37 Burst results for "National Park"

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on Walton And Johnson

Walton And Johnson

00:47 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on Walton And Johnson

"Meals and food stamps to American citizens ever the most free food given out if they're distributing food stamps and free food to 46 million Americans. Meanwhile, the National Park Service also a part of the government, This is the Department of the Interior. Has printed up more signs than ever before. To put in our national parks that say, Please do not feed the animals, and the reason for that policy is they will grow dependent on the free handouts and will never learn to take care of themselves. So don't Feed the animals. Yeah, imagine that. Today's lesson and good all American irony. Yeah, it is incredible How the world ends up, isn't it at the same time that we're telling people not to feed the fish because they could become too dependent on the free handouts. We're out here, giving free handouts to the people. Apparently more people joined Medicaid. During the pandemic than ever before. Mhm part of this to be fair, because there's more people out there, But like let's not kid ourselves, it's probably not a coincidence that this all happened at the same time as the planned Emmick. This great push for the re transformation of our country into something remarkably different, and that's what it was, and that's what it is. They want to transform the Navy just like they want to transform the economy. Remember, and this has been brought up into the email since we started talking about the Navy like Brian says here, the Navy Like most of the military being purged of right wing people, conservatives and the ones that are left are being taught to hate conservatives. They may need to use the military against those conservatives in this gun control battle that they're kicking up. Yeah. How about that? Probably true, Which means pretty soon you're going to get a knock on your door. It's going to be a member of the military. You're going to open the door. There will be a guy in a dress and he's going to ask you to hand over your rifle and he's standing there in his beady use. You're probably going to do what he tells you. What is the person's Walton and Johnson Radio network. I feel really overwhelmed. Walk into the human or if there's just too many cigars, a cheese from Hey, you ever heard of.

National Park Service Brian 46 Million Today Department Of The Interior Walton And Johnson Radio Medicaid Navy American Emmick Cigars Americans
After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Are Overcrowding National Parks

The Heatwave Air Experts

02:00 min | 4 d ago

After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Are Overcrowding National Parks

"With people trying to enjoy outdoor activities. Arches National Park in Utah. They reach capacity and close the gates. The visitors most days before nine a.m. or more on how everywhere is packed Right now, we'll speak to Alison Poli reporter at The Wall Street Journal. Some of the most popular national parks are expecting record crowds the summer and these are parks that have already seen a lot of visitation. So some of these parks were closed last spring, and then when they reopened last summer, people flock to them because they were able to be outside, they are able to social distance and enjoy the outdoors. And visitation numbers have only increased since then. So at arches National Park, for example, the gates to the park do temporarily closed when the parking lots become full and most days that happens before nine a.m., and they will open back up anywhere from 2 to 5 hours later, But in some cases, people have still seeing lines when they go back and later in the day to try to enter the park. And the demand is there this April, people going to the park was up 15% from 2019. So this was before the pandemic, so people are wanting to get out there. One of the interesting things that happen with all of this, though, is some some of these unattended consequences. If they can't get into the main park, they'll go on to some other undeveloped land that's in the nearby area. They make these kind of campsites there. Fires have started trash. You know, it can become a big problem for the community around there as well. So a lot of people started camping during the pandemic, and so more people are camping on federal lands, and in some cases, the land that they're camping on isn't intended for tourism or overnight stays. So in some of those areas are seeing a lot more trash, even human waste, and it creates resource management issues for the local community. You know, it's kind of a catch 22 because the people in the nearby communities obviously want tourists and visitors to come by. It helps

Alison Poli Arches National Park The Wall Street Journal Utah
Fresh update on "national park" discussed on Outside Podcast

Outside Podcast

00:52 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national park" discussed on Outside Podcast

"That can only have in texas from camping in big bend national park to world class keyboarding in windsurfing. Off south padre island. What comes through in all these stories. Is that texas israeli. What you expect. I feel like it's a place of discovery and as an editor. There's nothing more exciting than surprising and delighting my readers with something they don't see coming. This is my colleague. John who found himself totally unprepared for the spectacular environment. He encountered on his first trip to texas when he visited guadalupe mountains national park. It's a remarkable place. It's got a range of ecology and fossil history and wildlife and birdlife. That is truly stunning. There's something really special about the colors in this northwestern corner of texas the contrast of the yellows and the reds in the oranges that are flaming fall color against the backdrop thousands of feet. Below you of chihuahua desert where you look out and see sand dunes and salt flats and acres and acres of cacti. It holds a special place in my memory. Among the the hundreds of backpacking hiking trips. That i've taken in my lifetime. learn more. About the many unique adventures you can find all across.

John Texas Thousands Of Feet South Padre Island First Trip Chihuahua Big Bend National Park Guadalupe Mountains National P Hundreds Backpacking Israeli
Biden Promotes Milestone of 300M Vaccine Shots in 150 Days

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Biden Promotes Milestone of 300M Vaccine Shots in 150 Days

"Many Americans are resuming pre pandemic life even as some worry virus related restrictions are being lifted too fast as he touted three hundred million vaccine doses administered during his first one hundred fifty days in office president Biden looked ahead and breaks Trish Williams summer majority for Alicia Walter that means going to baseball games like this week's trip to nationals park here in Washington she thinks the re openings happening just right I think it's a good balance between too fast and not fast but a third of Americans in AP-NORC center for public affairs research poll think restrictions were ended too fast and readjusting to normal life will take time in Michigan Phyllis script sick wants to get back to the gym and it will happen but I've got to get prepared mentally I think for that Sager made Donnie Washington

Trish Williams Alicia Walter Nationals Park Biden Norc Center For Public Affairs Baseball Washington Phyllis Michigan Sager Donnie Washington
AP-NORC Poll: Many Americans Resuming Pre-Virus Activities

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 d ago

AP-NORC Poll: Many Americans Resuming Pre-Virus Activities

"Many Americans are getting back to everyday activities that will poll show some worry cope with nineteen related restrictions were lifted too fast for a stadium in two weeks at nationals park here in Washington we are so happy that baseball bat like Alicia Walter four in ten people in a piano RC center for public affairs research poll say the re opening space is just right not too fast not too slow about a third say restrictions have been lifted too fast still majorities of Americans who traveled or went to restaurants and games before the pandemic art now back at it David story says it's a leap of faith I'm gonna try to take a step out there the poll shows many Americans are still wearing masks but significantly fewer than a few months ago Sager mag ani Washington

Alicia Walter Rc Center For Public Affairs R Nationals Park Baseball Washington David Sager Ani Washington
After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Expected to Overcrowd National Parks

Tim Conway Jr.

01:24 min | 5 d ago

After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Expected to Overcrowd National Parks

"One way to ease back into traveling is to find a vacation spot with a little more space like a visit to one of America's 63. National parks. We sent Johnson vaguely Adi to California's Yosemite National Park, which is my favorite. That sounds like your sidekick Amber Johnson vaguely RD to get a bigger TRT and, uh, what was your last name Cannoli Big Adi Adi and Canola Johnson, vaguely Adi to California's Yosemite National Park, which is my favorite. We're here at Tunnel view, and you can clearly see how Yosemite became the muse for pain photographer Ansel Adams. This park has everything from dramatic waterfalls, two towering sequoias and iconic rock formations like El Capitan and half toe during the pandemic. National parks welcome roughly 237 million visitors. About what A year during the pandemic. National parks welcome roughly 237 Million visitors about a 30% drop from the year before. Those numbers are expected to go back up Yosemite preparing for I don't buy that number. I don't think that the national parks had 237 million visitors are in covid. So they say. Normally, it's It's 30% higher. That's normally 300 million. So it's basically the population of this country going to everybody went once. Every year, Right? That's the BS. I understand, Angel,

Yosemite National Park Amber Johnson Adi Adi Canola Johnson ADI California Ansel Adams Johnson America National Parks Angel
California Wildfires Have Decimated the Giant Sequoia

Pacifica Evening News

01:41 min | 5 d ago

California Wildfires Have Decimated the Giant Sequoia

"Wave comes amid a drought has dried up vegetation, increasing fire danger. There have been a number of small wildfires around California this week. But thus far, the state has avoided the kind of fierce gusts of wind that drove last year's devastating blazes. Last year's sq. FT. Complex fire in the Southern Sierras scorched more than 176,000 acres and giant Sequoia National Monument and the adjacent Sequoia National Park and now report compiled by National Park Scientists indicates far more of the iconic redwoods may have been killed. Than previously five. Some 30 to 40% of all the giant sequoias within the fires, footprint or incinerated by the severity of the flames. Researches explained that the intensity of their fire was brought on by drought conditions, fire prone undergrowth and a legacy of fire suppression together with climate warming, stressing the entire ecosystem. Ecuadorian files. This report from Fresno. The devastating castle fire in the southern Sierra Nevada last year may have killed between 31% and 42% of all the large giant sequoias in the footprint of that blaze. National Park Service report says that translates into a stunning loss of somewhere between 7500 and 10,600 large giant sequoia trees that are more than four ft. In diameter. That's 10 to 14% of the entire population across their rank along the western slope of the Sierras.

Ft. Complex Southern Sierras Sequoia National Monument Sequoia National Park California National Park Fresno Sierra Nevada National Park Service Sequoia
Woman Dies in Fall at Zion National Park

Morning Edition

00:11 sec | 2 weeks ago

Woman Dies in Fall at Zion National Park

"In Nashville. Officials at Zion National Park in Utah say a woman died there over the weekend. After falling in mystery cannon. She fell 50 to 80 ft into steep,

Zion National Park Nashville Utah
Woman, 26, Dies in Fall at Utah's Zion National Park

Red Eye Radio

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Woman, 26, Dies in Fall at Utah's Zion National Park

"Officials in Zion National Park in Utah say a 26 year old woman is dying after falling in a canyon, a news release says. Visitors reported the woman was hiking alone and had fallen 50 to 80 FT Saturday afternoon medics finding the woman Sunday evening alive, but she died a short time later. Park officials say the woman had injuries consistent with a high elevation

Zion National Park Utah
Study: California Fire Killed 10% of World’s Redwood Trees

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

Study: California Fire Killed 10% of World’s Redwood Trees

"Scientists have been assessing the losses from converging wildfires that tore through sequoia national park last August researchers say the numbers are preliminary but in a draft copy obtained by the by silly at times delta scientists with the National Park Service say at least a tenth of the world's mature giant sequoias were destroyed in a single wildfire that tore through the southern Sierra Nevada mountains last year using satellite imagery in modeling from previous fires researchers determined that between seventy five hundred and ten thousand sequoias perished in the fire lead author Christie bring them says the figures are mind blowing pointing out that the trees have lived for thousands of years and I've already survived dozens of wildfires next week teams of scientists plan to hike to the gross that experience the worst damage sequoias require wildfires to burst their pine cones to reproduce but scientists worry that fire suppression longer droughts and climate change are making wildfires harder for the ancient trees to survive I'm Jennifer king

Times Delta Southern Sierra Nevada Mountai Sequoia National Park National Park Service Christie Jennifer King
New Idaho Law Calls for Killing 90% of State's Wolves

90.3 KAZU Programming

02:07 min | Last month

New Idaho Law Calls for Killing 90% of State's Wolves

"They did well enough that 10 years ago, the animal came off the endangered species list. Since then, hunters have legally killed hundreds every year on a host current wolf population is about 1500. That's way too many for state lawmakers like Dorothy Moon, You know when there s O fearless that they are now walking down the center of a dirt road. Um, that that means there's too many of them. Moon and many others don't like how some of the state's prized herds of elk have become smaller since wolves returned, but biologist Michael Lucid, formerly with Idaho's Department of Fish and Game Says big herds of elk don't necessarily indicate healthy ecosystems. One of the points of having wolves in the ecosystem is to have a reasonable number of them in the head. Him perform their roles as predators, keeping milk, another prey, wild animals and doing things like reducing disease and calling older and weaker members of those herds. Lucid helped write Idaho's Wolf Management plan, informed by studies showing positive ecological impacts from returning wolves to Yellowstone National Park and other locations. But lawmakers have a different idea What a reasonable number of wolves is. Idaho's new law calls for killing up to 90% of them again lawmaker Dorothy Moon whose central Idaho district includes wolves, and some of their prime habitat, We've got to get this in check. And in all due respect, efficient game, they need this help. That help means giving wolf hunters the right to do things that are illegal when pursuing other animals, like using night vision goggles, killing wolf pups in their dens and chasing wolves with motorized vehicles. Those changes don't sit well with Ned Burns, the mayor of a small town near where wolves currently Rome He's also a hunter and says it's more important to follow the principles of fair chase than what laws might allow. Sits in a wide open area, and they can't get into cover. If you could just run one down, Tol basically exhaust itself. I don't necessarily know that that's the way I've ever been raised to hunt animals. It's unclear how many hunters will respond to Idaho lawmakers call

Dorothy Moon Idaho Michael Lucid Department Of Fish And Game Sa Yellowstone National Park Lucid Ned Burns Rome
New Idaho Law Calls For Killing 90% of State's Wolves

Environment: NPR

02:01 min | Last month

New Idaho Law Calls For Killing 90% of State's Wolves

"Conservative lockers in. Idaho montana are going after wolves in those states New laws call for killing more than thousand wolves and paying people to shoot them to boise. State public radio's troy oppy. Says the laws passed despite objections from local wildlife managers twenty five years ago. Federal wildlife officials re introduced wolves to idaho. They did well enough that ten years ago the animal came off the endangered species list since then hunters have legally killed hundreds every year. Idaho's current wolf population is about fifteen hundred and that's way too many for state lawmakers. Dorothy moon you know when they are so fearless that they are now walking down the center of a dirt road. That means there's too many of them moon and many others don't like how some of the state's prized herds of elk have become smaller since wolves returned but biologists michael lucid formerly with idaho department of fish and game says big herds of elk don't necessarily indicate healthy ecosystems on points of having lows in the ecosystem is to have a reasonable number of them in Perform their roles as predators keeping elk other prey wild animals and doing things like reducing disease and colon older and weaker members of those hurts. Lucid helped write. Idaho's wolf management plan informed by studies showing positive ecological impacts from returning wolves to yellowstone national park and other locations but lawmakers have a different idea. What a reasonable number of wolves is idaho's new law calls for killing up to ninety percent of them again lawmaker. dorothy moon. who's central idaho. District includes wolves and some of their prime habitat. We've got to get this in check. And i'll do respect fish and game. They need this help. That help means giving wolf hunters the right to do things that are illegal. When pursuing other animals like using night vision goggles killing wolf pups in their dens and chasing wolves with motorized

Troy Oppy Idaho Dorothy Moon Michael Lucid Idaho Department Of Fish And G Boise Montana Lucid Yellowstone National Park Colon
Portsmouth Village Under Threat From Hurricanes and Rising Seas

Climate Connections

01:09 min | Last month

Portsmouth Village Under Threat From Hurricanes and Rising Seas

"Portsmouth village on an island off. The coast of north carolina was once a thriving shipping town. Today nobody lives there but building such as a wooden church a post office a school and clapboard houses remain and they offer a glimpse into life more than a century ago but as the climate changes rising seas and more extreme storms threatened to destroy these historic landmarks twenty nineteen hurricane. Dorian was absolutely devastating. Every single historic structure in portsmouth village was damaged and heavily impacted by the storm. That's jeff west superintendent of cape lookout national seashore which includes the island. He says that after the storm the national park service demolished two buildings that would have been expensive to repair and highly vulnerable to future damage. He says it was a difficult decision. You lose his st. You'll lose a sense of where you've been and where you came from when this stuff disappears. So the national park service answer to preserve as much of the historic village as possible for as long as it's practical but as waters rise and damaging. Wade's crash ashore. It gets harder all the time.

Cape Lookout National Seashore Portsmouth Jeff West North Carolina Dorian National Park Service Hurricane Wade
HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION  NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

Asian Enough

01:39 min | Last month

HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

"Sandra thank you so much for joining us today itself. So good view. Oh jen tracy. It's a pleasure to be here. It goes without saying that. I'm usually the cheesiest one on this podcast. So i had to start this off by saying to one and all welcome to asian enough. The it's an honor just to be asian. I worry that. The t shirt. And i i could. I could tell from the font at the top the bottom of the screen. I know t shirt. You're wearing he. S how could. I not wear the shirt on a day that i get to talk to you. It's an honor just to be asian anton view. Let's say thank you jeff yang for picking that up and making tee shirt. That's right what's it like to see like your quote. It's not a destination and it's credited to sandra credited. it's a wonderful writers. I don't know if they were at that time on live. I think it was frank. Lesbian sudi green. Yes and i've been trying to kind of like give them credit for writing that line but unhappy because i understand what that line is and what it means and it pleases me greatly. That has become a t shirt. I remember someone my friend in canada. She sent me a picture because her her boys are really into basketball. And it was jeremy lin. Who had that does walking out the t shirt. And i'm like oh the something is happening with this t shirt and i think it's just a really nice very shorthand identifier of a moment where we could just step into the forefront to Claim pride for second you know and so i'm really really happy when i see anyone wearing the t shirt

Jen Tracy Jeff Yang Sudi Green Sandra Frank Jeremy Lin Basketball Canada
Making Personal Connections and Friendships Through Biking

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

02:08 min | Last month

Making Personal Connections and Friendships Through Biking

"How is the bike kind of making connections for you differently than it might have a decade ago. Well so a decade ago i. I didn't have the didn't have the depth of relationships that i have now around the bike so i had a few people that i rode with and so on. If we go let's see a decade ago was twenty eight. So i was pretty focused on racing in mountain biking That's a pretty solitary endeavor especially when you're living out of the back of your honda elements driving around the country. Sleeping in national parks and truck stops at this stage. I look as i reflect on my time here. I had to get together the other day with your showed up in a park with some speakers and t you know in a blanket and said whoever wants to show up show up in about half the people who showed up repeating line new through bike so these are people that i was connected to his as an entrepreneur who are also in the bike space. These are people who i've met through writing people who bought you know some of our early bites or their friends. I met a few others that i had met before. Actually that varada are bugs and that was really special and then i was part of a burning man camp. That was you know the the bicycle repair camp and so those people as well. So there's this really strong bicycle theme. That knits together. This patchwork with people in my life. I always find it interesting in my personal connections as well. How different the people are that ride by. You know from the spectrum of sex race whatever its use itself selects around this activity of the bike and around nothing else whereas i don't know if a lot of other things in life that really do it in such a great way this element of Certainly i got my start in a much more competitive sort of paradigm and. It's it's probably no coincidence. That's i didn't have the deep relationships when i was in that competitive mindset that i have now whereas my mindset is is very much one of. Let's go to adventure together.

Varada Honda
HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION  NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

Past Gas

01:21 min | Last month

HEADLINE CAPITALIZATION NTSB Releases Preliminary Report on Fatal Tesla Crash Capitalize Words With Four or More Letters (Associated Press style) Capitalize Words with Five or More Letters (APA Style) Do Not Capitalize Words Based on Length (Chicago Manual of Style) Capitalize Major Words and Those With Four or More Letters (MLA Style) You are likely here because you need a headline checker to make sure your title and headlines are properly written. That's exactly what Headline Capitalization does. It's a free tool to make sure what you capitalize online for publications like blogs and news articles, or for academic papers, is correct. This headline checker should help you to correctly format all your titles in the future. It's important to accurately capitalize titles and headlines for articles and papers. Headline Capitalization is a free headline checker that correctly capitalizes titles for all your writing. Article Title and Headline Capitalization Rules When it comes to creating headlines and titles for articles, it can get confusing what words to capitalize and what words should remain lower case. There are several styles of title and headline capitalization which different publications may use. For the most part, there are general rules that all publications follow with a few minor deviations between them. For those who write, it's important to understand these rules about which words to capitalize when creating headlines and titles. Major Headline Capitalization Styles There are four major title capitalization styles. These are: AP Style APA Style Chicago Style MLA Style There is no single authoritative style guide when it comes to capitalizing headlines and titles, although some are used for certain types of writing. For example, the Associated Press Stylebook (AP Style) is often used by news organizations, the Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago Style) is more comprehensive for in-depth writing, and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA style) is used for academic papers. While this is where the different styles are usually used, it's not mandatory to use a particular style for a particular type of writing. If you are unsure of which style to use, the best method is to seek out which style the course, editor, or teacher prefers so that you know, and then use that specific style. If you're in a certain field, you should learn the style that's most prominent in your field. For example, the AP Style for those in journalism, and the MLA style if you're in academics. In all cases, it's best to ask for each project to make sure since each style has its own rules. General Headline Style Rule: Title Case How to write headlines and titles is usually referred to as "headline style" or "title case." As mentioned, all styles are not the same, but there are a few general rules they all follow. These are: Capitalize the first word in the title Capitalize the last word in the title Capitalize the important words in the title The first two points are clear cut and easy to follow. The next question is, what are considered "important" words in a headline? In most cases, they include the following words: Adjectives (beautiful, large, hopeful) Adverbs (forcefully, silently, hurriedly) Nouns (computer, table, manuscript) Pronouns (they, she, he) Subordinating conjunctions (as, so, that) Verbs (write, type, create) Words in Headlines That Aren't Capitalized The above words are the ones generally capitalized, so what words are usually written in lowercase when creating headlines and titles? These tend to be shorter words (under five letters long). The following types of words are generally not capitalized: Articles (a, an, the) Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, for) Short (less than 5 letters) Prepositions (at, by, from) Alternative Headline Capitalization: Sentence Case One style of headline and title capitalization which doesn't follow the rules is Sentence Case style. This is where editors decide to write titles as if they were a typical sentence. In this case, the first word of the headline would be capitalized while the rest of the title would be in lower case, except for proper nouns. Below are a few examples of Sentence Case style headlines: How to properly write article titles A review of a hike at Grand Canyon national park The best value meal when eating at Chipotle Referencing Titles of Publications No matter what style of headline capitalization you decide to use in your writing, if you ever reference the title of a book, article, or journal, you should write the title of it as it has been written, even if it happens to be a different style than you're using for your writing. You should not change them to fit your style, and they should always be written as they appear in the publication. Copyright © Headline Capitalization 2021. All rights reserved.

"Groupie is often referred to as the golden age of rally racing. It was by the faa in nineteen eighty two and its rules gave birth to an incredibly powerful and ultimately dangerous new era of rally with very fee regulations to keep things in check. And just for those. Who haven't who. This may your first episode. Maybe this is the first thing you've ever heard about racing. Rally racing is not traditional circuit racing with multiple cars on track rallying point to point cars. Go one at a time. And their time into between the two points and over the course of event the team with the lowest time wins. Just a little background for you. I'm obligation requirements. Meaning the number of units per year that the car manufacturer was required to produce each year to enter a car were reduced to a paltry two hundred vehicles compared to the five thousand cars a year in group and and group a i take building materials. Were now allowed as well. As unrestricted turbocharged boost basically while previous rally regulations had tried to keep the cars somewhat close to production versions in group. B there are almost completely unleashed for example and the year before group groupie the average rally car produced about two hundred fifty horsepower but by nineteen eighty six the final year of group b. That average was up to five hundred

FAA
Travel to Utah - burst 1

Exploring New Places Podcast

02:01 min | Last month

Travel to Utah - burst 1

"Likes the extreme cold into me. Utah super cold during the winter. I know the the winter to supposed to be cold but to me it's just super cold And i love to see snow because it just looks like the movie. But i prefer the summer and the sun because in my opinion it's just better. I know some will agree and some won't and that he's okay comment on our facebook page whether you like the summer or winter better now. I'll let you know that will be going over attractions food and fun facts about this elevated life state. You said what i did there. I added that life elevated. But i said elevated life. That's from commercial anyways as always i want to share with you. Were you can go to find more information to plan your travels. You can go to visit utah. Dot com for more information regarding national parks ski resorts stargazing spots outdoors activities and winter activities. Planning your visit and more explore this website and find out where you can create your next new memories and remember. This is in no way sponsor. So i'm just being naive is letting you know about a good website to go to to find more information about this state okay so for attractions you have a variety of stuff that you can explore to make new memories like mentioned before this is a state that various unacceptable depending what season of the year. You decide to go with this mine. For winter there are many places in the state of utah where you can go in ski or snow. Whatever you're into for skiing utah. Many for this kind of activity which

Utah Facebook
Backcountry Guide Mauled to Death While Fishing Near Yellowstone National Park

Atlanta's Morning News

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Backcountry Guide Mauled to Death While Fishing Near Yellowstone National Park

"He was cut loose, whole legally bought both weapons used in the attack that killed eight people. A man dies after being attacked by a grizzly bear near Yellowstone National Park. 40 year old Carl Mach was mauled Thursday near Baker's whole campground. Instigators later shot and killed that bear when it charged at them them as as they they return return to to the the area area to to

Carl Mach Baker's Whole Campground Yellowstone National Park
Elephants Kill Suspected Poacher at South African National Park

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Elephants Kill Suspected Poacher at South African National Park

"Something known his karma in life, and it seems to be what caught up with a suspected rhino poacher in South Africa's Kruger National Park. The guy and two bodies apparently spooked a herd of breeding elephants, causing the stampede. Culture was trampled by the two death by the elephants Check out more on the case, including what happened. The other two suspected poachers on the front page of wi rd dot com.

Kruger National Park South Africa
Massive Cape Town Fire Damages University Buildings and Forces Evacuations

WBUR Programming

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Massive Cape Town Fire Damages University Buildings and Forces Evacuations

"Have been evacuated from South Africa's University of Cape Town after a wildfire on the slopes of nearby Table Mountain is Tim Allman reports. The fire began on part of the mountain called Appropriately enough. Devil's Peak, huge, billowing clouds of smoke drifting into a brilliant blue cape town sky. Firefighters desperately trying to get the flames under control, but pretty soon they had spread to the campus at the local university. Historic buildings damaged hundreds of students forced to flee for safety Also in the path of the fire, the city's historic mustards mill The oldest surviving on only working windmill in South Africa now burned out and almost completely destroyed. Hikers in the table man's in National Park were urged to leave. But it was a pretty close run thing for this cyclist. You suddenly found himself surrounded by smoke. Flames smoke. My eyes can't see he did eventually managed to make it home safely away Day helicopters have flown back and forth. Dumping thousands of gallons of water on the mountain below. People have been told to stay inside and keep their windows shut. The battle goes on.

Tim Allman University Of Cape Town South Africa Table Mountain National Park
"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"Little kids always love counting books but it has beautiful illustrations. It's kind of talking about the different creatures and animals that are part of these tall trees and why they're so important so that's great for younger kids and then if you have a little bit older kids elementary aged the book we refer to the most is called the magic and mystery of trees and it's by gen green. This is also a picture book. It's more kind of in the form of like a decay resource. Or national geographic. It's more kind of encyclopedia type. So you're having a bunch of information in you're learning new vocabulary and you're learning the parts of the trees and different types of trees and How tree grows and just everything wanna know about trees. This book has it and so it makes it a wonderful resource and linked to both of those in the show notes. Also we have a youtube channel where we go through and show the video of our trips and so we have one on redwood national park and you can see these different stops in video of these different hikes and stuff along the way. So if you're more visual or you just want to see what some of this looks like. He can check that out there on youtube. You can also find us on instagram and facebook at rv and thanks so much for joining us. We're going to try to keep doing this weekly so join us next week as we kick off another one of the pacific northwest parks that we went to thanks so much for listening..

youtube next week facebook instagram both redwood national park rv one
"national park" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

01:59 min | 2 months ago

"national park" Discussed on The Experiment

"This week. A conversation between tracy hunt and david troyer about how to make america's best idea better. I'm julie longoria. This is the experiment. A show about our unfinished country. David grew up on the leech. Lake reservation in northern minnesota. It's near what they call the mississippi headwaters region and it's about one hundred miles from the border with canada. The border lakes are basically how we travel and have traveled for centuries for generations. Native people would use these waters to visit each other and trade among different villages. It's basically a highway a watery highway and when he was growing up a new national park called voyagers was opening up right near there. Basically the part was plopped down in our yard. And david says that's the way a lot of national parks were created all throughout history. You know i think. Many americans imagine these national parks are made out of these. Untouched pristine natural landscapes. That's not true. People were living there. I like glacier. National park was established. Exactly a black homelands and the black feet reservation. Boundary was pushed off of what became glacier so they took the land directly away from black. Beat the black. People weren't allowed to hunt or fish or trap or harvest timber or worship within the confines of glacier the parks were set up in such a way as to deprive native people of our homelands and our treaty rights. The parks were just another way of taking. At least from native people.

john muir teddy roosevelt george bird Grinnell america david troyer northern minnesota first time grand canyon english five years old Europe one this summer last summer yosemite thirteen year old yellowstone years american
"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

03:32 min | 2 months ago

"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"You're listening to the home school. Podcast where we make travel educational amphion. Let's walk among the giants as we head to sequoia national park. Thank you for joining us on. The rv homeschool podcast. My name is amber steven. And i'm your host. We are a family of four that travels in our jaco seneca motorhome with our two elementary age daughters. We travel the us and canada when borders are opened and we love bringing you content about the national parks and other fun rv travel ideas so we took a one year hiatus but we are back and trying to bring you some regular content from all of the national parks that we've been to lately so thank you so much for joining us if you're new to the podcast. We like to talk about the logistics specifically about driving with your rv to the locations and things that you need to know and consider then we'll go into some of our trip highlights things that we liked hikes places to visit stuff like that and then we usually end with some camping ideas in any other general tips and recommendations for you so let's get started with sequoia national park. So why do you want to visit sequoia national park. While first of all sequoia has the largest earth. And i'm talking about large in terms of volume so just the overall width of the trees. It was the second national park and it was designated to protect these massive trees that are within its space. It has the highest mountain peak in the lower forty eight. And that would be mount whitney which stands at fourteen thousand four hundred ninety four feet in elevation. It also is home to thirty different sequoia groves throughout the park now this is only grow in the sierra nevada range which is kind of in the central part of california it's between five thousand and seven thousand and elevations sets pretty high up there and Trust me you feel that is. You're driving your rv pretty much from sea level and working your way up into the park. These trees are the largest in volume but they are not the tallest that designation goes to the redwoods which are along the coast of california. And we'll talk about that in our podcast on redwoods national park the sequoia trees are also very old and some of them are over three thousand years old and one of the other really interesting things about the sequoias is that they. They're seeds fall down in the form of these pine cones these big green cones and in order for them to release the seeds which will actually generate new force growth..

fourteen thousand california sierra nevada one year amber steven five thousand four hundred ninety four feet canada sequoia national park second national park seven thousand two elementary age one over three thousand years old thirty different sequoia grove jaco seneca first family of forty eight earth
"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Cactus the mesas of Monument Valley are quintessentially the southwest right. John Borden Sean. A lot of his movies in fact Play Circle John Ford Point. Also a narrow part so they've taken the resources that they they have. I in the land that they have an through using it for tourism parks so right before we wrap up any other parks that are not national parks that you WANNA give an onto state parks or I really can't think of any state parks. I wasn't really paying attention to it. Although I'm sure there are I know. Extensions like there's a national monument that's an extension of the Grand Canyon but it's not a national park service site under the Bureau of Land Management. Okay but it is a national monument. That's that's the weird thing about national monuments. Most national monuments are part of the park system. But not all national monuments. Some are run by the ear of land management. Some are run by the four service and I think a few even by the fish and Wildlife Service okay because there is vermillion cliffs National Monument which is managed by B. M. and it's in between the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and pagers. We talked about with the with Antelope Canyon a right along the Colorado River. Just north of it a very beautiful sight but very basic. It's much more event. Outdoor off back country kind of thing in their for instance. There are places like the wave in some well known spots there that you need a backcountry permit to get to and they'd really don't recommend that you go there if you don't have backcountry experience but even just driving by the cliffs or were rafting down the Colorado River by the cliffs of vermillion cliffs. Nash Ammonia is beautiful place. I know it's Grand Canyon Parachute National Monument. Oh Cayenne usually called parachute national monument. But it's not a park service site and know if I was secretary of the Interior for like a week I think my my top priority would be reorganizing a lot of this stuff so it makes more sense and I would move the forest service out of the Department of Agriculture which a lot of people do not realize that it's part of the Department of areas not the interior and moving into the Department of cheerier and try to create some sort of order. With how all. This federal land is divided in organized. Well I mean the reason it's Department of Agriculture is we use those trees as an agricultural renewable resource is the reason it ended up in there as I understand it was original Lawrence politics or something today. A lot of the national forests are they could still do logging and stuff like that honor. In those places I mean they have different classifications for the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management is in the Department of the Interior. And so there's different land usage requirements for different types of Federal Lance. Oh I don't think that's excellent as we go to wrap this up. You're standing in the prettiest spot in Arizona National Park of any stripe weary standing. But he looking at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Or or I should say you are probably overlooking Horseshoe Bend. Oh come in when climbing national recreation area. I think that particular site of the band is pretty great. Whereas there's lots of sites along the Grand Canyon I haven't been to horseshoe bend in. Several years has changed there. Were No guardrails. Yeah nothing. Most people didn't even know about the gravel road at the parks. I'm kind of curious. It's like no has changed dramatically. There is a parking lot where you pay for parking a paved path up large crowds. It's instagram that has turned this into a very popular spot. But it is a it is a beautiful spot. I would say early in the day instead of late in the day. I found that late in the day I was shooting into the sun and so would have been better if the sun had been behind me earlier in the day But beautiful spot. It's it's really kind of one picture So whether it's worth a parking you're in the middle of nowhere you're out there. I would do it but I wouldn't say that it's more than just the one picture I would also say. Cheer how a National Monument the road all the way up. It's kind of a winding road. That goes up a mountain and then once you get to the very top. That's when you can kind of really see all of the stone spires. They're kind of like. Hutus are official called. Who does but it's kind of basically the same thing that that's really a fantastic view and there's one particular view and Daiva Trumpet on my website. Where you look out into this opening into this greater valley in the distance and you have all these rock pillars that are there. That's another great one too well and as I will do every time that Gary comes on the show I would recommend his website. Nachos for reading about things but for his wonderful photography for which he has won numerous awards in one thing that makes you laugh and say only in Arizona National Parks besides the buried National Park. Because that's that's clearly the first answer. That question prompted petrified forest. I I know there are other places in the world that have petrified wood. But you're just not gonna see it so easily exposed like you're going to in petrified forest national park and in fact. I think it's on the tentative list for the United States to become a world heritage site only for when that will ever happen but significant engine unique enough that place on that list excellent where guest again has been Gary Art and Gary. I'm assuming where I should send people in terms of your site. Is this wonderful page that you have that. I've been looking at this entire time. Which may be the only Lincoln this episode? Which is the National Parks Arizona on everything dish everywhere dot com?.

National Monument Grand Canyon Parachute Nationa Grand Canyon Arizona National Parks National Park vermillion cliffs National Mon parachute national monument National Parks Arizona National Park Service forest national park Bureau of Land Management Monument Valley Colorado River Department of Agriculture Antelope Canyon John Borden Sean Gary Art John Ford Point fish and Wildlife Service Horseshoe Bend
"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"We're talking about the first trip into what is now the United States by the Spanish in the fifteen hundreds so this basically fifteen forty to fifteen forty two they go all the way up into what is now Kansas. And that's Coronado so it's it's worth commemorating even if you don't get a motion picture experience. Yeah I mean I should have added that. That's what the Coronado from cornell come trump right to Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez Coronado. Yeah and they. They talk about his trip up and they're looking for gold. Of course we'll share. They didn't find any right so now we're moving towards the eastern border next New Mexico and there are two sites. Cheer Cowan National Monument. This was far and away. The biggest most pleasant surprise misses a site that could get national park status in probably should. It's not a huge site but the closest thing I could explain it as an and this will probably resonate with you that it's very similar to Pinnacles National Park in California. Sure but better. Oh okay there. Is this just a field of pinnacles and if you go to my website I'll you can see photos. I have taken from the park but yeah it's just a really need landscape and given some of the national parks. We have with the National Park status. I think Jerko would clearly qualify compared to like hot springs national park or something like that would should not be national park will and I should defend myself. Because I know you've just generated e mail from Jeff Ulf Sousa patron regular listener and contributor the show and former National Park Ranger He is definitely writing me at this moment as we're talking saying there's no hierarchy in the national park system of national parks being better than national monuments. It's actually officially. That's not true. But we don't have congressman lobbying to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore became Indiana Dunes. National Park will but Congress conform national parks in the president confessional monuments of my correct. Something like that correct. But it's marketing it's true Whitesands just White Sands National Monument to White Sands National Park. Why because they want marketers so there absolutely is a hierarchy even though officially according to the park service there isn't and they're all equal real know. Some parents love their children more than others and some national the National Park Service. There is no difference but to the marketing of the congressman. There may be someone says Oh. I visited all sixty one. National Parks Sixty one. Now by the way used to nine and then keeps changing There's someone says Yan visiting all the national parks. Well are they visiting all four hundred nineteen national park service sites or they visiting just those sixty one and most people will consider those sixty one to be the national parks. Yeah I'm I'm definitely not one of those people but I know what you mean and there's over four hundred now. That actually surprised me too I. Oh Yeah I think what? I got my first national park passport. It was three sixty ish. Yeah they they make every so often. The newest one is why. I don't think it's official yet but it's about to become and it's in Missouri Along the Mississippi River WanNa say it's like saint genevieve or something but yeah so there it depends on the president and things like that shirt only been a couple. I think made in this administration but a Cheer Common National Monument was Navajo country. Okay I would've guessed. Chiricahua is the Cherkaoui a branch of the Navajo. Man I wanNA have a word of an Stanley Navajo and we get to that by the site. That's very close to here. Which Fort Bowie national historic site and this was a former us. Army base the cavalry when they were doing things. Weston they fought their wars with Navajo. A lot of it was done at a Ford Bowie. He end if you're going to visit this area and it's kind of in a remote part of southeastern Arizona. You definitely want to visit. Both of them. Cherkaoui can usually visited by car a road that goes through the park. Parking lots and get out and walk around for Bowie on the other hand. I didn't know this until I arrived. It's a three mile walk from the parking lot to Ford bully though you cannot just drive up there. It's it's not a strenuous walk. It's not that bad and the road to the parking lot were you. You get out is kind of a gravel road. There is a visitor centre once you get there but takes time. You just need to be prepared for that. And I didn't realize that when I got there I did the and everything and spend some time and there's a few historical sites along the way. There is a small cemetery that you walk past. We're has some of the victims of some of the Navajo raids of settlers and interestingly enough several of them had the Congressional Medal of Honor. And this was back when the Congressional Medal of honor I think was given out a little bit more liberally than it is today. I think during the civil war and during the Indian wars there were a lot more given out certainly as a percentage of was a much smaller army at the time right and today I think if you earn it it's a much bigger deal on a requires. They have a much higher standard. But that is one of things you can see along the way and then when you get there to Fort Bowie. It's basically ruins. You can see the outline of where the buildings were most of them were Pueblo construction. So you can see the the outlines of the walls and you can see the field where they marched and things like that. But that's pretty much what you're going to be seeing. There's a lot of history in this site and location. But it's not like it's a all the buildings are there because motor them have disappeared from the elements because it really isn't a remote location rent. It's not a place you're going to get to easy. You just need to be prepared about that. Walk before you make and I did want to do. Correction Cherkaoui National Monument. Yeah the native. Americans live their word that Urakawa which is an Apache branch not Navajo. The Navajo were nearby. You're right it's patchy why I don't know why the hell are saying number two absolutely right now the whole further north right yell at the four corners area. You're right. It should be Apache. I'm sorry so if you've got into this part of the podcast and written your email excellent. We have a few left. Yeah I should also just just as an aside the Apache really good warriors really can't ask and I think you really get a good sense that when you read some of the history of what happened in the area so the remaining ones. They're kind of moving. The final one's talked about Hokum pima which site that both does not exist and you cannot visit a lot of them are ancient native sites. That are kind of around. I won't I won't say around the Phoenix area. But they're certainly within around SEDONA. I would say yeah. Montezuma's Castle National Monument and choose a National Monument. I actually drove right past them. Coming back from petrified forest. They're not that far off of interstate. So right there variously as it a trip that you can do. I just didn't do it because when the time I was driving back was very close to the closing times. I wouldn't have been able to the system Tonto. National Monument Casagrande Ruins National Monument. Then you have to them before though as I recall. No okay then. I'm confusing you with me so I have been to both those. So they are relatively small native American sites Montezuma's castle those very well preserved a very beautiful sight. Tuesday isn't quite as well preserved but it's Up on the top of a hill So it's a beautiful area in terms of you and such but again very easy to visit Both in the same day easily and Sedona the same day so they won't take a lot of time and were the stump. Yeah definitely I visited here in like I said January twenty twenty and I could easily see myself coming back in the winter next year. Visit these sites because I I was. I thought that all while winter narrow Zona there's GonNa be tons of people especially like the Tucson area. They're big event in the winter. Is the Rock and mineral show or the right gem mineral show and I think that's starts in late January early February. The whole town will book up for that. So prices before hotels will go up but other than that I found prices all of Arizona for like a motel. If you're on a road trip to be really affordable like forty dollars a night now. Phoenix is going to be a lot busier in the winter Especially when spring training starts and the prices are going to twice as much during spring training as they would be in the summer. When it's going to be over one hundred degrees right if you go like it said in January ends before Spring Training Starts. There are some really good deals to be had. I would go there again that time of year because I live in Minnesota so upgrading weather and affordable and all. These sites are accessible easily That time of year and the weather wasn't that bad temperatures would get up into the same like the low sixty s mid sixties stays with a high variation in temperature because it is in the desert. So you get pretty warm in the middle of the day and then drop down to maybe in the high thirties low forties in the evening. Yeah last time we went to visit friends in Phoenix. We actually didn't go in spring training even though I love to be there at that time of year but went among early. And you're right. It's nice weather great to be outside. I much rather be in Phoenix in January than I would in July. So an interesting of course talked about both Tucson and northern Arizona and Phoenix and the four corners region other episodes of the podcast as well no link to those yet I should add. There's some great parks to visit. That are not. I'M NOT GONNA ask that yet because I I was always surprised. For instance that Meteoric Crater for instance isn't in the National Park System. Yeah and that's not too far from some of the sites run flagstaff. 'cause I I saw the the road signs and I had a limited amount of time so my all right. I'm going to prioritize and visit the National Park Sites I had Saints Day. Usually would've gone and then also the Navajo parks. Oh sure Yup in the four corners region the slot canyons. They'd become extremely popular a so. We talked about him in the show in the first year of the show and I went in two thousand and six I want to say to visit page Arizona and Antelope Kenyon and I remember showing up Lower Antelope Canyon and having a tour by myself. First thing in the morning and that is not what you will find today we just did it again this this fall although I thought they managed the crowds very well in but it's much much more popular than it used to be and it's gorgeous yeah. I went to Antelope Canyon Litte tour several years ago and it was basically you have a group of people and they you walk really fast towards one spot and you all take a picture with no one in it and then was a group behind you in a group ahead of you and Y'all kind of move forward. You can get a pitcher where brands around the corner so nobody can see it. You cannot take a bad picture. An Antelope Canyon. I still see if you do sell your camera and by postcards because it is such an amazing place. Yeah well and the thing that I loved this time about visiting and I. I was fully expecting to be disappointed because I knew had gotten much more popular. It's more expensive. It used to be you need. You need reservations. Especially if you're booking in a more busy season multiple days ahead and so I was fully expecting it would be a lesser experience than it was when I was there when it wasn't as popular and it was not what I found. Any is still stunningly beautiful. Everybody that I brought loved it and the other thing that's different is everybody's got their their iphones and your guide knows how to take good pictures now. Which that really wasn't the case before they really. I think they've upped their game a lot. They made the Canyon. One lower antelope is when I went to which is the one that used to be unpopular Upper antelope was the popular one. That people went to and they made it a one way journey. So you're not kind of trying to get past people in these narrow areas and I thought they managed it really very well and it was thoroughly enjoyable now. I was in October so I wasn't there in the heat of summer and I wasn't there in the the most busy times but still gorgeous gorgeous place and its place you want to visit in the middle of the day most places you want to photograph or early in the day or late in the day Slot Canyon you WanNa do kind of in the middle of the day. Those beams of light coming down. We'll see I've always upper antelope canyon. Noon Lower Antelope Canyon in the day. Only been oppor so okay. I actually prefer. Lower lower is much longer than upper. So it's you can't and so yeah. And we also add technically technically not in Arizona but valley which is like I'll into Utah over the border and that's also another Navajo Park and most people are going to be accessing it from Arizona. Brent yeah you Mr there as well. That is long with a cigar..

National Park Arizona National Monument Casagrande R Pinnacles National Park National Park System National Park Service Cowan National Monument White Sands National Monument National Monument Navajo Park Phoenix Lower Antelope Canyon Cheer Common National Monument Cherkaoui National Monument National Park Ranger White Sands National Park Coronado Indiana Dunes National Lakesho upper antelope canyon Castle National Monument
"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

Parklandia

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

"Let me tell you about Pete who loved hockey and always wanted to play in the NHL. Pete played since he was three and begged his mom to let them stay on the ice. Apply some nights. He even slept in his hoppy skates Pete practiced and practiced until when he was forty seven. Pete realized he just wasn't that good so so he threw in the trash. But then you heard how diko proud partner of NHL good save money on car insurance so he switched and saved a bunch so it all worked doubt. Let me just say that things to Arches National Park in Utah. I know officially have a t shirt with an image of myself on it and even better. It's an image of a photo. I took a view looking all artsy by the arch. Yeah it's a great but oh got a lot of love and instagram. When I first posted it it was taken me from behind? Kind of gazing off at at this iconic arch in the park and it was transformed into a park landy at t shirt for our online merch store with the caption. Get over it. As as in like yeah. We're close picture myself on it. Get over it or you know get over it like the fact that this is a massive arch sure. Yeah it's a double entendre. I guess I remember having this like hilarious interaction with the briefs Data Coffee Shop in Chicago a few months ago I was wearing the shirt of myself at arches doesn't want to do and I was patiently waiting for my coffee or it was timber so I think I was getting a pumpkin spice Latte Jay. Since that's the time of year where I exclusively eat pumpkin spice flavors flavored things in the briefs came up to me and he asked me about the shirt because he was from Utah and it caught his eye because obviously the arch naturally and then I had to Explained to him that the shirt is an image of myself in he was like. Oh Wow I had no idea and we both had a good laugh and hopefully he was laughing having with me and not at me but I. I wasn't clear on either way. The shirt accomplished what we wanted to do. Catch People's attention and promote the PODCAST. Yeah National Parks. I know with gray and honestly honestly. I'm super proud to be a human billboard for Arches National Park and I'm brand this park lane or production of iheartradio radio. We packed up our stuff in Chicago. Sold or loft and now we're talking in the country with our dog Finn in an RV exploring America's national parks. Today's episode. It's about art. Does National Park in Utah when it comes to conic national images for National Parks Dogs Arches is right up there with the Grand Canyon and then there's like old faithful yellowstone and the bat cave at Carlsbad caverns but especially the delicate arch which is so popular that is featured on. Utah's license plate. Yes it's a biggie. This place is super significant and a big bucket list priority for both of us once we started living and traveling in the RV and it was actually one of the first national parks. We visited once we made that official leap from Chicago to RV. Oh yeah yeah that's right and fittingly. It was the second National Park. Revisited on our country road trip after Gateway Arch National Park in Saint Louis. So he literally went from arch wjr to arch. Yeah we did and that was actually super inadvertent. We didn't play a map but like we realize once we got two arches new tower like wait. A second we went from the Gateway Arch. The arch is like that's magical. Yeah works for a lot of reasons not just because it was poetic but the whether the time of the year was just perfect too. I know it really was. We Got Utah Arches located in southeastern Utah in early December. I think it was literally like December first I and it was chilly. At first it was pretty brisk but also super sunny and especially comfortable for hiking and light jackets. And I was wearing my doc Martin's which are really not at all appropriate hiking at higher since they're about as heavy heavy as and bills and just really cumbersome but I wish guide and like there are now on T. shirt with myself so yes but for the hikes they were. They were fine We didn't do anything too long or too strenuous. Just some of the big poplar blur spots. There yeah nothing too hard core. We add a limited amount of time at artists that we really wanted to maximize it by visiting the big icon trails and and we have to start with the delicate art show. Of course you cannot come to arches and not do this trail should be like priority number one in for it was. I think going to arches not doing delicate allocate arch would be like going to universal studios and skipping Harry Potter world which is really the only reason to go to universal studios these days. That's a little bit of a burn there. Oh I think you know how you feel about universal studios spoiler alert. Were not enthusiastic about it. Harry Potter world is another story though annual anyway the delicate arch trail is a must and not just because it's featured on the license plates. Were t shirts. It's popular for really good reason. It's the perfect length. The perfect the amount of comfort elevation gain. And it's one of those trails as just like an epic while factor grand finale. Once you come around the final bend then you see the arch itself surrounded by hikers. Getting photos I mean it was just like this beautiful landscape of the Lasalle Mountains in the background. Everything all all of it. I know it's really one of those kind of grand finale trails. You walk up to it. It's a fun trail and then you around the corner it's like wow my God. This is overwhelming in the best. That's possible way and it's no wonder this place is so iconic and this arch in particular. It's photogenic is how and especially in cloudless sunny day like when we visited where everything's just so pristine and majestic I loved it really is a male An amazing sight. But let's start talking about the trail leading up to this trails. It all started for us at the Visitor Center in Moab just off the main road which was super close to the RV Park where we reserved served a couple of nights the visitor centers at the base of this massive plateau called the Colorado Plateau. And the there's main park road that really twists and turns up to the top Apapa Toe. Where more than two thousand arches are scattered across the colorful landscape? Yeah some of those archers very tiny and then some are huge and You uh-huh many of them you can see from your car or V And then there's some that you can't see at all Then there are ones like the delicate arches so major that there's like a parking lot by the trail ahead that fills up fast. So get their earliest specially if you have an RV because you need to snack one of those Few large vehicle parking spots. Yeah you really do. Fortunately we were fine right and we're able to get spot. No problem and I think a lot of that had to do with the fact that we were visiting off season. Since most of the park's one point four million annual visitors there's tend to visit in the spring or early fall. We were right at the cost of winter and like literally. It snowed a lot the very next day. So it was we we. You really locked out with the timing on arches although the snow totally messed up our plans visit kenyan-led social park nearby but that wasn't total number in like terms of arches arches specifically the weather worked out perfect interface. Yeah it really wasn't ideal data visit we mentioned in our Mesa Verde episode from season. One that the park they are felt similar to the Park Road Arches and I I stay in by. I think they're both these lungs exactly roads that start. By visitor centers honors then meander up to the top of these plateaus mesas and artists is very Mesa Verde like except last green more desert. Yeah if you drive along this main park road. It's super easy to find. All of the parks trails in everything is like either directly along the road or right off the route including including the delicate arch right. So it's very convenient. Very easy to navigate here which is so refreshing especially driving in an RV. And you don't want to be like an fiddling around her going down these narrow off the beaten path roads so wants to get to delegate arch and you park you start the trail and one of the first things you see that we saw was this tiny ranch home we tiny tiny like it's like the OJ. Tiny house and it was built by John Wesley Wolf in the late eighteen eighteen hundreds. This was the time when ranchers were migrated into the area in droves well before arches became a national monument in nineteen twenty nine and then ultimately upgraded a to a national park in nineteen seventy one and remnants of their inhabitants. Is still there today as we with this. ITTY bitty little Rancho Gad's ads crazy to imagine people living in this environment It was so much more desolate at the time than it is today and especially in such small living quarters. The House was super small. Ma I mean it makes our. RV Look like a huge like mansion. He now and that's really saying something. It was basically just like one rickety little room and this was for like multiple multiple people which is unfathomable. That's not a lot of personal space. Apparently no definitely not like it's literally no bigger than most people's bathrooms but you know the trail continues on for about a mile and a half after that All the way up to the arch itself There's like study inclines. It's moderately difficult like trail especially since it's like in Drexel night the entire time without any shade and yeah there's really no tree cover here and even though it's pretty easy to do and not that long of a trail. It's it's an adventure experience for sure you cross this massive expanse of slick rock at one point in the trail then dips down into these little grotto's filled with shrubs and and then you shimmy along the side of a cliff as well with the trail running along the cliff wall until it ultimately rounds the corner too delicate arch and then you have this show stopping view Nasr such a beautiful and incredible. Say it's like seeing the Statue of Liberty for the first time it's such an American treasure. I know yeah. It is like the Statue of Liberty except instead instead of being made by France and gift to the US it was made by Mother Nature over the course of millions and millions of years. And this thing absolutely looks like a work of masterful art it's made of Sandstone. That's been whittled by wind and water and it's got these vivid tens of orange and red. It honestly looks too good to be real and when we made it to the end into the trail we definitely made sure to sit down and enjoy the views for awhile. We even packed lunches and then we aided we just laid down on the sandstone for a bit to drink it all in. Yeah we kind of Ward Off all the large crows. There were like slowly inching closer to US trying to eat our our lunch and like no you need to and this this is. Why don't feed the animals because then they get used to it and they'll just hop around? It's it's a lot and then so we have lunch. We kind of relax a little bit. And then you went scurrying down by the art and I was afraid they would slip in plot but it all worked out fine and I got some really cool like adventurous hands on photos view being daredevil. I'm not a dare do you are just stay. But they're doing things. Yeah it's fun. It is fun and there were other people during you weren't the only ones so it was somewhat reassured. You're listening to park land for my heart radio. We'll be back in just a moment to talk talk more about artists National.

National Park Arches National Park Utah Gateway Arch National Park Pete Park Road Arches Gateway Arch Chicago National Parks Dogs Arches Utah Arches universal studios NHL Visitor Center RV Park US Harry Potter Mesa Verde partner hockey doc Martin
"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

Parklandia

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on Parklandia

"History Hot Springs National Park is really a little odd bull of Park. I mean for starters. It's tiny one of the smallest national parks in the country. It's only about fifty five hundred acres yeah so to put that in perspective a little bit by comparison the largest national park in the US wrangle Saint Louis and Alaska is thirteen point two million acres. You can fit a lot of hot springs. They're actually it's primarily an urban park. I mean there's some nature but most of the park is actually situated around the town of Hot Springs Arkansas Right which is a historic mintage like town amidst these rolling Green Mountains in the what she she to mountain range near the ozarks. Yeah it's an old park to even though it wasn't made an official National Park until nineteen twenty one. It was initially protected as hot. It's brings reservation by Congress in April of eighteen thirty two yeah so in other words. This was the first time the US government had ever set set aside land for protection any for him. This is almost a full century before the National Park Service became a thing in a full forty years before yellowstone became America's first national park. It's pretty pretty crazy and amazing stuff yeah the thing that made this place so special to begin with and why they estimated up and worthy of protection is its namesake thermal waters which have longman Armand said to contain medicinal properties and we're revered both by native Americans and apparently also by gangsters and baseball players because sure yeah yeah the hot springs flow off the western side of the hot spring mountain and they're the primary reason the place has been preserved as a national park right. I think when important thing to clear up about hot springs first and foremost is that this isn't the place where you can take a dip in natural hot springs in the woods is actually none of that here whatsoever whoever which might be a bummer to some people. I know like when I was. I thinking I when I was younger. I like thinking of Hot Springs. I would assume that there are these natural springs like in the woods but there's something instead the national park conserves this amazing water for public use and other ways by managing the water flow in pumping it into the town for us in these ornate spas and bath houses and even in drinkable forum and sparkling water and beer people have long been flocking here for those springs and especially those bath houses in fact Hot Springs Arkansas earned the nickname the American spa due to the largest number of thermal treatments and spas along what is now called Bath House road. Yeah love that so this means street forms the heart of the park this bath house row but this lineup of gorgeous designed huge luxury luxury extre- bath houses each one with this gilded age architecture that looks like something off the titanic or something it's incredible and AS Roma Features these beautiful fountains billing with steam that kind of interspersed along the sidewalks like between these buildings. It's really beautiful yeah one point all these buildings were used as actual bath houses and Spas but nowadays oh days only two of them are still used for this purpose as most others have been re purposed into visitors centers museums and a brewery but more on that later. I'm chomping at the bit to talk about that burry. I love it. Yes so cool. Bath House row is actually so cooled that it was actually designated a national historic landmark on its own in nineteen eighty seven yeah. That's the year my birth so I now feel a newfound kinship with bath house row. We're both the same well now now. It's been around long time so that's ridiculous but anyway today the only two bath houses still in use for their original purpose are the buck staff and buildings both of which offer these elaborates boss services and treatments. I'm back in the day. The people soaked here because the thermal waters said to help cure things like rheumatism and since there's been so many health advances in the past century. That's why the bath house culture has taken such a decline yeah kind of kind. Mr I guess but it's really I mean not about Mar.. It's good that health advances happened. Yes what am I saying It's really cool to come here though because it's like kind I know traveling back in time to this like Byron ornate era and you get to luxuriate a little bit in that and the only thing missing really is like champagne champagne while we so wish we could have had that I think like when we took our bath we asked if alcohol is allowed now like notice shame shame right geology but let's talk about the basic water facts. I like the fact that the park contains forty seven natural hot springs pumping out more than a half a million gallons of water per day comes out of the ground at one hundred and forty three degrees Fahrenheit yeah. It's definitely hot aren't that it doesn't nation and much of that water being pumped out. That's much too hot for bathing so thankfully they call it down to a comfortable Jacuzzi Makusi like temperature for use in the bath houses comfortable but even though there was like some hot springs here for centuries. The town wasn't always filled with bass thousand fancy dubs. No no these aren't naturally occurring bath houses for thousands of years indigenous tribes lived in the area and they're the ones who discovered these hot springs and how they could be used and so they started to use the hot thermal waters for their healing properties. They call this place the valley vapors which I love I love that name I think it's so cool and they had these crude hot like structures that they build a long hot springs creek so this is like a far precursor due to these opulent mansion liking buildings. Bath House row for sure. I know some fortunate because you know as the case with too many settlers in developments the native qualify Indians gave up their land to the US government eighteen eighteen and they were basically forced onto nearby reservations. Yeah Arkansas then became an official state. The following year in eighteen nineteen in the areas quickly set aside for production then fast forward a couple more centuries and broaden. I are taking a dip gap in some of the famous and went under water. Yeah the bath was really nice and relaxing. When we win. I mean we did a couple so can had our own little private room so nice. I'm so glad we did. That was really relaxing imperfect. The Bath House also has this huge communal tub which looked beautiful like this ancient reminding of like an ancient gigantic Roman bath or something with these little waterfalls splashing into this gigantic mega tub and these these like Sheikh Lounge chairs all around around it was really lovely but I think we both needed. We just wanted to kind of privacy that we didn't mind me like floating around with a bunch of strangers yeah and we also got to select elect our own bath salts that we wanna use for the soak because we had the private room and as Nice because the water pumps in from jet just imagine when we were here here we took in the same types of old fashioned tubs. Al Capone used to so can yeah and just think to to live in Chicago just like us and visit some of our repeat restaurants like Italian village. He even has his own booth at a time village or at least they pointed out until you so so between our shegog connection the fact act the way essentially took a bath with alcohol and spirit. I mean he was a bone drapes down the street often. We have like a weird connection. Talk upon this really just cemented and I've I've never felt closer to alcohol. Yeah I mean aside from the fact that he's an awful person committed like really horrible and heinous crimes uh-huh I feel like you had Grayson Restaurants National Parks and bathtubs Ya. He really did too bad. He made off life decisions. After this short break. We'll continue talk about hot springs National Park..

Hot Springs Bath House History Hot Springs National P Hot Springs Arkansas US National Park National Park Service official Grayson Restaurants National P Alaska Congress longman Armand Green Mountains Saint Louis Arkansas Al Capone America Jacuzzi Makusi
"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"RV homeschool podcast where we make travel educational and fun grab your hairspray and your hiking boots as we head to glacier National Park the home school podcast I'm your host Amber Steuben the RV homeschool podcast is your source for travelling the US and Canada with kids in your recreational vehicle so we cover the sites the logistics campgrounds and educational opportunities and we focus on the national parks as we are take our elementary aged girls to all of them and also the camping accommodations that work for a large motorhome everyone in the family to describe glacier next the parks in just a few words I would say that Glacier National Park is majestic Jeremy said that it was epic Greta said that it had a lot of cool animals and also reminded us that she almost died there and that's part of our ice hiking story that I'll get to but overall the National Park is called the crown of the continent and that's for a very good reason it is so absolutely beautiful and spectacular and just an odd moment when you get there in your mouth drops and you say wow I can't believe this place we heard a lot about it we heard people say that can you really you can't understand until you go there just why people love it so much so let's talk a little bit about the location of glacier national park so it is located in Montana it is in the north west part of Montana and so it's not necessarily real accessible to most people across the Nation Lotta Times people will fly to a nearby area and then drive over to glacier and stay at a hotel or maybe try to rent an RV we did do the drive all the way from Colorado but it took us a few overnights ticket up into the area where glaciers at and then of course you WanNa have enough time to spend time there at glacier so we waited until we had a good couple of weeks in order to do this trip we actually throw in a little bit of time at Canada while we were there because you're only about four hours or so from banff and that's really worth some time to spend some time there in Canada and Banff in Z.. Everything at Lake Louise and everything else but we'll do another podcast on that overall though it's a little bit hard to access the area and of course you're only able to really go see it for probably three or so months of the summer so the main road that goes through the park the going to the sun road is only open really at the end of June sometimes it's opened as late as July this year it was opened by the time we went and I think our trip up there started about July twenty sixth so it was opened in time for us it's not always opened by then sometimes it's not till July obviously people tend to go in July and August before school is back in session and you could go even all the way through September but then the windows pretty much done now you're on wintertime the roads are closed and it's hard to access this era area so just so you know that's kind of location and then what you can come to expect in terms of the season that you can go and seek glacier national park.

Glacier National Park Canada Montana Amber Steuben Greta US Jeremy Lake Louise Colorado four hours
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"In our last episode, we explored the tension between rural Alaskans who've been accustomed to living and thriving autho land that in nineteen eighty suddenly became the purview of the National Park Service with a mandate of conservation that sometimes was at odds with how these Alaskans live their lives. That tension boiled into some violence and continued for years. How relations with Alaskans now, how has the park service and its relationship with these last changed? It's a really difficult question to answer because some of the answers depend on where you're where you're living and the relationships that people have with park staff and park management. I would say on the whole thing's of things have changed rather dramatically since nineteen eighty. When a number of allows Ken's. And again, I'm speaking generalities now, but. But Saul understood the creation of parks refuges up here as a a, locking up of the land. And I think over the years, many more Alaskans have begun to see that and understand it's it's not a lock up of land, but it's it's a locking the gates open if you will, where as development and and and extraction activities are prohibited if not severely limited it. Most national parks that the fact that national parks in the wilderness resources in the the wildlife that the contain provide not only an opportunity for recreation and recreation, but also the economics if you will. I think that as I looked back over two thousand seventeen I understand that the economic benefit of parks in Alaska equated to about one point, nine billion with a b. dollars. There were two point eight million. Visitors and nineteen thousand jobs, specifically connected to National Park Service units in Alaska more than four hundred private businesses operate in national parks in Alaska. And I think Alaskans have seen that there are opportunities benefits that are not necessarily consumptive, but in other words, can be utilized over and over again through tourism and the fact that people not only from our country, but the world over once it comes to Alaska to see its naturalness. Tin, joy, the the, the empty horizons. And so that's helped over the years. Now there are certainly places and there are certainly communities that look to their backyards where a national park site is located in and would still say to this day, you know, we were. We were never asked and you know, we, we don't welcome. This and I end I'm certainly in my position used to to communicating with people who have those sentiments. And then of course, there are those who live in the off the beaten track places, the rural communities in the Bush. Some of those individuals probably wish that there were more development, an extrication activities and businesses, but many, many others, many others, I think, have been become grateful and voice gratefulness that the national parks house established by Nilka with the provision for subsistence in traditional lifeways have made an have allowed them to continue their lifestyles that otherwise would have been would have been gone. And so as as I started, it's a mixed bag, but I think more Alaskans probably more than ever see national. Parks, national park sites in Alaska as benefit. One of the other tensions that the National Park Service has had to deal with was, is that of wildlife and in particular predators and humans. I know that for twenty years, the National Park Service has been monitoring the wolf packs in your Yukon Charley rivers, national preserve, but there perhaps it's been some some difficulty with that program. Do you? Can you tell us what you perhaps we're trying to do and and what's been happening recently, I be happy to rights. So over twenty years ago, the staff who managed and worked in Yukon Charley rivers national preserve began to look very hard at the wolf population in particular back then the idea was to try to understand wolf ecology and what that predator did or its impact on not. Just care boo, and moves, but the larger ecosystem in the national preserve and to try to understand what predator prey relationships meant. And for over twenty years that we the National Park Service had a capture and collar program that would help us understand how many animals in and were they traveled in and where where they would den in and what have you..

National Park Service Alaska Yukon Charley rivers Saul Ken Nilka twenty years
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Slash a. h. t. ZipRecruiter the smartest way to hire. We were just talking about the continued consumptive use of the land. I'm curious, what is the indigenous population around the park that that in terms of size, how many indigenous peoples are using the for subsistence right will before I fully answer that question Levy, let me again emphasize that NewCo was very clear that this was not a a promise or a guarantee to Alaskan natives. But this was this was an allowance for anyone who lived at a permanent residence in one of these remote communities or or perhaps even lived in a in a remote cabin away from any community. But again, that had a geographical or cultural connection to the park lens. And so it help help answer that question. How many rural allow skins would be eligible. To to harvest and to to hunts in gates, the Arctic national park, and I would I would estimate that number to be somewhere in the vicinity of four to five hundred people. Most of those communities again are outside of the bright line boundaries of gates. The Arctic with one very important exception, and I'd love to have loved to be able to talk about that exception short, please. If we have a moment, the very last nomads, if you will, in in the United States where people essentially five families, if you will, who had descended from almost ten thousand years of of people travelling behind the caribou herds and making a living from caribou doll sheep and and fish, and the things that they could harvest animals that they could harvest in the central Brooks range in the Arctic coast of Alaska and in the nineteen fifties. These families were convinced. That in order to be able to school their children and have a post office and and a live live a life that that I guess was more characteristic if you will, of our modern days and times those families settled into valley in the heart of what was to become gates, the Arctic national park and they called their community Antic to Vic pass to this day. That community which is on private land surrounded by the national park has a population of about three hundred people, and they again are descended from and and some of the remaining elders still remember the very last migration if you will before their their grandfathers mothers settled into the valley and this permanent community called Anik to pass. So five family, five, five families essentially, right? Yes. Uh-huh. It's a standing to me a city dweller that there could be such a massive expanse of land. So. Sparsely populated that expanse must make it hard to manage. I assume, like any job that there are good days and their bad days in the park. What would a good day for you will on a really, really good day. We might have heard that there was somebody missing or who had not arrived at their departure point from the park, and we would begin a search of the area and reach out to people maybe living in or having traveled through the vicinity recently to find out if if they had seen or heard from anybody that might meet the description of someone we're looking for, and then of course the the really good news is when you you find them in this particular summer has been. Somewhat unique because of all of the rainfall that we've received in the park and as a result of the rainfall, very high water levels in the rivers that.

Arctic national park Arctic United States Alaska Levy Anik Vic ten thousand years
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"And yet there are no designated trails, no designated facilities. It's all essentially a wilderness park and not that parks of large scale with very little development in them is unusual in Alaska. But I think I think it's the landscape. I think it's the wildness I think is the opportunity for unconfined recreation and recreation. That is so difficult to find for some of us anyway anymore. The lower forty eight stay. It's in some ways anytime spending Alaska. If if if this place touches your heart is as as we just mentioned in some ways, it makes you almost unfit to live anywhere else unfit what I said almost unfit. That's right. So now unfit for life anywhere else. You are the superintendent of the gates of the Arctic national park and preserve as well as Yukon Charley rivers national preserve, right. So in this case, I'm the superintendent for both of those National Park Service conservation units. Gates of the Arctic has the distinction apparently of being the least visited recreationally national park of the system other than its remoteness, which is probably the answer. Is there any other reason why gates of the Arctic is set apart from the other parks will again, I, you know, I don't know how different we are for those parks that are off the off the road system. I, I will say that. Compiling the visitor use numbers for gauge. The Arctic is particularly challenging due to the fact that visitors are not required to register to get a permit. So the data that we collect on back country visitation is gleaned solely from.

Arctic recreationally national park Alaska superintendent National Park Service Yukon Charley rivers
"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Ride shotgun while they patrol for poachers and contact locals with frontier mentality who scoff at rules and regulations. Alaskans were less than enthused by her comments. The copper river county journal called Wade's tone decidedly superior and said, she portrayed Alaskans as lawless Wade's common seem to reveal. She believed her main job was to keep local in holders, miners and hunters and check. The paper said in a letter to voice of the times will Sherman wrote while it's true that there aren't too many copies of Amy Vanderbilt's etiquette up here, I know of no park ranger who's ever been shot. I do however know of scores of Alaskans whose businesses have been ruined and whose rightful land property and access have been regulated out of their hands by Karen Wade and her predecessors is there no way that we can stop having to help pay the salaries of these people. They come from thousands of miles away. Tell us what our values should be complicate. Our ability to make an honest living tear apart communities, then have the temerity to wine the, we don't pay them enough. Wade, never returned to Alaska. After reactions to her testimony, she transferred became superintendent of great smoky mountains, national park in Tennessee. She was replaced that Tober by Jonathan Jarvis who previously been superintendent of craters of the moon national monument in Idaho. When he arrived Jarvis made it his first priority to improve relationships with the locals. Once again, he opened up communications and made a point of speaking with the media about welcoming input from the public. In his first interview, he said, I've got an open door if anyone wants to come down and talk to me about any of these issues or any other issues they can call me as things got better Jarvis insisted he wouldn't impose national park standards on local residents. We're starting to develop a relationship. He said, I want to continue with that. Have an open relationship. This park is a neighbor and can be a very good one Jarvis's tactics worked and resentment for the parks. Gradually started to dwindle his appr-. Coach set a course for his successors, though. Tensions over land use continue in Alaska today by the time Jarvis left in two thousand. The relationship with local residents had markedly improved. Jarvis eventually went on to serve as the eighteenth director of the entire National Park Service. The American national park system holds a unique place on the world stage. No other country can boast so many places of such very beauty. So open to the public Americans can walk into any national park in the country and proudly say to themselves that they own piece of these remarkable places writer and environmentalist Wallace stagner call them the best idea we've ever had absolutely American. Absolutely democratic. They reflect us at our best rather than our worst. But since their creation, the national parks have been like the country. They represent an experiment, we made mistakes. Many of them disastrous indigenous peoples were slaughtered. Animals were hunted to near extinction, valleys were flooded private interests battled and sometimes feed it the public good, the fight to balance preservation and conservation still continues today as our country has grown and changed. So have our parks, what's. Started out as an idea to protect land animals as volved into a desire to teach others about their world, their country and themselves. In our next series, we head back to World War Two as the roots of a new movement are taking hold in the country's black communities. Join us in two weeks as we start our six part series on the civil rights era. But first an interview with the head of one of the least visited national parks in the United States. I hope you enjoyed this episode if you did subscribe.

Jonathan Jarvis Karen Wade Amy Vanderbilt National Park Service Alaska superintendent United States Sherman Tennessee Idaho Wallace stagner writer director Tober two weeks
"national park" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from newman's own foundation workington nourish the common good by donating all profits from newman's own food products to charitable organisations that seek to make the world a better place more information is available at newman's own foundation dot org there has been a mass resignation at the national park service nearly every member of the park service advisory board nine in all quit in protest yesterday they say interior secretary ryan zinke has ignored them and that he's rolling back protections for public land's zinc he's office quickly countered saying the board members are lying and that they have ignored sexual harassment at the park service to untangle all these threads we've reached journalist elia woods at his home in montana happens we ryan zinke is home state woods recently profiled the interior secretary for outside magazine hey elliott thanks for being with us baker adamant there's been this longbrewing insurgency at the national park service during the trump administration over the course of the past year so was this mass resignation expected in some way you know i can say if it was expected or not but i think it fits a pattern of senior level officials in the interior department and the national park service and other agencies and the trump administration who are reacting to a very clear and firm anti science stance among the senior officials in the senior cabinet officials in the trump administration so we've seen whistle blower claims from people like joe clement and the interior department who was reassigned to and accounting job away from the job advising on on a policy and things like that and i think this this fits fat pattern of people in those positions saying enough is enough we're not being consulted or not being used in our for attended purpose and it would be better for us to make this very public statement of disgust and protest then to continue functioning in kind of a attempted position so then ryan zinke the interior.

newman food products ryan zinke harassment elia woods montana secretary joe clement advisory board elliott baker
"national park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on 1A

"I just feel like this is a little disingenuous coming from him that not fully admitting to the fact that they've proposed a thirteen percent cut to the national park service budget and the numbers don't entirely figure out and this is a thirty day comment period for a significant increase in park fees i mean when is this administration going to step up and actually show that they're gonna make a commitment they could endorse the national park legacy act tomorrow if they wanted to and show congress that they'll work hand in hand with them on a solution for the for the maintenance backlog but the evidence is just not adding up in terms of their commitment and i i really hope that they'll work with groups like ours too to try to address the maintenance backlog and not just keep kicking and under the rug or kicking it to visitors and holly anything from the deputy secretary stand out to you yeah just think the bottom line is that more money is unlikely to come from congress and we need to be more innovative to try to come up with ways to better protect these parks there are too many other competing issues with federal funds and unless we wanna see increase taxes are decreasing expenditures elsewhere we are not going to see that money coming into our national park so we need to look elsewhere what's the next step analyst well i just wanted to mention that the national pikes are impacted by climate change far more than the the nation as a whole and that there's lots of implications for that for the wildlife and for the m three nature there and there's very little money being spent to try to figure out what that all means and that's another place where fines if their race could be used that's elizabeth shogren the washington correspondent for high country news elizabeth thanks for spending the hour with us.

deputy secretary congress analyst climate change elizabeth shogren washington thirteen percent thirty day
"national park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on 1A

"Nicolas commented on our facebook page i think it's appropriate to raise the prices of entry to the most popular parks i'd much rather parks they managed by n p s the national park service rather than be privatized were corporations would raise prices anyway many of the most popular parks are overwhelmed by visitors falling into disrepair and humans are leaving a lasting impact on the ecology higher prices will encourage visitors to find less frequently visited parks distributing the impacts elizabeth show grin what do we know about how the parks are dealing with the current demand on their facilities are they really being stretched to the point where they're just wearing down well there are a lot of facilities that are wearing down there are very an app and with consequences that are quite dire for the environment for instance at a yosemite our favorite national park there's a a huge problem the sewer system there and it's it's it fabulously expensive fix and what happens on what's happening number of times is that day that there had been leaks into the mirsaid river and you don't want that that's not good for the fishing there of course and for the people either and so i just think that that's wining that's just one example of the kind of big infrastructure projects that are very expensive do some of these one of those interesting ones because it's got that big old hotel that was built their years and years ago the awani lodge that is basically kind of a luxury a luxury hotel it's no longer called that up because of the over there was originally called the awani lies i forget what is called today but majesty maybe suggested a majestic thank you very much so.

Nicolas mirsaid river facebook elizabeth yosemite
"national park" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"national park" Discussed on 1A

"Well it's really about entrance fees and it's not for all parks it's for seventeen parks that are kind of the most that they bring in the most money for the national park service three these kinds of fees and they're parks like yosemite and yellowstone end denali places where people will mostly destination pack some of the some of the ocean and della to guess which is kind of a local park but some of the other parks i think i think this is right like the bay area parks that are part of the golden gate they don't have this price hike which is interesting because that's the most popular national park have the golden gate national recreation area includes a lot of free spaces like the presidio and ocean beach in the marine headlines that you can just kind of driver walk up to right and so any way that lens not included but there are a lot of very popular parks included christon rangel is there a precedent for these rate increases is the first time the national park service has ever tried anything like this or is this the kind of thing that just happens from time to time this is probably the largest increase we've ever seen in sort of a broad way proposed for the national park service in the past uh some fees have been assessed over decades in several national parks but when congress started passing legislation to try to make fees more uniform this is probably the highest increase that we've ever seen and it's a pretty incredible jump for the public to handle and just two years ago sixteen of these seventeen national parks already went through a fee increase so this is a pretty rapid.

congress yellowstone end denali christon rangel two years
"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

The Global Travel Conspiracy

02:00 min | 5 years ago

"national park" Discussed on The Global Travel Conspiracy

"Whether something is considered lesser or greater i think most people would agree that the national park designation is kind of the cream of the crop these are the best places within the national park system which is why you sometimes see national monuments upgraded to a national park the most recent example of this was pinnacles national park in california which was a national monument i visited pinnacles national monument new sometime in the late 90s i forget it's actually south of san francisco and several years ago the president upgraded this to a national so now it's pinnacles national park and there's been several other examples of this of something going from national monument to national park and it seems to be something that each president tries to create one new national park during their tenure in office so they don't create a lot of new national parks i'd say you can expect may be one or two two crew be created every decade or so the peso certainly slow down of four hundred at eleven sites that include the battlefields the monuments in in whatnot of there's a lot of different things so if you go to washington dc all of the public monuments including the city parks because washington dc federal district are all technically maintained by the national park service so you will so of those four hundred eleven that includes the monuments such as the lincoln memorial the jefferson royal washington monument things like that of the mall vietnam veterans memorial the fdr memorial all that's those are separate national park service sites but then there's also parks within washington d c which are also considered a part of it and then there's wolf trap which is a national part of the performing arts which is not an actual park it's its own thing and it's basically just a venue for concerts and plays and and things like that but it's technically considered part of the national park service and one hundred one of the.

pinnacles national park california san francisco president washington lincoln memorial fdr memorial pinnacles national monument dc jefferson royal washington mon vietnam veterans memorial washington d c