40 Burst results for "National Park"

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on John Landecker

John Landecker

01:16 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on John Landecker

"I think they now have OK Sharks, Sharks sharks. It's time to talk bears it is national Fat bear week. Is that really a thing? Naomi Boake is the cat, My Conservancy, Media ranger at Katmai National Park and preserve. Hey, Naomi. I actually I'm not national parks of Media Ranger at Katmai National Park, National Park Service Media ranger. Well, let's give you that promotion right now. There you go. Thank you. We do. We do love can't my conservative apartment. Excellent. Well, let's talk about this. So up there this tell me a little bit about The Katmai National Park and preserve and your relation with them and what they do and what they I know It's a sprawling area and there are a lot of bears up there and they're protecting bears and other wildlife. So tell me a little bit about that area. Well. My National Park and preserve is in south on a southwest Peninsula of Alaska. It's about 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. Katmai National Park has 4.4 million acres. So that's about the size of the state of Connecticut. And we are not the largest national park in Alaska. So just different dimensions. Everything in Alaska and, um In Katmai National Park. We have somewhere over 2200 brown bears. Only brown bears no block there and where I live and work in the summer season is at the Brooks camp developed area, which is a sort of 1.5 miles. Area in Katmai and the center of the Camp area is the books with her and at the books River. We have the highest concentration of brown bears in the world during the summer and fall season and It's amazing. It is just a glorious place, and, um, this year we had a record breaking salmon run and the famine of the reason that all those stairs Are there we had over 800,007 goes through the books River this year. Well, and how do you know that? How do I know that there are people who have ways of doing those counts because we're part of the Bristol Bay Watershed, which is the largest salmon run in the world. So then, other people with better salmon expertise than I do those counts, sir, and so in general, so that's a record breaking salmon count. We hear so much about, you know the bad things that are going on in the environment and everything like that. What do we attribute that there's such a great run of salmon right now. Well, I think one of the things that we celebrate during fat, they're weak is incredibly healthy Ecosystem of the Brooks River. And salmon and queen. Cool water, and we have that Now we see the effects of climate change. Um, last year we had 1990 degree gays never had that before. Um, this year was a more normal summer, mostly in the sixties and fifties. Um, but it was just an amazing summer and left. Four years We've had very good salmon land. So that makes this year the fattest fat bear week ever. All right? So let's talk a little bit about fat Bear week. So you go to explore dot or ge and right there in the middle of page just above the little video. There's a blue banner. You can click on that. It says, you know, Vote for fat bear, which takes you right to the page then. You've got a basically a bracket challenge. Kind of just like March Madness. We've got 12 bears and so forebears Gotta buy in the first round now, I don't know. Naomi how much you were involved in the selection in that process, But what goes on behind closed doors out of those four bears get a buy into the second round. Oh, very workers. My fellow need a ranger, Brooklyn White and I learned the bracket. Oh, and, um, to be on the brackets. First, you have to be, um, July and September there because we've got a show fat skinny photos, then you have to be photographed. And then, um, once we've done that, then we threw only see who have a good story. Now, the bis bis some amazing bears here. I mean, therefore, 80 Otis is a two time champion. Of fat. They're weak so he gets to buy. Um they're one to a Grazer is just a giant illness this year, and she has two cubs and her cubs are huge. So she gets a buy, and she earns it. She really on it, and they're 747. Is now He may not be your favorite that affair, but he is definitely the biggest bear. On the books ever last year, we did some laser scan on estimated with and we estimated 747 to be over £1400. And because this is a subjective competition and vote for 747 didn't come in the runner up the last year, so he gets the body. Now, the other by is there for 35 Holly, who is the reigning queen of Korcula. She won sat there we 2019 and because she was that she was able to get pregnant. Um female bills cannot get pregnant in the did not get pregnant unless they are very fat, and she came back with the cup. So she gets by. That's now explain that to me just for a second before I get back to the bracket. You said that female bears cannot get fat or I'm sorry. Can I get pregnant Unless they're very fat? Their body will reject. Unless they have enough weight on them. T get through the season is that kind of what happens Just naturally exactly mating season is in the late spring, but ah life and will not implant. Until they get that then and they will not implant. It's the bear female bear is not healthy enough. And that means that enough pain, giving birth and then nursing In that first.

Katmai National Park Naomi Boake Alaska Katmai National Park Sharks Books River Anchorage Connecticut Brooks Camp Brooks River Bristol Bay Watershed GE Grazer Otis Cubs Holly Korcula
Washington DC Awarded Federal Grant To Study Women's History

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 4 d ago

Washington DC Awarded Federal Grant To Study Women's History

"DC Mayor Muriel Bowser's administration has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the National Park Service. The money is for developing a historic study of women's history and suffrage in the district. Nonprofit DC Preservation League will manage the grant. It says The study will identify important themes related to women's history and the suffrage movement.

Mayor Muriel Bowser Dc Preservation League DC National Park Service
Fresh update on "national park" discussed on Chip Franklin

Chip Franklin

00:42 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on Chip Franklin

"This report sponsored by Bayshore Plumbers California Governor Gavin Newsom has voted vetoed rather a bill that would have sped up the earthquake retrofit of Anderson Dam and the southern Santa Clara County area. Newsom says the measure said unrealistic timelines and would have required staff to be taken away from other critical state projects. Bill sponsor insists retrofitting the dam is key to protecting South County in Silicon Valley from catastrophic failure in the event of a major earthquake. Contra Costa County will offer free flu shots to people who go for covert testing its several testing site starting tomorrow, There will be a Syriza's well of one day flu vaccination clinics in October. Officials want to get as many people as possible vaccinated before the flu season arrives. They're also concerned about a so called twin endemic of covert and the flu that could overwhelm hospitals in the coming months. Starting November 1st. You will no longer need a reservation to enter Yosemite National Park. After nearly five months, the park will end its.

Governor Gavin Newsom FLU Anderson Dam Yosemite National Park Santa Clara County Area Costa County Bill South County California Syriza
Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 4 d ago

Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

"Of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So

Del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer Hector Plot University Of Pennsylvania Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
Fresh update on "national park" discussed on KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:43 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

"To match the supply of resource is that we deliver to the demand in our communities. Dr. Jonathan Charon is the director of the Department of Mental Health, He says providing care should always come. First supervisors noted the recent case of a family in Maywood, the parents of a 39 year old man called 911 for help during a mental health crisis there, son. Later died at the hands of deputies after they physically detained him. The family has filed a wrongful death claim against the sheriff's tomorrow. Day trip visitors to go 70 National Park. We no longer have to make reservations starting November 1st. That's because the park is dropping its limited day use reservation system that was implemented during the summer because of the covert 19 pandemic. Officials say the park has been maxed out with 1700 passes per day. But with the number of visitors expected to decline and the fall, they said, the crowns will be more manageable. Slim 48. The flu may fly right past us this year. All of your mask, wearing social distancing and improved hygiene will likely pay off this flu season. I see. This is one of our lowest flew years on record. I.

National Park Dr. Jonathan Charon FLU Department Of Mental Health Wrongful Death Claim Maywood Director
National Public Lands Day with Ashley Lusk

Podcast Gumbo

03:06 min | 5 d ago

National Public Lands Day with Ashley Lusk

"Hey Paul Ashley here I am excited for you to tell me all about National Public Lands Day the only thing keeping me saying during the pandemic has been the ability to take my dog and my partner and get in our car and drive to the middle of nowhere and most often that middle of nowhere is usually a state or local or National Park and what I love about these public lands is that anyone can come for a very low price or no price and really find and discover the great outdoors. So Paul tell me more about what makes them so special. Thanks. Today September Twenty Six, twenty twenty is National Public Lands Day the reason I give you the date and year is because this National Day officially falls on the four Saturday of September every year the goal this day which started in Nineteen ninety-four is to volunteer your time by visiting your favorite public land and doing some good like repairing trails or electing trash due to the pandemic psalm not all annual events have been canceled but have no fear of course there are some virtual events I will put a link in the show notes to help you find one. If you do get to your favorite public spot, you can share your story using the public land's Day take. Today's first recommendation is from the she explores podcast it's an interview with advocate Katie Boue. She is an advocate for the outdoors, but Katie explains that she does a lot of our advocating using social media but she also make sure to note that you need to take your actions out into the real world. My guest today is Ashley Lusk. I know Ashley because she is the Co editor of the Bello Collective a publication about audio and podcasts. As a little side note, Bello is a wonderful community that anyone can join in converse with a lot of podcast. Loving people over slack. Outside her work with the Bello collective actually has developed audience strategies for shows like Dolly Parton some MERICA Radio Lab Nancy and great big story. Since. That's a lot of podcast options. I'm not sure. I, can pick just one. But if I must I give you one of my favorite radio lab episodes, it's called the punch line and it's about hockey goon. John Scott who ended up playing in the NHL are game against a lot of odds. You don't have to be a hockey fan to enjoy it. For a third episode, Ashley Recommends P Line from the California love podcast. Ashley says and I quote. California love is a gorgeous and wide-ranging series and I hope you listen to all the episodes but if you wanna see what makes it so special checkout P line an episode about a party line that became a hangout spot for Los Angeles Teens Unquote.

Paul Ashley Ashley Lusk Katie Boue Bello Bello Collective Hockey Twenty Twenty National Park Dolly Parton Los Angeles California John Scott Partner NHL
Fresh "National Park" from Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:34 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh "National Park" from Rush Limbaugh

"Fighter pilot ejected safely and is being treated for injuries. The refueling tanker a KC 1 30, based in San Diego. Made an emergency landing in a field south of Palm Springs. All eight Marines on border Okay, The crash is now under investigation. Joshua Lipton News, 93.1 kfbk and reservations will no longer be needed to enter Yosemite National Park starting on November 1st. The park has been using a new day use reservation system. Those will still be required through the end of October. Traffic and weather together. Let's check the roadways with Brian Nobles right now. Good. All the way around. Sacramento don't have any accident Hazards or delays. Eighties. Full speed. All the way in from Rose also 50 from Folsom. Nothing to slow you down. Coming in from L. Grove on five or 99 traffic on the tens, every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons news 93.1 kfbk. Easy sunshine and hot today with areas of smoke and a high of 99 to 1 of three. The record is 102 from 1991 tonight. Clear and easy with smoke in the air. Low 61 65 Hazy sun is very hot tomorrow with widespread smoke and a high of 99 103. I'm AccuWeather meteorologist Joe Lundberg News. 93.1.

Yosemite National Park Joshua Lipton Joe Lundberg Brian Nobles Palm Springs San Diego Folsom Sacramento Rose L. Grove
Boston's Fenway Park Approved As Early Voting Location

Rover's Morning Glory

00:30 sec | 5 d ago

Boston's Fenway Park Approved As Early Voting Location

"Election officials in Boston are expected to approve historic Fenway Park as a venue for early voting seems the Ballpark needs coronavirus guidelines allowing people to vote in maintain social distancing October seventeenth in October eighteenth the days that they're looking at if this happens fenway will join at least two other baseball parks dodger stadium in L. A. and Nationals Park in Washington DC as voting venues along with more than a dozen and be a arenas

Boston Fenway Park Fenway L. A. Nationals Park Washington
Fresh "National Park" from The KFBK Morning News

The KFBK Morning News

00:31 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh "National Park" from The KFBK Morning News

"No contact delivery or no contact at the door pickup. Jersey, Mike's via some above from California's capital city. This is Sacramento's news 93.1 kfbk. Good morning to you, it is 7 30 on this Wednesday, September 30th time. Christina and I'm Sam Shane. Let's get you caught up on what's trending in this are we just got done talking with Gary Dietrich, and we're getting more reaction all morning long. I know what happened last night with the presidential debates. There is progress on one fire in Northern California to report this morning. In the news this morning. The way that we all access your 70 National Park is about to change once again, so we'll have more on that. Straight ahead. Let's get a check on the traffic right now. Brian Nobles. Good morning. Good morning. This reporter's by T Mobile for business. Got it. One Surface Street Concern. Manzanita Avenue and Muldrow Road. This is on Manzanita. Little bit south of management. Looks like couple of vehicles involved. No one is injured. He experience on the way doesn't immunity causing any delays? No delays on the freeways around Sacramento right now. Those were into neutrinos, the limit all the way around the mobile. Business advantage. Get up to 90 days of unlimited free on business plans. Be a bill credits when you switch plus taxes and fees by for details over 50 gigabytes per month, have lower speeds during congestion video already. PC t mobile dot com Traffic on the tans, Every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons news 93.1 kfbk. With smoke in the air air quality for for many folks right through Friday sunshine and easy today with areas of smoke and a high of 99 to 1 of three. The record is one of two from 1991 Clear, hazy tonight.

Sacramento T Mobile California Gary Dietrich Brian Nobles Northern California Mike National Park Reporter Sam Shane Christina
'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 5 d ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

Backer NPR GOP President Trump Bob English Nature Conservancy Jeff Brady Alaska Republican National Convention San National Park American Conservation Coalitio O'brien South Carolina
Left Litter in the Park? Thailand Officials Will Mail It to Your Home

Radio From Hell

01:30 min | Last week

Left Litter in the Park? Thailand Officials Will Mail It to Your Home

"Finally this story. If you're going to litter Be a litterbug in Thailand's Coyote I National park. You better be careful. Because the People who run the park have been collecting. Litter that they find and they've been mailing it back to the tourists who did it. Thailand's minister of natural resource is an environmental stress that Any rubbish left behind, which could endanger the park's wildlife will be packed up and sent back to the offending visitor. Your crash, we will send it back to you. On. They kind of are able to track who who was at the park at the service of my question. How did they know Because you have to register to go in and all of that stuff. Every visitor to the park is Hasta register and share their home address. And so you know, they kind of check. And if you if you leave later behind, they pack it up and send it to your address. It's a great idea, and we should be doing that here. Disappointed. I mean, if you you know you you have to sign up for those camp spots A lot of times. Let's do it like there's one There was one that online. It showed some empty plastic bottles in an empty chip bag and a note written in tie that said, You forgot your litter at how guy National Park we're sending it back to. I love this idea. This is terrific.

Coyote I National Park Guy National Park Thailand
Scientist seeks old vacation photos from Acadia National Park

Climate Connections

01:12 min | Last week

Scientist seeks old vacation photos from Acadia National Park

"If you've ever taken a fall trip to Acadia national park in Maine a climate scientist wants to see your photos don't worry. She won't judge outdated fashion. She just wants to see the trees behind you Stephanie. Sparrow of the University of Richmond is studying how rising temperatures and changing rain patterns affect the timing of fall foliage and Acadia she and her team have been analyzing satellite photos and scouring old newspapers and reports, and our preliminary research suggests that fall foliage has been occurring one day later a decade on average but she needs more historical data to confirm a trend because we don't have satellites. Eight that are consistent and robust before the year two thousand, we'd love if people would send in photos, the snapshots people submit by email can help establish a longer time line and verify other reports. She says surveys show that many people visit Acadia to see the colorful fall foliage. So knowing how it's timing is changing is important for park management and local tourism. It fall foliage peak particularly is occurring later and later, and later in time you can imagine that'll change some things for the way local businesses plan. So you're all snapshots could help this much love park and nearby communities adapt to climate change.

Acadia National Park Acadia Sparrow Maine Scientist University Of Richmond Stephanie
Trump and Biden hold dueling events in battleground states

Sean Hannity

00:26 sec | Last week

Trump and Biden hold dueling events in battleground states

"A traditionally democratic state that he won in 2016. Telling the crowd vote for Joe Biden is a vote to send jobs back to China. This is opponent, Joe Biden held a town hall style meeting near Scranton, Pennsylvania, where he grew up. People are listening and watching from their cars in a parking lot. He gets slammed the president's response to the pandemic, saying he knew how serious it was and did nothing, calling it almost criminal. Yosemite National Park forced to close

Joe Biden Yosemite National Park Scranton President Trump China Pennsylvania
How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | 2 weeks ago

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
Helicopter rescues 200 trapped by fast-moving California wildfire

WBT Afternoon Programming

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Helicopter rescues 200 trapped by fast-moving California wildfire

"Expanded expanded today. today. Two Two more more mountain mountain communities communities as as a a huge huge wildfire wildfire churn churn through through California's Sierra National Forest. It's one of dozens of blazes cruiser battling during a record breaking heat wave in that state. Officials hope to keep the fire northeast of Fresno from pushing Western towns along one major routine, possibly into Yosemite National Park. Over the weekend. The National Guard helped rescue over 200 people near that blaze, blaze, according according to to California California guard guard Colonel Colonel David David All All all all of of the the individuals individuals that that they they rescued rescued we're we're greeting greeting the the crew crew members members with with hugs hugs as as they they were were boarding boarding onto onto the the helicopter helicopter and and then then Again Again after after getting getting off off the the helicopter, helicopter, a a lot lot of of high high fives fives and and for for the the cruise cruise without without a a doubt doubt it it was was a a very, very, very very rewarding rewarding experience. experience. A A smoke smoke generating generating

Colonel Colonel David David California National Guard Sierra National Forest Yosemite National Park Fresno
Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the four Pekka cinnabon and Sioux tribes in Montana recently completed a large intertribal transfer of Bison Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. The forty buffalo were rounded up into semi trailers. In Wolf Point Montana they're headed to new homes with sixteen different tribes as far away as the United Nation in Wisconsin and Ludik tribe of Old Harbor Alaska. Urban Carlson is president of the intertribal Buffalo Council which facilitated the transfer. He says, the animals were part of a surplus population at Yellowstone National Park and would otherwise have been slaughtered today. Is Real. Gratifying. Just to be able to get some animals out of there, and then out to Chives, the Buffalo spent a year in quarantine on the fort pack reservation to ensure their disease free. Johnny Bear Cub, stiff arm has the Tribes Buffalo Program. She says, this transfer was a long time coming. We have drum group out here and they'll sing the songs they'll sing. Songs to send the Buffalo safely to their new homes, they travel safe and receive blessings. And say goodbye to enforce and we'll send them on their way. For National Native News I'm. Savannah Mark. A new art degree programs being offered to students at the University of Alaska Southeast, which is part of a larger vision that's been in the works for years to establish a north. West Coast Arts Hub Kate. Elizabeth Jenkins has more. The new degree program is a partnership between the University of Alaska, southeast Sealaska Heritage, Institute, and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa. Fe. New Mexico the agreements were signed a few years ago, but it's taken some time to line everything up Cari groove in the our director at Sealaska Heritage Institute says there's a lot of room for growth. We are mealy great. Now that exists in the first place, the program is a two year degree with a focus on north west coast indigenous art. As part of the new program students are required to take an intro course into relevant native languages. Then their hands on our classes to choose from some of the courses have been offered before by the university and some are brand new for instance and claimed Weaver Lily hope is teaching an online class about career development as an artist students enrolled in the program, we'll have the option to transfer credits to the University of New Mexico if they want to pursue a bachelor's degree. Groove and things kind of comprehensive academic offering is long overdue. She says, many people are familiar with the region's form line design, but the associate's program is a way to gain deeper understanding in a way that. Associates degree provides a starting point for that journey with Cova Nineteen. Some of the courses will be offered online in some will still happen in person in accordance with universities pandemic plan, and in the future students will be able to experience some of these classes on a brand new campus. SEALASKA heritage has already started breaking ground on a six thousand square foot facility in downtown Juneau. The campus is slated to be completed sometime next year I'm Elizabeth, Jenkins. Powell's are being held virtually this Labor Day due to the cove in nineteen pandemic the online social distance Powell facebook group has been helping connect vendors, dancers, and singers for the last six months over the weekend. Dancers took part in contests uploading their videos to be judged and win prizes. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Tribes Buffalo Program Buffalo Intertribal Buffalo Council Elizabeth Jenkins University Of Alaska Southeast Wolf Point Montana Antonio Gonzales New Mexico University Of New Mexico Sealaska Heritage Antonio Gonzalez United Nation Urban Carlson Sealaska Heritage Institute Yellowstone National Park University Of Alaska Wisconsin Bison Wyoming Johnny Bear Cub Savannah Mark
Driving the Carretera Austral, Chile

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Driving the Carretera Austral, Chile

"I'd like to welcome back to the show Steph dyson who has a travel journalist, a guidebook author most recently the Moon Guide to Chile and a travel blogger at worldly adventurer dot com. Steph. Welcome back to the show. Thanks having me Chris I'm excited to be back again. Well Of Truth. I should say when I say welcome back to the show, Steph has been on the show before you have heard her talking about northern Chile, a number of episodes ago I wanNA say five years ago. Yeah I think that's correct just before you started working on a guidebook. Kissed before Ya. So this is kind of rounding out that experience because the moon guy to Chile just published. And that was a quite a long amount of time working on this guidebook but also Steph was the show a week ago and something went terribly wrong and it did not record. So I appreciate your patience but I also appreciate your expertise on Chile. When. We talk about she leave this time we're talking about and I'm going to try and pronounce it the cut. US thrall the southern. Highway. Good. That was good pronunciation. I I. See you've been working on it. We'll have to do some things right this time. What is the? astral and where would we find that in Chile? The CATTA that Australia Archie means the southern highway to give you a bit of a clue and it's in Chilean Patagonia. Now, how to guy near is the sort of slightly nebulous region because nobody's really sure if it's somewhere on his own or if it belongs to other countries a what it is, but effectively, it's a region in the very far south of South America are in between Argentina and Chile. and. The kind of thorough style is the kind of rules western section. So it's the kind of Chilean bit where she gets really narrow sort of not part of the country, and it's just before you hit very southern Patagonia West toughtested by name and the destinations that you've discussed previously only put podcast bright further north than the last show we did on Patagonia, there is a lot of Patagonia. If we look at the map there. There's a lot of Chile in terms of height, not necessarily in terms of with. Yeah it's a long country and I have children most of it and it. Pile. Will End just this road is seven, hundred, seventy miles or twelve, hundred and forty kilometers. So when we talk about One week itinerary, you're going to start us not at the top and go all the way to the bottom where you're gonNA start, US. Yeah so I always recommend people planning Patagonia is starting inbound Maceda says about halfway down the cutter that'll style just outside this sort of biggest town in the area it's Koi Heike and it's an apple that where you can fly into directly in Santiago. So it makes it a really great destination to start your trip. and Are we gonNA do anything around the airport flying are where we going to start our actual trip? I would recommend picking up a call. Then you don't need a four wheel drive to cut that Australia just needs sort of reason, the high clearance because most of it is now paves. The big for the locals I'll tell you that hasn't that hasn't been paved before but yet you're gonNA jump in your car and you can head south for a couple of hours to via settled gusty steel, which really tiny little town outside of a national park. You talk about outside of national. Park. The one thing as we talk about this pretty much this whole way there are national parks everywhere I think. I'd made the analogy that if you started at the top of this highway in you're a squirrel, you could probably get to the southern tip of South America in jump from tree to tree within a national park. I'm not sure the tree is correct but the national parks is almost accurate. This just a whole lot of national parks here in southern Chile. Yeah, it's actually what the government did. Last year would start it up the root of their parks re to the parks. On, it's about two, thousand, four, hundred kilometers I believe I'm connecting pretty much port Lamont which is the very northern tip Patagonia all the way down to Cape Horn, which has its own national pockets the bit at the very bottom of South America's islands that people go. Because the sale is used around the whole and and it was a big deal because white windy down that. Square yes. Yes. There's now they sort of route to the pox. It's kind of this ingenious could you can't actually drive between all of them, but the capital style does opportunity to actually connect quite a number of them.

Chile Steph Dyson Patagonia United States South America Australia Steph Cape Horn Government Port Lamont Santiago Chris Argentina Maceda Apple Chile.
Trump, Biden will both mark 9/11 anniversary in Shanksville

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Trump, Biden will both mark 9/11 anniversary in Shanksville

"Both twenty twenty presidential candidates are scheduled to be in Pennsylvania on September eleventh to pay tribute to the victims of the two thousand one terrorist attacks Pennsylvania is a key battleground state on the side of a memorial in Shanksville where flight ninety three crashed into a field president trump and democratic challenger Joe Biden will both visit to commemorate the nineteenth anniversary of nine eleven although it's not yet clear how their visits might be staggered because of code nineteen the National Park Service is holding an abbreviated ceremony this year a twenty minute tribute in which the names of the passengers and crew members will be read aloud with the ringing of the bells of remembrance vice president Mike pence and his wife will attend the nine eleven memorial ceremony in New York City Jackie Quinn Washington

Pennsylvania Shanksville Joe Biden National Park Service Vice President Mike Pence Jackie Quinn Washington President Trump New York
The Steven Stayner Case

Casefile True Crime

05:30 min | Last month

The Steven Stayner Case

"The Smoke Californian Falling Tan of Said Laws One hundred thirty miles southeast. Of San, Francisco providing access to the Sierra Nevada mountains and California's central coast. Surrounded by almond groves and paycheck orchards. The town's slogan is gateway to Yosemite. A ninety mile drive leads ride into the heart of the famous Yosemite National Park I remote area of wilderness spans close to seven hundred and fifty thousand acres. The Miss said community is close knit with residents enjoying the range of outdoor activities on offer including skiing, fishing, hiking, and swimming. trae line to neighborhoods featuring numerous paths and pox make miss said an ideal place to raise a family. From nineteen, Sixty, seven to nineteen, seventy, one this Dana family lived on a twenty Acre farm ranch just outside of method, county? Parents K into del had married wake soft like I met and had gone on to have five children. Kerry Cindy Stephen Jody and Corey. Del worked as a mechanic at a local page cannery and also grew almonds on the families found. This Dana were a loving family as practicing moments. They enjoyed attending church services twice a week and in sped to on the children loved exploring their lodge property. Once a month, the family would spend the weekend camping at a nearby like. Middle Child Stephen loved the great outdoors and would explore the farm for hours with his dog daisy. Hey and his father often went fishing together. But it was a running joke that Stephen couldn't keep quiet long enough for them to catch anything. This summer of Nineteen seventy-one was hot and dry and Dell's almond crops struggled to due to poor irrigation. Hey Decay, decided to sell the ranch and move their family to suburban Miss said. They purchased a three bedroom single story in a lower middle class neighborhood that had a swimming pool in the backyard to provide relief from the summit hate. The. Move was difficult for seven year old Stephen who missed rural life. At first, he struggled to adjust to his new school of Charles wrought elementary bus September of Nineteen, seventy two he was settling down and making friends. On the evening of Sunday, December three nineteen seventy seventy-two Stephen attended the birthday party of his friend. Sharon giving her a stuffed Koala bears as a present. When he returned time Stephen Raved to his parents about how much fun he had had at the Party and tell them how much he was looking forward to Christmas in a few weeks time. He was so excited that he had trouble falling asleep that night. The next morning Monday December four was a regular day in this Dina household. After breakfast K. inspected her for eldest children to make sure they were presentable school while the youngest corey wasn't yet old enough to attend. Kerry Cindy Stephen and Jodie then walked the twelve blocks to Charles. Rot. Elementary together. With sixth grader Kerry keeping watch over his three youngest siblings. Stephen finished school at two PM, which was Annella hour earlier than his brother and sisters. He usually walked the half mile home with friends, but it was raining and cold. So K. decided to pick him up on her way home from running. Samaritans. She arrived at the school at two ten hoping Stephen had anticipated that she would pick him up and was waiting for her. However there was no sign of him. K. Drove home keeping annoy out for Stephen along the way. She didn't spot him on the Straits and when she arrived home at two twenty, he wasn't dairy the. At three o'clock, K. and Del returned to Charles wrought elementary to Pique Cindy and Jodi up from school. Carry wasn't there as hey typically won't time with friends. But Cindy into Jodi time their parents, they hadn't seen Stephen since lunchtime. This. Wasn't an immediate caused by concern as Stephen had recently by any trouble for going to his friend's house off to school without seeking his parents permission first. Del had punished him with a belt to the backsaw does the turn but they was certain he had disobeyed them again.

Kerry Cindy Stephen Stephen Kerry Cindy Stephen Jody DEL K. Dana Yosemite National Park Yosemite Sierra Nevada Corey Charles Wrought Elementary Cindy Charles SAN California Kerry Dell Francisco Sharon
Inland West Coast Roadtrips

Travel with Rick Steves

04:17 min | Last month

Inland West Coast Roadtrips

"If, you're ready for a memorable road trip where there's more to explore the freeway rest stops Chandler O'Leary wants to take you up the US west coast. She joined us a few months ago with tips for driving the Pacific. Coast highway from San Diego to big Sur, the redwoods and the Pacific northwest rainforest. She's back to recommend a few of the inland highlights from the desert playground palm springs through the orchards. California's Central Valley, old western Sacramento, and all the way up to my home turf around Seattle the detailed in her book the Best Post, a road trip Alice Chandler welcome back. Thank you for having me. So we talked about the coastal route before now we're GonNa talk about the inland. Route make a case for not taking the coastal route because I would think everybody wants to go up the coast, but you make the inland sound pretty good. I feel like if you like your vintage, Americana this the road trip for you and yeah, you're not gonna see the coasts until you get all the way up to Washington but if you're really into things like palm springs and mid, century architecture old neon signs, a roadside attractions, you're going to get tons of that on this route. I love roadside attractions, publicity stunts from fifty of your. What are few of those that come to mind because I just think they're so funky. The giant oranges that used to be Oliver California and there's a couple of them left and they were they to be drink stands for you know when you were thirsty on the road, you get fresh California orange juice right and they're still a couple of them left along old either farm. There's farm country all the way along the way absolutely all three states. So we're going sixteen hundred miles and apparently it's the old isn't isn't like the highway ninety nine is of it is yeah and in California highway. Ninety nine mostly is still intact and it's even a freeway in some places, but once you get into Oregon and Washington because of the mountains, it starts getting a little bit tricky kind of pick. Cherry pick sections of the old road and then connect with I five. Yes. It's just like route sixty six how it's kind of been swallowed up by interstate in places like five is it's sort of the enemy on the other hand. It's practical because he gets you from A to B in a hurry. Yeah. What's your philosophy you're gonna go from going basically from San Diego to Bellingham Right What's your philosophy on the balance between I five in the old roads I think you wanna use I five when you WanNa, make good time and take the old rose if you wanna have a good time. That's kind of how I look at it good time or have a good time. That's good. So let's talk about California first of all New Mexico on one side of the border and collection collects. It collects co is on the or is on the California side and Mexico on the Mexico side. So that's where a route starts are these kind of sister towns in away or are unfortunately there's a big old wall separate him so you Or now you have to go through the big international the big national checkpoint because I did that between San Diego and Tijuana was easy just walk across I think right now that's not the same as it used to be, but it may be again I mean who who knows what we're starting in Calexico then What's the flavor of collects goes? That's just a springboard or anything to do there. It's a sleepy small town and but it's kind of you kind of get the flavor of where you're starting and you're going to start out in the low desert. You're below sea level here that's below civil come into palm springs. A waste. It is palm springs to us. Palm Springs is is kind of Wacky. It got big in the nineteen fifties. So there's a lot of great mid century architecture there, but it's very glamorous. It's very glitzy. There's a lot of designers their fashion show was movie stars that doesn't retirement communities to. snowbirds it's kind of this weird mix of college spring breakers and snowbirds. Okay. So you put that in your checklist and then some I know in your book, you talk about a lot of worthy detours you know in one of your favorites would be Joshua Tree National Park. Yes. Joshua tree is stunning and Joshua tree trees actually the high desert. So it's above palm springs at altitude. So it has a completely different desert climate different plants, different animals. So Joshua Tree is one of these cartoon book yeah. Of Justice Joshua Tree is these classic kind of quintessential cactus Yes. Yes. So what do you do in Joshua Tree National Park Jessica cactus there's a great hikes. There's actually only those cactus in one small part of the park is an enormous park. So there's different bombs great rock formations they are beautiful scenery and

Palm Springs Joshua Tree Oliver California San Diego Joshua Tree National Park California Joshua Tree National Park Jess Washington Big Sur Chandler O'leary United States Alice Chandler Sacramento Seattle Central Valley Mexico Oregon New Mexico Calexico
It’s official: Fireworks over the National Mall in Washington DC on Thursday

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | Last month

It’s official: Fireworks over the National Mall in Washington DC on Thursday

"The National Park Service is approved the Republican National Committee's request to present a fireworks display on the grounds of the monument on August 27th. This follows President Trump's acceptance speech from the White House. So the Washington Monument to be the site of some fireworks Thursday night. All right, Let's find out

Washington Monument Republican National Committee National Park Service President Trump White House
Trump campaign unveils 2020 Republican National Convention speakers

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last month

Trump campaign unveils 2020 Republican National Convention speakers

"Trump will accept his renomination fromthe White House later this week, and that could include a brief fireworks display on the National Mall. President Trump is scheduled to deliver his speech accepting the Republican nomination Thursday, August 27th, the final day of the convention, the Republican National Committee. Has filed an application with the National Park Service for a five minute aerial fireworks display around 11 30 that night. The application says the fireworks would take place at the Washington Monument, and the application also advises that the event may attract demonstrators.

President Trump Republican National Committee National Park Service National Mall Washington Monument White House
Trump gearing up for RNC, expected to accept nomination at the White House

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last month

Trump gearing up for RNC, expected to accept nomination at the White House

"And with the Republican Convention This week, President Trump will accept his nomination from the White House, which could include a brief fireworks display on the National Mall. President Trump is scheduled to deliver his speech accepting the Republican nomination Thursday, August 27th the final day of the convention, the Republican National Committee. Has filed an application with the National Park Service for a five minute aerial fireworks display around 11 30 that night. The application says the fireworks would take place at the Washington Monument, and the application also advises that the event may attract demonstrators, particularly on O w T O P news.

President Trump Republican National Committee National Park Service National Mall Washington Monument White House
"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:48 min | 6 months ago

"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Wonderful <Speech_Male> page that you have that. I've <Speech_Male> been looking at this entire <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> Which may be the only <Speech_Male> Lincoln this episode? <Speech_Male> Which is the National Parks <Speech_Male> Arizona on <Speech_Male> everything <SpeakerChange> dish everywhere <Speech_Male> dot com? <Speech_Male> Yeah I have pages <Speech_Male> setup for every state <Speech_Male> nited <Speech_Male> states with a full <Speech_Male> map showing <Speech_Male> you where everything is <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> photography <Speech_Male> of all the sites <Speech_Telephony_Male> If I've been there and <Speech_Male> as I visit more sites <Speech_Male> I keep updating the pages <Speech_Male> and as they <Speech_Male> make more sites I'm <Speech_Male> always very <Speech_Male> anal retentive <Speech_Male> about making sure <Speech_Male> that I have <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Male> latest list so <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> and the only disadvantage <Speech_Male> I would say of going to <Speech_Male> Gary Site. Is I find <Speech_Male> when I go to Gary Side. <Speech_Male> I find that I don't <Speech_Male> know what I'm doing with my camera <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so one of <Speech_Male> these days. Maybe I'll take <Speech_Male> one of Gary's <Speech_Male> He will do <Speech_Male> photography tours. <Speech_Male> Occasionally so <Speech_Male> something you <Speech_Male> might think about Gary. Thanks <Speech_Male> so much <Speech_Male> for coming back <Speech_Male> on amateur traveler <Speech_Male> and sharing with us <Speech_Male> your love for national parks <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> for those <SpeakerChange> in Arizona. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank travelling <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in news the <Speech_Male> community. Let me I <Speech_Male> put out some. Thanks <Speech_Male> to two new <Speech_Male> patrons of the show <Speech_Male> on Patriots on <Speech_Male> Chris Kilworth <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> is also started <Speech_Male> his own podcast <Speech_Male> and unlike me. <Speech_Male> He said he would do <Speech_Male> that episode on climbing. <Speech_Male> Everest so <Speech_Male> well find out what <Speech_Male> his podcast is <Speech_Male> and get you that information <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and then also thanks <Speech_Male> to Cynthia <Speech_Male> talmadge <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and Cynthia <Speech_Male> says thanks so much <Speech_Male> for all you do all <Speech_Male> the episodes you've released. <Speech_Male> Your show is the reason my <Speech_Male> fiance and I went <Speech_Male> to Becca Stan. <Speech_Male> Which was <Speech_Male> life changing? <Speech_Male> I'm so inspired <Speech_Male> each time. I listen <Speech_Male> and especially now <Speech_Male> that I'm quarantined <Speech_Male> in New York City. <Speech_Male> Each episode offers <Speech_Male> a respite and a chance <Speech_Male> to daydream. <Speech_Male> Thank you thank you <Speech_Male> for your generosity <Speech_Male> sharing so much information <Speech_Male> over the years <Speech_Male> keep it up. Well <Speech_Male> thanks to both of <Speech_Male> you. We will try <Speech_Male> and keep this up. <Speech_Male> I also heard <Speech_Male> from Justin who commented <Speech_Male> on the episode. We did <Speech_Male> on climbing Kilimanjaro. <Speech_Male> This brought <Speech_Male> back fond <Speech_Male> memories. Thanks <Speech_Male> for sharing. <Speech_Male> We agree. Do <Speech_Male> the hike before <Speech_Male> the safari. We <Speech_Male> did the limo <Speech_Male> show route from <Speech_Male> the West and <Speech_Male> summited the western <Speech_Male> breach so <Speech_Male> a little bit different <Speech_Male> experience. <Speech_Male> We also did early <Speech_Male> September which <Speech_Male> matched well <Speech_Male> with seeing the <Speech_Male> great migration if <Speech_Male> interested. We <Speech_Male> kept log with <Speech_Male> photos and videos <Speech_Male> on. I'll put a link to <Speech_Male> Justin's <Speech_Male> blog in <Speech_Male> the show notes at Amateur <Speech_Male> Traveler Dot Com. <Speech_Male> And with <Speech_Music_Male> that we're going <Speech_Male> to end this episode <Speech_Male> of amateur traveller. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have any questions send an <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> email to host at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> amateur traveler <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot com or better <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> yet leave <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a comment on this episode <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at Amateur Traveler <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dot Com. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> so <SpeakerChange> much <Speech_Music_Male> for listening <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> the <Music> <Advertisement> cat. Sit in <Music> <Advertisement> one building.

"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:49 min | 6 months ago

"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Cactus the mesas of Monument Valley are quintessentially the southwest right. John Borden Sean. A lot of his movies in fact Play Circle John Ford Point. Also a narrow part so they've taken the resources that they they have. I in the land that they have an through using it for tourism parks so right before we wrap up any other parks that are not national parks that you WANNA give an onto state parks or I really can't think of any state parks. I wasn't really paying attention to it. Although I'm sure there are I know. Extensions like there's a national monument that's an extension of the Grand Canyon but it's not a national park service site under the Bureau of Land Management. Okay but it is a national monument. That's that's the weird thing about national monuments. Most national monuments are part of the park system. But not all national monuments. Some are run by the ear of land management. Some are run by the four service and I think a few even by the fish and Wildlife Service okay because there is vermillion cliffs National Monument which is managed by B. M. and it's in between the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and pagers. We talked about with the with Antelope Canyon a right along the Colorado River. Just north of it a very beautiful sight but very basic. It's much more event. Outdoor off back country kind of thing in their for instance. There are places like the wave in some well known spots there that you need a backcountry permit to get to and they'd really don't recommend that you go there if you don't have backcountry experience but even just driving by the cliffs or were rafting down the Colorado River by the cliffs of vermillion cliffs. Nash Ammonia is beautiful place. I know it's Grand Canyon Parachute National Monument. Oh Cayenne usually called parachute national monument. But it's not a park service site and know if I was secretary of the Interior for like a week I think my my top priority would be reorganizing a lot of this stuff so it makes more sense and I would move the forest service out of the Department of Agriculture which a lot of people do not realize that it's part of the Department of areas not the interior and moving into the Department of cheerier and try to create some sort of order. With how all. This federal land is divided in organized. Well I mean the reason it's Department of Agriculture is we use those trees as an agricultural renewable resource is the reason it ended up in there as I understand it was original Lawrence politics or something today. A lot of the national forests are they could still do logging and stuff like that honor. In those places I mean they have different classifications for the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management is in the Department of the Interior. And so there's different land usage requirements for different types of Federal Lance. Oh I don't think that's excellent as we go to wrap this up. You're standing in the prettiest spot in Arizona National Park of any stripe weary standing. But he looking at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Or or I should say you are probably overlooking Horseshoe Bend. Oh come in when climbing national recreation area. I think that particular site of the band is pretty great. Whereas there's lots of sites along the Grand Canyon I haven't been to horseshoe bend in. Several years has changed there. Were No guardrails. Yeah nothing. Most people didn't even know about the gravel road at the parks. I'm kind of curious. It's like no has changed dramatically. There is a parking lot where you pay for parking a paved path up large crowds. It's instagram that has turned this into a very popular spot. But it is a it is a beautiful spot. I would say early in the day instead of late in the day. I found that late in the day I was shooting into the sun and so would have been better if the sun had been behind me earlier in the day But beautiful spot. It's it's really kind of one picture So whether it's worth a parking you're in the middle of nowhere you're out there. I would do it but I wouldn't say that it's more than just the one picture I would also say. Cheer how a National Monument the road all the way up. It's kind of a winding road. That goes up a mountain and then once you get to the very top. That's when you can kind of really see all of the stone spires. They're kind of like. Hutus are official called. Who does but it's kind of basically the same thing that that's really a fantastic view and there's one particular view and Daiva Trumpet on my website. Where you look out into this opening into this greater valley in the distance and you have all these rock pillars that are there. That's another great one too well and as I will do every time that Gary comes on the show I would recommend his website. Nachos for reading about things but for his wonderful photography for which he has won numerous awards in one thing that makes you laugh and say only in Arizona National Parks besides the buried National Park. Because that's that's clearly the first answer. That question prompted petrified forest. I I know there are other places in the world that have petrified wood. But you're just not gonna see it so easily exposed like you're going to in petrified forest national park and in fact. I think it's on the tentative list for the United States to become a world heritage site only for when that will ever happen but significant engine unique enough that place on that list excellent where guest again has been Gary Art and Gary. I'm assuming where I should send people in terms of your site. Is this wonderful page that you have that. I've been looking at this entire time. Which may be the only Lincoln this episode? Which is the National Parks Arizona on everything dish everywhere dot com?.

National Monument Grand Canyon Parachute Nationa Grand Canyon Arizona National Parks National Park vermillion cliffs National Mon parachute national monument National Parks Arizona National Park Service forest national park Bureau of Land Management Monument Valley Colorado River Department of Agriculture Antelope Canyon John Borden Sean Gary Art John Ford Point fish and Wildlife Service Horseshoe Bend
"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

13:27 min | 6 months ago

"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"We're talking about the first trip into what is now the United States by the Spanish in the fifteen hundreds so this basically fifteen forty to fifteen forty two they go all the way up into what is now Kansas. And that's Coronado so it's it's worth commemorating even if you don't get a motion picture experience. Yeah I mean I should have added that. That's what the Coronado from cornell come trump right to Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez Coronado. Yeah and they. They talk about his trip up and they're looking for gold. Of course we'll share. They didn't find any right so now we're moving towards the eastern border next New Mexico and there are two sites. Cheer Cowan National Monument. This was far and away. The biggest most pleasant surprise misses a site that could get national park status in probably should. It's not a huge site but the closest thing I could explain it as an and this will probably resonate with you that it's very similar to Pinnacles National Park in California. Sure but better. Oh okay there. Is this just a field of pinnacles and if you go to my website I'll you can see photos. I have taken from the park but yeah it's just a really need landscape and given some of the national parks. We have with the National Park status. I think Jerko would clearly qualify compared to like hot springs national park or something like that would should not be national park will and I should defend myself. Because I know you've just generated e mail from Jeff Ulf Sousa patron regular listener and contributor the show and former National Park Ranger He is definitely writing me at this moment as we're talking saying there's no hierarchy in the national park system of national parks being better than national monuments. It's actually officially. That's not true. But we don't have congressman lobbying to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore became Indiana Dunes. National Park will but Congress conform national parks in the president confessional monuments of my correct. Something like that correct. But it's marketing it's true Whitesands just White Sands National Monument to White Sands National Park. Why because they want marketers so there absolutely is a hierarchy even though officially according to the park service there isn't and they're all equal real know. Some parents love their children more than others and some national the National Park Service. There is no difference but to the marketing of the congressman. There may be someone says Oh. I visited all sixty one. National Parks Sixty one. Now by the way used to nine and then keeps changing There's someone says Yan visiting all the national parks. Well are they visiting all four hundred nineteen national park service sites or they visiting just those sixty one and most people will consider those sixty one to be the national parks. Yeah I'm I'm definitely not one of those people but I know what you mean and there's over four hundred now. That actually surprised me too I. Oh Yeah I think what? I got my first national park passport. It was three sixty ish. Yeah they they make every so often. The newest one is why. I don't think it's official yet but it's about to become and it's in Missouri Along the Mississippi River WanNa say it's like saint genevieve or something but yeah so there it depends on the president and things like that shirt only been a couple. I think made in this administration but a Cheer Common National Monument was Navajo country. Okay I would've guessed. Chiricahua is the Cherkaoui a branch of the Navajo. Man I wanNA have a word of an Stanley Navajo and we get to that by the site. That's very close to here. Which Fort Bowie national historic site and this was a former us. Army base the cavalry when they were doing things. Weston they fought their wars with Navajo. A lot of it was done at a Ford Bowie. He end if you're going to visit this area and it's kind of in a remote part of southeastern Arizona. You definitely want to visit. Both of them. Cherkaoui can usually visited by car a road that goes through the park. Parking lots and get out and walk around for Bowie on the other hand. I didn't know this until I arrived. It's a three mile walk from the parking lot to Ford bully though you cannot just drive up there. It's it's not a strenuous walk. It's not that bad and the road to the parking lot were you. You get out is kind of a gravel road. There is a visitor centre once you get there but takes time. You just need to be prepared for that. And I didn't realize that when I got there I did the and everything and spend some time and there's a few historical sites along the way. There is a small cemetery that you walk past. We're has some of the victims of some of the Navajo raids of settlers and interestingly enough several of them had the Congressional Medal of Honor. And this was back when the Congressional Medal of honor I think was given out a little bit more liberally than it is today. I think during the civil war and during the Indian wars there were a lot more given out certainly as a percentage of was a much smaller army at the time right and today I think if you earn it it's a much bigger deal on a requires. They have a much higher standard. But that is one of things you can see along the way and then when you get there to Fort Bowie. It's basically ruins. You can see the outline of where the buildings were most of them were Pueblo construction. So you can see the the outlines of the walls and you can see the field where they marched and things like that. But that's pretty much what you're going to be seeing. There's a lot of history in this site and location. But it's not like it's a all the buildings are there because motor them have disappeared from the elements because it really isn't a remote location rent. It's not a place you're going to get to easy. You just need to be prepared about that. Walk before you make and I did want to do. Correction Cherkaoui National Monument. Yeah the native. Americans live their word that Urakawa which is an Apache branch not Navajo. The Navajo were nearby. You're right it's patchy why I don't know why the hell are saying number two absolutely right now the whole further north right yell at the four corners area. You're right. It should be Apache. I'm sorry so if you've got into this part of the podcast and written your email excellent. We have a few left. Yeah I should also just just as an aside the Apache really good warriors really can't ask and I think you really get a good sense that when you read some of the history of what happened in the area so the remaining ones. They're kind of moving. The final one's talked about Hokum pima which site that both does not exist and you cannot visit a lot of them are ancient native sites. That are kind of around. I won't I won't say around the Phoenix area. But they're certainly within around SEDONA. I would say yeah. Montezuma's Castle National Monument and choose a National Monument. I actually drove right past them. Coming back from petrified forest. They're not that far off of interstate. So right there variously as it a trip that you can do. I just didn't do it because when the time I was driving back was very close to the closing times. I wouldn't have been able to the system Tonto. National Monument Casagrande Ruins National Monument. Then you have to them before though as I recall. No okay then. I'm confusing you with me so I have been to both those. So they are relatively small native American sites Montezuma's castle those very well preserved a very beautiful sight. Tuesday isn't quite as well preserved but it's Up on the top of a hill So it's a beautiful area in terms of you and such but again very easy to visit Both in the same day easily and Sedona the same day so they won't take a lot of time and were the stump. Yeah definitely I visited here in like I said January twenty twenty and I could easily see myself coming back in the winter next year. Visit these sites because I I was. I thought that all while winter narrow Zona there's GonNa be tons of people especially like the Tucson area. They're big event in the winter. Is the Rock and mineral show or the right gem mineral show and I think that's starts in late January early February. The whole town will book up for that. So prices before hotels will go up but other than that I found prices all of Arizona for like a motel. If you're on a road trip to be really affordable like forty dollars a night now. Phoenix is going to be a lot busier in the winter Especially when spring training starts and the prices are going to twice as much during spring training as they would be in the summer. When it's going to be over one hundred degrees right if you go like it said in January ends before Spring Training Starts. There are some really good deals to be had. I would go there again that time of year because I live in Minnesota so upgrading weather and affordable and all. These sites are accessible easily That time of year and the weather wasn't that bad temperatures would get up into the same like the low sixty s mid sixties stays with a high variation in temperature because it is in the desert. So you get pretty warm in the middle of the day and then drop down to maybe in the high thirties low forties in the evening. Yeah last time we went to visit friends in Phoenix. We actually didn't go in spring training even though I love to be there at that time of year but went among early. And you're right. It's nice weather great to be outside. I much rather be in Phoenix in January than I would in July. So an interesting of course talked about both Tucson and northern Arizona and Phoenix and the four corners region other episodes of the podcast as well no link to those yet I should add. There's some great parks to visit. That are not. I'M NOT GONNA ask that yet because I I was always surprised. For instance that Meteoric Crater for instance isn't in the National Park System. Yeah and that's not too far from some of the sites run flagstaff. 'cause I I saw the the road signs and I had a limited amount of time so my all right. I'm going to prioritize and visit the National Park Sites I had Saints Day. Usually would've gone and then also the Navajo parks. Oh sure Yup in the four corners region the slot canyons. They'd become extremely popular a so. We talked about him in the show in the first year of the show and I went in two thousand and six I want to say to visit page Arizona and Antelope Kenyon and I remember showing up Lower Antelope Canyon and having a tour by myself. First thing in the morning and that is not what you will find today we just did it again this this fall although I thought they managed the crowds very well in but it's much much more popular than it used to be and it's gorgeous yeah. I went to Antelope Canyon Litte tour several years ago and it was basically you have a group of people and they you walk really fast towards one spot and you all take a picture with no one in it and then was a group behind you in a group ahead of you and Y'all kind of move forward. You can get a pitcher where brands around the corner so nobody can see it. You cannot take a bad picture. An Antelope Canyon. I still see if you do sell your camera and by postcards because it is such an amazing place. Yeah well and the thing that I loved this time about visiting and I. I was fully expecting to be disappointed because I knew had gotten much more popular. It's more expensive. It used to be you need. You need reservations. Especially if you're booking in a more busy season multiple days ahead and so I was fully expecting it would be a lesser experience than it was when I was there when it wasn't as popular and it was not what I found. Any is still stunningly beautiful. Everybody that I brought loved it and the other thing that's different is everybody's got their their iphones and your guide knows how to take good pictures now. Which that really wasn't the case before they really. I think they've upped their game a lot. They made the Canyon. One lower antelope is when I went to which is the one that used to be unpopular Upper antelope was the popular one. That people went to and they made it a one way journey. So you're not kind of trying to get past people in these narrow areas and I thought they managed it really very well and it was thoroughly enjoyable now. I was in October so I wasn't there in the heat of summer and I wasn't there in the the most busy times but still gorgeous gorgeous place and its place you want to visit in the middle of the day most places you want to photograph or early in the day or late in the day Slot Canyon you WanNa do kind of in the middle of the day. Those beams of light coming down. We'll see I've always upper antelope canyon. Noon Lower Antelope Canyon in the day. Only been oppor so okay. I actually prefer. Lower lower is much longer than upper. So it's you can't and so yeah. And we also add technically technically not in Arizona but valley which is like I'll into Utah over the border and that's also another Navajo Park and most people are going to be accessing it from Arizona. Brent yeah you Mr there as well. That is long with a cigar..

National Park Arizona National Monument Casagrande R Pinnacles National Park National Park System National Park Service Cowan National Monument White Sands National Monument National Monument Navajo Park Phoenix Lower Antelope Canyon Cheer Common National Monument Cherkaoui National Monument National Park Ranger White Sands National Park Coronado Indiana Dunes National Lakesho upper antelope canyon Castle National Monument
"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

Parklandia

11:28 min | 9 months ago

"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

"Let me tell you about Pete who loved hockey and always wanted to play in the NHL. Pete played since he was three and begged his mom to let them stay on the ice. Apply some nights. He even slept in his hoppy skates Pete practiced and practiced until when he was forty seven. Pete realized he just wasn't that good so so he threw in the trash. But then you heard how diko proud partner of NHL good save money on car insurance so he switched and saved a bunch so it all worked doubt. Let me just say that things to Arches National Park in Utah. I know officially have a t shirt with an image of myself on it and even better. It's an image of a photo. I took a view looking all artsy by the arch. Yeah it's a great but oh got a lot of love and instagram. When I first posted it it was taken me from behind? Kind of gazing off at at this iconic arch in the park and it was transformed into a park landy at t shirt for our online merch store with the caption. Get over it. As as in like yeah. We're close picture myself on it. Get over it or you know get over it like the fact that this is a massive arch sure. Yeah it's a double entendre. I guess I remember having this like hilarious interaction with the briefs Data Coffee Shop in Chicago a few months ago I was wearing the shirt of myself at arches doesn't want to do and I was patiently waiting for my coffee or it was timber so I think I was getting a pumpkin spice Latte Jay. Since that's the time of year where I exclusively eat pumpkin spice flavors flavored things in the briefs came up to me and he asked me about the shirt because he was from Utah and it caught his eye because obviously the arch naturally and then I had to Explained to him that the shirt is an image of myself in he was like. Oh Wow I had no idea and we both had a good laugh and hopefully he was laughing having with me and not at me but I. I wasn't clear on either way. The shirt accomplished what we wanted to do. Catch People's attention and promote the PODCAST. Yeah National Parks. I know with gray and honestly honestly. I'm super proud to be a human billboard for Arches National Park and I'm brand this park lane or production of iheartradio radio. We packed up our stuff in Chicago. Sold or loft and now we're talking in the country with our dog Finn in an RV exploring America's national parks. Today's episode. It's about art. Does National Park in Utah when it comes to conic national images for National Parks Dogs Arches is right up there with the Grand Canyon and then there's like old faithful yellowstone and the bat cave at Carlsbad caverns but especially the delicate arch which is so popular that is featured on. Utah's license plate. Yes it's a biggie. This place is super significant and a big bucket list priority for both of us once we started living and traveling in the RV and it was actually one of the first national parks. We visited once we made that official leap from Chicago to RV. Oh yeah yeah that's right and fittingly. It was the second National Park. Revisited on our country road trip after Gateway Arch National Park in Saint Louis. So he literally went from arch wjr to arch. Yeah we did and that was actually super inadvertent. We didn't play a map but like we realize once we got two arches new tower like wait. A second we went from the Gateway Arch. The arch is like that's magical. Yeah works for a lot of reasons not just because it was poetic but the whether the time of the year was just perfect too. I know it really was. We Got Utah Arches located in southeastern Utah in early December. I think it was literally like December first I and it was chilly. At first it was pretty brisk but also super sunny and especially comfortable for hiking and light jackets. And I was wearing my doc Martin's which are really not at all appropriate hiking at higher since they're about as heavy heavy as and bills and just really cumbersome but I wish guide and like there are now on T. shirt with myself so yes but for the hikes they were. They were fine We didn't do anything too long or too strenuous. Just some of the big poplar blur spots. There yeah nothing too hard core. We add a limited amount of time at artists that we really wanted to maximize it by visiting the big icon trails and and we have to start with the delicate art show. Of course you cannot come to arches and not do this trail should be like priority number one in for it was. I think going to arches not doing delicate allocate arch would be like going to universal studios and skipping Harry Potter world which is really the only reason to go to universal studios these days. That's a little bit of a burn there. Oh I think you know how you feel about universal studios spoiler alert. Were not enthusiastic about it. Harry Potter world is another story though annual anyway the delicate arch trail is a must and not just because it's featured on the license plates. Were t shirts. It's popular for really good reason. It's the perfect length. The perfect the amount of comfort elevation gain. And it's one of those trails as just like an epic while factor grand finale. Once you come around the final bend then you see the arch itself surrounded by hikers. Getting photos I mean it was just like this beautiful landscape of the Lasalle Mountains in the background. Everything all all of it. I know it's really one of those kind of grand finale trails. You walk up to it. It's a fun trail and then you around the corner it's like wow my God. This is overwhelming in the best. That's possible way and it's no wonder this place is so iconic and this arch in particular. It's photogenic is how and especially in cloudless sunny day like when we visited where everything's just so pristine and majestic I loved it really is a male An amazing sight. But let's start talking about the trail leading up to this trails. It all started for us at the Visitor Center in Moab just off the main road which was super close to the RV Park where we reserved served a couple of nights the visitor centers at the base of this massive plateau called the Colorado Plateau. And the there's main park road that really twists and turns up to the top Apapa Toe. Where more than two thousand arches are scattered across the colorful landscape? Yeah some of those archers very tiny and then some are huge and You uh-huh many of them you can see from your car or V And then there's some that you can't see at all Then there are ones like the delicate arches so major that there's like a parking lot by the trail ahead that fills up fast. So get their earliest specially if you have an RV because you need to snack one of those Few large vehicle parking spots. Yeah you really do. Fortunately we were fine right and we're able to get spot. No problem and I think a lot of that had to do with the fact that we were visiting off season. Since most of the park's one point four million annual visitors there's tend to visit in the spring or early fall. We were right at the cost of winter and like literally. It snowed a lot the very next day. So it was we we. You really locked out with the timing on arches although the snow totally messed up our plans visit kenyan-led social park nearby but that wasn't total number in like terms of arches arches specifically the weather worked out perfect interface. Yeah it really wasn't ideal data visit we mentioned in our Mesa Verde episode from season. One that the park they are felt similar to the Park Road Arches and I I stay in by. I think they're both these lungs exactly roads that start. By visitor centers honors then meander up to the top of these plateaus mesas and artists is very Mesa Verde like except last green more desert. Yeah if you drive along this main park road. It's super easy to find. All of the parks trails in everything is like either directly along the road or right off the route including including the delicate arch right. So it's very convenient. Very easy to navigate here which is so refreshing especially driving in an RV. And you don't want to be like an fiddling around her going down these narrow off the beaten path roads so wants to get to delegate arch and you park you start the trail and one of the first things you see that we saw was this tiny ranch home we tiny tiny like it's like the OJ. Tiny house and it was built by John Wesley Wolf in the late eighteen eighteen hundreds. This was the time when ranchers were migrated into the area in droves well before arches became a national monument in nineteen twenty nine and then ultimately upgraded a to a national park in nineteen seventy one and remnants of their inhabitants. Is still there today as we with this. ITTY bitty little Rancho Gad's ads crazy to imagine people living in this environment It was so much more desolate at the time than it is today and especially in such small living quarters. The House was super small. Ma I mean it makes our. RV Look like a huge like mansion. He now and that's really saying something. It was basically just like one rickety little room and this was for like multiple multiple people which is unfathomable. That's not a lot of personal space. Apparently no definitely not like it's literally no bigger than most people's bathrooms but you know the trail continues on for about a mile and a half after that All the way up to the arch itself There's like study inclines. It's moderately difficult like trail especially since it's like in Drexel night the entire time without any shade and yeah there's really no tree cover here and even though it's pretty easy to do and not that long of a trail. It's it's an adventure experience for sure you cross this massive expanse of slick rock at one point in the trail then dips down into these little grotto's filled with shrubs and and then you shimmy along the side of a cliff as well with the trail running along the cliff wall until it ultimately rounds the corner too delicate arch and then you have this show stopping view Nasr such a beautiful and incredible. Say it's like seeing the Statue of Liberty for the first time it's such an American treasure. I know yeah. It is like the Statue of Liberty except instead instead of being made by France and gift to the US it was made by Mother Nature over the course of millions and millions of years. And this thing absolutely looks like a work of masterful art it's made of Sandstone. That's been whittled by wind and water and it's got these vivid tens of orange and red. It honestly looks too good to be real and when we made it to the end into the trail we definitely made sure to sit down and enjoy the views for awhile. We even packed lunches and then we aided we just laid down on the sandstone for a bit to drink it all in. Yeah we kind of Ward Off all the large crows. There were like slowly inching closer to US trying to eat our our lunch and like no you need to and this this is. Why don't feed the animals because then they get used to it and they'll just hop around? It's it's a lot and then so we have lunch. We kind of relax a little bit. And then you went scurrying down by the art and I was afraid they would slip in plot but it all worked out fine and I got some really cool like adventurous hands on photos view being daredevil. I'm not a dare do you are just stay. But they're doing things. Yeah it's fun. It is fun and there were other people during you weren't the only ones so it was somewhat reassured. You're listening to park land for my heart radio. We'll be back in just a moment to talk talk more about artists National.

National Park Arches National Park Utah Gateway Arch National Park Pete Park Road Arches Gateway Arch Chicago National Parks Dogs Arches Utah Arches universal studios NHL Visitor Center RV Park US Harry Potter Mesa Verde partner hockey doc Martin
"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

Parklandia

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

"History Hot Springs National Park is really a little odd bull of Park. I mean for starters. It's tiny one of the smallest national parks in the country. It's only about fifty five hundred acres yeah so to put that in perspective a little bit by comparison the largest national park in the US wrangle Saint Louis and Alaska is thirteen point two million acres. You can fit a lot of hot springs. They're actually it's primarily an urban park. I mean there's some nature but most of the park is actually situated around the town of Hot Springs Arkansas Right which is a historic mintage like town amidst these rolling Green Mountains in the what she she to mountain range near the ozarks. Yeah it's an old park to even though it wasn't made an official National Park until nineteen twenty one. It was initially protected as hot. It's brings reservation by Congress in April of eighteen thirty two yeah so in other words. This was the first time the US government had ever set set aside land for protection any for him. This is almost a full century before the National Park Service became a thing in a full forty years before yellowstone became America's first national park. It's pretty pretty crazy and amazing stuff yeah the thing that made this place so special to begin with and why they estimated up and worthy of protection is its namesake thermal waters which have longman Armand said to contain medicinal properties and we're revered both by native Americans and apparently also by gangsters and baseball players because sure yeah yeah the hot springs flow off the western side of the hot spring mountain and they're the primary reason the place has been preserved as a national park right. I think when important thing to clear up about hot springs first and foremost is that this isn't the place where you can take a dip in natural hot springs in the woods is actually none of that here whatsoever whoever which might be a bummer to some people. I know like when I was. I thinking I when I was younger. I like thinking of Hot Springs. I would assume that there are these natural springs like in the woods but there's something instead the national park conserves this amazing water for public use and other ways by managing the water flow in pumping it into the town for us in these ornate spas and bath houses and even in drinkable forum and sparkling water and beer people have long been flocking here for those springs and especially those bath houses in fact Hot Springs Arkansas earned the nickname the American spa due to the largest number of thermal treatments and spas along what is now called Bath House road. Yeah love that so this means street forms the heart of the park this bath house row but this lineup of gorgeous designed huge luxury luxury extre- bath houses each one with this gilded age architecture that looks like something off the titanic or something it's incredible and AS Roma Features these beautiful fountains billing with steam that kind of interspersed along the sidewalks like between these buildings. It's really beautiful yeah one point all these buildings were used as actual bath houses and Spas but nowadays oh days only two of them are still used for this purpose as most others have been re purposed into visitors centers museums and a brewery but more on that later. I'm chomping at the bit to talk about that burry. I love it. Yes so cool. Bath House row is actually so cooled that it was actually designated a national historic landmark on its own in nineteen eighty seven yeah. That's the year my birth so I now feel a newfound kinship with bath house row. We're both the same well now now. It's been around long time so that's ridiculous but anyway today the only two bath houses still in use for their original purpose are the buck staff and buildings both of which offer these elaborates boss services and treatments. I'm back in the day. The people soaked here because the thermal waters said to help cure things like rheumatism and since there's been so many health advances in the past century. That's why the bath house culture has taken such a decline yeah kind of kind. Mr I guess but it's really I mean not about Mar.. It's good that health advances happened. Yes what am I saying It's really cool to come here though because it's like kind I know traveling back in time to this like Byron ornate era and you get to luxuriate a little bit in that and the only thing missing really is like champagne champagne while we so wish we could have had that I think like when we took our bath we asked if alcohol is allowed now like notice shame shame right geology but let's talk about the basic water facts. I like the fact that the park contains forty seven natural hot springs pumping out more than a half a million gallons of water per day comes out of the ground at one hundred and forty three degrees Fahrenheit yeah. It's definitely hot aren't that it doesn't nation and much of that water being pumped out. That's much too hot for bathing so thankfully they call it down to a comfortable Jacuzzi Makusi like temperature for use in the bath houses comfortable but even though there was like some hot springs here for centuries. The town wasn't always filled with bass thousand fancy dubs. No no these aren't naturally occurring bath houses for thousands of years indigenous tribes lived in the area and they're the ones who discovered these hot springs and how they could be used and so they started to use the hot thermal waters for their healing properties. They call this place the valley vapors which I love I love that name I think it's so cool and they had these crude hot like structures that they build a long hot springs creek so this is like a far precursor due to these opulent mansion liking buildings. Bath House row for sure. I know some fortunate because you know as the case with too many settlers in developments the native qualify Indians gave up their land to the US government eighteen eighteen and they were basically forced onto nearby reservations. Yeah Arkansas then became an official state. The following year in eighteen nineteen in the areas quickly set aside for production then fast forward a couple more centuries and broaden. I are taking a dip gap in some of the famous and went under water. Yeah the bath was really nice and relaxing. When we win. I mean we did a couple so can had our own little private room so nice. I'm so glad we did. That was really relaxing imperfect. The Bath House also has this huge communal tub which looked beautiful like this ancient reminding of like an ancient gigantic Roman bath or something with these little waterfalls splashing into this gigantic mega tub and these these like Sheikh Lounge chairs all around around it was really lovely but I think we both needed. We just wanted to kind of privacy that we didn't mind me like floating around with a bunch of strangers yeah and we also got to select elect our own bath salts that we wanna use for the soak because we had the private room and as Nice because the water pumps in from jet just imagine when we were here here we took in the same types of old fashioned tubs. Al Capone used to so can yeah and just think to to live in Chicago just like us and visit some of our repeat restaurants like Italian village. He even has his own booth at a time village or at least they pointed out until you so so between our shegog connection the fact act the way essentially took a bath with alcohol and spirit. I mean he was a bone drapes down the street often. We have like a weird connection. Talk upon this really just cemented and I've I've never felt closer to alcohol. Yeah I mean aside from the fact that he's an awful person committed like really horrible and heinous crimes uh-huh I feel like you had Grayson Restaurants National Parks and bathtubs Ya. He really did too bad. He made off life decisions. After this short break. We'll continue talk about hot springs National Park..

Hot Springs Bath House History Hot Springs National P Hot Springs Arkansas US National Park National Park Service official Grayson Restaurants National P Alaska Congress longman Armand Green Mountains Saint Louis Arkansas Al Capone America Jacuzzi Makusi
"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"RV homeschool podcast where we make travel educational and fun grab your hairspray and your hiking boots as we head to glacier National Park the home school podcast I'm your host Amber Steuben the RV homeschool podcast is your source for travelling the US and Canada with kids in your recreational vehicle so we cover the sites the logistics campgrounds and educational opportunities and we focus on the national parks as we are take our elementary aged girls to all of them and also the camping accommodations that work for a large motorhome everyone in the family to describe glacier next the parks in just a few words I would say that Glacier National Park is majestic Jeremy said that it was epic Greta said that it had a lot of cool animals and also reminded us that she almost died there and that's part of our ice hiking story that I'll get to but overall the National Park is called the crown of the continent and that's for a very good reason it is so absolutely beautiful and spectacular and just an odd moment when you get there in your mouth drops and you say wow I can't believe this place we heard a lot about it we heard people say that can you really you can't understand until you go there just why people love it so much so let's talk a little bit about the location of glacier national park so it is located in Montana it is in the north west part of Montana and so it's not necessarily real accessible to most people across the Nation Lotta Times people will fly to a nearby area and then drive over to glacier and stay at a hotel or maybe try to rent an RV we did do the drive all the way from Colorado but it took us a few overnights ticket up into the area where glaciers at and then of course you WanNa have enough time to spend time there at glacier so we waited until we had a good couple of weeks in order to do this trip we actually throw in a little bit of time at Canada while we were there because you're only about four hours or so from banff and that's really worth some time to spend some time there in Canada and Banff in Z.. Everything at Lake Louise and everything else but we'll do another podcast on that overall though it's a little bit hard to access the area and of course you're only able to really go see it for probably three or so months of the summer so the main road that goes through the park the going to the sun road is only open really at the end of June sometimes it's opened as late as July this year it was opened by the time we went and I think our trip up there started about July twenty sixth so it was opened in time for us it's not always opened by then sometimes it's not till July obviously people tend to go in July and August before school is back in session and you could go even all the way through September but then the windows pretty much done now you're on wintertime the roads are closed and it's hard to access this era area so just so you know that's kind of location and then what you can come to expect in terms of the season that you can go and seek glacier national park.

Glacier National Park Canada Montana Amber Steuben Greta US Jeremy Lake Louise Colorado four hours
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"In our last episode, we explored the tension between rural Alaskans who've been accustomed to living and thriving autho land that in nineteen eighty suddenly became the purview of the National Park Service with a mandate of conservation that sometimes was at odds with how these Alaskans live their lives. That tension boiled into some violence and continued for years. How relations with Alaskans now, how has the park service and its relationship with these last changed? It's a really difficult question to answer because some of the answers depend on where you're where you're living and the relationships that people have with park staff and park management. I would say on the whole thing's of things have changed rather dramatically since nineteen eighty. When a number of allows Ken's. And again, I'm speaking generalities now, but. But Saul understood the creation of parks refuges up here as a a, locking up of the land. And I think over the years, many more Alaskans have begun to see that and understand it's it's not a lock up of land, but it's it's a locking the gates open if you will, where as development and and and extraction activities are prohibited if not severely limited it. Most national parks that the fact that national parks in the wilderness resources in the the wildlife that the contain provide not only an opportunity for recreation and recreation, but also the economics if you will. I think that as I looked back over two thousand seventeen I understand that the economic benefit of parks in Alaska equated to about one point, nine billion with a b. dollars. There were two point eight million. Visitors and nineteen thousand jobs, specifically connected to National Park Service units in Alaska more than four hundred private businesses operate in national parks in Alaska. And I think Alaskans have seen that there are opportunities benefits that are not necessarily consumptive, but in other words, can be utilized over and over again through tourism and the fact that people not only from our country, but the world over once it comes to Alaska to see its naturalness. Tin, joy, the the, the empty horizons. And so that's helped over the years. Now there are certainly places and there are certainly communities that look to their backyards where a national park site is located in and would still say to this day, you know, we were. We were never asked and you know, we, we don't welcome. This and I end I'm certainly in my position used to to communicating with people who have those sentiments. And then of course, there are those who live in the off the beaten track places, the rural communities in the Bush. Some of those individuals probably wish that there were more development, an extrication activities and businesses, but many, many others, many others, I think, have been become grateful and voice gratefulness that the national parks house established by Nilka with the provision for subsistence in traditional lifeways have made an have allowed them to continue their lifestyles that otherwise would have been would have been gone. And so as as I started, it's a mixed bag, but I think more Alaskans probably more than ever see national. Parks, national park sites in Alaska as benefit. One of the other tensions that the National Park Service has had to deal with was, is that of wildlife and in particular predators and humans. I know that for twenty years, the National Park Service has been monitoring the wolf packs in your Yukon Charley rivers, national preserve, but there perhaps it's been some some difficulty with that program. Do you? Can you tell us what you perhaps we're trying to do and and what's been happening recently, I be happy to rights. So over twenty years ago, the staff who managed and worked in Yukon Charley rivers national preserve began to look very hard at the wolf population in particular back then the idea was to try to understand wolf ecology and what that predator did or its impact on not. Just care boo, and moves, but the larger ecosystem in the national preserve and to try to understand what predator prey relationships meant. And for over twenty years that we the National Park Service had a capture and collar program that would help us understand how many animals in and were they traveled in and where where they would den in and what have you..

National Park Service Alaska Yukon Charley rivers Saul Ken Nilka twenty years
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Slash a. h. t. ZipRecruiter the smartest way to hire. We were just talking about the continued consumptive use of the land. I'm curious, what is the indigenous population around the park that that in terms of size, how many indigenous peoples are using the for subsistence right will before I fully answer that question Levy, let me again emphasize that NewCo was very clear that this was not a a promise or a guarantee to Alaskan natives. But this was this was an allowance for anyone who lived at a permanent residence in one of these remote communities or or perhaps even lived in a in a remote cabin away from any community. But again, that had a geographical or cultural connection to the park lens. And so it help help answer that question. How many rural allow skins would be eligible. To to harvest and to to hunts in gates, the Arctic national park, and I would I would estimate that number to be somewhere in the vicinity of four to five hundred people. Most of those communities again are outside of the bright line boundaries of gates. The Arctic with one very important exception, and I'd love to have loved to be able to talk about that exception short, please. If we have a moment, the very last nomads, if you will, in in the United States where people essentially five families, if you will, who had descended from almost ten thousand years of of people travelling behind the caribou herds and making a living from caribou doll sheep and and fish, and the things that they could harvest animals that they could harvest in the central Brooks range in the Arctic coast of Alaska and in the nineteen fifties. These families were convinced. That in order to be able to school their children and have a post office and and a live live a life that that I guess was more characteristic if you will, of our modern days and times those families settled into valley in the heart of what was to become gates, the Arctic national park and they called their community Antic to Vic pass to this day. That community which is on private land surrounded by the national park has a population of about three hundred people, and they again are descended from and and some of the remaining elders still remember the very last migration if you will before their their grandfathers mothers settled into the valley and this permanent community called Anik to pass. So five family, five, five families essentially, right? Yes. Uh-huh. It's a standing to me a city dweller that there could be such a massive expanse of land. So. Sparsely populated that expanse must make it hard to manage. I assume, like any job that there are good days and their bad days in the park. What would a good day for you will on a really, really good day. We might have heard that there was somebody missing or who had not arrived at their departure point from the park, and we would begin a search of the area and reach out to people maybe living in or having traveled through the vicinity recently to find out if if they had seen or heard from anybody that might meet the description of someone we're looking for, and then of course the the really good news is when you you find them in this particular summer has been. Somewhat unique because of all of the rainfall that we've received in the park and as a result of the rainfall, very high water levels in the rivers that.

Arctic national park Arctic United States Alaska Levy Anik Vic ten thousand years
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"And yet there are no designated trails, no designated facilities. It's all essentially a wilderness park and not that parks of large scale with very little development in them is unusual in Alaska. But I think I think it's the landscape. I think it's the wildness I think is the opportunity for unconfined recreation and recreation. That is so difficult to find for some of us anyway anymore. The lower forty eight stay. It's in some ways anytime spending Alaska. If if if this place touches your heart is as as we just mentioned in some ways, it makes you almost unfit to live anywhere else unfit what I said almost unfit. That's right. So now unfit for life anywhere else. You are the superintendent of the gates of the Arctic national park and preserve as well as Yukon Charley rivers national preserve, right. So in this case, I'm the superintendent for both of those National Park Service conservation units. Gates of the Arctic has the distinction apparently of being the least visited recreationally national park of the system other than its remoteness, which is probably the answer. Is there any other reason why gates of the Arctic is set apart from the other parks will again, I, you know, I don't know how different we are for those parks that are off the off the road system. I, I will say that. Compiling the visitor use numbers for gauge. The Arctic is particularly challenging due to the fact that visitors are not required to register to get a permit. So the data that we collect on back country visitation is gleaned solely from.

Arctic recreationally national park Alaska superintendent National Park Service Yukon Charley rivers
"national park" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from newman's own foundation workington nourish the common good by donating all profits from newman's own food products to charitable organisations that seek to make the world a better place more information is available at newman's own foundation dot org there has been a mass resignation at the national park service nearly every member of the park service advisory board nine in all quit in protest yesterday they say interior secretary ryan zinke has ignored them and that he's rolling back protections for public land's zinc he's office quickly countered saying the board members are lying and that they have ignored sexual harassment at the park service to untangle all these threads we've reached journalist elia woods at his home in montana happens we ryan zinke is home state woods recently profiled the interior secretary for outside magazine hey elliott thanks for being with us baker adamant there's been this longbrewing insurgency at the national park service during the trump administration over the course of the past year so was this mass resignation expected in some way you know i can say if it was expected or not but i think it fits a pattern of senior level officials in the interior department and the national park service and other agencies and the trump administration who are reacting to a very clear and firm anti science stance among the senior officials in the senior cabinet officials in the trump administration so we've seen whistle blower claims from people like joe clement and the interior department who was reassigned to and accounting job away from the job advising on on a policy and things like that and i think this this fits fat pattern of people in those positions saying enough is enough we're not being consulted or not being used in our for attended purpose and it would be better for us to make this very public statement of disgust and protest then to continue functioning in kind of a attempted position so then ryan zinke the interior.

newman food products ryan zinke harassment elia woods montana secretary joe clement advisory board elliott baker
"national park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on 1A

"I just feel like this is a little disingenuous coming from him that not fully admitting to the fact that they've proposed a thirteen percent cut to the national park service budget and the numbers don't entirely figure out and this is a thirty day comment period for a significant increase in park fees i mean when is this administration going to step up and actually show that they're gonna make a commitment they could endorse the national park legacy act tomorrow if they wanted to and show congress that they'll work hand in hand with them on a solution for the for the maintenance backlog but the evidence is just not adding up in terms of their commitment and i i really hope that they'll work with groups like ours too to try to address the maintenance backlog and not just keep kicking and under the rug or kicking it to visitors and holly anything from the deputy secretary stand out to you yeah just think the bottom line is that more money is unlikely to come from congress and we need to be more innovative to try to come up with ways to better protect these parks there are too many other competing issues with federal funds and unless we wanna see increase taxes are decreasing expenditures elsewhere we are not going to see that money coming into our national park so we need to look elsewhere what's the next step analyst well i just wanted to mention that the national pikes are impacted by climate change far more than the the nation as a whole and that there's lots of implications for that for the wildlife and for the m three nature there and there's very little money being spent to try to figure out what that all means and that's another place where fines if their race could be used that's elizabeth shogren the washington correspondent for high country news elizabeth thanks for spending the hour with us.

deputy secretary congress analyst climate change elizabeth shogren washington thirteen percent thirty day
"national park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on 1A

"Nicolas commented on our facebook page i think it's appropriate to raise the prices of entry to the most popular parks i'd much rather parks they managed by n p s the national park service rather than be privatized were corporations would raise prices anyway many of the most popular parks are overwhelmed by visitors falling into disrepair and humans are leaving a lasting impact on the ecology higher prices will encourage visitors to find less frequently visited parks distributing the impacts elizabeth show grin what do we know about how the parks are dealing with the current demand on their facilities are they really being stretched to the point where they're just wearing down well there are a lot of facilities that are wearing down there are very an app and with consequences that are quite dire for the environment for instance at a yosemite our favorite national park there's a a huge problem the sewer system there and it's it's it fabulously expensive fix and what happens on what's happening number of times is that day that there had been leaks into the mirsaid river and you don't want that that's not good for the fishing there of course and for the people either and so i just think that that's wining that's just one example of the kind of big infrastructure projects that are very expensive do some of these one of those interesting ones because it's got that big old hotel that was built their years and years ago the awani lodge that is basically kind of a luxury a luxury hotel it's no longer called that up because of the over there was originally called the awani lies i forget what is called today but majesty maybe suggested a majestic thank you very much so.

Nicolas mirsaid river facebook elizabeth yosemite
"national park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on 1A

"Well it's really about entrance fees and it's not for all parks it's for seventeen parks that are kind of the most that they bring in the most money for the national park service three these kinds of fees and they're parks like yosemite and yellowstone end denali places where people will mostly destination pack some of the some of the ocean and della to guess which is kind of a local park but some of the other parks i think i think this is right like the bay area parks that are part of the golden gate they don't have this price hike which is interesting because that's the most popular national park have the golden gate national recreation area includes a lot of free spaces like the presidio and ocean beach in the marine headlines that you can just kind of driver walk up to right and so any way that lens not included but there are a lot of very popular parks included christon rangel is there a precedent for these rate increases is the first time the national park service has ever tried anything like this or is this the kind of thing that just happens from time to time this is probably the largest increase we've ever seen in sort of a broad way proposed for the national park service in the past uh some fees have been assessed over decades in several national parks but when congress started passing legislation to try to make fees more uniform this is probably the highest increase that we've ever seen and it's a pretty incredible jump for the public to handle and just two years ago sixteen of these seventeen national parks already went through a fee increase so this is a pretty rapid.

congress yellowstone end denali christon rangel two years
"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"I just visit the sites without bother getting the stamp but if you're going on a trip in you have kids especially it can be a really fun way to kind of of track your adventures personally over my lifetime and i began doing this in the nineties i would go on business trips and i would have to spend a couple of extra days in a place because i would get like a saturday return ticket which was cheaper so i would spend another day or two and i always try to visit the national park service site so i got to visit you know most of the sites in new york city there's the theodore roosevelt birthplace grant's tomb of your battery park so there's a statue all silent obviously in in other cities as well as visited pinnacles national monument driving from san francisco to los angeles a lot of these places i've done a fort mchenry him in baltimore i also visited as part of a trip i took from washington up to new york registrar destroy of so i estimate that i've probably ben i'd have to go through account again but i've been to about one hundred in forty maybe two hundred fifty of the national park service sites of those four hundred and eleven in about maybe a little more than half of the national park sites of which there are fifty nine and later this year i'm going to be going and visiting whole bunch more sites i'm doing a trip up to alaska and this year there are eight national parks in alaska including monuments in i'll be visiting six of us national parks all be going to gates of the arctic denali late clark cat mine glacier bay and that i'll be returning in september and i'll be going to wriggle saint elias so the only to i will not have visited would be kobuk valley which is difficult one battle return somebody in the future to do that and can i fjords which is actually pretty easy park to visit i just them i'm not gonna be able to schedule it on this trip but if you fly in anchorage you can drive a car in and get down there quite easily so it's pretty easy to do and then i also may be going on a.

san francisco baltimore glacier bay elias kobuk valley new york theodore roosevelt pinnacles national monument los angeles washington alaska
"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"Um so as prices are no longer parks and of the places that are currently parks right now it's very interesting to look at what are the most popular and most visited national parks in the united states so the most visited are pretty obvious you've probably heard of most of them the would be number one is the great smoky mountains national park and i think that gets about eight million visitors a year and the reason why the great smoky mountains get so many visitors is that you have of the parkway that goes through it and in it connects north carolina in tennessee so there's a lot of people that drive through the park grand canyon gets five and a half million visitors a year rocky mountain which is not far from denver it get several million visitors a year yosemite and yellowstone zion signs actually not far from vegas our member it's a it's a couple of hours had visited their as part of a photography to her iran several years ago olympic national park which is in the olympic peninsula not far from seattle gets of visitors grand teton just south of yellowstone acadia in glacier in these are even even glaciers not easy to get to but it's along with yellowstone you know one of the big parks one of the best known parks but the lesser known parks i think are often times equally interesting and when he pull up a list of some of the the lesser visited national parks the least visited park in the current park system is gates of the arctic national park in alaska and that's one of two parks that we have which are north of the arctic circle gates of the arctic and kobuk valley both of which get approximately ten to fifteen thousand visitors a year and they don't really breakdown what constitutes a visit so for example i'm gonna be visiting gates of the arctic later this year i'm going to be going up to alaska in you can fly in that's pretty much the only way you get there is is by flying in and you can take a day trip you can kanther overnight there are absolutely no facilities there's no visitor's center of no store no nothing you fly in an end your premachandran round they don't even of as far as i know campsites so you just pitcher tent were.

united states north carolina tennessee grand canyon denver yellowstone zion vegas olympic national park yellowstone arctic national park kobuk valley iran seattle alaska
"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"Whether something is considered lesser or greater i think most people would agree that the national park designation is kind of the cream of the crop these are the best places within the national park system which is why you sometimes see national monuments upgraded to a national park the most recent example of this was pinnacles national park in california which was a national monument i visited pinnacles national monument new sometime in the late 90s i forget it's actually south of san francisco and several years ago the president upgraded this to a national so now it's pinnacles national park and there's been several other examples of this of something going from national monument to national park and it seems to be something that each president tries to create one new national park during their tenure in office so they don't create a lot of new national parks i'd say you can expect may be one or two two crew be created every decade or so the peso certainly slow down of four hundred at eleven sites that include the battlefields the monuments in in whatnot of there's a lot of different things so if you go to washington dc all of the public monuments including the city parks because washington dc federal district are all technically maintained by the national park service so you will so of those four hundred eleven that includes the monuments such as the lincoln memorial the jefferson royal washington monument things like that of the mall vietnam veterans memorial the fdr memorial all that's those are separate national park service sites but then there's also parks within washington d c which are also considered a part of it and then there's wolf trap which is a national part of the performing arts which is not an actual park it's its own thing and it's basically just a venue for concerts and plays and and things like that but it's technically considered part of the national park service and one hundred one of the.

pinnacles national park california san francisco president washington lincoln memorial fdr memorial pinnacles national monument dc jefferson royal washington mon vietnam veterans memorial washington d c
"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"A group of of from the us calvary that was in yosemite and they were the ones that maintained yosemite national park macachek island national park there was actually military fourth there and they maintain that part and then there were some that was actually maintained by the us forest service because man national forest her under the department of agriculture believe it or not a lot of people don't know that because in theory trees are a product which can be grown like corner wheat so you had the department of agriculture the department of war the department of interior which were running all these parks and it was confusing and there was no set of rules already things so 1916 they create the national park service and adds a little bit of of cohesion to it and then you see a continuation of growth of national parks today there are now fifty nine parks in the national park system abbott prior to the development of national park system one decade before congress pass what was known as the antiquities act and the antiquities act was designed to preserve cultural artifacts of for example mesa very which i just mentioned in colorado it's also a world heritage site today is a fantastic place that preserves clift wellings from ancient anastazia people and there are people coming and they were taking artifacts from these places so the antiquities act was design that nobody could take things off federal lands unless you had a permit and those it probably only be given to museums universities cetera but it also did something else it allowed for the president of the united states to declare that any particular bit a federally owned land could be could be a national monument and soon after the passage of the antiquities act theodore roosevelt actually did that and he declared the very first national monument which was devils tower wyoming which you probably know from closing counters in the third kind in it's still a national monument today and the national monuments are very similar to the national park system or i should say the national parks with one exception.

yosemite colorado president united states devils tower yosemite national park macachek island department of agriculture national park congress theodore roosevelt wyoming one decade