36 Burst results for "National Organization"

Fresh "National Organization" from The Young Turks

The Young Turks

00:43 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "National Organization" from The Young Turks

"Everyone welcome to our first social break of the show. I wanna start off by reading a few member comments. Beginning with little mac mckee. Who says i read a report where the fbi just came out that they underestimated white supremacists first and only after the oklahoma city bombing. Did they realize it was even a national organization. But now now white supremacists see themselves as modern successors to the organize violence in the south post civil war which caused reconstruction oops reconstruction to fail. I used to think tucker was winking nodding to these groups but now i'm wondering if he isn't actually one of the leading members and is officially part of the organization. Honestly there there are no dog whistles on tucker carlson show anymore. He's very clear in his white supremacist views. On one hand he denies them on the other hand. He's spouts the exact same talking points that you would hear from a white supremacist. Because he's a white supremacist. Moving on I just wanted to say thank you to l. m. g. fifteen. Who says does anna do a great job presenting the first hour on her own. Of course thank you. I really really appreciate it. We already have someone in our members section with the handle. No cookies for you. I love it. Great news today biden. Ooh oh you're stepping on my lines uber. I know you're not uber. But this is a story that we'll talk about in more detail later But great news today.

Today Uber Anna First Hour Fifteen First South Post Civil War Biden Oklahoma First Social Break Tucker Mac Mckee One Of The Leading Members One Hand M. Tucker Carlson Member City
"national organization" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"national organization" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"I stood within what they were right. And i don't give a damn who didn't like it. If they were doing their job they did right. I stood well. I did talk out of both sides of my mouth. In when they need it to be held responsible they would discipline in a few cases they would terminate in even in a few cases they were charged with offenses offenses. It comes with the territory comes with the job. It comes with being a strong chief. But here's the thing. Why can't today because what happened in portland in what happens now in carbon best. Who's a friend of mine. She was outstanding in seattle. And she had enough she left you. Cannot you have to pay out a land that you draw in the sand. I'm not gonna let you take over streets. I'm not gonna let you take over buildings. I don't care how right you are. How rain you may happen to be. We're going to do things that are going to be legal in it's going to be sync. I'm not going allow you to set up communes in a city street you take city blocks in. I can't come in. That's not gonna happen in. Here's the thing. I don't need to be achieved just to see on my chief. I needed cheap ninety to be achieved. It has the power and authority that goes along with had to be decent in fair to everybody to protect life in the hole. My men and women responsible but also the whole communities responsible to do their part. So i probably will never be a chief of yet. Because i'm not kissing anybody s to be achieved. I'm going to a job fairly. I'm going to do the job with integrity in. I'm going to do the job in a way that it protects people in that community. I don't need to be achieved just for the sake of being a cheap. I need to have the authority. That goes.

seattle today portland both sides ninety
"national organization" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

"national organization" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Is a tough job. There are times when you may have to make decisions in split-second but that ain't every day right happen any day at any moment right in idiots now i also love to talk to you about sort of security broadly in the united states you know in the aftermath of the killing of george floyd. We had towns like seattle and portland who were overrun. Who had sections of them were that were ungovernable Where destruction happened in rapes happen. In some cases murders happen and it perpetuated for for weeks on end we saw our capital breached with. You know what looked like to me is an average citizen. An extraordinary lifting. That should never have been even possible and this most recent killing at the capitol and so i just look at this stuff and i think how is this stuff possible. You know. I spent time in israel by way of example and i don't know what the realities are but the impression you get in a place like israel is security is very tight everywhere and if you tried some of that stuff you'd probably be dead or arrested pretty quickly and so how is it that. Let me ask this question. It appears to me. And i don't wanna be overly critical but we are soft on some of these things you don't hear this happening in singapore. You don't hear this happening in israel in some countries where they take Security law enforcement very seriously. Why do we tolerate these things. Why does the capital happen. Why seattle and portland happen. Get well that's not a police chief today. In as much as i love being a chief. I was a no nonsense chief. I was no nonsense when it came to my men and women. I was protective of them long. As they were doing things the right way and they were doing constant constitutionally legally and ethically.

singapore israel portland seattle george floyd today united states
Bowling Green State University student in critical condition, fraternity suspended after alleged hazing incident

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:40 min | 2 months ago

Bowling Green State University student in critical condition, fraternity suspended after alleged hazing incident

"Back now with a parent's worst nightmare. The college student hospitalized after an alleged hazing incident just days after another student was found dead at a fraternity house. That heartbroken family now speaking out. Here's abc's mona. Kosar abdi tonight to families. In two states devastated by what happened to their college age sons in separate incidents of alleged fraternity hazing bowling green state university students stone foltz is alive but in critical condition a statement from bowling green university citing quote alleged hazing activity involving alcohol consumption at a pi kappa alpha off campus event. We have placed this fraternity on interim suspension as we work with local law enforcement this less than a week. After the father of adam oates a freshman at virginia commonwealth. University opened his door to police. The news to the family says they heard from friends. President that adam was encouraged to consume a large quantity of whiskey as part of an initiation process. Then passed out next morning. May checked on him. He was dead that fraternity suspended by the national organization and by vcu which promises an independent investigation but to anti hazing activists who son tim. Piazza died during hazing at penn state in two thousand seventeen frustrated by locks laws. The word hazing apparently is acceptable. But if you translate it to what it really is abuse then you see it as the crime that it is just devastating for those families or thanks to mona kosar abdi for that

Kosar Abdi Green State University Bowling Green University Adam Oates Foltz ABC National Organization Virginia VCU Adam Piazza TIM Mona Kosar Abdi
"national organization" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

04:01 min | 3 months ago

"national organization" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Jobs. Uh, it doesn't magically happen like that. No. We already know that Right. I gotta hear it again. Geez, Mary poofy to judge then his Senate confirmation hearing this morning. You so brilliant that he couldn't get his name, right? Yeah. Yeah, man, There are a lot of people that feel duped already. You don't have a huge don't have an honest media. No, I'm kind of find it surprising that the Black lives matter National organization said. It's boy, something allowed paraphrase here but something along the lines of boy, it sure seems like the Democrats used us. Yep, they did. Anyone with two brain cells to rub together could have told you that sure. Now you were using you. Black conservatives all through 2020 tried to put that message fourth. Okay, No one will listen. Nope. Matter fact we've learned that if you are a black conservative, you're really not black. How offensive is that? There can't be any other ideas. A lot of times you can point to rich white liberals for that. Because They help with that message. And never letting a black conservative have a black form. That's Amazing to me. All right, so we got Blackfoot. Blackfoot. That's the band. I'm thinking. Train train train train. David was talking about Bigfoot hunting. Yeah. Open season now, apparently, well, no. Well, there's a state lawmaker in Oklahoma that's introduced a bill that would create the country's first Bigfoot hunting season. State representative Justin Humphrey. That he's not done really believe in Bigfoot, but he keeps an open mind. It's really about a tourism draw. It's like, Yeah, come on, and hunt Bigfoot, although he's saying if you find Bigfoot don't kill him. Just just, you know, Take a picture of him. Don't kill him. Don't kill him! No. No, it's not the idea behind a hunting Apparently, you can't put him in a cage. What you gonna do? Just Like lure men with beef jerky, Wow, and then just lead him on a leash. We can't have Bigfoot's in cages separating him from Mother Bigfoot guessed that would be terrible to look in cages. There is he's saying he's hoping to include language in the bill to secure a $25,000 prize for the first person who captures Bigfoot. Can you imagine all the knuckleheads walking around for 25 Grand? Dude, I would go just to people watch I was Freddy get shot. You do have a little hair on your back. You thought about waxing matter laser and it Braided occasionally in the summer. And this curious, Yeah. Uh, there's a whole lot of news out there. You've probably seen about Different testing. As far as covert 19. Then there's you know vaccines, of course, but as far as the tests, you want it quick, right and the ones you can find out 20 minutes. That's great for a while. It was like taking a week and then people that know you wouldn't get a call back. But it's getting better and better as time goes on, right. Did you hear what they're doing in China because it's actually giving more accurate results. Either one of you guys heard this. No, no, there will be using a swab. I will say that They're using a swap. But not at the nose. I don't know. Yeah. Oh, no. 00. Yeah. China? Yeah. You know? Rectal swab. Oh, jeez. If you really wanted to know. Oh, God, if you were sick that drive through no saying your capital in Beijing Son of a gun, man. That might actually be more comfortable than.

Bigfoot Justin Humphrey China Senate Mary poofy Beijing Oklahoma State representative National organization David Freddy
Episode 77:  Police Reform, Public Safety, and Gun Violence Prevention

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

05:39 min | 4 months ago

Episode 77: Police Reform, Public Safety, and Gun Violence Prevention

"And so I'm wondering if we can just start I kind of calling out the elephant in the room which is talking about, you know, the background like what why now are we seeing all these conversations about race and policing Beyond, you know, maybe just suck the recent shootings that have drawn attention to police reform. I guess I'll start then again, good morning everyone in admissions earlier, but greetings behalf of our national presence l&j Davis where she's actually the police chief of Durham North Carolina city of New York and she puts sadly enough police culture wins out a lot more time you compare to policy and I think when you look at what's our critic just and the recent birth But historically for decades and then some cases leaving probably go back to hundreds of years. Fortunately. This is nothing new in our community. So will they be communities of color African American communities wage? I think when you look at what occurred Mister Floyd, it really caught the country where it was pretty much all able to view here. I think get some bad public confirmation that even eight minutes and forty six seconds is not enough to address the Injustice of our country. And so the complexities go well beyond lot, of course about this law enforcement for most persons of my opinion represent the government meaning most citizens would probably never be the mayor of their city or their city council or both. We would encourage him what a meat sauce and do those meetings, but it main ways that that rank-and-file officers that beat cop is the government and so when I look at this definitely will ennoble standpoint we're outraged birth What occurred with mister Floyd be very Frank were outraged even going back before you until we outraged by really just decades and Decades of things that have occurred in this space. So, how do we respect and honor everyone's Humanity? How do we ensure the Irwin Fields as though they can and will achieve the American Gene regardless of edgy maybe and so from an overdose standpoint and we sit in front of Congress both the u.s. Sending US House of Representatives is that these issues go well beyond law enforcement. We in law enforcement have to own it off. And so I look back to Ferguson Missouri many of us tried and and continue to try to get the kinds of reforms and things we felt we needed after Michael Brown Stephanie Sussman deaths of many other three one more than Aragorn and so on and we were not successful. I think what you're seeing now is a cross-section of not just African-Americans, but all Races and then from genders and dead. And demographics across the board say this time we're going to put a stake in the ground and do our best to adjust. We saw over those eight minutes and 26 seconds. And then the broader thing is to age is of class and education housing jobs, et cetera is a whole lot more complex than just what occur but we had Noble or asking for comprehensive reform now just in law enforcement but looking at kind of a hobby. Oh, shared resources across our entire National landscape know, I mean, I think that that context that larger placement is huge and Clayton a under sort of what your perspective is as someone who literally as we've described it on this podcast is is also boots on the ground but maybe from a different direction. Yes, you know, this is not what they say the straw that broke the camel's back. That's pretty much what we're experiencing right now. I mean a lot of the Injustice and the stuff has been going on for decades. And we knew about it, you know, but some of the people that are never in power always turned a blind eye because as you say the video wasn't prevalent a lot of things just wasn't out there. But now I think Society changes you're starting to see, you know, the the people wake up almost, you know, as they say they're not starting to be woke but when you have a sister that's been put together for you know, decades generation and misses the status quo other system. It's so hard to change overnight. It's so hard to make adjustments where you know, it's kind of a finger it's going to take a lot of sacrifices going to take a lot of love. It's going to take a lot of you know, just Community effort in order to put for certain things to make sure that you know, we change the system from within and from without people try it like no one wants to keep getting pulled over by law enforcement. No one wants to keep going, you know the same old same old when all them Going to do is live. All I want to do is live and a lot of folks and how communities they are in survival mode because they've been surviving for so long that that's all they know. So when you got individuals in a survival mode and they're trying to move around or they're trying to you know, make sure certain things for they family is good, you know, if individuals around me willing to do anything anything wage and everything to anybody to because that's that's Survival Mode. They not living anymore because they they feel like it's not worth. It don't matter know regardless will happen. Everything will still be the same that's how they feel and and you know, that's what you know, we have to do and change that mindset on your holiday. You perceive certain things because if they always feel defeated and their survival mode, it's going to stop progress from family, you know, and then the places where it needs to be because they're not thinking about their future. They not thinking about nobody else feature. They thinking only in the present and that day to survive just for the next ledge

J Davis Mister Floyd Stephanie Sussman Durham Us House Of Representatives Michael Brown North Carolina Aragorn Ferguson New York Frank Missouri Congress Clayton
Army beats Navy 15-0 in 121st meeting of historic rivalry in West Point, New York

Ben Shapiro

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

Army beats Navy 15-0 in 121st meeting of historic rivalry in West Point, New York

"Do a the population coin toss you need people for today's who seem Army to be Navy members game, of that population. Army Obviously, beat maybe so 15 this is 0 where things because stand. of Apparently the pandemic. The in 2011, fanfare of the she rivalry enrolled as a looked student quite at CSU different, East Bay, no long She served traffic as president lines of the school's or tens Chinese of student thousands Association of Spectators. and president of the The team's campus originally chapter of Asian were Pacific set Islander to face American off in Philadelphia's Public Affairs. Lincoln Financial It is a Field. national organization, But because of encouraging the limit Asian on outdoor Americans event, to get involved in Pennsylvania, civic affairs. the And roughly then she used 8000 that as a cadets lever and midshipman in order to get filled into politics, the stands and she had an here uncommonly close at relationship. this stadium boxes. Alex With the Chinese Hogan. The last Embassy, time Army Navy and she played used at West these Point was 1943, Bay area campus organizations a federal judge as and as

Association Of Spectators Army Lincoln Financial National Organization CSU East Bay Navy Philadelphia Pennsylvania Army Navy Hogan Alex Bay Area Campus
"national organization" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:00 min | 5 months ago

"national organization" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"So we're going back to the savage glossary from the old days. Of the favorites Savage and so let's see if these are any good. These are some of the names I called W. Bush. Ah, comedian conservative. She ocracy Clinton Kool Aid. Hijack son clipped hair, mean faced liberals, Lexus liberals. N a. W no W National Organization of which is ninth Circuit Court of Slim Eels. Trickle down immorality. Secretary of Hate John Kerry, Waffen I N s the Janet Reno Brigade, the Clintons Patasse's people. I would not refer to Hillary Clinton as the first lady called it. The last lady. Whenever I referred to the third world, I would call it the turd world. The government media complex. Femi Fascist Check pants. Republicans, Demon cats, dunk ism. And then recently, I use terms such as knee jerk conservatives and compassionate conservative those interesting, but they're not really insults. They're better insults than that. And some of them I have for gotten. That you remember again. This is not going to be like a nostalgia Christ show. I am actually elated that this is finally over. So what I want to do now is go to the next stage, which is Um Well, let's put I used to say to people when I was on the air in the nineties there only nineties. I'd sit in front of the microphone. God has been a long time. It seems like one day to me. Would say to you. I know I'm really exerting myself too hard. I shouldn't do this. I know this is not good for my health. Almost every day. I fear dropping dead from exhaustion or heart attack from the way I did my shows I would do a show. Ask any program director ever worked with May I come off the stage sweating. And never forget. I wonder if I could mention who are my first PD was was Jack Swanson. Jack is probably one of the most knowledgeable program directors in the history of talk radio, and I could tell you about him another day. But I So Jack, I once said to me the beginning in the early nineties, a ks about studios down on front Street, which I remember to this day. Jack would be out on the balcony. Before the show. Smoking doesn't smoke anymore, I guess. And I go out there we chat. Jack was smart. Jack had a law degree. Jack was one of the smartest people I ever met in radio, but he knew talent. Which unfortunately, is a lost art in the radio business. And Jack knew I was a natural talent. Remember? I was an older man. I started radio in my fifties. Remember that I had other careers before I went into talk radio. And all of them were successful. So that's a separate story for my own biography. I don't even bore you with that now. So Jack and I would talk and, you know, we say a lot of different things about radio and this and that. And I remember those early days of radio very, very strongly, but the point of this little vignette Is that after a show I'd be sweating from the soles of my feet to the top of my head because I put my all into it. I mean, when I do a show, I wave my hands. I walk around I was the only guy in the history of talk radio who used barbells in the studio. You may not know that there were 2 £20 weights of the Caiazzo studios, and there's the pump iron during a show. Was a wiry guy and I did it not to show off. I did it because it pumped me up. So Jack said. That shows you You're really doing your show you really into it, he said. Anyone who walks out of a radio show and didn't break into a sweat is not really there that mailing it in. So that's what he said. You know what I'm saying? So here we are years later and remember saying to my audience, I'm going to do this until you hear a clunk on the table of my microphone falling down as I dropped out of a heart attack. Well, lo and behold. Thank God that didn't happen. But I had a warning almost a year today, December 5th of this has been some year over the last year and things change in your life. But unlike Some. I didn't quit. I thought about it. I went on the air. Two days after I was in the hospital. Because I wanted to be on the air. And then I struggled through the first month till I started to get old stronger. And then here we are. Almost a year later, and now this is all gonna be over. Was switching over to the podcast, of course in January, so today's show is a little self indulgent. And I have begun the long goodbye and I've said to you What are your favorite savage shows? When did you first hear the show? What do you favorite cause? What's your favorite savage insults? It's interesting to me that no one has said the mama Savage show. Which many people used to say was their favorite show when I would call my mother in her senior citizen living home in Florida. In her Last years. Some of the shows were amazing. She was much faster than I was and It's easy to under estimate a parent because you don't think there was cool is you know for the time you 15 you think your parents are antiquated old. Out of it. You know you want to be around them. You think you're smarter than fasten them better looking to them. As time went on. Of course you grow up in the will. That crap goes away. And then, um, if you're lucky enough to have a parent who lives into their eighties and have a dialogue with them, you find out they're different than you may have thought they were when you were younger, you know? So once she was on the show, we could probably rob. It's probably searching for right now. You know the sex thing, Robert member that one So I'm talking with her. Remember she was about 85 at the time 86. And normally we would talk about food. You know, she's always complaining about the food in the senior citizen home Food was big, dark, Great Cook. From New York and you talk about Thanksgiving. My God, what memories? The house was full with our little house, 20 ft wide. And one of those attached brick houses and a dining room. So called was a dining room was clean, neat table never used.

Jack Swanson Hillary Clinton Clinton Kool Aid Lexus Circuit Court of Slim Eels W. Bush John Kerry W National Organization Janet Reno Brigade Femi Fascist Secretary Caiazzo studios program director Great Cook New York Robert Florida
"national organization" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"national organization" Discussed on KGO 810

"National organizations who will press Joe Biden and Camilla Harris to turn their plan into law if they win. Gina McCarthy is president of the NRDC Action Fund on was the administrator of the U. S Environmental Protection Agency. During President Obama's second term. Annie Leonard is executive director of Greenpeace, Yusa and Tamara Tolls. Lawful is North America, director of 3 50 dot or Grassroots environmental group and co chair of the Green Leadership Trust, a network of indigenous and people of color who serve on the boards of national environmental organizations. Before we get started, producer Juliana Bradley put together some additional context for this program. It'll start getting cooler. You just watch California tonight is home to a record shattering heat. Climate change has been polling as a top issue in 2020 Democratic should not be a part of Trump taking swift action to roll back much of President Obama's climate change. United States will withdraw from the Paris climate accord. The American people can be problems because this historic agreement is a tribute to American leadership. President Obama is making the fight against Climate change central to his presidency will mark a new chapter in America's leadership on climate change that will strengthen our security and create millions of new jobs in the process that.

president Obama executive director NRDC Action Fund North America Joe Biden U. S Environmental Protection Gina McCarthy Green Leadership Trust Grassroots environmental group Annie Leonard Camilla Harris Yusa Juliana Bradley Tamara Tolls United States administrator California Paris
"national organization" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"national organization" Discussed on WTOP

"The shooting officer found the gun 98 ft, away from where Kay was shot. A second suspect got away Theatre, Knee General for D C will conduct an independent review of the shooting. All the officers involved are on administrative Leave Megan Clover Data Beauty Opie News. And the idea was responding to the release this morning of the body cam footage, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of the District of Columbia, Monica Hopkins, says in a statement. The D C. Police department's approach to gun recovery has been dangerous and ineffective for years. The tragic shooting and death of 18 year old John K. Is the logical conclusion of a policy that not only meets violence with violence. But actually escalated incited, especially in our black communities. A page Fernandez with the National Organization calls D. C. Police department, one of the most problematic in the country. She says the department's quote over policing a black communities has resulted in one of the highest racial disparities in police killings in the entire country. Stay Tim 307 on w T. O P P after his predecessor resigned amid claims of racial bias at the police department, Hector Villas. His was named the interim police chief at the Prince George's County Police Department in June and now as a national search for a chief for the department, continues the state's attorney in the county that she's encouraged. I really appreciate the transparency of the new police chief Prince George's County State's attorney, Aisha Braveboy, says. There's been an open line of communication between her and the less we talk. Early we communicate often also says he seems to be open to hearing from her about where the police department can improve and also has worked with her on training programs for officers were going to be conducting training's on fifth, UM and manned use of force and public integrity. Blaise was the assistant chief for the department but assumed the role of interim chief after Hank's tow whiskey, resigned in June. Mike Murillo. W T o p New Friday morning September 4th welcoming to double the GOP, Add 308. Traffic.

County Police Department D C. Police department Prince George Aisha Braveboy Fernandez assistant chief Mike Murillo American Civil Liberties Union officer Kay Hector Villas GOP executive director Monica Hopkins attorney County State District of Columbia Tim Blaise
Danni Reches: How to Enrich Your Experience as a PhD Researcher

Papa Phd Podcast

05:11 min | 9 months ago

Danni Reches: How to Enrich Your Experience as a PhD Researcher

"I'd really want Danny to focus on. What's your projects have been you know and? One of them we already mentioned and is quite evident but. Other projects you've been developing besides just your PhD research and the idea is also to see if we can take out of that, how that enriched your experience as a PhD student and how listeners out there could maybe take some some example of that too. Also wherever they are You know find a group of like minded people and also enrich their experience and make it a a richer one and A. How to make their PhD a more diverse experience than just doing their research? That's where I wanted to say. I've been to a lot of different things and this is something my supervisor has warned me for so. Now, a bit more cautious at I'm trying to do it a bit less, but I've been slowed down by the whole situation with corona. Anyway. So I just want that to be a little bit of a warning when I start talking about all the fun things that I did because you definitely have to keep in mind how much a person can do without burning out. By As let me start with w about my love for conferences, especially if they're paid for and abroad. in a way, it allowed me to keep traveling, which is so much love. In, my first year Beastie, I managed to spend three weeks in. Australia where never been before somewhere in the mountains beautiful place. at the form. And there are. A huge conference on different topics with two hundred. Students, not only be as there were just a few these most of them were in. From all over the world is shared my flats with someone from Pakistan right as an Israeli. F from the Philippines ends from South Korea and we went to arts events and I a events conferences about politics about health. All kinds of fields bunket, Moon spoke there prisons of Australia's spoke there I was invited as far as Israel delegation do very fancy dinner with people who worked at important banks and things like that. So this was like the big thing that I was very excited about enemies I might give per station about my research about a Mike Proposal and I got some really useful feedback from people from the field. So this was absolutely great. So in a way, it was a lot of fun at for me. It was free, but it was also different work because I got that feedback that I needed. Has to continue to projects, and then I've also spent some time in Brazil. which was the first time that was really great and I gave myself a few extra days in Rio. also about migration on a learned a lot about migration in the Global South 'cause, I focus very much Europe. And then I've done my trips to Germany for research. So this way, I get to travel been to Cairo in January for sight that have seen a beer minutes. For a conference of the. National Organization for Migration that's connected to the UN. And I presented my research on the bow dare. which was pretty cool and there will so policymakers there which is something I'm very much interested in going into after. Doing. The interesting. So also some networking definitely. And just to see how day spoke about similar topics outside of academia. So these are things that I love doing that definitely projects because you have to apply for these things especially if they involve money right and they need to plan all of your trip started dime and only Gives you a flight ticket place stay but doesn't say anything about the preparation of your actual doc or bolster at the conference. And then there you're also working 'cause you're networking is about your topic trying to get out be volts. Things like that. But for me, it was very motivating. It's It's everything I ever wanted to travel for work right. And besides that, I've always works next to my degrees I am getting scholarship, but it's not enough to survive off. So I'm working also for the center where I study. And they're responsible for organs of guest lectures like getting the guest lecturers in also from countries to speak to our students in English we also have trips for students plans, for example, to embassies here in Israel. So they can see what their options are after the grief. And also conferences and Colloquia. So this way I, really got to learn how to organize the these events and be working on something that's not so much research, but still helps with the network.

Moon Israel Australia Danny National Organization For Migr Supervisor Pakistan Corona Beastie Germany Philippines UN Europe Cairo South Korea Brazil. Rio.
Trump administration begins formal withdrawal from World Health Organization

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

02:16 min | 10 months ago

Trump administration begins formal withdrawal from World Health Organization

"President Trump is following through on his threat should withdraw from the World Health Organization, which he's criticized along with China for the response to the initial Corona virus outbreak in Wuhan. Are you seeing any evidence that this is something the American public is paying attention to you at all? Or is You know, I worry about the virus really just swallowing everything else. Well, I think it's probably the latter. People are most interested in their date early. It's a life and whether or not their kids to be able to go back to school in the fall, whether it's safe for them, whether they've got a job, whether it's safe to go back to that job, Get on the subway. Get toe work. What's gonna be happening at work? You know if I'm you know, age am I going to be exposing myself to cope? You know, at work and the W H O way off in Geneva. It's kind of not on their radar screen Thie president's decision, too. Withdraw the United States. Is the result of his feeling that the W H O misinform the United States about the severity of the outbreak in China. He blames China. For the same not informing the United States he believes, blames the W. H O. He blames individual state governors, particularly in Democratic states for not doing enough about the Corona virus. There's a lot of blaming done by the president, but Truth of the matter is that he was getting plenty of intelligence separate from the W. H O through the National Security Council and other health authorities way back at the beginning of the year. And the president away, you know, talk virus down that it was going away that it would go away. You don't spring, you know, got warm. I mean, you've heard heard all this. So the plane the W H O I think is kind of a nonstarter. It serves a purpose. It's not perfect, but it serves a purpose, and it's in the health interests and in the self interest of the United States citizen to be a part of that inner and national organization. Essentially given them a one year notice of withdrawal. So it'll be interesting to see what happens with

United States President Trump China W H O World Health Organization Wuhan Thie National Security Council Geneva W. H O W. H O.
Planned Parenthood Improperly Claimed $80 Million in Coronavirus-Relief Loans

Morning Edition

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Planned Parenthood Improperly Claimed $80 Million in Coronavirus-Relief Loans

"Morning which organizations should get money from the federal government's coronavirus relief programs like many Planned Parenthood chapters around this country received funds from the paycheck protection program several Republican senators now want Planned Parenthood to return the money NPR national correspondent Jeremy cameras on the story Sarah good morning good morning Steve what did the Planned Parenthood chapters receive exactly so what we're talking about is the federal loan program under what's known as the cares act the one meant to keep small business workers on the payroll during this crisis so small businesses and small nonprofits with fewer than five hundred employees can apply for forgivable loans and it's important to note that while Planned Parenthood federation of America is a big national organization the national groups as they did not apply for these funds instead it's the local Planned Parenthood organizations that operate clinics around the country that received the money I talked with Stephanie frame the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of southwest and central Florida she says they got a little over two million dollars mostly to cover employee paychecks economic uncertainty at that moment was profound and the two weeks while we waited for this loan we spent having some very tough conversations about what we do we didn't get a strong so it's not clear how much Planned Parenthood or its affiliated groups have applied for or received nation wide fox news has reported and some Republican senators have repeated a figure of eighty million dollars combined nationally but the small business administration which administrates these loans would only say that the agency doesn't comment on individual borrowers okay but in any case the money was loaned to these Planned Parenthood chapters loans that they may not have to pay back if they keep people on the payroll like a lot of other businesses and non profits but this particular nonprofit does work that some Republican lawmakers are ideologically opposed to what they say right a Florida senator Marco Rubio who's chairman of the Senate small business committee says that Planned Parenthood isn't eligible for these funds under the program's rules he wants the money returned immediately he wants the SBA the small business administration to investigate why and how Planned Parenthood got the money and I talked with Republican senator James Lankford of Oklahoma who's also objected to this he also wants Planned Parenthood to send the money back that's what the Los Angeles Lakers are done that's what check check is done that's where risk Chris is done so other organizations arms exposed that they should not taken the money have returned the money so that would be the reasonable thing for them to be able to beat and Lankford says because Planned Parenthood affiliates nationwide have many more than five hundred employees combined they don't qualify so Steve there's some dispute about how to interpret these rules but let's not forget there is a big political element to this I mean currently it is illegal in most cases for federal funds to pay for abortion but there is a long standing political debate about any federal funds going to Planned Parenthood because of what it has come to represent about the national debate around abortion and of course Planned Parenthood has argued they do a whole lot more than that perform abortions how is Planned Parenthood responding to the specific criticism here well they say they haven't received word from the SBA small business administration about this they only know what Republican senators are saying and what's been reported by fox which says that the SBA has sent a letter to Planned Parenthood affiliates informing them that they're not eligible for this money and instructing them to return it but again SBA isn't commenting on this are you able to figure out what the rules actually say and how they actually apply to this particular organization it's hard to say for sure Steve I talked to a few lawyers about this and I'm hearing that there is just a lot of confusion Republican senators insists Planned Parenthood doesn't qualify under the rules Planned Parenthood says each local affiliate looked at the program decided whether to apply for this paycheck support but a lot of lawyers say the rules are unclear and they've been

Virtual Indigenous commencement celebrates 2020 Indigenous graduates

Native America Calling

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Virtual Indigenous commencement celebrates 2020 Indigenous graduates

"This is national native news. Antonio Gonzales the Mescalero Apache tribe is calling for the resignation of us. Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Tara. Sweeney the New Mexico tribe sent a letter to president trump this week raising concerns about Sweeney's ties to Alaskan native corporations and their inclusion in the eight billion dollars and treble cove in nineteen relief aid in the Cares Act Mescalero. Apache president gave Aguilar believed Sweeney has a conflict of interest as a former businesswoman. For An Alaskan Native Corporation. Aguilar says Mescalero is joining other tribes. Which have already called for her to resign. Time of quogue nineteen. We've been working very hard with the with everybody in the federal government working with our lobbyists and we just been trying to push and push it has come to our attention that You know mysteriously has tried to a lot corporation you know it's money set aside for tribes or a bunch of tribal leaders have been on calls. We've been talking and saying how unfair this was you know so we didn't feel it was right so we. I'm of us. We went ahead and just says you know what it's right. We can't have somebody in there representing you know. Other corporations besides tribes in mid April the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's association similar letter to the trump administration accusing Sweeney of seeking to divert emergency treble cove in nineteen eight to Alaska native corporations a spokesperson from the Interior Department. Said it's false. Sweeney has attempted to divert funds away from American Indians and on the talk show native America calling Tuesday Sweeney commented about the controversy. I want to reiterate the I am and will continue to be committed to supporting all American Indians. And Alaskan natives My approach has always been focused on inclusiveness transparency and partnerships and I was raised with high ethical standards and I take those responsibilities seriously I made sure that my participation was evaluated by career ethics officials who determine that there was no statutory or regulatory prohibitions in the administration's ethics pledge that would limit my participation in consulting with Treasury As they went to implement the the Cares Act the issue of Alaska native corporations eligibility for Tribal Cares Act. Funding isn't federal court. Sweeney declined to comment on the litigation. Meanwhile tribal leaders including Aguilar say. They're waiting on much-needed treble cove. Nineteen relief aid. Several national organizations are hosting the event virtual indigenous commencement on facebook Friday. They're recognizing native students as cove in nineteen has cancelled graduation ceremonies and celebrations across the country. Graduates families and friends can share photos videos or comments. Melvin Monette Beraha says President and CEO of indigenous education. One of the hosts he says are already more than forty five hundred participants. Beautiful are excited to be able to share their photos People do feel a little bad. I think that they are not receiving their cap and gown Like they were going to so. We're asking people's supposed excited pictures of their treatment in their personal celebration. Maybe they're in their traditional regalia. Maybe they're not maybe photos of them throughout the year just to share who they are and what they're going to do next. The celebration is for graduates of all grades. The Hash Tags are twenty twenty native Grad and deer native graduates. The virtual commencement will continue through this summer. I Antonio's Gonzales.

Sweeney Alaskan Native Corporation Aguilar Mescalero Antonio Gonzales Alaska Great Plains Tribal Chairmen Assistant Secretary President Trump Melvin Monette Beraha Quogue New Mexico President And Ceo Facebook Apache Gonzales Interior Department Treasury America
"national organization" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"national organization" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A national organization that supports undocumented students who are pursuing careers in healthcare and science Denise is a medical student at the I can school of medicine at Mount Sinai hospital in New York and she's a master's candidate at Harvard University new is a first year medical resident at chan Zuckerberg General Hospital in San Francisco both are undocumented immigrants and daca recipients good to talk to you both thanks thank you you're listening to the weekly broadcast of world affairs this produced in partnership with KQED I'm Philip yeah we just heard from Denise Ross Marquez in jury I knew the T. Vong scored their medical professionals and daca recipients were fighting on the pandemic's front lines next we'll hear from another care giver whose work puts her at risk of contracting cove in nineteen hospitals across the country are struggling to find enough healthcare professionals to treat their covert nineteen patients from New York to Colorado states are encouraging retired doctors to come back to work they're also struggling to hire enough nurses the World Health Organization reports a nursing shortage of five point nine million worldwide and that was before the pandemic started we know we have a finite number of health care workers a growing number of patients and really a dwindling supply of health care providers wealthy nations make up for the shortfall with immigration from developing countries in the U. S. almost sixteen percent of our nurses just a little under one out of six are immigrants many of these nurses care giving duties extend far beyond their day jobs as they risk their lives to treat patients in their adopted country they're also struggling to support their families back home world affairs producer Teresa consul realis has more around seven o'clock in the morning wrestling fan way back gets to go home she works the night shift at a hospital in Galveston Texas caring for the acutely ill she updates the day nurses as they file into the hospital says goodbye to our patients then.

Denise Mount Sinai hospital New York Harvard University chan Zuckerberg General Hospit San Francisco Denise Ross Marquez T. Vong World Health Organization Philip Colorado producer Teresa consul realis wrestling Texas
Second Generation Genetics

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

08:10 min | 1 year ago

Second Generation Genetics

"All right well we earn spur. Well I know I guess it's not spring yet but it seems like it's trying to be spring here it's trying. It's making me anxious. I WanNa plant some stuff. I know. Well that's everybody's implant fever. There's a lot of people out there right now. That are you know getting ahead of the game. I you know like J. B. E. popped in late February He's already like two or three weeks deep on his stuff so people are out there. Doing we don't usually do it to like March because they get paid like we. We don't need nine foot plans exactly so so. There's no really reason for us to go until about now but we are going to pop seeds now ready. I think that basically where we pop in our crosses from last year for sure because we gotta work those and I guess will pop you know whatever we decide on the ripcord jd short yep and then of course the rip cord and then yes. Of course the ripcord have to because I mean we've been waiting for that one mix monsters. Yes things are ugly. So we're GONNA Maybe considered crossing those two since since we have them. Why not why not? It's supposedly very very gassy. Now I told you about it. Got Me really high in studio when he brought it in for the Accu. I don't got to try it quite yet. You Jealous loop a little bit all right. So let's get right into the news just a few things here. The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and explosives issued a memo requiring gun dealers in Michigan to use federal background checks because current policy is allowed to many habitual marijuana users to illegally obtain firearms. Are Dirty. A bitch will marijuana use. Our SAMPHA CAN POT SMOKERS. Dammit figure shot a whisking come down. We'll sell your gun all day long you I. It's terrible. It's terrible I take that back. I mean it's just terrible that they're being so focused on a bitch you'll marijuana users as they put it. Yes exactly food and Drug Administration finally sent Congress Overdue Update on its efforts to formulate policy on enforcement discretion for CD products. Basically what this was you know? They've been getting dinged to come up with some guidelines for marketing. Yeah because people can make these crazy claims and they kind of have been. Yes I mean and if it's not crazy claimed CBD bedsheets in like. I'm surprised they haven't come up with. Cd TAMPONS AND CBD. I think they have some but they the CD pillow. Have you seen that one? You'll see okay. The pillow and I was the reason. I- pauses because of thinking about that. Yeah the CBD. Tampons probably not for a while. I could see that being well. It's they've offered you know they I was. I remember when we first went into top shelf and we were told by one of the guys in there about using I think it was empower on a Tampon and that his girlfriend did it. And so it helped with it helps with internal use of keeping cramps. Os sure will mean empower. That shits the bomb so. I expect their products to work. But I had a lapse or I'm like wait a second. That doesn't sound too crazy. But yes CBD pillow. I mean with snap crazy I mean. Do they surprised? They don't have like CD car seat covers and Shit Cagno. Ashdown way you drive in which I could see this commercial now. Do you have road rage order now? Our new. Cbd Car seat covers in road rage and your road rage now. Only twenty nine ninety five organ activists announced that they've collected more than the required number of raw signatures to put a drug decriminalization treatment. Expansion measure on the November ballot. This is what we've been talking about. We've had a couple of interviews. One was decriminalised and also we talked with a Delic and we referred number numerous times even read the news articles about how organs pushing for decriminalized drugs all of them really but You know Suicide in An and the genes is part of that to the signatures haven't been validated yet. Though so the campaign will keep collecting for more absolutely so basically. They announced Thursday that they had gathered. One hundred twenty. Five thousand signatures was huge I guess invalidated so that means. Probably no one's not. What responded back we know what that means is they gotta validate that the all those signatures are legit. So basically they WANNA make sure that they're not like duplicates or you know if they're forging signatures. I don't know exactly how they do that. Basically your son's nephew. Yeah well. It wasn't there but yeah just make sure that they're legit signatures. So their efforts is to go over. There already. Claimed ten thousand over. But they're going to continue going just to have some sort of safety They've had really good response though and not really surprised. I mean organ. I think is one of the places. It's going to be pioneering theologians. You know we didn't so much with cannabis but it seems like we're really pushing for pretty quick with the with people wanting to do this. Yeah this initiative is backed by the National Organization Drug Policy Action It's GONNA make it. Basically a civil infraction punishable by a maximum. One hundred dollar fine no jail. Time Nice and this is the problem. I just have to mention this. This is only thing that really bugs me about this and we did mention this previous. I think it was indicriminate. But the measures going to take funds not all of them but takes some marijuana tax revenue from schools education and redirect that to substance abuse programs. I get it. It's just education you know that was a great thing that we were getting from the cannabis taxes and we still will get that. I just don't know how much is GONNA be diverted. I hope it's not enough to affect education because right now everything's going well but as you know even with this money they still have short days at school They still don't. It's not like before where was five days of the same schedule. So anyway you could guarantee school. Most of the year is right right right and there wasn't extra days taken offer. It's really strange now. So even though with all this money they still do have some somewhat of a budget. I guess that limits their time at school A study indicated that THC might be present continuously even in non daily smokers at low levels even if the smoking occasions are separated by a week. Yeah I think there's so many variables like if you have a high metabolism that you know might be. You might be able to get away but we all know thirty days. I mean if you're smoking but I don't think that this study probably took an account. Niacin CRANBERRY JUICE. Lots and lots and lots and lots and lots of water. Yes yes you'd have to do that but yes. This isn't too surprising. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Released a solicitation for grant applications to fund studies investigating quote the effects of cannabis and cannabinoid exposure on the developing brain from pre and post natal development through young adulthood in humans and using animal models. Yes it has tested on animals as we should there is not a lot of. There's not a lot of solid evidence or studies on especially on developing prenatal babies. And we've talked a few times about our situation when we had our two year old so I think that stuff like this needs to be done and I'm glad to see this. I had to mention that as well too.

Marijuana Cannabis Wanna Accu National Institute On Drug Abu Bureau Of Alcohol Tobacco Fire J. B. E. Drug Administration Niacin Ashdown Michigan Solicitation National Organization Congress
No Washington D.C. ballot measure to decriminalize sex work after local activists object

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

No Washington D.C. ballot measure to decriminalize sex work after local activists object

"There will not be a measure on the DC ballot to decriminalize prostitution at least for now the effort dropped after an uproar from local sex sex work activists The Washington Post reporting the national advocacy group call decriminalize sex work has been working on legislation to eliminate criminal penalties for prostitution but local groups also working on the measure I've told the national organization to stay out the post says the object to the organization's predominately white and cisgender leadership arguing that black Latina and transgender women bear the brunt of anti prostitution laws local activists say they'll continue organizing on the

Prostitution The Washington Post
Washington - No D.C. ballot measure to decriminalize sex work after local activists object

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Washington - No D.C. ballot measure to decriminalize sex work after local activists object

"Two there will not be a measure on the DC ballot to decriminalize prostitution the effort was dropped after an uproar from local sex work activists The Washington Post reporting the national advocacy group called decriminalize sex work has been working on legislation to eliminate criminal penalties for prostitution but local groups working on that legislation of told the national organization to stay out the post says they object to the organization's predominately white and cisgender leadership arguing that black Latina and transgender women bear the brunt of anti prostitution laws local activists say they will continue organizing on the

Prostitution The Washington Post
From The Tea Party to The Resistance

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

09:54 min | 1 year ago

From The Tea Party to The Resistance

"Imagine it's early. Two thousand nine. Barack Obama has just been sworn in as the first african-american president in the history of the United States after momentous election soon resistance arises. The Tea Party comes into being all over the United States. In many places people come out to say they don't like what's going on and they wanted to stop now fast forward another eight years too early. Two Thousand Seventeen President. Donald trump has just been elected and the same thing happens people all over the come out to say they don't like what's going on and they wanted to stop so the tea party and the Democratic Resistance. Are they similar? Are they different? What can we learn by looking at the two of them together? Hi I'm Avi Green. And this is the scholar strategy networks no jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon in this episode. I spoke to Lagos. She is a doctoral student. Sociology at Harvard University and it contributed to the book a- bending American politics which just came out edited by Caroline Turbo and are very unbeatable. And here's our conversation. Thanks so much for coming under jargon. Thanks for having me so we could. You've set the stage by telling us some something about the tea party. No what what did professors got bull. I think. One of your other colleagues Vanessa Williamson. Learn about the tea party. You can give us that background that that would be great. Yes so professor. Scotch and Vanessa Williamson have published a lot of really interesting work on the birth of the Tea Party. And what they've done since they started in two thousand nine so after. President Obama was elected there. Was this backlash and it started off really small and small in the way that it was something people were talking about. They weren't excited for the politics of of Obama they weren't excited particularly for the economic policies. That would come with a stimulus which was referred to as Porculus and so a commentator on Fox News Rick Santelli told supporters and people who are listening. Let's go out let's protest. Let's throw t in the river. Which really translated to? Let's make our own uprising against what we think are really bad. Economic Policies so the tea party was a movement of people acting at the local level and they did this by making friends at protests between Tax Day April two thousand nine to the march on Washington in September of that. Same year organizing their friends reaching out to people on meet up on this before facebook. I really popular we kind of have to remember. This was actually ten years ago now. And the idea truly became something of we are trying to make a movement out of educating people who are interested and saying no to Obama's politics and as educational movement was wasn't is really spectacularly unique because it involved local groups engaging with one another so sharing information where he together to host lectures workshops but also working with national level funders and think tanks and candidates support groups that would be their packs that would be the candidates themselves and then also the RNC and what happened in two thousand nine is Americans for prosperity Civitas. The John Locke Foundation the coke brothers. They all got together whether in public or privately and we're starting to fund these groups not just through grants to do things or signs but their education. We want to support certain economic and voter policies in particular so came down to this idea that we're going to give education opportunities to these local groups e solid partnerships between the John Locke Foundation between Civitas. And this idea of saying let's go on educate people on the constitution. Let's talk about how local politics works and so these groups working in tandem with national organizations and there was a relationship there that started to push the party to the right large part the Republican party largely. Because there's no compromise so the tea party wasn't about finding a middle ground. It was like they took their suitcase. And they marched to the right and they haven't really stopped since and think tanks and these foundations went with them and at this time the Republican Party. Rnc were particularly hollowed out in a sense that there wasn't a lot of national and local support and there wasn't a lot of work between those two factions of the organization. So they kind of just had to go with the. Rnc could say we're a powerful group of tons of people who love the RNC who loved the Republican Party. Being what it currently is and we're GONNA fight for our status quo or are moderation or center right or there's a few people and they were basically quickly stampeded. Moseley by this this kind of insurgency on the right yes so jumps forward eight years to the flip side and before you tell us what. You found out about the resistance. Because I think you've found out a ton of things I love for you to tell me about what it was like to do this research like was this about like looking at big data sets and sitting in front of computers. Or did you get in a bus or a train or a car go someplace and if so where did you go? Yes so the thing that interests me most about the jumping forward as we have to remember that the tea party still exists so jumping forward as almost like getting on a train and we're all going in a direction of the future which is currently now the tea party produced all of this knowledge about how to engage congressmen and senators congresswoman. Anyone WHO's working in local national politics and so when it came time for the two thousand Sixteen Election Liberal Democrats were all just of course Hillary Clinton's going to win and didn't everyone was unbelievably stunned. Stunned sad I haven't seen the word devastated so often on social media and in the news before this moment and so you have. This question of people are wondering who voted for him. What's the direction America's going in? I'm devastated what's happening. And this is happening in local communities in rural areas and cities on college campuses and churches. There's this response that you see your friends on social media and this big idea of what we're looking for an we're trying to understand right like what happens after election of Donald Trump is. We automatically know. There's going to be something similar to the tea party solely because of this massive immediate response on facebook so there was a group. I don't know if anyone was a number. It was a secret group. It was called pantsuit nation. But I I'm just going to tell tell our listeners. I have to admit it I was not a member I was. It was an exciting experience. I think at the height of the group which was the day of the election. There's almost three million members and grew the idea that was you would share your excitement for a female president would wear your pants suit or your child aggressive dress up in a pantsuit to go to vote and once. Hillary Clinton lost this group went from being cheerleaders to being a support group and all of a sudden a member in this group. Teresa shook was like why don't we have a march on Washington and I'm going to jump ahead a little a pants. State Nation Actually took on nonprofit status. It was no longer able to be politically engaged in the same way so groups. This is where this whole local grassroots movement kind of picked up force. I WANNA fly there too. I think that's like a whole interesting story in itself you know. And we've had other researchers talked about the ways in which the land therapy and tax laws distort what people are able to do because activists say like. Oh I want to do war of this work and then the first thing people say. Let's get some grants so we can do it and it was like well. Let's be a five hundred eighty three and then you can't do politics the way that you were doing it before and it's a it's a very strange set of things that are happening. We talk about like it's a natural thing but it's all a manifestation of ways in which our our tax laws in our laws about regulating politics advocacy and. Who GETS TO DO IT? You know play out in real life. It's almost as if we walked into a vacuum where people want it to be able to tell stories of that experience of the support of a woman running for president her loss. And that's what happened with dancing nation but at the same time you had millions of people primarily women who were saying. I want to be more involved. I WANNA do more. How do I do it? And so there's this large push for March on Washington which became women's March which happened and two thousand seventeen and at the same time. So we're still kind of in December. You see something pop up online. It's the indivisible guide so who wrote it in and what is it and how did that play a role so visible guide was written by as relevent Leah Greenburg? Who are at this point in time have experienced as congressional staffers. Dc insiders so they understand what the tea party has been doing for the last eight years. So they post a Google doc and remember tea parties. You've been using meet up basic aged him out where eight years in the future. We've got new technology. The Google doc explodes wasn't side of it is a list of ways to beat. Donald Trump in the future based on what the tea party did. Just kind of completely agitate Obama's efforts for eight years

Tea Party Barack Obama Republican Party President Trump Donald Trump RNC Hillary Clinton Facebook Washington United States Professor John Locke Foundation Avi Green Google John Locke Foundation Between Harvard University Rick Santelli Vanessa Williamson
Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy amid sexual abuse lawsuits

Lance McAlister

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy amid sexual abuse lawsuits

"V. Boy Scouts of America is urging victims to come forward after that national organization filed for bankruptcy protection today in the first step toward dealing with multiple sexual abuse lawsuits the scouts plan to create a compensation fund for potentially thousands of men who were

V. Boy Scouts Of America
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:34 min | 1 year ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
The Orphan Train

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:21 min | 1 year ago

The Orphan Train

"Today the orphan train the little boys stepped off the orphan from train in Rockford Oregon hundred and five years ago. He had no luggage just the clothes he wore. He spoke only German. Someone had pinned a card art on his jacket. At said he was six years old. His name was Charles. Frederick before the day was over the boy would be loaded into a covered wagon with other children who've been the ship West from the crowd at New York City. Orphanages Frederick and his companions were headed for durant where they would be parceled out to farm families the Children Aldrin were part of a social experiment called placing out between eighteen. Fifty three nine thousand nine hundred twenty nine trainloads of destitute and homeless children ruinous many as two hundred fifty thousand in all were transported from New York City Boston and other cities on the eastern sea coast to cities and towns along along the burgeoning rail. Lines in America's Middle West and West eventually large missile West cities also established orphan trains in exchange for good homes. uh-huh children many of whom have been living on the streets and eating from garbage cans were offered to farmers housewives businessmen as indentured workers workers. Some children were lucky may went to families that adopted them and treated them with love for others. Like Charles. Frederick results were mixed. This Irish family took him my dad. Franklin Frederick Seventy seven says he was just someone to work on the farm although the place you now program operated in the United States for about seventy five years until recently it was little known part of history of American childhood. It wasn't a tone nineteen seventy eight. When orphan train a fictional account of first orphan train writers was published? The curiosity about the system began now. There's a national organization the station to help descendants of train writers find their roots nonfiction. Books have been written and organizations across the country like the Illinois genealogical society are gathering records about orphan train riders the orphan trains stopped included Rockford Freeport Rochelle Oregon in all ninety. Children were taken in by Oregon families. The babies would ride in train coaches. The older kids were just stuck in boxcars. They orphanage Operators couldn't afford to put them all coaches citizens and towns along. The rail lines learned that the orphan train was headed their way. When an orphan print agent posted handbills put notices in the local paper in the case of children from Catholic orphanages like Frederick and his companions priests in parishes along the way were notified in advance and asked to lineup homes? When the train arrived towns people wanting to child would come to examine them and make a choice? People would poke their arms luck their muscles they would pick out kids. They wanted if any were leftover. They would go back on the train and move onto the next stop. Many children fell through the cracks. Though they were mistreated malnourish overworked on the other hand. For at least half it was a good experience. They had opportunities opportunities they would not have had if they stayed where they were. They may not even have survived

Franklin Frederick Charles Oregon Rockford Freeport Rochelle Ore New York City Rockford Aldrin United States America Illinois Durant Boston
Apps don’t provide reliable help for suicide prevention

Geek News Central

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Apps don’t provide reliable help for suicide prevention

"Are so we know the holidays and we kinda talked a little bit about this other prior show for those of view that might be suffering a little depression over the holidays Just a fair warning. The folks from the verge reporting the APPS are not providing reliable so help for suicide prevention a study found non-functioning crisis hotline numbers in six APPS. This is really really really bad. And you know. These types of APPs could filling an important role and many people feel comfortable looking for or seeking help online. But what if it's wrong. Aw so here's the thing to remember the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. It's all you have to say. His you tell your device to find the number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Dad's that's GonNa get you a connected to a national organization. There's the Trevor Project as well so and of course there's different resources says outside the United States but It's bad news when the APPS or not keeping contact information up-to-date really really. They isn't in its. You know it could be the difference between life and death so again. Use your APP to search and if you need help please is cooper help. It's But a very sad state of affairs on on some APPS.

DAD United States Cooper
Introduction to Open Source Projects for Beginners With Safia Abdalla

Learn to Code with Me

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Introduction to Open Source Projects for Beginners With Safia Abdalla

"I would love if you could talk a bit about how you got into open source in what that gene so bear in mind a lot of folks listening to this show are brand new to technology and some maybe are have only been learning about it for me few weeks so you could tell me about that'd be great yes so if you google open source the dictionary definition is some legally about towel open source software is software where the creator the software gives you the right to modified or copy it in some way something in fact that is one definition of open source for me the definition of open source is any code that exists publicly the individ Joel's can collaborate on oftentimes people will host this code on platforms like hub DOT COM Where the CO distorted repositories and multiple software developers can come in and submit changes to the code that's in these repositories on opened up commentary about features or bug fixes that they would blake things like that for me open source software Israeli any software that people build together in a public fashion and how long has this been like around four like if again if that's the right word to freeze I'm sure we'll have been collaborating on on different kinds of software for ages but like I dunno like when did it become more popular or more common I guess are softer has been around since forever you pieces of open source software from the Sixties and seventies I would say marie-cecile it's gotten popular with the advent of tools like get help dot com which is often described as a social coding platform I think this was a really monument toll on technology because it gave people a place to share their code to collaborate on it in one centralized location taking the advent of those kinds of technologies was really helpful and I think in general theme emergence of the Web and the Internet is more accessible allergies for some people kind of brought about the advent of open source because now you had a way to communicate and interact with people who it didn't just work at the same company as you are studying the same computer science department university maybe you were a programmer At one university collaborating with a software engineer at a different company and the Internet kind of opened up these opportunities where people didn't have to be in the same space in order to have technical Oh conversations and to build soccer together I think it was really the Internet is is what did it At of course the Internet made a lot of important things happen in technology so that's I think that's fair to say yeah yeah and I would love to hear like how did you discover open source and what made you want to start participating in it yes so for me it started off as a personal challenge when I was a freshman in college I had gone you workshop series called Right Speak Code Right Speak Code is I believe a national organization here in the United States where different workshops will prop up in different cities it's geared at primarily women in tech and be idea is to help you build your brand as after engineer by writing you know blog posts books so on speaking at conferences or meet ups and coding on in open source expenses one of my kind of personal goals my freshman year of college is I wanted to get involved in all of those things I'm sorry I had started writing blog posts I had started speaking meet up some small local conferences and then my last big goal was I had to contribute to open source remember it good day I did it and I always like to tell the story it really puts it into perspective for a lot of people who are beginners and chest looking to get started an open source The first time I made it change to an open source project first time submitted a polar quest it was a one letter change was it it was so trivial in so many ways now that I look back at it but believe it or not I sat on that one letter change I think a week and a half trying to figure out how I use get and how I use get hub and how I use all of these different technologies how I make the change how I test embarrassed by it and I was just so nervous the whole time and spending so much time on it and then I submitted the request the container of the project the person who's in charge of reviewing pull requests send issuing releases and things like that reviewed it said Thank you and they merged it and it was done and that was an extremely again when I talk about like empowering moments in my career the first one was the first time I made a theme for my neo pets profile page I think another one was when I had my pull request merged into the open source project for the first time it was like wow I can do this it's not the hard you know I just have to put in time and I can do it and I've been doing open source ever since it's been about Oh boy like five years now sometimes people joke that I've spent a fourth of my life or more in open source But yeah that was kind of the catalyst for me is I had this personal goal of contributing to open source that was tied into my kind of other role of starting to build my brand as a software engineer in the night just got hooked on it so such a very it was a satisfying experience on it's always great tick collaborate and work with people and form a network of other software engineers that I work really well with to understand how I were that you know a really interesting idea I can go to them and hear me out and help me out with it it's great to have that network yeah that is such a cool story and I love how you told us how you like if just one letter change in you were sitting on it as it for a week that's really as really great and you mentioned you went to this conference invent rights be Code Your Freshman Year of college incident when was this like how much after how much time had passed after that event yeah so I would say I think I went to the event Gosh I have to dig through my brain I think I went to the event it must have been the winter of my freshman year of college and then the I spent like the winter and the spring you know blogging and I had found like a conference to speak at and some meet UPS to speak out in the summer is a summer after my freshman year of college I was Doing internship in the bay area and that's when I did the open source bid so it must have been maybe they could save to say like five to six months after that conference is when I got around to submitting my first pure question open-source wow K and you're studying computer science at your college that's that for some reason I thought you said your senior a year so I think I misheard you early I thought it was four years later but okay that make them accents but still universe four years later that would be a great story nonetheless so do you remember I project it was four yeah it was for a project in the Piney coca system it was cold pandas it's essentially a data analytics tool I was familiar with that project because I had used it during my part time job during my freshman year of college I was already familiar with as a user and the other thing that was really appealing about that project is they did a really good job of labeling all of their issues in their hub on their issues essentially realistic Bugs features that they need to implement and they had a really great labelling scheme where they kind of label things by how easy or hard it was how much time they expected it to take and then what category was in so it was really easy for me to essentially find an easy bug that would not take long time to do and typically in those are really great because they tend to be the kinds of things that are just small enough that the maintainers of the project might not have enough time to do something so small but small enough that you know a new contributor or someone who's never been working in open source can tackle them so that's how I got I chose the pandas project is the first project that I submitted a PR

Four Years Five Years Six Months
What is Landscape Architecture?

Revision Path

13:50 min | 1 year ago

What is Landscape Architecture?

"Studying landscape architecture. Is that right yeah. That's right what appeals to you about landscape architecture yeah no. I think something that appeals to me about landscape architecture is really the broad range of possibilities that come with it so i guess you could say architectures focus focus primarily on the building and landscape. It's everything outside of that in so that encompasses a lot of different types of spaces and a lot of scale space some really interested in more of the social aspect or like public spaces within the urban city. That's kind of what drew me to study landscape and under god. I was always focused on like thinking about the community people that lived around public spaces or in buildings that we we were designing for and i was really interested in thinking about okay how do people move throughout space or where do they interact and kind of like what are big places places or opportunities to engage communities more and give them access to green space clean air and other opportunities for like socialization shen yeah i think when most people think about landscape architecture they're thinking mostly about greenspan. Yeah parks up things things of that nature. I know here in atlanta. There's we have so many little just pocket parks in a way like little parks just kind of tucked in here and there i think right but now there's a proposal to build sort of part of a park over our highway over one of the highway but what are some of the other sorts of things that make up landscape architecture aside from that yeah. That's a good point. I think it's easiest to describe people like oh you know like park designed but they're actually a lot of different other types of the public spaces plazas one of the most famous places that a lot of people recognize is like the hotline so also thinking about post industrial uses uh spaces there also a lot of power and landscape where we can. We have a lot of control over sustainability so we can impact the environment in a positive way way. There are a lot of initiatives happening right now. New york to kind of protect the city against sea level rise so there are a lot of constructions happening along the the coast and we're seeing that development happened so there's a wide scale to thinking about design both on a regional scale but also they're smaller like hard scape plans and thinking about outdoor malls plazas and transportation kinda gets <unk> looped into that as well. How does transportation you looked into that yeah. I guess that is a big statement but i think now that people are kind of thinking about the future of like driverless cars i <hes> now we're thinking about how we can retake over the street for pedestrians or like. Maybe we will need as many spaces for car so i think there's a a lot of pedestrian centered ideas about read configuring street spaces or like what happens if we take away highways from you we know communities can be transformed those spaces into other types of recreational use or ecological use. I think to bypass a really big and thinking get about circulation so how do people move throughout spaces that can be both through cars <hes> through highlights through aeroplanes but also at the ground sound level like walking or biking dot space so those are factors. I think that a lot of designers try to influence into their designs but also could be it's like the highland is a completely new way of kind of moving throughout new york city so really you're. You're kind of like you have the opportunity to design on a bunch of different types of scales it sounds you can do something really small like a plaza or yeah ab- santa park but even apart can range in size from really small to like central park or something the yeah it's funny said positive because <hes> i guess for our first semester design school we had a design like from the smallest scale so like a courtyard yard and it was like teeny like enclosed space but it was really fun of what we can come up with and there were so many different ideas and it was kind of our first project and and then we ramped up in scale and thinking about boston's city hall plaza in that was like seven and a half acres and thinking about okay like this is a hard scape space like we weren't allowed to use like lawns or anything like that like it's completely like thinking about people moving freely and it had to be accessible supposed to boston's like governmental building and then our final design was ramped up in scale again and it was thinking about like waterfront design and interaction between the city city and also like recreational space say yeah. It's definitely a wide range of scales that you can design and everything in between. I'm glad you mentioned accessibility accessibility. That's been something that's been on my mind lately mostly in the web space and i'll bring this back landscape architecture so just just what would be your. I was reading this article this morning about how <hes> domino's pizza is trying to take a case all the way to the supreme court art because a customer suing them because their websites not accessible to not able to access it on a screen reader and there has been other types of lawsuits that are like this. I think there were people that were trying to sue beyond say because her website was not accessible and granted the web guidelines around accessibility normally normally tend to pertain to government sites in terms of enforceability beyond say side is not a government site. Neither domino's pizza however what i found is in the weapons that accessibility the is kind of a it's a slippery scale. Some people really adhere to others. Don't care about it at all but when it comes to landscape architecture accessibility is super important because all types of people have to move throughout spaces yeah. How do you design for physical accessibility yeah. No that's a good question and i think it varies in the designer what you're trying to achieve and some people are very much like oh. We don't want this to be accessed by like massive amounts of people like it could be very dangerous address. It could pose threats large gatherings but i think to like the more practical answers. Oh like in designing public spaces. There are laws and codes like a._d._a. Accessibility laws that you have to buy four but it's also like okay now you can accept those code standards or like how do you truly remake space open and then it raises more questions about like who is allowed in what spaces in who isn't so that got really interesting and especially in terms of the plaza plaza and how do you make a space feel comfortable for maybe a single person who's walking there or in their wheelchair and then also can the space <unk> accommodate like large art gatherings of protests like does the public have a right you know to gather and protests and speak in kind of connected large groups yeah. I don't know if that answers your question. No this is my question. It also made me think a little bit about sorta this concept that i've heard of with defensive design where sometimes certain public spaces like you say designed to keep people out yeah like for example park benches that may have a middle railing so no one can lay across them or four. Maybe low to the ground services. They'll put like little bumps or spikes on them so no one can sit comfortably on it. Yes what it reminded me that that definitely light comes up a lot in designed to in. It's like then. It gets extremely political suicide in like yeah okay. I'm just wondering design like this nice space that maybe people could have like a lunch break oregon but then i think too in the era of like public safety and security people get really like nervous about okay like who sitting sitting and lingering in these spaces and yeah. It's a fine line but i think it's also kind of exciting because you're giving a space where you would not you don't necessarily know what will happen like an park and prospect park in brooklyn. It's like a wonderful space. When i go there. I see people by gang doing tai not doing yoga with their dogs and like there's not a set like programmed area for that to happen. It kind of just is able to happen and there are like political local statements that also happened there so i think it's an exciting platform to be able to design kind of within that one thing when you when you sort of talk about spaces like this i'm thinking of how a few years ago there were a lot of public protests in the streets blocking highways and and blocking major thoroughfares thoroughfares and things like that and i know like here in atlanta for example there was a big complaints that people could walk down onto the highway. Yeah they're like oh. Why is that. Why is that possible which doesn't make sense like why wouldn't they you can drive down there. You walk down there but no it's interesting about the the sort of governance of different spaces for different types of people or even different modes of transportation. There's more that i want to dive into with the topic but i want to take it back a little bit. I'm really curious to know about more about you and how you came to be studying at harvard talking about all this stuff so where did you. Where'd you grow up yeah definitely so i was born in new jersey but i grew up my whole life and south west virginia. A little town called roanoke doc. Anybody knows it and i'm the youngest of three girls and so my mom. She's a new yorker. My dad was from chicago. They're both from big city and then when they have made they decided they wanted to move down south and kind of slow things down and so i grew up in roanoke must of my life i went to school with a lot of my friends like kindergarten through high school and even some in college. I think it was a good community where everyone was really well connected. It and everyone knew each other and so grown up in a place like that was really unique as i'm learning and then i went off to school to study architecture at the university of virginia i think tau i got there was like not a linear path at all listening like oh. How did you have it figured out yet was curious. Here is like has designed been like a big part of your childhood growing up where you're surrounded by it. Yeah i think one since i was surrounded by it i didn't really realized that until later and now like looking back. I was like oh <hes> my parents did a good job at like teaching me how to do this or that and so oh my dad did many things that he also briefly worked in furniture procurement in my mom went to fashion school for a little bit and then decided that wasn't for her but they in my grandma on my mom's side like always painted and drew and so my parents were good at like exposing me to the arts very early but i didn't realize what's that there were possible careers through design until high school and so i kind of was always interested in drawing and painting in but it was kind of like something i did just for fun and then i thought i wanted to be a doctor. I thought that was like what is going to do and i very it. Quickly realized like i don't like hospitals. I'm very scared of blood in bali fluids and so then i said oh my goodness like what am i gonna do. Who i think was like fourteen. I was like man. I just don't know what i'm going to study and my dad actually said what about architecture and then at that time i had no. I know i dea what that field was an. I was like what is this and <hes> in high school. I got to go to a couple of design camps at <hes> virginia ginny tech university. What was other school. I went to another school north carolina state university and they had like the summer design her rams that my dad found his co. You you should go in and you can kind of test and see if he liked it and so at first it was just such a different way of thinking and i was not really excited about it <hes> but then i went on to study it in college and it was very hard at first has a lot of people seal when i studied architecture but <hes> no now it turned out to be really amazing from people who have had on the show we've had a couple of of architects on before and they have always talked about i mean the difficulty of i think just yes of course learning about the subject matter but also a lot of those spaces are not super diverse and so if you're coming in there as quote unquote the other and that sort of just adds an element to the difficulty of studying and being a space like that yeah absolutely so no one in my immediate any family or anyone i knew of really studied architecture and so that was a whole new learning environment for me. I went to school in a lot of people the parents had studied architecture like they're punctual and so they were kind of already looped in the field and yeah it was very hard to understand the language <hes> just even what architecture it was <hes> it was a difficult amount of learning that you have to do a friend like learning the software but also a lot of technical skills that you need to choir but overall though what was your time at university of virginia yeah i think overall the wall. It was really great. 'cause then my first year the kind of restarted i think as my first year right before i got they restarted their no muss chapter. I know ma says the national organization

New York City Atlanta University Of Virginia Domino Boston City Hall Plaza Greenspan North Carolina State Universit Virginia Ginny Tech University West Virginia Santa Park Harvard Chicago Roanoke Doc MA Brooklyn Roanoke Oregon
Why Arent There Female CPR Mannequins?

BrainStuff

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Why Arent There Female CPR Mannequins?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production the vallarta hey brain steph lauryn bocom here breasts to put it mildly can sometimes get in the way they're the recipients of some unwanted attention it just to be fair some wanted attention they can make it hard to find properly fitting clothing and they require all kinds of special and sometimes times unpredictable maintenance they can cause back pain can hurt during exercise and can be strapped down by bras which are often uncomfortable and almost always expensive in all of this is inconvenient and annoying but not really a matter of life and death but did it ever occur to you. That breasts might be the reason that you might not be administered c._p._r. If you need it it's true and one new york based. Creative agency is taking the initiative to try to change that the problem. Is this those a to a formally or informally learn c._p._r. Or who are at least confident enough to attempted in a situation where it might do more good than harm are overwhelmingly comfortable only if if the chest of the person in need of c._p._r. Is reasonably flat in other words if resembles c._p._r. Dummies female breasts get in the way and research shows that those was who would be inclined to perform c._p._r. On cardiac arrest victim in need are less likely to do so if their breasts complicating the situation since it's mostly women who have breasts ests. It's mostly women who are subject to this kind of probably unintentional discrimination. So how much of an impact does this have. A research indicates women are twenty. Seven seven percent less likely to receive c._p._r. If the experience a cardiac arrest incident in public since prompt administration of e._p._r.'s key in such situations that could indeed be a matter of life and death but enter the woman. The woman again is training bras sorts to help bring equality to c._p._r. The mannequin is a fabric fabric add on the bestows a standard c._p._r. Dummy with breasts so people can learn c._p._r. In a way that will hopefully keep them from being scared to perform the lifesaving procedure on approximately gently half of the adult population. The idea is to get people used to the idea that performing c._p._r. On a woman means that yes there will be some hand to breast contact. We spoke by email with joan agencies co founder and chief creative officer jamie robinson via email. She said there are so many ways women are treated differently and this resulted in them dying in the streets with nobody rushing into help. It seemed like an issue that was solvable comes directly from a lack of education and awareness the performing c._p._r. And a woman is a normal and necessary thing though mannequin took about four months to develop from the time the jones team. I came up with the idea to its reveal in june of two thousand nineteen of course joan creative enlisted the help of medical experts to ensure that the woman is useful and accurate as possible that included -cluded dr audrey bluer the author of the study that inspired the entire endeavor. Who's currently an epidemiologist in resuscitation scientist at duke university. Joan shared shared the process with bluer and acknowledged that the team was fortunate to have that opportunity. The jones team also worked closely with other doctors and experts in c._p._r. Including the new york it based frontlines c._p._r. A school that was closely involved throughout the process and be united state of women a national organization that connects and amplifies the work of organizations nations and individuals who are addressing inequalities. These partnerships ensure that the woman akin is properly designed and has the credibility necessary to get into the right right hands to make an impact as attended. A joan isn't finished with a woman again in fact the hardest part may be yet to come convincing gatekeepers that it's is necessary and useful despite the overwhelming evidence that women are currently under served in this area jones team says they hope to get women again into every c._p._r. School school in the country by next year motivated by a goal that cardiac intervention saves lives furthermore. Joan isn't driven by profit robinson says that the idea was to make quote mannequin is easy to replicate. It's possible to encourage widespread adoption and thus its pattern is available to anyone with open source to plans available for free download the one of the elements of the story that initially caught our editorial teams. I is that joan creative initiated the woman it can project simply out of an opportunity and a need to do good good. It's unusual but not unheard of for creative agencies to spend time and resources on internal projects that aren't funded by client. Usually the goal for such a project is publicity and to be sure there's an element of that in the mannequin story but in this case there may be a measurable improvement in women's lives and the saving of them as as well. Today's episode was written by sri wit and produced by tyler clang. Brain set is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more on this and lots of other inclusive topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles and every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

C._P._R Starbucks Joan Jones Cardiac Arrest New York Jamie Robinson Iheartradio Tyler Clang Duke University Apple E._P._R. Scientist Chief Creative Officer Dr Audrey Co Founder Seven Seven Percent Four Months
"national organization" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Me like something's wrong. Sarah, Jane reference wasn't that song. Vera, is it says Queen Jane just let it. Yeah. I just let it play just little play for like full minutes. WGN? It's Jane Jane Jane song. I promise that Jane song by Bob Dylan, of course, and people are gonna Texan right now. And be like, don't, you know, this song thing you show it? It's your name. Right. I said, okay. I love the I love the whole reference to jank. Thank you so much. You've on that you want to ask you a question. Yeah. Do you feel all the pink power happening in the room tonight? Yes. Sorry, David, David pink, power girls. I'll win and my next guest in studio with me, I'm super excited to have here because they're doing something that is helping a lot a lot of people and they're really embracing their pink power. The organizers of the habitat for humanity is national women's Bill the week, which is may fourth in the th this is Chicago. So we'll we'll get into that. Ladies, please. Welcome Gina Glasgow. Say that right. Yes. He did. Well, we'll sit up. To the mic. That's good. And then I listened in all transparency, I gotta be honest. It is my college sorority roommates. Lynn michaels. I mean, Lynn Kazlauskas. That's okay. Okay. Call you by the maiden name. We're fine. It was a long time ago. Oh god. Yes. It wants to find eons ago ENZA your building houses. Then Lynn, no, no, no building. Houses says I don't ever remember at any sorority thrown tropic events you having a tool belt on in hammering anything in together. No. Usually, it was duress of some sort singing dancing ever. Now. We're talking about building houses. Now getting dirty, and I gotta be honest. I mean, I love you. You're my friends, and you're not just here on the air because you're my college roommate. No because I let you get away with things you're here because you guys are doing something really great. You're promoting really extraordinary week. And I see this, and I know it so that's why I wanted to have you end today. So tell us first of all we've all heard about habitat for humanity. But just give us the the big picture while habitat for humanity were nonprofit housing provider. And we work with individuals and families to provide an affordable home, one of the biggest misnomers may be that habitat gives homo homes away. Right. We don't give homes away. Our people get a hand up. Not a handout, they work alongside our volunteers. They do three to four hundred hours of sweat equity along with the volunteers. So is is is the national organization. Yes. And building houses all year round. Is that right? Correct. And but you guys are primary leaf focused on the will county. That's where I'm with will county habitat for humanity. And we are part of the Sokoto land coalition puck though, there was a Chicago land regional. Group that was formed with nine affiliates of habitat to solve the housing issues in Chicago, and the suburbs. Wow. And so you're directly with habitat and Lynn, your volunteer. I volunteer. Yes. And I'm on the committee, and you're on the committee for the the the women's belt, so the women's bills a week long because you're building a house in week like type Pennington could build a house in a day. What's what's up with the women here? Come what the house in a day or we're building several houses in seven days. We're we're we're starting we start momentum's Ana built, and we come together to support the community, and the people that we are putting in this house. Eventually it's all about coming together starting something and being productive in that in that time so taking me so the day of or the beginning of this week when rebuilding house. I mean, there's like I did women builds like saws hammers t squares penny again, boots pink t shirts. I mean you. You'd be amazed at how empowering it is to come together. And see everybody kind of in their pink gear ready to go ready to learn something, new sure. Absolutely. Because I would imagine a lot of the women. I mean, yes, there are women there that have their know what they're doing with this equipment. Right. They can actually build something. And there's a lot of women there that don't know. So if you're there, and you don't know if you wanna volunteer and you want to help. You don't need to have experience building house. Oh, no, not at all. I mean, voyeurs she's like look at me. I've never built a house before. I I don't normally put myself in that position again. Dresses on but it is actually really a supportive Toth. You don't know what you're doing somebody's right there. And we had a woman last year that came from Wisconsin Canada Canada. And she was amazing. I mean, she took women by the hand and said, no, you're getting in there, and you're gonna try so it was really empowering so one of my favorite things 'cause I love to make things right? I don't necessarily saw anything or build houses. But I do love the idea of creation and taking pieces of whatever and turning it into something. A masterpiece with your painting something or you're making dinner, right? But taking these pieces of lumber and putting your heart and soul. I always say it's the sense of satisfaction. When you make it yourself. And so if I just put up one wall or I put up one beam it's like I did that and forever to go by that house and go I built that house. Right. You just do you think that part of the draw? For people to help. Is that sense of satisfaction? One of the best things that I was ever told was by volunteer who said every time I drive past that home. It reminds me of the experience, and it made them feel empowered that they knew that they help someone out and it was tangible. They could see it. I mean, that's just great. So so where is this house being built we have a couple of houses in Joliet? And there's houses in all of the local suburbs that are participating at designated areas for that week. So does everyone in the Chicago land area than all the habitat it's a women's build, and there's one in Chile there could be one in another Berber there. They're all over right? Oh and women builds are all throughout the year, and they're all over the actually, national and international. Oh, so there is a women's built that could be going on at anytime. Helen, how did you get involved in? Pin this. Well, I went to volunteer and met Gina and I met the executive director, and I just fell in love with their passion. And it became my passion. And I have just what does of all in tier now Anna committee. It's being able to spread some of that excitement and empowerment and growing something into something. That's really special and the week is fun. Right. Like, it's not all labor. I get to have some coffee and laughs. Yes, we have done it board the lemonade and yet we knew one me at donuts. Good doughnuts. Don't. But we know we do we do have a lot of fun, and we do raffles, and we do lunches everything's donated by other companies in the area, we have a full committee getting this together. So it's it's it's also fun to so so rally you're building a house that is really an event it's an events behind. Yes. Yeah. It is. It's an it's an event and the women actually come out, and they do the work, but they also do peer to peer fundraising to raise funds to support the billed as well. Right. Because you got to pay for the bills how and how who gets the house? There's a process that we go through in qualifying applicants, and when that applicant has completed the process in shown that they are ready, then they go into the house. So by the time that we build we'd like to have them working alongside with our volunteers. That's great. And so, and so there's two different groups here right to their habitat for humanity that are building houses where people in need that are plying the houses, I would say and then over on the other side are is group of women and men that are volunteering to help raise awareness race funding do the actual work right to work behind that. There is some tired. Are you guys have three weeks left? Well, you know, it's ongoing all the time. And donations are always something that we look for all year round. So we are doing a lot of that. All the time. You were an accounting major says she had to bring up the money, of course. Yeah. Absolutely. Got pointed not. What funding are. All right. We're gonna take a quick by using stick around. Okay. I want you each to think about the most amazing moment from the Bill last year, and the most absurd funniest moment. No, you got to think about it. All right. Stay there. You guys we will be right back at seven twenty WGN. What I'm talking about? I thought you'd like that. Twenty WGN. I'm swayed Jane Fillon for any news on Saturday. The.

Jane Jane Jane Chicago WGN Queen Jane Lynn Gina Glasgow Jane jank Vera Jane Fillon Lynn Kazlauskas Lynn michaels Bob Dylan Sarah David pink Sokoto Anna committee Chile
"national organization" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Welby national organization investigates further John Jeffreys NBC News Radio. Researchers say they found a remarkable cache of fossils in China, possibly the most significant fossil find in a century. The discovery was made along a river Bank and China's who bay province the fossils are around five hundred eighteen million years old and more than half of them are previously unknown species. What makes the fine especially remarkable is that most of the creatures were soft bodied like jellyfish and worms organisms that typically never become fossilized. New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft has apologized after he was charged with soliciting prostitutes last month de mutual has more craft issued a statement yesterday. The said he knows he is heard in disappointed, his family, close, friends coworkers and fans who rightfully hold him to a higher standard. It was the first public comment on the case since the seventy seven year old was charged last month. He said he has great respect for women and thanked the love of his life. He hopes to use his platform to help others make a difference. He said he wants to be judged. Not by his words, but by his actions graph closed by saying he wants to regain confidence and respect the mutual. NBC News Radio a new Guinness world record has been set by two men who set out to ride all of Boston's commuter trains in less than seven and a half hours. Alex, Cox Dominic delusional. We're notified by the organization that they did set the new record after writing every Massachusetts bay transportation authority train in seven hours twenty nine minutes. Forty six seconds. Phil Hulett NBC News Radio. What.

Robert Kraft NBC China John Jeffreys Phil Hulett England Patriots Massachusetts Boston Cox Dominic Alex five hundred eighteen million twenty nine minutes seventy seven year Forty six seconds seven hours
"national organization" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Through so much to finally realise his dream last year making it to the big lakes for the first time after what eleven seasons of professional baseball the over shift on against choi the big burly lefthanded batter takes inside one or no choi hitting to twenty seven with three runs batted in he's reached base safely and six straight trying to break out on tap here they've vince dirks ready to go and the pitch is a fastball low the two seamer in it's too and all austin dirks pitched here for the sky sox in twenty twelve appearing in seven games was one in one with a thirteen point eight nine era that's not great the two oh pitch swing and miss took something off the fastball and account is two and one i doubt he's the only one who's coming to colorado springs and seen as era go up a little bit he had started that season with washington the nationals organization was released and signed on with iraqis and he has been around for sure is even pitched in the independently exists choi fouls at back at a play so you went from obscurity in the independent leagues to pitching for the rangers last year he is definitely a testament in perseverance and trying to make it back there this year he was five and two of the rangers in twenty four games last year with four six seventy ra infield us back here's the two to pitch check swing taken low count fills up with christian beth in court on deck originally gibbons dirks was drafted by the mariners sixteenth round pick in two thousand six he wasn't sure he was going to get drafted was not recruited out of high school went on to play at a community college up there in the north west and did get drafted by the mariners he was going to join the navy had he not been drafted here's the payoff delivery this is lifted into shallow right field the wind might take it out a little bit deeper coming on his heinemann to make the catch braxton tags he's gonna try and score here comes the throw and he will score standing up on the fly ball by choi makes it one nothing socks here on the first inning.

baseball choi vince dirks austin dirks rangers mariners navy heinemann colorado springs washington gibbons dirks braxton
"national organization" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Only man in the us to have elected three has been elected three times to the board of the national organization for women and it's a pleasure dr warren to welcome you war on terror it's a pleasure to be here with you especially since that insure to your show says that that a lot of possibilities of what can happen with us okay this book this is a book that why not the girl crisis why is it the boy crisis because one of the things that i've been working on male female issues all my life and one of the things that i discovered in the process of doing so was seeing that in all sixty three developed nations that boys were doing much worse than girls now in all academic areas overall but especially in reading and writing and reading and writing the two biggest predict predictors of success so i started asking the question why and what i started to see was that in all developed nations had in common enough access to survival that their countries could allow permission for divorce and once there was divorced there were two groups of boys that seem to form one were boys that had a significant amount of father involvement after divorce and and a good percentage of those boys that had a very that had minimal or no father involvement daft divorce and it was a second group of boys one's with minimal or no father involvement after divorce that we're doing absolutely terribly along with another group of boys so for example in the united states this other group of boys fifty three percent of all us women who have children have who are who are under thirty so us women under thirty who have children fifty three percent has those children without being married when when amanda women aren't married the chances are much greater.

dr warren united states amanda fifty three percent
"national organization" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"And we were kennett hand to make everything happen and my devious maquiavelian scheme is complete and the torture for this will go on a lifetime if i have no doug were middle bores they've given of course yeah actually it's just a quick call up i as well because you both got involved in the show we got a little bit of a glimpse into it but i was wondering if you could go a little more indepth from like why like what really drew you to do a sex positive podcast with a bunch of weirdos like myself i'll start on this one i've been involved in a number of boards uh for detractors for national organizations in the kink and sex activism community for the past probably twenty years on and off i had retired a few years ago but it's something i've always been very passionate about is educating and fundraising and providing safe spaces for a variety of different um nonnormative although i hit the word and uh communities and so it doesn't not it makes perfect sense to be a part of this and i got sucked into mm and from for my part um you know you can't tell because you can only hear my voice but maybe you can guess i am a white sis gender male so basically i'm trying to pay back for our crimes i i understand that a little bit yeah yeah you know the and i've because i've always been involved in creative stuff and movies and theater and all that kind of stuff i've been around a lot of like the madam said nonnormative people i consider myself a nonnormative person you know what normal means normal means of or pertaining to average abilities were experience that's not us we eight average.

doug twenty years
"national organization" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"The first thing is what i saw that news the first thing i thought was the press conference with the mold in the air conditioning as ridiculous as it sounds but that that whole thing turned into such a little bit of a fiasco but then transport came out and pitched a great game so we didn't see to make any difference why did this happen in washington price could during the year though the national general manager said repeatedly that he expected he would be back they actually negotiated during the season extension get it quite across the finish line but this is a classic case what have you done swimming lately and so even though the nationals one hundred ninety two regular season games on to the fact that they lost in the playoffs they had that strasbourg people in the nationals organisation blamed that on the in his mishandling of it may be all that changed the perspective of the owners they say one big factor always with the national donors did they do not like to pay their managers they've had guy walk away because of the fact that they don't like to pay their managers so look looking at the yankees do you think it will be more he's why joe backed georgia's or wanna come back or the yankees don't really wanna back joe watts who and by the way let's o'brien brian cashman there's in his in his deal up as well as far as whether he's gonna be back or no yeah now every time that a contract played out like this he gets to the end of the contract he's a very strong relationship with the steinbrenner's with how steinbrenner in i would expect that he's going to be back on the thing if i were to guess how it's going to play out i think it's going to come down a lot in negotiation where here joe goes to them and look on i'll come back but i want a significant raise over the four million dollars that are making that point i'm going to be really curious about the yankees reaction because if you know they feel like internally look we're we're not going to pay you know six seven eight it's not going to pay with the top of the marketplace at that point i wonder if joel make a decision in all sort of emu she'll parting of ways it it definitely felt like.

general manager yankees georgia joe watts brian cashman steinbrenner joel washington strasbourg four million dollars
"national organization" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on KKAT

"Bring you two hours of inside utah politics as opposed to those sissy saturday morning garden shows good morning good morning tom good morning josh hey good morning and you know we've had a great show so far but are going to talk in this next cnet about you coal well actually about you as a sort of metaphor for it for people in utah where we have one of the youngest populations in the nation we have a lot of young families and just young people here in utah and we have an organization in this state chapter of a national organisation the young republicans and you know here's something we got to correct the record here people don't really understand in republicans sir locals at least many people don't understand what the young republicans are i think people confuse then this a young republicans and those like the kids i could say it's like a boy scout club royale against raised that teenage republicans are always at the college students and you know there's actually an organization the teenage republicans there's an organization the college republican ends there's organization in other women's federal you know the federation of republican women but this organisation young republicans give us the definition yeah yeah so we are we are related all those things it isn't official auxiliary of the republican party but this is really were at fall so i think everybody if you just kind of look at social psychology rice especially in politics know if you're kinda in your 60s year older than that year sometimes you're willing to give the young young guys a chance right you've had your day in the sun you've kinda unit you've done your thing if you're in your forties and fifties oftentimes that's where you're like okay it's my time to shine right you've paid your dues you're here you've worked for a long time and you do you do deserve that time but oftentimes what happens is and people kinda get a little pushed out under the age of forty with their opinions with their ability to be involved so what young republicans is is it to representative body for for republicans are people who think their republican under the age of forty it's designed to get networking opportunities kinda give a voice have some of that representation kind.

josh utah republican party official representative two hours
"national organization" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Financial planner association of it's it's at the hawaii one is the principal it's a national organisation and it is it is we're not going to be mentioning our our guest's companies of this because it's not about selling tickets it's about making you aware of what a financial planner does and so far today we've learned from about the both david and why key that even though we are hours say competitors if it seems to me that what we're trying to achieve here is make people understand look you need some help i mean you know if you're back to shore every day don't just say my vectis or you go to the doctor um i wanna find out for both you've you can give us examples of maybe what a train wreck some people can be when the when they 4star out say not i don't have enough financial adviser why do we need one by key know what i mean i'm sure the i'm sure that there been some entry level clients were all my goodness sports as a train wreck and you know we come across whether they are already successful with their on i guess financial a few earned exactly so they've already came only a lot of wealth but you know you open their portfolio i like why are you invested delay you are do you realize what kind of restricts posing yourself to add be granted however the market to perform its that mao but it y'all have you thought what happens if a two thousand eight two thousand nine happens yeah you know and it's just having those conversations and then you know back in the younger days highearning potential they can survive into your house an eight two thousand nine and be cover but you know let's if there were approaching retirement and we're like well why are you still invested this way well you know what i'm glad you said that because i remember that in our then having a lot of different the financial advisers advertising and doing with again because there are people ready to jump i.

principal financial adviser hawaii david
"national organization" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on WLOB

"To the national organization for women website you're the head of the la chapter of national organisation for women is that right yeah you know you should have been struck by lightning her that i like it you can't you can't cut that you can't go over there well look there and they added so they added to that list of women's issues economic justice racial justice lgbtq right and yelling is it may i think uh the how do you serve wh women who like i said they're more than fifty percent of the electorate and yet we're treating them as a special group maybe that's what's keeping him out of the mainstream politics well that part of it of course in all of this spoke at one they don't have any details really i mean they're they're answered everything it the bernie sanders answer which is the word free but but in order to argue that when they talk about yet what they're really thing is we remain decadent and that people of color remained victim and that the only thing that's going to lift up or the only thing we have to look forward to peak at apparently be screwed up our ally throat like with hillary at everyone else's fault is for the government kid you justice or to do reparation door to helpless along that is the most racist sexist homophobic framework you can argue four which is the dismissal of the power of the individual now this is why trump was elected it gets he spoke to the power of the individual he said forget all of this about a division in the country on ray on gender and everything else and that of course than what what what's argued the narrative with oh well heat if he's not going to speak in the right manner that it approved up he's a rate and so.

bernie sanders hillary trump fifty percent
"national organization" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"national organization" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"News a little visible satan's trophy wife i have not heard from the national organization for them i have not heard from the sar sour who the women's march the linda sarsour and and her team had enough time to march against dana lash they have yet to hear from them on what they think about call behr referring to kellyanne conway as satan's trophy why i want to know where the women are i have not heard from kathy griffin i have not heard from beyond say i have not heard from chelsea handler i have not heard from lena dunham i have not heard from hillary clinton where are ma ladies oprah where are you where are you oprah i wanna know where you are to dig on this don't you know you of a woman being attacked satan's trophy why so clearly being attacked for for for what she looks like and we we we she's been attacked for her luxury four i thought this was unacceptable obviously this is completely fine because i don't have a single woman from the american left from american culture from american politics getting angry about this they will stay on on on the steps of congress in their shirtsleeves the women we'll we'll to show that they will need a dress code where's debbie wasserman schultz where sheila jacksonlee dance pelosi where are my ladies to stand up for kellyanne conway and stand up to stephen colbert say this is an folly we don't allow this kind of talk why are you denigrating women nothing you hear nothing maybe that'll change may be a won't and maybe call bear we'll have the stones to to answer the phone it's not like you're going to be able to hear him what with all that jon stewart in his mouth i'm tony cats the ninety three wip patriots let my help with your science project this mom once the kids.

linda sarsour dana lash behr kathy griffin hillary clinton congress debbie wasserman schultz pelosi kellyanne conway jon stewart chelsea sheila jacksonlee stephen colbert tony