joe, of course, was a big antisocialist and he was really pushing the idea for many years from rights from the whitlam era through to the hawk era that the horror of the Labor Party and its socialist leadings needed to be combated and really the federal Liberal Party are just not doing enough for that. What we need is real leadership. And he really got sufficient support within the party in Queensland to run this idea, which was initially Joe for p.m., but became Joe for Canberra as the campaign moved on. And then it was sort of watered down and then suddenly abandoned. And of course many including John Howard himself attribute that to the loss of the 1987 election where the coalition thought they had a very good chance. It split the coalition because essentially it forced the federal nationals to at least temporarily split and it led to Ian Sinclair losing the leadership as well. Despite their decline in influence since the high water mark of the 1950s and 60s, the nets remain an important part of the political landscape in Australia, although there are an anomaly when you consider what's happened to the other agrarian parties that emerged elsewhere in the early 20th century. In the early 20th century, quite a lot of countries had clearly agrarian parties, and particularly I guess a good comparator is probably the Nordic countries. You could see them in Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark. It were quite influential. They either die out or they change their identity to some extent. And for example, it's quite telling that in the Nordic countries, they are labeled some version of center parties and they do seek to sort of get between, I guess, social Democrats on one hand and liberals on the other hand. And they do their take on green things. So they are agrarian, moderate and green. And regional, of course, I should have mentioned that. So I think the nationals have retained the agrarian origins, but they are original party. Most of their candidates now are not farmers. But people who have worked in regional areas in some degree or other and probably have agricultural roots of some sort, but their original party and they definitely have not taken on green thinking, even though, of course, they would make claim to the idea that farmers the original conservationists and so on, you do hear that quite a bit. And the nets are an anomaly in another way. They're essentially in a permanent coalition with a Liberal Party. In fact, even on the rare occasions that the liberals win enough states to govern alone, they choose to remain in coalition with the gnats. Absolutely. Because what the national party does is it allows the non labor side of government to capture a whole range of different values and different political perspectives. And it allows them to capture some of the vote on perhaps the slightly more extreme right end of the spectrum who would probably go elsewhere if the party was just the Liberal Party. So the nationals allow for a separate identity to attract those different sets of values, but in a sense corrals them into a two party system. And it serves the party very well, because again, as a minor party, it would never have had the level of influencing cabinet that it has as a member of an almost permanent coalition. So from the party's point of view, with only a handful of seats, it gets very key cabinet portfolios. The coalition is a very, very unusual political arrangement. Hardly ever, do you see such a long-term permanent coalition in operation in multi party democracies in Europe? What you see is elections are held and then people negotiate around coalitions, but an enduring coalition is extremely unusual and an enduring coalition in which there are only two parties is extremely unusual as well. The pluses for the nationals that you get a seat at the table and particularly you get the agricultural portfolio and you get the regional development portfolio. And up until 1980s, you got the trade portfolio as well. When in government. And of course, they have been in government quite a bit. So you can see the potential advantages there. The counter to that is they have sold out. They join the liberals and they've become like liberals and they're giving to the liberals. That's the kind of critical thing that comes from the bush areas and comes from people who are political opponents or competing minor party candidates will be saying. People who take up portfolios are bound by cabinet solidarity. So once the decision is taken, nationals ministers either resign or they go along with whatever has been decided. And this contributes to the impression that that kind of lep dogs over the liberals. And it's very hard to get credit for holding back the tide as they did in the deregulatory period in the 1990s. They certainly were successful in getting lots and lots of concessions. But if your farmers and you see your commodity board disappearing or you see your bush services disappearing, your bush post office clothes and so on. You're not very open to the idea that someone has been defending you stoutly and you're annoyed at the loss of.

Australia Labor Party Canberra Joe hawk Keating government Ian McLaughlin national farmers federation white Woods national party Tim Fischer national party center of ident Queensland John Howard Queensland national party sir Jo berki Peterson bob hawke Joe era federal Liberal Party Ian Sinclair Howard government
"national party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You The Scottish national party will table emotion of centuries against Boris Johnson this week in Blackford the party's Westminster leader will call the prime minister must be held to account for his disastrous actions He is described the government's outstanding street as damaging and dangerous Australia's prime minister Scott Morrison is proposing new legislation that would force a social media firms to reveal the identities of anonymous trolls under the laws people who believe they can be defamed could get a court order forcing companies to disclose who is behind the post If companies do refuse they would have to pay defamation costs and online lectures could be sticking around after university vice Chancellor said they found a range of benefits to some pandemic practices a briefing from universities UK says they need to capitalize on the digital transformation Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick take powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries and the anger guerins This is Bloomberg Caroline Thank you so much for going with the world news Now we are focused on the omicron the new variant of concern suspected in several EU countries so suggesting that this new mutation has already found a foothold on the continent here in the UK too identified or suspected cases reported in Belgium Germany Italy the Netherlands where of course they are already battling various serious waves of coronavirus For more let's bring in our European correspondent live in Brussels Maria today Maria good morning How's Europe then reacting to this new mutation another problem for them Yes Caroline you know when you look at the situation this morning we know that there are confirmed cases now in Germany Italy France Belgium of course that was a first case connected to a passenger who went to Egypt then returned to Belgium and she was unvaccinated and of course we have this big hop in the Netherlands There was a flight from South Africa that landed in the country over the weekend There's 13 positives to the new COVID variant and we also know overall there is about 61 positives on that flight So again there was a very almost clear forceful message from governments that this virus is already here in Europe There's nothing we can do to avoid it The mission now is to prevent it from being spread out across the European Union And for that the head of the commission over the weekend again repeated would spend the message now for days you have to get your vaccination whether this is your first time vaccine or whether this is a booster shot you have to get your vaccine going into the winter Yeah that was the same message from Satya javid the health minister here who was questioned about why people coming into the UK from South Africa Southern Africa were not tested upon arrival although the UK government's responded quite quickly The other issue though Maria the new variant its reignited this debate around patents and whether IP should be removed Europe has rejected this in the past You think that that would change now I mean that seems quite a long term issue though Yes and you know for a very long time we've heard this sentence which is now almost a catch phrase because it doesn't really translate into real life And that is no one is safe until we're all safe and we need to provide vaccines to everyone including the least developed countries When you look at the richer nations that London and the UK where you are but also here the EU the United States and so on we have enough vaccines for everyone who booster shots for everyone I'm 31 years old and I got already a message from my local government saying get your booster So clearly we're in a much better position and we're far ahead of some African countries where they haven't even gone in the first doses Until now as you mentioned the EU had always said this is not about the IP and a company like beyond tech that's based out of Germany This is a breakthrough This is their entire business model and that should be rewarded They've also said this is about the industrial capacity We need to be able to produce more Having said that when you look at covax and that is a program in which the rich countries provide vaccines for the least developed countries when you look at what was promised and would have delivered there is a huge gap So this debate is going to increase whether or not the IP should be removed but having said that this is an issue that has to get treated at the WTO when as you know the median that will schedule for this week got canceled because Switzerland does not allow politicians entering the country from South Africa nor Belgium by the way Yeah Just briefly could Europe see border closures in the way that sweeping border closures I suppose in the way that Japan and other countries have closed borders I think externally that's a very different picture You know we saw on Friday there was this huge knee reaction The numbers that they're working with in the EU are already bad enough that they say anything that's external we need to shut it down immediately whether it's a panic reaction or not they don't actually really care They just want to shout it down from moment one I think internally once again however for Europe is very important to keep borders open You know this is one of the fundamental freedoms of the EU and even at the height of the pandemic in 2020 there was this thing that border should not be officially shut Yeah exactly Yeah very interesting Really thanks so much for being with us That has been both me today there are European correspondent in Brussels keeping us up to speed with where the latest Omni krom cases have been confirmed in EU countries and what may happen with IP and the vaccine of course this is a key focus really whether the vaccine is effective against this new varied of concern or not we still do not know and whether more vaccinations will be rolled out to other countries too as we get another twist in this terrible COVID pandemic Well let's tell you what's coming up next though on the program So what does it mean for oil markets when both Helen Robertson will be talking to us about the impact of omicron and the variant on oil We have the OPEC class meeting later this week a rebound in oil prices after a 13% slump on Friday WTI crude.

EU Belgium UK Bloomberg Caroline Brussels Maria Yes Caroline Europe Scott Morrison Scottish national party Germany Blackford the Netherlands Satya javid Boris Johnson South Africa Italy Maria Westminster Bloomberg Australia
"national party" Discussed on Brandwidth® Big Ideas on Small Business Marketing

Brandwidth® Big Ideas on Small Business Marketing

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Brandwidth® Big Ideas on Small Business Marketing

"You know, and there's the same kind of extends a little bit to brands. Absolutely. So there's a likeability. I mean, that's fame. I think you want to talk about the term. I think Liz Bennett and Peter field use that advertising campaigns that create fame. Fame is a likeable Ness that's, you know, I like that. And it doesn't even, it's not even much deeper than that, is it? Have you met many politicians? I have but not on much of a level. Like I wouldn't have had. A long conversation with them and they've been short kind of. I've made a few what we're really strikes me every time is they're all really nice. Every time I've had them anyway, they're all seem really nice, but they're not these caricatures that we all start, you know, if you have sort of into politics you say these are this person's evil and this person's great and this person's this other thing and you sort of meet them and they're all very like average maybe you're like in a good way. What do I strike like? So I do understand that if I drop by your house, particularly if they're one of the bigger ones and you invite them in for a cup of tea you had a conversation with them for a period of time that probably is enough to sway most people. And maybe that's a signal too. Absolutely. I was prepared to stop by your house. Did you say that? Very costly. Yeah, so anyway, are you ready for my analogy? We don't agree. As usual. If we can agree and maybe we can, it doesn't really matter. The liver national party are the leading brand of politics in Australia. Then we might be able to say that the liberal national party are Coca-Cola. Okay? So the big sugary soda that that's consistently held the number one spot I like it. They've got big budgets. There's healthier arguably tastier alternatives, but it somehow keeps fighting its way into our shopping basket. Very good. I like it. Cool. I'm down with that. We've got the colors wrong, though, don't we? No, this is and it's been tearing me apart because you probably know where I'm going next. If Ellen pay is Coke or the Labor Party has to be Pepsi. And we definitely we've got the colors around. Yeah, yeah, I've got the round the wrong way. It kills me. But yeah, so Labor Party Pepsi, the clear number two, almost indistinguishable in every way, and arguably better in a blind taste. And if you can't find a.

Liz Bennett Peter field liver national party liberal national party Coca Cola Australia Labor Party Coke Ellen Pepsi
Diving Deep on John Durham With Kash Patel

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Diving Deep on John Durham With Kash Patel

"Someone that understands the Russian collusion story better than anybody else and his predictions have been coming true and I push back against them very politely when he was on the show. He's a friend of mine cash, Patel, very smart guy American patriot. Cash are you with us? Yeah, Charlie, got you loud and clear and thanks so much for having me back on your show. Really appreciate it. The floor is yours, what have we learned this week with John Durham and these indictments? Well, as your show and your viewers have taken a great interest in John Durham, what he's been doing since we last talked was issue another indictment. And let's just rewind history for a little bit for those who haven't watched the plot against the president, spend 90 minutes of your life and learn about the biggest political scandal and how Devin Nunes and I expose that scandal in the United States history. So first, you have Christopher Steele, or let's back up one more step. You have fusion GPS and the democratic national party and Hillary Clinton campaign pay millions of dollars to obtain fraudulent information through a MI 6 asset Christopher Steele and pump that into the FBI and have the FBI intentionally lie to a fisa court. So you have a democratic political party. You have a foreign operative. You've got tens of millions of dollars, and you have our FBI and DOJ being corrupted. As if that wasn't bad enough, that was proven. Not just by the Nunes memo and the Russia gate investigation we did validated by the inspector general, but also John Durham indicted one of the attorneys who lied to the fist court for the surveillance warrant during the Trump campaign era. And then indicted just a couple of weeks ago, Michael sussman for lying to the FBI. Who's Michael sussman? Oh, he's the head lawyer for the DNC and Hillary campaign who was getting paid millions of dollars to shell. This information about the Russia gate hooks to the FBI and lied about it. And now we have this guy indicted danchenko. His name's not that important, but his position is. And if you recall, Christopher Steele did this terrible interview with George Stephanopoulos recently. We do go to try to resuscitate his credibility. And people were asking, why would he do that now? Because he knew this indictment was coming. And why does it matter? Because we already destroyed Christopher Steele's credibility in his lies. But you asked, where does Christopher Steele get his information from? Danchenko, this guy that was just indicted at lying to the FBI. 5 times over 5 counts in a federal indictment was Christopher Steele's primary source for the information that we knew was rather than to begin

John Durham Christopher Steele FBI Michael Sussman Devin Nunes Democratic National Party Patel Charlie Hillary Clinton Nunes Russia Danchenko DOJ United States DNC Hillary George Stephanopoulos
"national party" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Conversations

"With me now. Listening to that as a former wife of federal member of parliament but debutante balls were not beak in magic longer. It was a riverina thing that we're very big in tim's electric. It would all and i have a place and they have a wonderful place and people love them. But i i had never been to one But this day. I did dress up. Held the got the bouquet and had the the flares nor did all the right things. But tim got sick halfway through the not and by the time we'd got to the car to drive home. He was very sick. Very sick had a terrible flu and it was dock. It was foggy was to as driving along the highway next murray river and he said do you mind if you draw sleep on the back seat because i've got to go to pamper tomorrow. Would an. that's exactly what he did. So i drove back and Dropped him in his motel and thought well. I'm never doing that again. About two months later he said oh another invitation for you. I said i'm not interested. I'm really not interested in no no more details. He said oh no. It's the quyen unless what the quaint wasn't quite show is banned the quyen what it was but it was. The quainton was qe to coming to aubrey. Which was his electorate again for the boston. Tenure and account past that one up so yeah not not enough. It was really just that sense that there was someone that you couldn't really live without them in your life you know and and That's the same for him. He must have been conscious. That being married to a politician was going to mean something very different than than being married to someone out of politics. I mean once you had your two sons judy. How often were you at home alone in those early years without tim. Well i think you ride in the sense that i when we got married you know make other federal members of parliament and wives or partners or spouses and they would be like oh life has changed so much and i wasn't. I didn't sign up for this when i married in afraid maria. Whoever was let me say it was more likely to be fred if it was the national party So they were sort of going through shop for me. Tim was member of palm. When i met him so i didn't really have that fullback saying look and i was involved in politics. I had a sense of what politics was like. So i thought i was well equipped to manage it and i was also a very independent person. I'd spent a lot time on the farm on my own. So that part didn't worry me but when not so. I have the kids at changed a lot. Tim would be home. Firstly we finally got into government in nineteen ninety six airforce and was born in ninety three and a second son was born three months after we got into government and so i had a three year old and a toddler in a a baby through the busiest times of tim's a political career so he was deputy prime minister. Who's was mr. He was later the national party and he was facing peps. The biggest issues. The national party of feist in many many ways outcast broadcast this is conversations with sarah connor. Judy.

tim murray river parliament flu aubrey boston national party judy Tim maria fred palm national party of feist sarah connor Judy
How Sean Spicer Transitioned to a Career in Politics

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

How Sean Spicer Transitioned to a Career in Politics

"Back to one. On one with my good france sean spicer. So let's finish this story how you got fascinating career. Transitioning from asia studies japanese into politics running campaigns. How'd you end up in the white house. Working the president so i i was mobile ice in the navy from two thousand eight to two thousand eleven. I got off active duty in basically january. Two thousand eleven. I went on terminal leave. And so i was looking for the next professional move My wife and i wanna start a family. We didn't really think politics anymore was the right. You know the most stable and conducive to to raise kids and so i was looking for some corporate stuff and a mentor. My said there's this. New chairman of the rnc has just been elected. Would you guys should talk. We met we hit it off. My wife was like look. This is probably what you want to go to the national party. Sort of like the major leagues and she understood how important that wasn't said okay. It's a two year gig. Go for well. We finished the first two years and we really wanted to change the party and make some Some huge changes in how we did business meaning. We wanted to shift away from all adds get more into a data specific model where we helped candidates up and down the ballot reform. The primary system reform the debate processing systems. We stuck around for two more years. That made it four. We did very well in the midterms. And then you not sticking around for presidential as sort of like walking out for the super bowl and so again. I look my is literally my god. It's now going with my six year so we did

Sean Spicer White House France Asia Navy RNC National Party Super Bowl
"national party" Discussed on Shut Up & Sit Down

Shut Up & Sit Down

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Shut Up & Sit Down

"That's you collecting. The resources look tree gets a tree. Resource look at mountain mounted. If you look at like that is so cool but like it doesn't matter the person that you're telling your story about this going to the national party doesn't care about the trees in the rain. La you saw a bag so cool. We should talk about what parks is like as i'm game. News talk by the rules. There's loads a little systems going on. But the core of it is that little track where you're moving hiker along and taking resources using it to buy these parts and then you get points at the end. Who has the most points wins and let me tell you ever pox pretty nice. It's a pretty nice game. I don't think it's ever going to dislodge anything from my collection if oh to copy. But he's gorgeous reiki little box if you're showing it to people who may be new to games or like relatively new to games. This is why. I was thinking about arthur. You played it right. It makes the crunch that's in here makes it kind of like a litmus test for if people are going to be super into those like action efficiency resource gathering games but it presents so many options on how to solve the problems that it's giving you that you always going to just be able to pull off something satisfying the stuff we excited for. Is that like eye of the needle. Play where you just managed to squeeze the perfect number of points out of the actions in front of you. And i think what we're getting a kick out of those games today is like when the is really small right when you can. There's a tiny opportunity to get the efficiency you need parks instead. Felt to me like you're not threading a needle much as you like dunking a basketball. You have a significant roster of powers and upgrades that makes that process feel easier and up power creek feel strong and i think personally i wish it was a spruce meena like action selection track.

national party La arthur basketball
"national party" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Ascension National Parties Day but not leap Day. Just getting we're doing late day because every day is perfect for saving money with the home and auto bundle early at progressive, But for real, we're not doing my chocolate because why chuckle is grown. Progressive insurance company affiliates. Discounts are available in states or situations. Alice Cooper, the godfather of Shock Rock is back. Alice Cooper Live in concert. With special guest former Kiss guitarist based freely. Huntington Pavilion have Northerly Island Friday. September 24th can't tickets now at life nation dot com. About concerts. Return of the year with legendary rocker Alice Cooper. Check more at Alice Cooper. Com. China is going to eat our lunch. Come on, man. They're not cut their dinner. Another competition for us. Yeah, man, Chyna. They're not competition for us. He's in business with them. Turns out so is the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, which is kind of unusual. Please tie. I think it's unusual. Oh, yeah. Our government was in New Hampshire wants to break away for the lover. Wow. What?.

"national party" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Chairing the party enduring the obama period and you saw the way that republicans went after barack obama the attempts really to brand his presidency itself has somehow fundamentally illegitimate and the you know the birther claims again. Donald trump was the main driver of those other republicans. Picking them up. I just want to know whether you felt when you were sitting in those meetings as chair that republican committee in the obama period. Did you feel confident that everyone around. You is only opposing obama because he was a democrat and because it was a it was an agenda for the country or did you feel. There was a racial element. There's always a racial alabama come on. You're dealing with white folks. There's always a racial that you know. That's how i just wish people could be honest about that. Of course there is. Look i was sending said in. Meetings is jammed. The national party in the you know these people would do these presentations that look at the. You realize i'm black right. I can't go up this stuff. What are you you talking about. Won't kind of things. were they thinking. Oh i mean just just communications. I mean just how do you. How do you mess stuff. What are you say. How do you you know talk about things you know. I can't talk about these things like a white boy. I'm not. I'm not white. The reality of it is yeah. They're obviously there are those who were much more interested in playing up the birtherism narrative that trump and others at stirred up around president obama and i push back against that. I never gave them speeches. I never made those comments for me. The fact of the matter is we made a conscious effort as a party To to lean into it Both in the nineteen sixties and now more recently under trump is we sort of braced this sort of fake populism which is nothing but a ruse for white nationalism. And i think that we're gonna pay a dear price for ultimately if we stay on this course live..

obama republican committee Donald trump national party alabama
"national party" Discussed on Bible Prophecy 4 Today's Podcast

Bible Prophecy 4 Today's Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Bible Prophecy 4 Today's Podcast

"I actually started my eviction back in september of two thousand eighteen nineteen before kobe. Nineteen even existed. And i can interject here in texas. The same thing is here. We have some really bad people. That live in this apartment complexes. Well there's no way to get rid of them. And -til i think is back in june the thirtieth when that expired here in texas praise god. They're able to get them out but anyway back to the story says rapper said doesn't believe his tenant doesn't have the means to pay rent is within has caused serious damage property for which he has to pay to get fixed. He still going to work on top of that. A large part of his income is honestly and inheritance. He is very vast inheritance. Repre said he owes eight. He owes twenty eight thousand dollars in rent plus the property damage. You're looking at about eight thousand dollars in the hole said said he wants the court to open. I don't think there needs to be innovation. Moratorium if you apply for indo assistance your fiction is automatically postponed. He said of the state's emergency rental systems program. If you have a pending application in that program then you're not going to be evicted ramp. Said said that he thinks there are deeper reasons behind the federal government. Introducing the moratorium. I believe that not the moderate left but the more social leper but the more socialist left believes they cancel rent movement. They believe the free housing they don't believe in landlords providing apartments or rental properties. Where was until the puck. Tom's that he that there is a similarity to the communist revolutions. In the past where the landlords were targeted by the revolutionary movements also act protests was ray-hyung of the national party association. He said landlords were gathered to make their voices heard new york state in new york. City courts are not only are not only not opening up the cases but they are delaying them. they don't know that the landlords they don't know that the landlords are the ones who actually have been affected more. We need to be treated fairly. Excuse me. he told the..

Repre texas kobe rapper national party association federal government Tom new york
"national party" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Tell me what i can do to fix this. I don't like the direction countries going. That's what i've finding. And i'll tell you what is going on with the national party. I'll tell you here. in congress. The prison currently have lead is leading us in our whip. And probably the fourth. What is what does that whip. So i mean literally think about every whip and congress has literally given actual weapon they hang on everything so you're supposed to whip the votes so they they are responsible for going out in executing. The party's vision and be interesting. I don't know why you're not voting for this. And i'm going to either give you care oral whip to do so god and so. That's that's the that's what a weapons and they'd probably say command and then as you go down the line you'll see that because it's actually a popular election up here once you win. You're election back home. You have go straight into another election among all your peers. Mike we about two hundred nine. Okay you're in congress. I've two hundred ninety two. Did you have to convince to vote for you to be leader and right now. A lot of conservative politicians well over fifty one percent of them were elected under our previous president with at the top of the ticket and so they're very conservative. Very populous minded very people oriented right. And i'll tell you. I think our our leadership in our party is actually taking note of that. Unlike a lot of the national party asked him. And they're kicking asking me. And i actually our messaging battles. It's great the reason why you're seeing such a good coalesced message from my side of the aisle in in here's because the messaging is on point what most members believe. So we're actually capable of all. Yeah i can get behind that. Let's go do it. I'm actually. I'm really glad to see guys like yourself doing it stepping up and speaking up because i've heard for so long this concept of the silent majority and there's even people who tell me he's like there's going to be a bunch of people who like this this particular podcast because we're talking about politics because i'm talking to you and it's like i'm sick. A plan the silent majority game. And that's what everybody's talked about and they say things like oh well wants to silent majority wakes up and like well wake up. What are we waiting for. Really dollars in debt or children are gonna have to pay to unbelievable knots taxes. Well and even. I mean even if you wanted to talk about the debt on both sides of the aisle every i'll spend spend spend spent. It's not your money to spend and it doesn't seem like like the people here are understanding realize that an acting accordingly right because a very frustrating. It's incredibly frustrating to people who say that they are would get upset about this podcast because warmer focusing on politics when we're talking about shocking to me those things is i would say you know what this you've got to get over that people just need to get over. We don't talk politics because it's hard to talk about. Politics requires a lot of critical thinking and we might be on different sides of the aisle and people might not agree with every position. I take but you know what. I think that people who do podcasts. I'll go on podcasts. While the other side of the aisle things these i just think. I want to get my messenger as much as i can because i believe my message i do But you know what it's it's it's based on values and i think what we need to do is come back around. Values not get so caught up in incremental. Gdp increases at the end of the year or get so caught up in corporate. Tax price was focused on dying with politics. You've got four young kids yet let's focus on making their life better. what what. What are you talking about the dining table. That can make your life better. And so i'll focus so much on diary politics. I think most people would say including myself. The thing that a politician can do to make my life better to stay out of it boom and this this is actually kind of what So where's the balance. Well one more thing about this is what i gene belief when they politician hoping about federal politicians. Because induna you save your life. We should be focused on. Warsh be focused on trae which infrastructure we focus on the new radio power constitution not all these other agencies. Who are telling you what to do in your life. I'm telling you we should all that back or governor should become so kick ass like rhonda's santa's they. I don't care about what your tyranny wants to be here at your federal thing. My state doesn't believe that's a good that which is how it was how it was established and how it should be exactly answer to the people that are that are to your podcast. You're like oh you know. I don't like the fact you're talking to him. Whatever just know that. I'm trying to become incredibly unimportant your life. I'm trying to be the make our power here in congress so limited that you don't even care what i think that my opinion just doesn't matter that much so that's i believe you when you say that i'll preface with that but that is also a conflict of interest with your job. It is so how do you balance so one of our number one. Things that we're going to be doing is voting. We will be putting a term limits bill on the house floor. Congress has that what's the farthest to like that has has died.

congress national party Mike Warsh rhonda santa Congress
"national party" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on The Audio Long Read

"He reached out to one of his. Party's biggest rivals. The brazilian democratic movement party. Pm db led by michel temer. This marriage of convenience was doomed from the start the pm. Dp is brazil's biggest political party. That has never taken an ideological stance or a leadership role preferring to do deals to shore up governments. It is a mishmash of factions ranging from conservative rural landowners and urban social democrats to evangelical nationalists and former guerrillas whose only common ground is a desire to secure the patronage prestige and bribes that come with government posts. The party has been involved in every corruption scandal in modern brazilian history. But lula was desperate so we struck a deal in return for support in congress. The workers party gave tim as pm. Db control at the international division of petrobras and the funds that flowed from it severo then. The director of that division was required to deliver payoffs to different mazdas. It was a grueling task. In two thousand eight severo failed to deliver sufficient funds and he was forced to stand down. Tomorrow has been named countless times in car wash testimonies. Julio camargo a consultant for the toyo seato construction and engineering company said money was channeled from petrobras to a lobbyist representing senior. Pm db figures including tamar. One industrialist testified the thamar had arranged illicit payments into the party's campaign coffers and had taken leadership of the m d be in order to control who got the millions of dollars that were being siphoned off from petrobras albrecht and their applies a former odebrecht. Vice president cloudier mellow feel. Who testified that in twenty fourteen. He secretly donated. ten million. Ray is two point. Three million pounds to tim political campaign this bomb could end in his lap in a more serious way than for rousseff. He's more involved than her. So timur a constitutional lawyer publicly denied. The allegations saying suggestions of illegality were frivolous and untruthful. Despite the long list of accusations almost none stuck other testimonies against him were withdrawn. No charges were filed. Prosecutors said there was not enough evidence. temir seemed untouchable. guardian the guardian.

brazilian democratic movement michel temer international division of petr severo Julio camargo toyo seato construction and en workers party thamar lula brazil tim petrobras albrecht odebrecht petrobras congress tamar rousseff timur Ray
"national party" Discussed on Immigrantly

Immigrantly

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"national party" Discussed on Immigrantly

"In britain as in many parts of western europe you have of course conservative government in power. It's fairly ideological fairly right-wing but what has happened is that britain is also the country with probably the smallest far-right political presence after brexit. You know once the conservative party managed to own brings it. It destroyed the uk independence party and any other party that was explicitly racist. So you might accused people in the governing party here or indeed in a position of being racist. The labor party has been embroiled in a longstanding controversy or antisemitism for instance but neither of the two big parties nor the third party the liberal democrats will ever explicitly be racist but that coup in some other places. Think it's been counterproductive. Brexit has been counterproductive far right wing racist parties in britain year. It's funny in some ways. Yes because you know. They were wiped out after brexit. They had nothing else to go on. But of course you can also argue that the ruling party the conservatives have actually taken up a lot of their baggage and made it part of their own yet. Done it's not very very interesting ways. So britain today. If you look at the british cabinet is the most racially diverse cabinet british history and it took the conservatives to do it labor which is the traditionally leftist party hadn't done it. I think in part because they will always nervous you know. They thought that their own so called white working class. Voters would dislike it if they became to racially diverse. The conservatives have no such problem because the conservatives it's your ideology that counts and that's what i was going to ask you because to me. Yes a racially. Diverse cabinet on paper looks great but it also matches what kind of ideology is being implemented and perpetuated right. Yes oh you know today. Our home secretary is in fact of ugandan asian and she's the toughest you can ever be on immigration bringing this australian Way of doing things where potential refugees or accurate fiji's actually off shored. They're not even allowed in. How do you offshore from offshore and some of the central rwanda which is really weird because rwanda is just one country north of the country. She came from when she came from..

britain conservative party labor party cabinet europe uk fiji rwanda
Johnson Calls for UK Talks After Scottish Nationalists Win

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Johnson Calls for UK Talks After Scottish Nationalists Win

"Scotland's first minister Nicola sturgeon has discussed proposals for holding a new referendum on Scottish independence following her party's victory in recent elections sturgeon leader of the Scottish National Party says this week's results prove a second independence vote for Scotland was now a matter of democratic principle but the first minister Khan put a date on it but now that will not just be a judgment for me the Scottish parliament which of course no you highs a majority of bigger majority okay miss piece in favor of an independence referendum than was the case before the elections of the parliament will judge when the time is right sturgeon says however how a medium priority will be steering Scotland through the pandemic meanwhile British prime minister Boris Johnson has invited the leaders of the U. case the Volvo nations for crisis talks on the union Charles Taylor this month London

Scotland Nicola Sturgeon Scottish National Party Scottish Parliament Khan Sturgeon Parliament Boris Johnson U. Charles Taylor London
Boris Johnson Calls for Talks After Scottish Nationalist Victory

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson Calls for Talks After Scottish Nationalist Victory

"House. Finnish Prime Minister Boris Johnson is invited The leaders of the U. K. Steve all of nations for crisis talks on the union after Scotland's pro Independence Party won his fourth straight parliamentary election. Think of a sturgeon, leader of the Scottish National Party says independence is

Finnish Prime Minister Boris J K. Steve Pro Independence Party U. Scotland Scottish National Party
Houston leaders denounce proposed voting legislation in Texas

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Houston leaders denounce proposed voting legislation in Texas

"Voters in poll after poll but Texas Democrats not so much Now Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. He's doing the National Party line. Several people speaking out a diverse group, he said against a Georgia like election bill that passed the Texas Senate. These bills and the name of election integrity are largely built on concerns over widespread voter fraud for which there is little or no evidence. State Senator Paul

Mayor Sylvester Turner National Party Houston Texas Texas Senate Georgia Senator Paul
Trump Republicans McDaniel Intro and Voicer

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Trump Republicans McDaniel Intro and Voicer

"If president trump decides to run for president again in twenty twenty four he shouldn't expect preferential treatment from the leader of the Republican Party the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee Ronna McDaniel tells the Associated Press the party plans to stay neutral for the next presidential primary the National Party spent the last four years focused on Donald trump's reelection but should he run again in twenty twenty four make Daniel says the R. N. C. infrastructure would not support his ambitions over those of other candidates make Daniels also denouncing the pro trump conspiracy theory group Q. anon calling it dangerous Jackie Quinn Washington

President Trump Ronna Mcdaniel Republican National Committee Republican Party The Associated Press National Party Donald Trump Daniel Daniels Q. Anon Jackie Quinn Washington
Party down: Vietnams Communist leaders meet

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:25 min | 2 years ago

Party down: Vietnams Communist leaders meet

"Once every five years with much pomp and pageantry the bombs communist leadership convenes in a national party congress thirteenth. One again in the capital hanoi. This week the expectation is that there will be a raft of stamp policies and new party leaders john despite the country's relatively low kobe numbers and positive economic performance. The party's position outside. The national conference center is weaker than it seems at the national party congress. They discuss issues confronting vietnam. They set policy and they elect the central committee. Politburo and the four top jobs. Charlie mccann is our southeast asia correspondent among them the most powerful job in the country. That is the party. Secretary-general and what's the overall tone at the congress. This time around pretty self. Congratulatory parties had a good year. They've handled the pandemic pretty well. Had just over fifteen hundred cases and fewer than fifty deaths and the economy actually grew by three percent but there's still a lot of disquiet and the party and indeed in the public disquiet in the party in the form of some kind of opposition. There's no organized opposition. Nobody's going to supplant the communist party anytime soon and ever since the nineteen eighties. When the country embarked on the transition from a century planned economy to market one the party has state its legitimacy on rising incomes on his ability to increase prosperity. And it's done that over. Four decades vietnam has transformed from one of the poorest countries in the world to middle income manufacturing powerhouse. But if you look beyond. Those headline figures are causes for concern. The economy has been growing at about seven percent. The last several years and the economy needs to reach that level of growth to keep the labor market. It's not clear that it can do so however at the same time as you have this depressed. Economic growth inequality is rising and social mobility is declining. okay that's about formal opposition parties but you mentioned disquiet among the public as well. What's happening. They're vietnamese can't express their discontent through politics. Because opposition parties are banned but informal criticism is growing. There are a lot of vietnamese. Social media users about sixty five million out of a total population of one hundred million according to our social british firm as level of education has improved in the country and more and more people have access to the internet. they've been exposed to values that are antithetical to the communist paradise that the regime is trying to build these values like democracy and human rights and they can express views on social media and so it's that disquiet than in the public that's causing the disquiet in the party. I mean how is the house. The party dealt with that space for criticism harshly. They have cracked down over the past five years. They've arrested two hundred eighty people for quote anti-state activities up from sixty eight in the previous five year period instructed the serum press to scrub phrases like civil society and human rights from their pages and in the months leading up to the national congress. This crackdown has intensified earlier. This month day sentenced three freelance journalists famous for criticizing the government to between eleven and fifteen years in prison. It's a lot easier to shoot off an angry tweet or facebook post than it is to organize in vietnam where protest is technically illegal but actually there have been a lot of protests in real life over the last several years so in two thousand eighteen for instance tens of thousands of vietnamese took to the streets. Because they're angry about a proposed law that they were worried would allow chinese companies to lease special economic zones for a ninety nine years as a lot of anti chinese sentiment in vietnam. Because there's a lot of concern that chinese infringing on their offering sovereignty and the protests so violent angry there were clashes between the police and protesters. The government eventually abandoned this law so a good pandemic response and the economic growth. That comes with that somewhat offset by this discontent. What else is on party leaders minds. Ironically trade is going to be a worry as well and i say -ironically because trade is a is a massive driver of economic growth. It is through trade. That vietnam has been able to transform itself into manufacturing powerhouse and yet at the same time it gives its export markets leverage over the government. So for instance in order to get the eu to agree to free trade deal last year. Vietnam had to agree to abolish forced labor and allow the creation of independent labor unions which was a massive concession but surely concerns such as that aren't limited to the you know means the party officials have to think very carefully about their relations with both china its biggest trade partner and the us biggest export market. The trump administration came down really hard on vietnam labeled it. A currency manipulator late last year and trump has described vietnam quote. Almost a single worst abuser of everybody for that reason. So the party will be very keen to rebuild the relationship with the biden administration. But at the same time i can't be seen to cozy up too closely to the us for fear of offending china. With whom it has an incredibly important relationship you know. Shares ideology shares along land border and they have an important trade relationship you know. China is largest source of materials and equipment for vietnam manufacturing industry so that it's a tricky balancing act required of party officials to get that relationship right so whoever emerges from the congress secretary general. There won't be much time for celebrating. He's gonna have a lengthy to do list.

Vietnam National Conference Center Congress Charlie Mccann Politburo National Party Central Committee Hanoi Asia John National Congress Facebook Biden Administration China EU Donald Trump United States
Scotland's leader vows to push for second independence vote

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

04:26 min | 2 years ago

Scotland's leader vows to push for second independence vote

"Party has today set out how it plans to secure a new referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. The Scottish National Party, or SMP, says it will try to hold a referendum if it went the majority in this year's elections to the Scottish parliament. The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has made clear his opposition to another vote. The last referendum was in 2014 when 55% voted no to independence. Paul Hutchins, political editor of Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, will the SNP leader Nicholas Sturgeon be able to secure that second referendum. If you look at what they are plan ears, it is to get a joint agreement with the U. K government on a referendum on scorching depends, which is what happened back in 2000 and 14. But this time around Tory government in London has decided that it will not grant what's known as the section 30 order, which is effectively a joint agreement, so that's put the S and P in a difficult position, so they come up with a plan B, which is to organize their own referendum at the Scottish parliament. The big issue. There is whether or not that is legal. And while there's no doubt that they will probably go down that road is going to end up in the courts, so the question of whether there will be a referendum is probably will be decided by judges. Would unionist parties in Scotland go along with the referendum that hadn't been sanctioned by Westminster? Well, that is the key issue here. I think there's a big distinction to be drawn between whether Scotch Parliament can legally organize a referendum on the legitimacy of such a process. So even if the Scottish Parliament did push ahead with our and judges To say that it was legal. I think that be question Marks Reese because first is this court's conservatives who are pro union. They've already said they would boy court such a referendum on so you could be left for the situation where you have a referendum, but one side is just not taking part. And then you end up with the result could be C 18 90% fever of independence on internationally just looks quite amateurish. So I think that ultimately what you need is a process that is agreed by both sides on as we speak to snow and agreement on that looks quite far off. In the last independence referendum you mentioned there was a pretty large margin 10% in favor of Scott, the remaining part of the United Kingdom has that shifted dramatically in the last six years. There's no doubt that in the last couple of years their husband a shift in favor of independence. I think that around the last 20 opinion polls on independence surely lead for independence. So I said quite dramatic turnaround. From 2014, and I think there's a few reasons for that. One is Brexit as you well know, People school rejected Brexit when there was a referendum on that subject. There's also no doubt that the conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is hugely unpopular. In Scotland, and I think that is partly responsible for the shift in public opinion. There's also a perception that Nicolas Sturgeon has handled the pandemic better and Boris Johnson has. I think it's a combination of a wussy factors as resulted in the increase in independence with the last couple years. And yet, I suppose in the back of people's minds is is the worry that actually, if membership of the European Union was driving things, there's no guarantee is there a tool that Scotland could quickly rejoined the U. Well, Brexit is the degree imponderable off this to beat. On the one hand, there's no doubt that is driving increased support for independence, but it does re some issues for the pro independence state. After was a referendum there's MP would liken depends got to rejoin the U. So you have the issue of? Well, how long would that teak and then even if an independent school and did join the European Union? What would that mean for things like Borders on immigration and cite the United Kingdom of what would it mean in terms of trade between Scotland and the rest of the Yuki? So I think that you would see a very different referendum. If we lose to tea, please, with a different set of questions raised. That was poor Hussian of Scotland's Daily record newspaper.

Scottish Parliament Scottish National Party Paul Hutchins Nicholas Sturgeon U. K Government Tory Government Scotland Boris Johnson Scotch Parliament Marks Reese United Kingdom SMP Daily Record People School Prime Minister Boris Johnson Westminster Nicolas Sturgeon
"national party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"national party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Street. The Dow was off by 12, the S and P rose a fraction the NASDAQ gaining nearly 74 points and some new numbers on jobless claims this past week. 900,000 Americans filing for unemployment benefits On Twitter, South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison writing I'm honored to step up his chair of the Democratic National Committee. He challenged Lindsey Graham and last November's Senate race and prior to that ran to South Carolina Democratic Party. It is first post inauguration meeting today, the DNC party, making it official Jaime Harrison as its new chair. Today We are embarking upon a new mission to build back there and bring home back to this great nation. Together. We are working to create opportunities so that more people can tell the stories similar to my own as a son of a single mom and orange for of South Carolina. I didn't grow up with much. We live with my grand parents. And even though they work hard, we relied us food stamps and government assistance to make ends meet. Grandparents had to stop smuggling for creating secret After I learned to read I would sit at the kitchen table, help them reach their bills each month. The words don't always make sense to me, but their faces said everything we didn't have the money to pay. But regardless of what we were missing, we always had our thems. And that from Jamie Harrison President Bynes picked to be the new chair of the Democratic National Committee. It was approved today. He will succeed outgoing chair Tom Perez. Earlier today, a Senate committee and a vote this afternoon in the House Clearing two key pass for Lloyd Austin deserves the next defense secretary. Congressional approval of a waiver will clear the path for his final confirmation. Ah, law requires that officers be out of the military for at least seven years before taking the job journal, Austin retired in 2016 after a 40 plus year in career in the Army, and last night, the Senate did confirm every Haynes she becomes the new director of national intelligence. The confirmation hearings continue for a number of the Cabinet nominees today. Former South Bend mayor people to judge a 2020 presidential candidate Testifying before the Senate Commerce Committee, Montana's Democratic Senator Jon Tester, saying that Buddha judge put on a clinic on how a nominee should work an act and Republican Senator Todd Young of Indiana, introducing him to the committee, praising his Indiana background. There's a portion of people, the judges opening remarks. The mayor from the Industrial Midwest, I will bring a bottom up perspective on transportation programs and funding. If confirmed, I'm looking forward to working with our partners at the state, local, territorial and tribal levels as well to find solutions to our infrastructure issues. While we also prepare for the future of transportation at a time of great change. When I took office as mayor of South Bend City, built by the power of American transportation, we had been hit so hard by economic law. What's that? Some in the National press listed us is one of America's dying cities as our city fought its way out of the teeth of the great recession infrastructure was at the heart of our vision for a better future. As mayor, I worked with public and private partners to launch a smart streets initiative that brought new life to our urban core into the historically underserved west side of our city revitalized, revitalizing our downtown, redesigning streets and spurring hundreds of millions in major economic investment. If confirmed, people to judge would be the first openly gay man Cabinet member to serve. The Department of Transportation does distribute billions of dollars in federal highway funding and also regulates aviation railroads and bussing Senator Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas and member of the Commerce Committee, using the hearing today to criticize the new administration's decision to rejoin the Paris climate agreement. Here's that exchange earlier today. I will say it was disconcerting to see yesterday, the first day of the Biden administration straight out of the gate. President Biden announced that he was canceling the Keystone Pipeline that is a major infrastructure project. That is a project that right now today has 1200 good paying union jobs and in 2021, the Keystone Pipeline was scheduled to have more than 11,000 jobs, including 8000 union. Jobs for contracts worth $1.6 billion, and with the stroke of a pen president Biden has told those 11,000 workers those union workers your jobs are gone. Mr Booty Judge, What do you say to those workers whose jobs have just been eliminated by presidential edict? I think the most important thing is to make sure that we make good on the promise of the president's climate vision as being one that on net creates farm or two US millions. We hope I know that won't just happen. We'll have to do a lot of work to make sure that's real. But getting this right means ensuring that there are more good paying union jobs for all Americans delivered through that infrastructure vision, So for those workers, the answer is somebody else will get a job. The answer is that we are very eager to see those workers continue to be employed in good paying union jobs, even if they might be different ones. Well, I fear that decision is the front end of Whole Syria's of regulatory decisions, one after the other after the other that will be eliminating union jobs that will be eliminating manufacturing jobs that will be eliminating energy jobs, and that is altogether out of step with what the American people want. There is also some rich irony. In the long history of the Democratic Party. There was a time when the Democratic Party under presidents like FDR, Was considered the party of Union workers of blue collar workers and decisions like yesterday. And I fear Maura decisions that we will see in the days and weeks to come, are demonstrating more and more that today's Democratic Party is not concerned with working men and women having jobs and that the answer is will eliminate your jobs. And I guess good luck in the future again. Senator I think the answer is that we're going to create More good paying union jobs, and we can do that, while recognizing the fact that when the books are written about our careers, one of the main things will be judged on is whether we did enough to stop the destruction of life on dropper T due to climate change. I've got to believe we could do both of those things. But if you and I could make common cause in our support for labor than I think that's great news that from today's Senate Commerce Committee and keep Buddha jugs, the president's nominee to serve is the new transportation secretary. He is expected to be confirmed. But questions from Republican Senator Ted Cruz. On our podcast. The weekly a conversation with a White House veteran from three Republican administrations. Andy Card worked in the Reagan administration served as the deputy chief of staff under George H. W. Bush. And his chief of staff during the first six years of the George W. Bush administration. He knows a thing or two about presidential transitions. So is President Biden and his team now navigate these first few days in the West Wing. We asked him what the early days are really like. It's exciting for the people who were working at the White House do they'll kind of on the job for the first time, and it's unbelievably exciting and they don't want to leave their job and part of the responsibility of one claim. The chief of staff is to make sure people actually do go home at the end of the workday and spend some time with the families and that's what Evergreen Challenge for chief of staff. It's so exciting to work the White House you can be completely consumed by it and forget that you also have a family and you have to have some time for rest and relax station and you've got to be able to go home. Do your job. But go home and spend some time with your family because that's how you recharge your batteries don't get burnt out. But run is coming into the job with a plan he probably I know he has 100 Day plan and, yes, the president will want to.

president Democratic National Committee Democratic Party President Biden South Carolina Senate Commerce Committee Senator Senate Ted Cruz Jaime Harrison White House Lloyd Austin chief of staff Jamie Harrison President Bynes Senate committee Lindsey Graham Senator Jon Tester Senator Todd Young Tom Perez Indiana
Queensland election chaos as Opposition Leader referred to election watchdog by her own party

From The Newsroom

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Queensland election chaos as Opposition Leader referred to election watchdog by her own party

"To Queensland now and the opposition leader. DEB FRECKLETON is at the center of political crisis just weeks before the election according to the ABC say the Liberal National Party Lleida had been referred to the Electoral Commission of Queensland. By members of our Party followed alleged concerns about a series of fundraising events. The code have violated laws intended to Qatar the political influence of property developers the Ellen pay. Such complaint was made.

Liberal National Party Lleida Electoral Commission Of Queens Deb Freckleton Queensland Qatar ABC Ellen
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:08 min | 2 years ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"I want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida. Michael ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground? Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in. Florida. Republicans. Democrats, are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person. Republican moves down here from the Midwest another democratic leaning Immigrants May move into central Florida from the Global South and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans, and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the New Yorkers that are coming to Florida to retire, and you have all these different politics and ideologies of mixed together I think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia, you see the Conservatives from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United States and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear cut in that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas She Barack Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton. Did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans, into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats. I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning Democrat or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is is changing. So at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting. Republican. In the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation, you know really having more of an experience in the. US and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So I think that that's what's interesting right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in but also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chalked off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. Still. Talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States. But as it turned out for the entire world, you know I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was I mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of. You know the way these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins these things make a huge difference. I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael United States Republican Party Republican Coalition White House Hillary Clinton Columbia Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Puerto Ricans Midwest Latin America Barack Obama Iraq Global South Brooks
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:07 min | 2 years ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"Want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida Michael Ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in Florida Republicans, Democrats are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person Republican moves down here from the Midwest. Another democratic leaning immigrants may move into central Florida from the global south, and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation, you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans, have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the new. Yorkers. That are coming to Florida to retire and you have all these different politics and ideologies kind of mixed together. I. Think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United, states and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear? Cut In that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas she. Barack. Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West, Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump, there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere. Is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats? I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning? Democrat. Or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is changing so at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting Republican in the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation you know really having more of an experience in the US. and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know? Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So i. think that that's what's interesting. Right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in. But also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I, don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chopped off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. People still talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States but as it turned out for the entire world, you know, I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was i. mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of you know the way, these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins, these things make a huge difference I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael Ask Hillary Clinton Republican Party United States Barack Republican Coalition Midwest White House Republicans Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Columbia Puerto Ricans Iraq Latin America Brooks Palm Beach
Highlights from the Democratic National Convention

The Sunday Show

02:34 min | 2 years ago

Highlights from the Democratic National Convention

"Virtual National Party convention is in the books, but it wasn't just the lack of balloon drops or cheering delegates that made this convention so different from the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia four years ago. In 2016, the wounds of a contentious primary were still on display this week. On the final night of the convention, The major 2020 Democratic primary candidates were featured in a primetime zoom like talk show format. Are, they gushed over Biden's decency and sense of purpose. I think the day I saw Joe, the clearest was on the one year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing. Everyone, of course, was enormously honored to have the vice president here. But at some point in that speech, he shifted to the parents who had lost a child. To the man who had lost life. To someone who had experience loss. Very personally, and he spoke to each of the families. From the heart. The week also featured a number of high profile Republicans who vouched for Biden's competency and centrism. Their job was to assure the white suburban moderates who have soured on Trump. That Biden is a safe choice. I'm sure they're Republicans and independents who couldn't imagine crossing over to support a Democrat. They fear Joe may turn sharp left and leave them behind. I don't believe that because I know the measure of the man. It's reasonable, faithful, respectful. And you know, no one pushes Joe around the through line in each night, and each speech was the threat our current president poses to our democracy. The urgency of this moment this administration has shown it will tear our democracy down. If that's what it takes for them to win, so we're at an inflection point constant chaos. Leaves us adrift. The incompetence. Makes us feel afraid. Callousness makes us feel alone and if we want a chance to pursue any of these goals, any of these most basic requirements for a functioning society. We have to vote for Joe Biden in numbers that cannot be ignored. Because right now, folks who know they cannot win fair and square at the ballot box are doing everything they can to stop us from voting.

Joe Biden Vice President Donald Trump Philadelphia Boston President Trump
Final takeaways from the 2020 Democratic National Convention

The Takeaway

04:14 min | 2 years ago

Final takeaways from the 2020 Democratic National Convention

"First first virtual virtual National National Party Party convention convention is is in in the the books, books, but but it it wasn't wasn't just just the the lack lack of of balloon balloon drops drops or or cheering delegates that made this convention so different from the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia four years ago. In 2016, the wounds of a contentious primary were still on display this week. On the final night of the convention, The major 2020 Democratic primary candidates were featured in a primetime zoom like talk show format. Are, they gushed over Biden's decency and sense of purpose. I think the day I saw Joe, the clearest was on the one year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing. Everyone, of course, was enormously honored to have the vice president here, but at some point in that speech, he shifted To the parents who had lost a child. To the man who had lost life. To someone who had experience loss. Very personally, and he spoke. Each of the families. From the heart. The week also featured a number of high profile Republicans who vouched for Biden's competency and centrism. Their job was to assure the white suburban moderates who have soured on Trump. That Biden is a safe choice. I'm sure they're Republicans and independents who couldn't imagine crossing over to support a Democrat. They fear Joe may turn sharp left and leave them behind. I don't believe that because I know the measure of the man. It's reasonable, faithful, respectful. And you know, no one pushes Joe around the through line in each night, and each speech was the threat our current president poses to our democracy. The urgency of this moment this administration has shown it will tear our democracy down. If that's what it takes for them to wait, so we're at an inflection point constant chaos. Leaves us adrift. The incompetence. Makes us feel afraid. Callousness makes us feel alone and if we want a chance to pursue any of these goals Any of these most basic requirements for a functioning society. We have to vote for Joe Biden in numbers that cannot be ignored because right now Folks who know they cannot win fair and square at the ballot box are doing everything they can to stop us from voting. There's a lot to get into. So let's dive right in. I am joined by a virtual panel of reporters who've been following the convention all week. Maya King is a reporter covering race, ethnicity and campaigns for politico. Alex Ready is politics reporter from McClatchy. And instead, Herndon is national politics reporter for The New York Times. Instead has actually been in the place where we were all supposed to be this week in Milwaukee instead. Could we start with you and tell us what it is like to actually be in a convention city? Where there's no convention. You know, I think that the, um the levels of the absence here had been even greater than folks would imagine. There are times when you would not even know that the convention was ostensibly being hosted a block away. There are very few protesters. There is very few sign age, the kind of hallmarks of convention that we're used to seeing. Are just totally absent. And so the few reporters who are here you know, have have have watched it virtually just like everyone else. There has been some some programming this week. They had a drive in to see that as a kind of projected in Delaware at the drive in of fireworks at the Milwaukee Zoo, That was about the only in person thing. And even that was kind of hard to see him for press to get into Just a cz. One anecdote or how difficult it wass. You know, I tried. We took a five minute convincing to get this bar to play Joe Biden speeds that the few reporters were at turning a. The kind of kind of exploitation from them was well, they took it from a city way. So so so why play it?

Joe Biden Reporter National National Party Party Herndon Boston Vice President Milwaukee Zoo Philadelphia Donald Trump Milwaukee Delaware Mcclatchy The New York Times President Trump Maya King Alex Ready
Rajapaksa brothers win by landslide in Sri Lanka's election

BBC World Service

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Rajapaksa brothers win by landslide in Sri Lanka's election

"Have cemented their grip on Sri Lankans politics with an overwhelming victory in parliamentary elections there. Sri Lanka People's Front and allies would have a 2/3 majority in the new house, allowing President Obama Roger Puncture to name his elder brother Mahinda as prime minister as well as all the relatives to his cabinet. More from Ambala sanity, Rajan The scale of the victory for president. Gotta buy. Rajapaksa's party is not a surprise, but the opposition's total drought has been stunning. The former prime minister, Wickremesinghe lost his own constituency on his United National Party managed to win just one seat. It had more than 100 in the outgoing parliament. With the dominant majority, the fractures could attempt to change the constitution to increase the powers of the president. Activists, already alarmed by the diminishing space for dissent and criticism, fear such an eventuality could lead to greater authoritarianism. The Indian Health

Prime Minister President Obama Roger Puncture President Trump Sri Lanka Sri Lankans United National Party Ambala Rajan Mahinda Indian Health Rajapaksa Wickremesinghe
U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 2 years ago

U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

"Parliamentary report on Russian influence in the United Kingdom is out this morning. And it's bad, among other things that says the UK government actively avoided trying to figure out of Russia tried to influence the Brexit referendum for more. We've got NPR's London correspondent with US Frank Langfitt, who's looking at this high, Frank. Hey, Rachel. I mean, I said, it's bad. It's that that the British government would be intentionally trying to avoid figuring out the extent of Russian interference. I mean, what can you tell us? It's well, it's It's completely damning people here. Actually, we've been waiting for this report for months. And we thought we were going to find out if the Russians tried to influence the Brexit vote. The answer, in fact, was different and definitely it was more unsettling. Stuart Hosey is with the Scottish National Party is also in the parliament, and this is what he said today at a press conference. No one in government knew if Russia interfered in or sought to influence the referendum because they didn't know want to know the UK government of actively avoided looking for evidence that Russia interfered. Why, Frank? Why wouldn't anyone in the British government want to know this? That's actually really easy answer, and I think the answer is this. It would have undermined the Brexit referendum. Remember the biggest decision of the British people in decades? It's already changed the course of British history and the person who was front and center and that was a guy named Boris Johnson, who is now the prime minister. So if you say Russia interfered, then it could undermine this thing that has changed the course of British history. You can see why nobody certainly in the government wanted to mess with that. Ah Stewart, Hosey said No one would touch with a 10 foot pole and he went on and said this. This is in stark contrast. To the U. S response to reports of interference in the 2016 presidential elections, No matter how politically all quarter, potentially embarrassing there should have been an assessment of Russian interference in the referendum. They must now be one. Okay, So did this report find Russian influence anywhere in the British government? Yes, it absolutely did. One is the Scottish referendum. This was 2015 when Scotland was voting for independence. And the reason this is important is from the perspective of Russia. Vladimir Putin would want Scotland to leave the United Kingdom to weaken it. It's the same reason why we know that he wanted the Brexit vote to pass so that it would weaken the European Union. But another part and everybody kind of knows everybody knows this, Rachel, But another thing that that's mentioned here is that London is such a Place for money laundering, and this is a really good quote that I liked, frankly from the text. Russian influence in the UK is the new normal. Successive governments have welcomed the oligarchs and their money with open arms, providing them with the means of recycling illicit finance through the London laundromat. So how's the British government responding? Not much of anything, considering what this report says. You might expect something more robust. Dominic Robby's the Foreign secretary, he has has a boiler plate response so far, saying Russia must desist from these attacks. And that the UK has defend its country and democracy and values from such a hostile state. NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Thanks, Frank. We appreciate it always breaks it

British Government Russia United Kingdom Frank Langfitt London Stuart Hosey NPR Rachel Vladimir Putin Boris Johnson Scottish National Party Dominic Robby Scotland Ah Stewart Prime Minister European Union Secretary Brexit