22 Burst results for "National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration"

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:21 min | Last month

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Native America Calling

"809 9 native. You can also post on our social media pages. That Twitter handle is one 8 zero zero 9 9 native. Speaking with us live from kodiak, Alaska is Mike lizzo. He is a marine biologist and director of the kodiak lab for the national oceanic atmospheric administration fisheries. Mike, welcome to Sean. Thanks for having me on. Mike, huge number of Alaskan snow crabs have seemingly disappeared. When was the drastic population decreased first spotted? Well, we got our first indications in 2019. So just to give you sort of the history, our group has been doing these bottom trawl surveys to estimate the number of snow crab in the Bering sea to set fisheries quotas since the early 1980s. And in 2018, we saw the most snow crab that we've ever seen in that whole time and things were looking great for the fishery. Then 2019, we saw about half as many as we'd seen in 2018. There's a lot of head scratching 2020. We missed the survey because of COVID and then 2021 we went out and there was just almost. I shouldn't say nothing, but it felt like nothing. Our survey abundance went down by about 10 billion animals between 2018 and 2021. That's just a huge number, 10 billion. Scientists are using this term disappearance, disappeared. I mean, what does that mean exactly? Is it safe to say that these sea creatures have died off? Yeah, I think at this point, it's really safe to say that. So we've gone out again in 2022. We've done another survey in 2021. We just had such a shocking answer. There was a lot of interest in whether the crowds had actually died or perhaps they had just moved into an area that wasn't available to the survey or some sort of other explanation, but with the data we got for 2022, it just really looks like they died off and it's a mass mortality event that we're dealing with. And what is the cause? Well, there's a couple of projects that are underway trying to analyze the data we have and figure that out. And both of those projects independently have identified warming of the Bering sea as the real cause.

Mike lizzo kodiak lab national oceanic atmospheric a Mike kodiak Bering sea Alaska Sean Twitter
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

06:10 min | Last month

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"I saw that. Oh, I hope that we get to talk about that. Or maybe not. No. Also, no, okay. And also joining us. From a place to stand and a place to grow. It's retired financier, an aviation enthusiast spreadsheet master in our producer. It's Liz piper from Ontario, Canada. Good day, everyone. Specifically, Toronto, Ontario. That's where I am. Yep. Oh, so nice to have you with us, Liz. Also, we're expecting Nick camacho to join us while the show is in progress. And also, we'll be joined virtually. Sort of in time delay. From Miami Rick. Tuck Miami Rick's going to be time traveling. Yes, he is. All right. And you and I are as well. If he's in a Boeing, it will be going backwards in time. He reversing. It already starts. Skirt. I love it. Stand by for news. All right, let's do this item in our new segment. One a flying into hurricane Ian. Now, this is topical. This just happened. I think it's finally been degraded to a tropical storm. It's kind of petering out a bit, but it made two separate landfalls here in the U.S. hurricane Ian. The strongest approach was to the West Coast of Florida and it was a category four, a very strong category four as it made landfall. And it just basically destroyed many communities on the West Coast of Florida. It looks like fort Fort Myers beach for Myers was like the kind of the most badly affected. But, you know, we've heard about the hurricane hunters. The U.S. Air Force reserve has a some C one 30s, especially outfitted to do hurricane hunting. And the national oceanic atmospheric administration, NOAA, also has a couple of airplanes. I'm not sure how many they have, but they're basically Rick you said they were like P three. Like P three Orion. Yeah, P three Orion is the navy used to use them for anti submarine warfare. Before they transitioned fully to the P 8 Poseidon. A 7 37 NG platform, but NOA still uses a P threes, which is a fantastic airplane apparently. It's based off of the Lockheed Electra. So you're talking 1950s airframe technology. And I know a couple of good friend of mine went to the naval academy with my brother. He was commissioned to enable aviator and went on to fly P threes, and he liked it better than the P 8. It says 5 second dream. Well, Lockheed makes a great product. I've flown a couple of them. And lucky lucky. Yeah. So we have this from, let's see, what does he call himself Liz? Underwood, his last name's Underwood. Tropical Nick. Nick Underwood, yep. Yeah. And we have a couple of tweets from him. He's on the crew of one of these. I don't know if they call him hurricane hunters at the NOAA, but he was a board Kermit, which was number November Oscar alpha alpha 42. And we have where he took some video of how let's see. First of all, he tweeted. When I say that this was the roughest flight of my career so far, I mean it. I've never seen the bunks come out like that. There was coffee everywhere. I have never felt such lateral motion, aboard Kermit, NOAA 42 this morning into hurricane Ian. Please stay safe out there. So let me play a little bit of that video. If I can navigate over here to that window, okay, here we go. I'm going to add it to the stream, and here we go. Kermit, we've got the bounced around. Some nervous laughter. They had to come back back and say. All right. We're all right. So it's the back end of this thing. All the instrumentation. Just. Here it goes the sauce. There goes the beds. There goes the bag. Yeah, there's a lot of side to side that mushroom. It's not smooth. So. A lot of smiling going up, as I said, Rick, I think that laughter that we hear from my name. You got it coming out of this. That's forward to see if there's any other good stuff here. Recording. That just looks like a lot of bouncing around. That's the guy. Wow. So a little glimpse of some. Yeah, we're good. Lightning out the window there. Wow. You know what? That is something I never, ever want to experience. You

hurricane Ian Liz piper NOAA Nick camacho Tuck Miami Rick fort Fort Myers beach Ontario U.S. Air Force reserve West Coast Rick Liz Lockheed Florida Underwood Tropical Nick Nick Underwood Boeing Toronto Miami Myers
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Lifeblood of the region. The crustacean forms are a huge part of the state's identity, the main car license plates even feature a large image of a big red lobster on them. Everyone seems to be wearing lobster clothes, belts, sweatshirts, and then identity is a key industry and source of jobs for the state. But that may be under threat. And why is that now under threat, rosemary? Well, last month, the Atlantic lobster was put on something called the seafood watch list as an avoid, which is a red listing. The seafood watch list is a program by California's Monterey bay aquarium, which advises consumers and businesses on what marine life to eat sustainably. And the addition of the Atlantic lobster so they're avoid list was a huge surprise and very upsetting to the people who rely on lobster for their living in Maine, where it's a huge part of the economy. So why did Monterey bay aquarium add it to its red list? Well, their reasoning is that the lobster fishing lines can entangle the endangered North Atlantic right whale. But the lobster industry pushes back on this. They say they have not had an instant with the right whale in almost two decades, and those in the industry truly pride themselves in sustainability. They call themselves stewards of the resource. Something which became really clear to me when I spoke to Jeff Holden, who was the first licensed lobster processor in Maine and has been a veteran of the industry for nearly four decades. We've been big promoters of the resource, sustainability, the traceability, and all those things that we considered important. This particular species is healthy, it's not over fished. Humanely pot. So what does seafood watch his argument? Well, they say it's not enough. The North Atlantic right rail is in danger of extinction. There's fewer than 250 in the ocean right now. And fishing gear is a big part of the problem. According to one study, over 80% of surviving rails have scars showing they've been entangled at least once in fishing gear. fishing men in Maine say it's not because of them and there's no documentation showing well that's linked to them in the last few decades. But it's not just seafood watch that has concerns. The national oceanic atmospheric administration NOAA is the federal agency responsible for fishing, and they've been working with the main lobster industry, and they recognize that the lobstermen have been proactive and doing everything they can to react to new regulations. But they also say there's much more to be done, and they recently put out a road map for reducing risk, which includes transitioning to robles traps. But these robles traps are bound to be very costly, and there is a chance these additional regulations could significantly impact supply. So I understand there are some people in this world who have unfortunately never been to Maine. For their sake, can you explain how lobster fishing works? Well, I got to see it firsthand. So this is a typical main lobster trap as you can tell the seagulls are well. So the lobster trap is on the ocean floor, attached to a floating boy with a purple rope that they call a line. And then the same rope is pulled up to access the traps and retrieved the lobsters. And this is the line that supposedly causing problems for the right whales. And what about the sustainability part of lobstering? Well, in terms of what they're already doing, when the lobster and pull up their catch, they measure each lobster. Three and a quarter inches. The lobster must have a lens on a long its back and three to 5 inches. Everything else, anything bigger or smaller is tossed back into the water. And this is to help ensure the breeding population. Also, pregnant females are marked with a V so that other fishermen know not to harvest them. I'm ever caught with eggs. I get a V cut V notch right here. This announces to every fisherman whoever catches this lobster from now on. This is a free for life lobster. And they're cut back in. Water. They've also reduced the number of traps. And to the point of contention, the lines since 1997 over 30,000 miles at 48,000 kilometers of rope have been removed by lobster fishermen, and they've also introduced weekly cinder lines so that whales can break through and break free easily, and also in Maine, the lines are uniquely marked so they can be traced back to the state if the line does cause problems. So lobstermen who've invested thousands of dollars in recent years have argued that they're more proactive with protecting the whales than seafood watches giving them credit for. So how could this red listing affect Maine's lobster industry? Well, this industry is a big deal in me. And most of the lobstermen, they're like family operated small businesses. And the whole lobster supply chain in Maine contributes about $1 billion a year to the state economy. About 12,000 people work in the industry and that includes an lobsterman dealers and processors. So if the industry collapses, entire coastal towns that live off the tourists industry could be at risk. And thousands of small businesses and families could suffer. We

Maine Monterey bay North Atlantic Jeff Holden national oceanic atmospheric a federal agency responsible for rosemary Atlantic California
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

05:33 min | 6 months ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"We very much dispute that these activities need to be going out there at this point in time, or that this is even Taylor energy oil out there at this point in time. In response, cuvier's maritime lawyer pat mcshane characterized Taylor's allegations as quote pernicious. And he pointed us to a wealth of evidence indicating that the oil was indeed tailors. The national oceanic atmospheric administration, the United States coast guard, have taken all manner of visual evidence of the plumes coming out of the seabed right at the platform. When you say that's not our oil against this overwhelming evidence, you're playing some different kind of game. A former Louisiana state wrestling champion says he's not backing down from the fight. You're working to fix a problem that an oil company was responsible for. And now they're suing you. Kind of crazy, isn't it? It's intimidation by litigation. Taylor energy also filed legal action against captain Kristi luttrell, arguing that she overstepped her coast guard authority. You've been named personally, how do you perceive the situation? As the federal unseen coordinator, I use my authority to do the right thing and to protect the environment. Phyllis Taylor, CEO of Taylor energy, declined our interview request. The company said in a statement that it has retained and relied upon the world's foremost experts to study and then recommend a plan of action. We continue to advocate for a response driven by science. Taylor lost its case against cuvier and in action to recover the $432 million still left in that cleanup trust. 60 minutes has learned that Taylor is now in mediation with the government to conclude all the outstanding litigation at once. Asked why he thinks Taylor resisted so intensely Timmy cuvier doesn't hesitate. That's the $432 million question. You know, in this case, it seems like if you follow the money, you'd have a better chance of getting your answer. What would you say to Phyllis Taylor if she were sitting right here? I just want to know why. Why are we at this point? Someone that has given so much to our state. Why would you continue to allow this oil spill to happen? And our gulf waters. After our story first aired, Taylor.

cuvier Taylor pat mcshane national oceanic atmospheric a United States coast Phyllis Taylor captain Kristi luttrell coast guard authority Taylor energy wrestling Louisiana Timmy cuvier government
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:23 min | 11 months ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WTOP

"Breaking news out of London today Buckingham Palace says that Prince Andrew's military affiliations and royal patronages have been returned to Queen Elizabeth with her approval and her agreement The palace's statement coming after more than a 150 navy and army veterans wrote to the queen asking her to strip Andrew of his military ranks and titles It comes amid continued legal trouble for the prince who's being sued by American Virginia giofre who claims that Andrew sexually abused her when she was 17 He's repeatedly denied those accusations The army relieving 6 active duty officers including two battalion commanders for refusing to get vaccinated against COVID Meantime nearly 3000 written reprimands have been issued to soldiers for the same reason though the process of kicking them out of the service hasn't started yet The army says it's gotten more than 2100 requests for a religious exemption but it hasn't granted any nor has the navy Air force or the marines at least 96% of active duty soldiers are now fully vaccinated While starting this weekend anyone who wants to dine in or watch a live show in D.C. will need to show proof of vaccination If you've got a reservation tickets or a spot at any D.C. entertainment venue they'll have to show a vaccination card Anyone 12 and older needs to have their first shot by Saturday The district hosted a town hall this week and the questions came rolling in How do we expect this to change when the weather changes Hot or cold weather everyone gets checked If you have regulars that you know or ID you have to go through the physical rechecking when they come in each time Yes every time D.C. health senior deputy director Patrick Ashley says the new rule is encouragement to get the shot We want to spread the vaccine but we don't want to spread the disease Gigi Barnett W TOP news New measurements show the earth has simmered to the 6th hottest year on record while NASA and the national oceanic atmospheric administration says it wasn't record hot in 2021 The years 58 and a half degree average is not much behind the record The last 8 years have been the 8 hottest ever Scientists say heat trapping gases from the burning of fossil fuels have warmed the earth about 2° since the late 1800s Coming up next.

American Virginia giofre army Prince Andrew navy Air force Andrew Buckingham Palace D.C. Queen Elizabeth navy London Patrick Ashley marines Gigi Barnett national oceanic atmospheric a NASA
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"In response, cuvier's maritime lawyer pat mcshane characterized Taylor's allegations as quote pernicious. And he pointed us to a wealth of evidence indicating that the oil was indeed tailors. The national oceanic atmospheric administration, the United States coast guard and have taken all manner of visual evidence of the plumes, coming out of the seabed right at the platform. When you say that's not our oil against this overwhelming evidence, you're playing some different kind of game. Cuvier, a former Louisiana state wrestling champion, says he's not backing down from the fight. You're working to fix a problem that an oil company was responsible for. And now there's suing you, kind of crazy, isn't it? It's intimidation by litigation. Taylor energy also filed legal action against captain Christy luttrell, arguing that she overstepped her coast guard authority. You've been named personally, how do you perceive this situation? As the federal Ensign coordinator, I use my authority to do the right thing and to protect the environment. Feel this Taylor, CEO of Taylor energy declined our interview request. The company said in a statement that it has retained and relied upon the world's foremost experts to study and then recommend a plan of action. We continue to advocate for a response driven by science. Taylor lost its case against cuvee on and in action to recover the $432 million still left in that cleanup trust. 60 minutes has learned that Taylor is now in mediation with the government to conclude all the outstanding litigation at once. Asked why he thinks Taylor resisted so intensely can be cuvee on doesn't hesitate. That's the $432 million question. You know, in this case, it seems like if you follow the money, he'd have a better chance of getting your answer. What would you say to Phyllis tale or if you were sitting right here? I just want to know why. Why are we at this point? Someone that has given so much to our state. Why would you continue to allow this oil spill to happen? And our.

Taylor cuvier pat mcshane national oceanic atmospheric a United States coast Cuvier captain Christy luttrell coast guard authority Taylor energy wrestling Louisiana government Phyllis
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Station. High school in northwest Indiana, was placed on lockdown today after reports of an active shooter who's next. But first, the weather Channel forecast looks like we're in good shape the next few days overnight. We'll see alone the upper fifties with a generally clear skies, sunshine and clouds for Thursday Friday Is in the mid to upper seventies weekend warms up still dry eyes in a little bit eighties over the weekend lows in the mid to upper sixties from the weather Channel, and we're only just spoke to the dough WLS Am 8 90 with another update in 30 minutes currently 71 out of here. It's 73 at Midway, 72 downtown along the lakefront. While students are safe at Lake Central High School in northwest Indiana. After reports of an active shooter this morning, police say no shots were fired and no one was injured. Daniel Lewis has a child at the school, she told ABC seven. She was in constant contact with her daughter during the ordeal. Basically told me that they were Unlock down and they were in hiding. Basically, there were a lot of different rumors and stories going around. But she has up to the minute has been Have been able to be in contact with her. I know that several parents have not been able to contact their students to students were questioned about the 911 call. No gun was found after police searched every room on every floor. Covid hospitalizations are up across the country, and the delta variant accounts for nearly all cases. But there's a new variant in town. The mu variant doctor Rashid's jaw, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, spoke with ABC News. We're still learning a lot about this new move variant So far, I don't see any evidence that this variant is going to be able to displace Delta. The very contagious Delta variant still the concerning one The new version of the coronavirus that was first identified in Colombia in January, has since caused isolated outbreaks in South America, Europe and the United States. The Illinois Department of Public Health today reported over 3900 new confirmed and probable cases of covid, 19 and 62 related deaths. Florida Panhandle. Suddenly bracing for a tropical storm this evening, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration says Tropical Storm Mindy formed this afternoon in the Gulf of Mexico..

Daniel Lewis National Oceanic Atmospheric A Colombia South America Gulf of Mexico Rashid January Thursday Friday ABC News Illinois Department of Public 19 Brown University School of Pub United States 30 minutes northwest Indiana 71 Florida Panhandle 911 today Lake Central High School
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Have to trust me. You don't have to trust anyone in the media. Here's the bottom line. The United Nations admits that hurricanes are not getting more frequent NOAA The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration admits that hurricane lamp are the most active decade for the worst hurricanes with the 19 forties. It's not happening. This is what the what the media has done is they've weaponized the weather events so that every weather event is another opportunity to lobby for the climate agenda for the green. New Deal for U N. Paris Agreement on every measure. Hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, droughts, wildfires, There is either no trend or declining trend on climate timescales, and that is a fact Even the United Nations is forced to admit that in the United Nations is the holy script for these climate activists. How can they deny that? Yeah, I mean, there's like a lot of lying going on. Remember, the polar bear story of the polar bears are disappearing. The polar bear populations are exploding. But nobody talks about that. In fact, interestingly enough in my book Green Front, I detail how polar bears are disappearing, but only from Al Gore's books and movies because Al Gore made him the posters out of the first film, and they disappeared there. Adenoid historic population highs. This is this is just there. They've been doing this. I liken it to the lottery events where you know they show you all these lottery winners. The odds of you winning the lottery every day or zero. The odds of you know someone winning the lottery are high. So what they do with this extreme weather. They find an extreme weather events somewhere on the globe. And they say, Look, a record has been broken, which is perfectly normal and they make it look like extreme weather is happening when the actual government data and period studies showed nothing of the kind, but it doesn't matter. It's an emotional story and they can use it. The lobby for some kind of climate bill That's on the level of medieval witchcraft because they actually believe they actually believed we had a Salem witch trials. This is not a joke. The majority of the judges were educated in Harlem at Harvard. That put the which is the death thinking that they crossed crop failure in bad weather. And now we believe, as Chuck Schumer actually sat on the floor of the United States Senate. Everyone knows if we had done more on climate through UN treaties. Green New deal, these hurricanes would be less severe. We have the United States. Senator on record, saying the government could have legislated less severe hurricanes in our atmosphere. This is this is where we are modern witchcraft. Yes, we have a long history of Harvard educated people running the country just goes way back. Exactly. Martarano. Thank you very much. Really Appreciate your time. Thank you, Vince. All right. He's the publisher of Climate depot dot com and an amusing guy, too. He makes me laugh for 45 Now. Time for W m mail Traffic weather every 10 minutes. First On the five.

Chuck Schumer Vince Al Gore National Oceanic Atmospheric A Martarano Green Front Harlem United States Senate 45 First five first film United Nations Climate depot dot com zero U N. Paris Agreement NOAA United 19 forties Harvard
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on The Restless Ones

The Restless Ones

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on The Restless Ones

"Lot more requests for real time. Data and requests for transparency and a focus on community based emissions reductions which ties into the california state assembly bill six seventeen to address air pollution impacts and environmental justice communities which are really disadvantaged communities economically disadvantaged. So we've been tasked to build solutions such as the mobile also realtime air monitoring and fence on monitoring and flare notification. So there's really like you said there's a big awareness and we're delivering at one that that's great. I would like to learn a little bit more about the technologies that you're using in order to detect things like changes in pollution levels. What are you actually using to monitor and then process that data and send it out. In a way that's consumable to the average person bright so we have forty three Major air quality monitoring stations and these are epa regulatory monitors. Recently we're able to use low cost sensors which are organization created a special organization with enter. Just evaluates the sensors to see if we could use them so we analyze hourly data from these monitors and land that with national oceanic atmospheric administration air quality model to produce a an air quality index. Right down to the localized level. We have now more than twelve hundred distinct locations so we're grabbing all this data and were analyzing it and we're doing it in almost real time which is pretty amazing and to me. The cool thing about that is not just the immediacy of that data but then the ability to contextualized that in a way that is meaningful to other people. I mean as any leader in the tech space understands. It's one thing to have access to information. It's another thing to make that information meaningful to your in customer whether that is a citizen or a consumer or another business or even someone within the same organization. I'd love for us to kind of segue now into talking about emerging technologies you. You've mentioned one that i think Kind of falls into the internet of things category with these sensors you were talking about. Do you foresee further use of internet of things technologies in your work over at south coast q. Md well below cost air quality. Sensors are iot and we're using these devices. It's really enabled us to do more and provide more accurate equality information so i see it just moving light speed especially when we have the ability of five g. coming out we're going to be able to pull a lot of data chunks and provide more information quicker and better what i'd like to see is every phone and device have like a little air monitor on it and make everybody Essentially a point where we can grab data so we can better serve our communities to me. That sounds very similar. To the accelerometers that are in phones that can be used to detect things like earthquake shocks for example so to have that similar approach with an internet of things perspective powered by something like five g. Where you have that low latency and high throughput and you can get that data in real time right. People can very quickly act on it. I would imagine that that would be an incredible tool in your toolbox to provide the services to the region right. That's really near and dear to my heart. Because i was born and raised here. I'm a lifelong angelino. And when i was a kid we had smog days. We'd go out and our lungs would hurt from the smog. We had no way of knowing information that we're trying to get like what is the level of smog. Where of pollutants in here. What does is on. What is the particular matter. What what's the carbon monoxide. We had none of that. And where i work now. This is what we do this. We provided information and the app that we developed. It gives people all of that information. So you can open it up now and see what your you know. What air quality is around you and you can make better decisions on adult of your life. I also love that with this discussion. You always see where the little bottlenecks are in the road. Through technological improvement right. Occasionally you're bottleneck. Is that the technology itself is lagging behind. Maybe it's more on the connectivity side. Where you need to have better solutions to transmit information. I think we're now reaching a point with five g. Roll out where. The communication side is in a really good space. And i'm really excited to see from the hardware site. People developing things like sensors that could be incredibly precise and hopefully low maintenance so that the deployment of sensors could be beneficial right with five g. It's a total game. Changer will be able to collect. Industry data faster allows us to collect. Becker chunks of data more often a better use experience for mobile app with could potentially replace even our campus wifi and provide remote teleworking capabilities for employees. That just vastly improved. I mean we have a number of field inspectors. i go on site to various locations and with five g. without infrastructure is allow them to pretty much instantaneously connect with our office and the apps. They used to do their work. So it's it is an exciting time. I'm just curious. Are there any emerging technologies that you find particularly interesting or exciting. Either within regard with your work itself. Coast ache you. Md or just personally. Well i mean. I can get into things like quantum computing lease. I'll talk about but you know things like chat box from the customer service experience. That's getting really good at every day is just getting better that ai based feedback five gm in. It's going to change everything from our phone to our vehicles. Going to be connected transformational before i could let go. I of course needed to ask him one more thing. Who in the world of tech leadership do you think is really killing it. Right now Well elon musk because he has just gone against the grain every time at as winning almost every time but even when he loses. He's still winning because he's proving that you have a dream you have an idea and it makes sense could go for. I mean he took on the automotive and oil industries and change the way we try it. They forced them to develop fuel-efficient if not completely electric vehicles and improve the world as we know so he's killing run. Thank you again for taking time out of your schedule to talk with us. This was a fascinating conversation. I find the work you do to be really inspiring and your approach to leadership with that team. Focus wanting to foster and support a team so that you can actually achieve the mission that is Speaking to my heart. So thank you again for joining us. My pleasure thank you.

national oceanic atmospheric a california state assembly epa south coast Becker elon musk ai gm
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"8889795995. When you hear the recording just press number two that will get you into the voicemail. So leave us your name and phone number. And like I said, I promised to call you Monday, okay? Um, so I go through these lists. You know these things pop up on the news and and bankrate dot com did their 2021 listing for the best and worst states to retire in and Lo and behold, Maryland came in dead last. I'm like, Okay, so that's something we should talk about on the radio. Maryland comes in dead last for a variety of reasons. They way they chose the states parties. Affordability was a factor. Climate was a factor. Culture prime Those things were all factors mean. Unfortunately, crime is a big deal, because if you know the suburbs of D, C and the city of Baltimore, not exactly the safest places to be Unfortunate because I just think they could be so much nicer. But this is all part of a A blue Democratic run city. And a defund the police mentality that these kinds of things will destroy you. Look what it's done to Portland, Oregon, that cities and chaos And because of their defund the police. Minneapolis has seen a massive spike in crime New York City a massive spike in crime. And we're seeing it here, too. And Baltimore was on the news for for for for, um, increased homicides around the country. Chicago, New York, Minneapolis, Portland all these, you know all these very blue cities. When a massive increase in crime and it's horrible. It is absolutely horrible. You can't defund the police and maintain a decent standard of living for the people in the community. You just can't do it. You need to have community policing. You need to make sure the citizens are safe. Government's first responsibility is to protect its citizenry. I think our politicians have forgotten that Either that or just they're just downright stupid. Because this this business of defund the police is ridiculous. Okay, let's go back to the list. So oddly enough, who makes the top of the list? Georgia did I'm like, Wow. That was the first Georgia ranked number one. Low taxes very affordable. Climate Now, personally, I mean, I am not a fan of the sun belt because I don't like the heat. Florida is not for me. Maybe in January, Florida for me, but not not the rest of time. I've been there in May. And you know, September and August. I mean, no, it's too hot for me. I don't like it. But Not everybody feels that way. My brother, for example, he thought Maryland was way too cold. He was, he said. I'm out of here. I can't handle these Maryland winters. I'm like, seriously. It's just Maryland. It's not that cold. This is not main. This is you know, we are not in the mountains were not in Alaska. And he said, No, he went to Florida. He's fine. He's happy with it. Okay, fine. Anyway, so they look at this methodology and they ranked it according to affordability. Wellness, That's a good one. Especially for your if you're retiring. You want to maintain the proper health? Actually, that's one thing Maryland does have. We do have access to good healthcare here. Culture, whether and crime Now that's where we we, We got dinged on crime, because, uh, Well, my thoughts were defund. Don't defund the police and got to get Baltimore reigned in. Got to get in control. All right. So anyway, they looked at all these different things they use the cost of living index. They went to the Council of Community Economic Research for culture. They would they examined arts, entertainment, recreation, things like that. Temperature for whether they went to know. Uh, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration checked out the data there. They use things like, you know, average temperature. What's winter? Like with summer like, Do you get your current games? Tornadoes? Earthquakes anyway. Stuff like that. And then, of course crime and they used FBI stats for crimes. So anyway, put all that together. Maryland is at the bottom of the list. So when I look at this list, I look at different things too, You know. Unfortunately, Maryland came in 50 out of 50. That was that was a shocker. So actually, I went looked at other lists. Like Where does Maryland rank and you know these lists of best and worst places to retire. Marilyn routinely comes in the bottom 10. So that's actually unfortunate and personally because of the cost of living. It's too high, but we're a very blue state. We may have a red governor. He's not all that red. But we have a very blue state, and they're bound and determined to mismanage the budget and jack up our taxes. Unfortunately, they can get away with it because we have so many people working for the federal government. The paying taxes in Maryland is good. These are good jobs they pay, which they pay well. And consequently those taxes that the tax revenue flows to the state so they can be a little bit haphazard with how they spend money because they got this nice tax base. Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Missouri. All they at there's your top four states right there. By the way, they're all red states. Uh, that was something else. I took a look at when I was going through this list. The top 10 states. To retire in For actually Let me rephrase that the top 10 states for affordability. Are all red states. Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Indiana, South Carolina, Oklahoma. Not that I want to live in Oklahoma, Texas. Um, Mississippi, Alabama. And New Mexico. New Mexico is actually little more purple. But The rest of them are red states. So isn't that interesting? The Red States are the most affordable to live in. Let's take a look at the least affordable states. I mean, where's my okay? I highlighted them. Here we go. Okay, Massachusetts. New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Oregon, Hawaii, California, Connecticut, Maine and Maryland. I don't know why Maine is so unaffordable. Mainz of Purple State, but the.

Alaska Rhode Island Oklahoma New York New Mexico Maine National Oceanic Atmospheric A California New York City New Jersey Mississippi Portland Hawaii Chicago Indiana Texas Alabama South Carolina 50 August
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

"Yesterday so how did i to get so powerful so fast so climate change is basically supercharging storm. That's rebecca hersher correspondent for. Npr's climate team. We spoke on monday. Climate change does is. It adds fuel to hurricane fuel in the form of heat so hurricanes over water you can think of them like engines spinning up like a propeller on a plane and the energy for that propeller comes from the heat in the water as the earth gets hotter because of climate change the water on the surface of the ocean. It also guitar. So there's more energy for storms like ida to get really big and really powerful. What's the evidence for that. How do we know this happened with ida specifically so we can basically observant in real time which is pretty terrifying. So for example. Let's talk about the wind on saturday. The day before item made landfall. It had top wind speeds of about eighty five miles an hour which is pretty serious. It can remove shingles from a roof. Snap off the victory but overnight the storm got a lot more powerful. The top wind speeds jumped to about one hundred fifty miles an hour. That is fast enough to tear it. Whole roofs off of houses. Now power-poles uproot entire trees and that extra power. It came from the water in the gulf of mexico. What do you mean by that help. Like warm was that water. It was basically like a bathtub About eighty five degrees which is a few degrees warmer than average. If you get measurements from the national oceanic atmospheric administration so whether forecasters could watch the storm feed on that heat and when a hurricane gains that much power that quickly scientists call it rapid intensification so studies have found that hurricanes are more likely to rapidly intensify because of global warming and people who live on the gulf coast of the us. They are on the front lines of this. You know hurricane. Harvey this in two thousand seventeen michael in two thousand eighteen lauren. Twenty twenty and now ida. They have all rapidly intensified Does the speed the intensity translate to a more powerful storm. Yes yes it does and and it also gives people less time to prepare when we're talking about these really fast wind speeds that come really quickly you know. There's less time there might not be time to evacuate by the time you know. The storm is going to be that powerful and the national weather service tries to get around this by putting out warning saying basically you know. The storm is likely to get a lot stronger before it makes landfall but it can be really hard to convince people to them seriously. Wanted intensifies really late. Ida at this point is a tropical storm. It's heading northeast Is climate change playing a role on kind of what happens next how it's moving. Yes absolutely so. The hot water in the gulf of mexico also helped the storm moisture that falls as rain. It is really important to remember that. These storms can cause flooding really far inland so in mississippi. We're going to see a lot of flooding. And then the track goes through central tennessee where they just had a lot of deadly flashfloods. So people in the path need to take those flood warnings really seriously rebecca hersher with npr's climate team the good news emerging after ida's landfall is that in new orleans the levy system held. That's unlike of course what happened. During hurricane katrina sixteen years ago when a storm surge breached levees and inundated the city in the flooding and aftermath more than fifteen hundred people died in louisiana alone ida so far has been blamed for four deaths in louisiana. A number that the governor warned may rise considerably but now people their face a new threat. Many could be without power for weeks. In stifling summer heat as the remnants of ida spread farther north and east millions of people are bracing for the threat of flooding or tornadoes and that includes middle tennessee. Which as you just heard is still recovering from a catastrophic storm that dumped seventeen inches of rain in twenty four hours that killed at least twenty two people. Climate scientists say storms like these are not just freak events even if that's how people see them. I think it's more seen as an anomaly. Even that we've had several pretty significant sled events in the past decade janey camp a professor of civil and environmental engineering at vanderbilt university told. Npr that flooding is becoming more common in areas. Like tennessee. where people haven't had to worry much about it. In the past she spoke to npr's ari shapiro. It's becoming a regular thing but it's hitting different people in different ways so i don't think the general population is seeing this as the norm yet even to describe it. The norm doesn't quite capture it because climate change means the definition of normal is just going to keep getting worse right absolutely I think we're going to see more extreme events and we're gonna see flooding in areas that we historically have not and that levels that we haven't seen explain why that's happening in tennessee. Because i think many people associate climate related flooding with coastal areas. Like miami new orleans cities that get hit by hurricanes. Explain why a landlocked state lake. Tennessee is seeing more now. Tennessee made the a landlocked state. But we have a lot of surface waters in rivers and streams and tributaries to the rivers and streams that we also see low lying areas For a lot of precipitation accumulates. And we don't have adequate storm whether infrastructure and drainage to convey that water away that can happen in landlocked states like tennessee to. Let's say you identify your house as being in a flood-prone area maybe the city is even offering to buy out houses in those neighborhoods. How likely are people to actually relocate based on a forecast of what climate change is going to do in their part of the country and so in the national area. We've had a pretty proactive home by out. Program in place for over thirty years and the city of national has a wishlist of properties that they knew have potential flood risk. The challenge is not everyone that is offered a buyout participates because of their connection to their home and their community. And then what we've seen in nashville and other areas is limited housing stock for people to relocate to that's at a comparable value Without having to move away from their local community and that network of social connections that they are todd too. I wonder whether you think these programs that are going to require. Major adaptations and big adjustments in people's lives are likely to succeed without that. Buying from the local population that tomlin for the projections is often challenging for individuals. Especially if you think about someone that may have lived in their home. Fit your six years when you say well with climate change. You can't live here in the more in the next ten or twenty years It's hard for them to come grasp that and think about starting over somewhere professor genie camp of vanderbilt university who studies climate change and risk management..

rebecca hersher ida national oceanic atmospheric a tennessee gulf of mexico Npr npr janey camp louisiana ari shapiro gulf coast new orleans Harvey lauren hurricane hurricane katrina
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

"You might remember a few weeks back. We told you about a landmark report from the un's intergovernmental panel on climate change. It warned that human caused climate change is accelerating and that we're running out of time to avoid its most catastrophic effects and that extreme weather events are more likely as a result right now hurricane can ida is making its dangerous trek towards a us gulf coast hurricane ida is exactly the kind of event that scientists were talking about on saturday evening. Ida was a modest category two storm with one hundred and five mph winds but it's poise to rapidly intensify and that's what it did just as forecasters predicted so hurricane ida has strengthened to a category three storm with winds of one hundred fifteen miles an hour trump saturday night maximum sustained winds of one hundred thirty miles per hour into sunday morning. It's now up to one hundred forty five miles per hour side. A gut stronger by the hour is storm has strengthened yet again. The last time we spoke sustained winds were one forty five. They're now up to one fifty. I wanted to all of this at the storm up to be at. Its most powerful. Just as it made landfall over louisiana bring as much as twenty inches of rain in some areas with the potential for destructive storm surge yesterday so how did i to get so powerful so fast so climate change is basically supercharging storm. That's rebecca hersher correspondent for. Npr's climate team. We spoke on monday. Climate change does is. It adds fuel to hurricane fuel in the form of heat so hurricanes over water you can think of them like engines spinning up like a propeller on a plane and the energy for that propeller comes from the heat in the water as the earth gets hotter because of climate change the water on the surface of the ocean. It also guitar. So there's more energy for storms like ida to get really big and really

rebecca hersher ida national oceanic atmospheric a tennessee gulf of mexico Npr npr janey camp louisiana ari shapiro gulf coast new orleans Harvey lauren hurricane hurricane katrina
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Org live from npr news. I'm barbara klein. Us supreme court has struck down the federal moratorium. that's been protecting millions of americans from eviction during the pandemic. npr's chris arnold reports in a six to three decision with liberal justices. Dissenting the court said the. Cdc's order exceeded its authority. The eviction moratorium has been in place for nearly a year but cdc imposed it because evictions spread kovic. When people get forced into more crowded living situations the ruling comes as upwards of seven million. Americans are behind on rent payments. That's twice as many people as normal before the pandemic while the moratorium was in effect though eviction filings had been at half their normal level nationally. So clearly it's been protecting a lot of people. Meanwhile congress six months ago approved nearly fifty billion dollars to help people pay back rent and eviction but only a small fraction of that money has reached those who need it. The biden administration just issued new rules to try to allow states and counties to get that help to more people. Chris arnold. Npr news president biden held a moment of silence at the white house after today's deadly terrorist attack in afghanistan. Npr's windsor johnston reports thirteen. U s members were among those killed in a pair of explosions targeting the evacuation mission at the airport in kabul president biden is vowing retribution against isis k. The terrorist group that has claimed responsibility for the deadly attack. Speaking from the white house biden warned that the us will hunt them down and that is directed the pentagon to draw up plans to strike back against the group. In the meantime the president says the us will continue evacuation efforts at the airport in kabul ahead of the august thirty first deadline to fully west troops from afghanistan. Npr's windsor johnston. The texas supreme court is upholding governor greg. Abbott order banning local governments from imposing mandates from texas public radio joey palacios reports the ruling could prevent san antonio from enforcing a mask requirement for schools and certain public buildings. The all republican court said the san antonio case and similar lawsuits are not about whether masks should be worn or governments should mandate them. But who makes the rules. The court said that power lies with the governor at least twelve this and other mask lawsuits are decided in state appeals courts with texas reporting its highest ever number of covert nineteen hospitalizations san antonio mayor ron nuremberg says. Schools should be allowed to require masks. It using it as the enemy of emergency response and the governor is excelling at it other mask. Mandate cases are expected to reach the state's high court and a federal lawsuit is also pending. I'm joy palacios in san antonio. This is npr. More than fourteen thousand firefighters are battling blazes up and down california the kaldor fire the nation's top priority for firefighting resources has grown to more than two hundred seventeen square miles as it moves. Toward lake tahoe. It's still only twelve percent contained. Climate change is making wildfires more frequent and intense meanwhile federal scientists have confirmed that greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere last year were the highest ever recorded and records date back eight hundred thousand years. Npr's rebecca hersher reports scientists at the national oceanic atmospheric administration confirmed the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in twenty twenty. Hit four hundred. Twelve parts per million that's higher than the previous record said in twenty nineteen and it's the highest ever observed including an ice cores. That go back eight hundred thousand years. Twenty twenty was also the ninth year in a row that global sea levels had a new record. Global sea levels are rising a little more than one inch each decade because glaciers and ice sheets are melting and the oceans are heating up and expanding human emissions of greenhouse gases primarily from burning fossil fuels are the cause of global warming scientists say emissions must fall dramatically this decade to avoid catastrophic warming rebecca hersher. Npr news on wall street today. All three major market indices fell in trading. I'm barbara klein npr news..

Chris arnold windsor johnston npr news barbara klein Npr news biden administration president biden san antonio kabul biden npr Npr governor greg Us supreme court joey palacios republican court afghanistan Cdc ron nuremberg
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"They want to be able to direct american civilians to engage in work products projects around the country. Fdr launched a conservation corps during the great depression leading to similar programs in the ensuing decades over the past six years. The national oceanic atmospheric administration and the nature conservancy have teamed up on the gulf core program to help restore wetlands and other habitats along the gulf of mexico. They want bigger government. They want volunteers who were actually paid to go around the country and expand environmental activism. Not only that in california. They wanna ban gas stations now from the guardian british paper. Emily remembers a time when she didn't feel the to throw the climate change. Her family lives in american canyon and southern napa valley california state now being hit by record high temperatures devastating wildfires. It didn't use to be this bad. She said these days. Your family has to evacuate their home. Every summer to over friends lost their homes in town consumed in the campfire disaster. Two thousand eighteen. She worries about her younger siblings. A twelve year old sister and an eight year old brother. What's it gonna be like the future. She's seventeen now. She and fellow student activists are working to break one big link in the fossil fuel chain. That's driving climate. Change gas stations. There are two proposed new gas stations in town. She wants them scrapped. We don't need them. She says petaluma and said oma county became the first of the us to ban future gas station. Construction or any new pumps on existing sites in july said oh my counties regional climate protection of the voted to explore ways to support the nine cities in the county considering bands of their own. Final vote scheduled for september. It's the beginning of what could be a seismic shift. California has the highest sale of electric vehicles of the country. Close to eleven percents of all new car. Sales were electric in the first three months but nationally just two point three percent of new. Us car sales in twenty twenty were plugging compared to seventy four point. Eight percent norway where most of the entire country's population lives in oslo by the way the battery suck and cold weather in norway the wintertime. they have all sorts of problems. You don't get that coverage though do.

national oceanic atmospheric a napa valley california Fdr american canyon gulf of mexico oma county depression Emily california petaluma us California norway oslo
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Again. 8889795995. When you hear the recording just press number two. That'll get you into the voicemail. So leave us your name and phone number. And like I said, I promised to call you Monday, okay? So I go through these lists. You know these things pop up on the news and and bankrate dot com did their 2021 listing for the best and worst states to retire in and Lo and behold, Maryland came in dead last. I'm like, Okay, so that's something we should talk about on the radio. Maryland comes in dead last for a variety of reasons. They way they chose the states parties. Affordability was a factor. Climate was a factor. Culture crime. Those things were all factors mean. Unfortunately, crime is a big deal, because if you know the suburbs of D, C and the city of Baltimore, not exactly the safest places to be Unfortunate because I just think they could be so much nicer. But this is all part of a A blue Democratic run city. And a defund the police mentality that these kinds of things will destroy you. Look what it's done to Portland, Oregon, that cities and chaos And because of their defund the police. Minneapolis has seen a massive spike in crime New York City a massive spike in crime. And we're seeing it here, too. And Baltimore was on the news for for for for, um, increased homicides around the country. Chicago, New York, Minneapolis, Portland all these, you know all these very blue cities. Um, with a massive increase in crime, and it's horrible. It is absolutely horrible. You can't defund the police and maintain a decent standard of living for the people in the community. You just can't do it. You need to have community policing. You need to make sure the citizens are safe. Government's first responsibility is to protect its citizenry. I think our politicians have forgotten that Either that or just they're just downright stupid. Because this this business of defund the police is ridiculous. Okay, let's go back to the list. So oddly enough, who makes the top of the list? Georgia did I'm like, Wow. That was the first Georgia ranked number one. Low taxes very affordable. Climate Now, personally, I mean, I am not a fan of the sun belt because I don't like the heat. Florida is not for me. Maybe in January, Florida for me, but not not the rest of time. I've been there in May. And you know, September and August. I mean, no, it's too hot for me. I don't like it. But Not everybody feels that way. My brother, for example, he thought Maryland was way too cold. He was, he said. I'm out of here. I can't handle these Maryland winters. I'm like, seriously. It's just Maryland. It's not that cold. This is not main. This is you know, we are not in the mountains were not in Alaska, and he said no, and he went to Florida. He's probably he's happy with it. Like okay, fine. Anyway, so they look at this methodology and they ranked it according to affordability. Wellness, That's a good one. Especially for your if you're retiring. You want to maintain the proper health? Actually, that's one thing Maryland does have. We do have access to good healthcare here. Culture, whether and crime Now that's where they we got dinged on crime, because, uh, Well, my thoughts were defund. Don't defund the police and got to get Baltimore reigned in. Got to get in control. All right, So anyway, they looked at all these different things they use the cost of living index. They went to the Council of Community Economic Research for culture. They They examined arts, entertainment, recreation, things like that for temperature for whether they went to NOAA. The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration checked out the data there. They use things like, you know, Average temperature. What's winter? Like what? Some are like. Do you get your current games? Tornadoes? Earthquakes. Anyway, stuff like that. And then, of course crime and they used the FBI stats for crimes anyway. Put all that together. Maryland is at the bottom of the list. So when I look at this list, I look at different things too, You know. Unfortunately, Maryland came in 50 out of 50. That was that was a shocker. So actually, I went and looked at other lists. Like Where does Maryland rank and you know, uh, these lists of best and worst places to retire. Maryland routinely comes in the bottom 10. So that's actually unfortunate, and it's mostly because of the cost of living. It's too high, but we're a very blue state. We may have a red governor. He's not all that red. But we have a very blue state, and they're bound and determined to mismanage the budget and jack up our taxes. Unfortunately, they can get away with it because we have so many people working for the federal government. The paying taxes in Maryland is good. These are good jobs they pay, which they pay well. And consequently those taxes that the tax revenue flows to the state so they can be a little bit haphazard with how they spend money because they got this nice tax base. Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Missouri. All that there is your top four states right there. By the way, they're all Red states. That was something else. I took a look at when I was going through this list. The top 10 states. To retire in For actually Let me rephrase that the top 10 states for affordability. Are all red states. Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Indiana, South Carolina, Oklahoma. Not that I want to live in Oklahoma, Texas. Mississippi, Alabama. And New Mexico. New Mexico is actually little more purple. But The rest of them are red states. So isn't that interesting? The Red States are the most affordable to live in. Let's take a look at the least affordable states. I mean, where's my okay? I highlighted them. Here we go. Okay, Massachusetts. New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Oregon, Hawaii, California, Connecticut, Maine and Maryland. I don't know why Maine is so unaffordable. Mainz of Purple State, but the rest of them are definitely blue. So when you look at the top 10 Most affordable states. One Purple nine red when you look at the least or most expensive states One Purple nine blue, So the blue states. I mean, these are the higher tax states. The Democrats have draft up the taxes. They must spend the money. Not the Republicans can't spend money like it's going out of style. They can. However, the Democrats just seem to be either better or worse at it. If anyone how you look at it. But the most expensive states to live in our blue states. The most affordable states to live in red states, huh? No, I got a very good friend of mine. He's bound and determined to get out of here. He doesn't like Maryland. He wants to go to a red state where there's less regulation less taxes, and he doesn't like the policies And every time we get into this, I said, Look at him like For the grandkids. He says. Well,.

Alaska New Mexico Rhode Island New York Oklahoma California New Jersey Texas Maine Mississippi Hawaii New York City Chicago August Portland 50 Indiana Alabama South Carolina September
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on the NewsWorthy

the NewsWorthy

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on the NewsWorthy

"News and about ten minutes fast fair fun and on the go. I'm lacey evans. Filling in for erica mandy during her maternity. Leave you ready. let's do this. A powerful storm is pounding the east coast of the us tropical depression. Claudette is now threatening the carolinas. And it's expected to strengthen back into a tropical storm this morning that means people need to prepare for torrential rain and flooding and possible tornadoes. Already claudette left. A deadly trail of damage across parts of the south mostly in alabama. A man and a child were killed when a tree fell on their home. Ten more people including nine children died in an alabama crash officials. Say it happened when their vehicles hydroplane on wet roads overall strong winds heavy rains and tornadoes were reported in alabama florida georgia louisiana and mississippi damaging or destroying dozens of homes. Claudette is the third named storm of the year. For atlantic hurricane season and there are likely a lot more coming. The national oceanic atmospheric administration or noah is predicting an above average hurricane season. It expects about thirteen to twenty named storms. The season runs through the end of november. A controversial political figure is now set to become iran's new president and this could complicate things for american diplomats abraham was elected over the weekend. He's a conservative. Judge who has strong ties to iran's supreme leader or iotova the us sanctioned right. You see two years ago over alleged. Human rights abuses. He's accused of playing a role in mass executions a political opponents back in one thousand nine hundred eight as well as the deadly crackdown on protesters in two thousand nine. And that's just to name a couple of accusations against him. Beyond that seen as a more confrontational opponent to the us analysts. Think he will resist the us trying to limit iran's military activities.

alabama nine children Claudette two thousand nine two years ago abraham claudette Ten more people end of november about ten minutes twenty named storms erica mandy dozens of homes american one thousand nine hundred eigh third named storm florida georgia louisiana about thirteen this morning lacey evans
"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"national oceanic atmospheric administration" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"I write a book that is very factual, well referenced transparent on. It's completely ignored by the blue media. Despite trying I'd imagine you have a publicist who's trying to get to these people and say, Of course, yeah, we cried, You know, Washing post New York Times, CNN. I'd love to go on those Platforms because I've seen my gold mainly as to inform people not to persuade them right. And maybe they've got problems with that. Have you heard from other scientists who might have been considered part of the consensus? Is anyone attacking your book? From the standpoint of science? No, there is a hole. Web page up there with five different consensus scientists attacking not my book directly. But a review of the book that appeared in The Wall Street Journal. And almost all of them are Complete nonsense. The great bottles not chosen yet to report them, But I will just to give you an example One prominent M I. T professor who's an expert on hurricanes. Says You should not be looking at the record of hurricanes over a whole century. But in fact, he's a comb author on a paper last year that did exactly that. So you know, there's a lot of duplicity and the public discussion of what's going on. I've tried to write a very well referenced, transparent and accessible book. For many people, Many people have said the science is very well explained for non experts. Uh and I can't believe I get attacked for it. Yeah. I'm not sure if you saw this because I just found it. Yesterday study came out from NOAA National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, singing.

CNN last year New York Times NOAA National Oceanic Atmosphe One Yesterday M I. T The Wall Street Journal five different consensus scien over a whole century
Election Science Stakes: Climate

60-Second Science

04:13 min | 2 years ago

Election Science Stakes: Climate

"This installment of our pre election podcast series I spoke to the Thompson. She's a scientific American associate editor covering issues in sustainability and the environment with an emphasis on climate. I think there's probably a pretty clear difference between the contestants in this election regarding climate science. Yeah. There definitely is president trump has called into question a lot of You know well established climate science. He has denigrated the federal government's own national climate assessments as well as the work put out for years by the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change which are sort of the. The two documents that really bring together and summarize and synthesize all of climate research that's being done whereas former vice president Biden has made it clear on that he understands and respects climate science and that he thinks that climate change is a really existential threat and specifics. So one of the key things that president trump did was last year he put in a request to. Remove the United States from the Paris climate agreement which is the global agreement to for countries to gradually reduce Sarah greenhouse gas emissions. If Biden wins, he has said, he will immediately bring us back into that agreement. The national climate assessment that I needed to earlier that comes out every four years mandated by Congress. There's multiple federal agencies that put that together and the last one that came out came out during the trump administration, and it was very different from the one that came out during the Obama Administration, the trump administration it out very quietly. To minimize attention to it. So now we're at the prosper at the beginning of the process for the next one. But I think it would be pretty clear that Biden administration would reprioritize that report whereas trump administration could be expected to affect what science gets included in it and what conclusions are and how those are communicated and the reason that's such an important document is because. It sort of synthesizes all of this climate information about the changes we have observed and expect in the future across the whole United States and that's really valuable information for state and local governments to have as they try to figure out how to respond to climate threats today, and also plan for them in the future because it's not you know information, you can necessarily get on your own if you're a city government So that's kind of the resource that cities and states can use. So it's really critically important document. What about the scientists themselves? And how they have been either supported or interfered with yeah. Not that's one at various I think from agency to agency. I think in part because of where the trump administration sort of put its energies. So just like NASA, I think have seen probably a little less interference than others versus the Environmental Protection Agency which has been main focus of the trump administration to date and where they have done. Of rollbacks and sort of overruling of agency scientists in terms of rulemaking, and they've also changed some of the rulemaking to. Limit what science can actually be included in some of those regulations and rules processes. I think Noah, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration has probably been a little bit in the middle. They're still doing a lot of fair traditional climate work. They do a lot of work with satellites there. The main entity does our record keeping on weather and climate, and so they've been continuing that. Have Been. Some appointments to that agency very recently that has scientists and environmental concerned because the people appointed in the past have made statements Showing that they don't accept climate science, and so there's some concern you know and if there's a second trump administration that could undercut some of the science and scientists at Noah.

Donald Trump Biden National Oceanic Atmospheric A Environmental Protection Agenc Obama Administration United States President Trump Associate Editor Vice President Congress Noah Intergovernmental Panel Nasa Paris
Climate science denier appointed to top position at NOAA

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Climate science denier appointed to top position at NOAA

"We're also following the controversy over a client climate science denier who's reportedly appointed to a top climate position in the US. Government C. N. N.'s Brian Todd is joining us right now Brian critics say this is a rather dangerous pick for such a key position right? Wolf critics including scientific watchdog groups are pouncing on this appointment tonight of David Lee Gates. Those critics say this appointment is especially troubling now in the middle of the wildfires, the hurricane season and the coronavirus pandemic. As record-setting wildfires. States as America's southern coast continued to get pounded by more frequent hurricanes. President trump continues his assault on climate science it'll start getting cooler. You just watch and the president's time is facing blistering criticism tonight for reportedly appointing a climate science denier to a top position at America's preeminent weather and climate agency David Lee. Gates has been tapped to be a top deputy at the National Oceanic atmospheric administration known as Noah that's according to NPR and the Washington Post. This is a dangerous pick for Noah because it threatens the thousands of Noah scientists who conduct and communicate climate science. Every day La- Gates has a long record of accepting fossil fuel industry funds and spreading disinformation about climate science according to the Post League Gates was once forced out of job as the state of Delaware's. climatologist because of his research paid for in part by the fossil fuel industry, which cast doubt on the science showing that the burning of coal and other fuels were main factors in climate change at a House hearing last year Lee Gates openly disputed the belief of many climate scientists that carbon dioxide is mainly responsible for heating up the planet that has little to do with carbon dioxide as the demise of the little ice age and warring conditions we've had due to increasing son according to NPR in two thousand, seven league gates helped author a paper funded partially by the oil industry that question scientific findings about the role, of climate change. In destroying polar bears habitats, he now heads to an agency Noah which watchdog groups say has a long history of nonpartisan, very credible work in providing the country with weather and climate information. What kind of effect could lead gates have it? Noah. One watchdog group sites the trump administration's appointments a former fossil fuel industry lobbyists to head the EPA and the Department of the Interior and they have retired there we've seen a altered of reunifications on climate change. We've seen climate websites removed. We've seen climate scientists gagged from communicating with the media and the public critics say this is only the latest move in trump's pattern of denying or trying. To suppress science, he announced that the US would withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. He's dismantled regulations on greenhouse gas and auto emissions Noah itself has at least once shown it couldn't withstand trump's pressure when a branch of the National Weather Service corrected trump's erroneous predictions for hurricane Doreen last year, which he later displayed with a sharpie threatening Alabama Noah disavowed that correction we have data wars going on data is being politicized, but one side of the other being weaponized and when you get into that point were the public can't tell who's telling the truth. It undermines democracy undermines a kind of trust that you need to make a democracy work. CNN reached out multiple times to David Lee Gates to know to the Commerce Department which oversees no and to the White House for response to the criticisms of La-. Gates's appointment. We didn't hear back from any of them but one board member of the conservative think tank the heartland institute which downplays the Climate Change Threat which David Gates is a member of told us that La- Gates will provide much-needed science sanity at Noah which this board member claims. has been taken over by quote climate

David Lee Gates Noah President Trump La- Gates Post League Gates United States NPR David Lee America Brian Todd Washington Post LA CNN C. N. N. Assault Commerce Department Heartland Institute
Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

Environment: NPR

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

"Hurricane season is coming and federal forecasters are predicting that there will be between six and ten hurricanes in the Atlantic this year. That's above average Jerry. Bell is the lead Hurricane Forecaster at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The Twenty Twenty Atlantic. Hurricane season is expected to be busy one. Npr's Rebecca Hersher reports. If the forecast turns out to be correct. This will be the fifth year in a row with above average hurricane activity in the Atlantic. That's the most consecutive years ever recorded bell says we're expecting yet another above normal season and now is the time to make sure that you're getting prepared. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is asking state and local governments to consider issuing evacuation orders earlier than they would have in the past in order to give people more time to safely leave their homes while maintaining as much social distance as possible. Carlos CASTILLO OF FEMA says Americans in hurricane prone areas should also pack different supplies than they would have be prepared to take cleaning items with you like so panna tiger disinfecting wipes or general household cleaning supplies to disinfect surfaces. You may touch regularly. Fema is also urging people to stay with family or friends or in hotels rather than in shelters if they can forecaster Jerry. Bell says the main reason for the large number of storms in the forecast is phenomenon called the Atlantic multi. Takeo Oscillation basically the wind temperatures in the Atlantic have been really good for making strong hurricanes since about nineteen ninety five that will probably change in the next few years as normal climate fluctuations happen that's separate from manmade climate change but climate change is making the storms that do form more damaging for one thing bell says sea levels are rising sea levels mean more storm on Dacian as a hurricanes approaching and warmer air and water mean that hurricanes are more likely to drop catastrophic amounts of rain. When they make landfall think hurricane harvey in two thousand Seventeen or Hurricane Florence in twenty eighteen and he says rain and storm surge affect more people than they used to our coastlines. Were built up tremendously over the last several decades so that there's potentially many more millions of people in harm's way every time a hurricane threat together normal climate variability plus the effects of human caused climate change plus the pandemic add up to a potentially deadly summer and fall hurricane season officially begins on June first and runs until November first Rebecca Hersher NPR needs.

Hurricane Bell Atlantic Twenty Twenty Atlantic Hurricane Florence Forecaster Federal Emergency Management A Jerry Rebecca Hersher Npr National Oceanic Atmospheric A Rebecca Hersher Takeo Oscillation Harvey NPR Carlos Castillo Dacian
Science Movie Club: 'Twister'

Short Wave

08:22 min | 2 years ago

Science Movie Club: 'Twister'

"Alley. Burgos still remembers the first time she saw it. I mean we all do as about in fourth grade. It was maybe around midnight. Probably not that late because my parents probably wouldn't let me step that lay but Curtains drawn. I was knitting and I happened to come across admitted I happened to come across this movie on. Tv is just flipping channels. You know and I saw a tornado so I started watching it and I was just mesmerized. I remember my dad coming down and like yelling at me to go to bed. I was like just just wait. One more minute like I need to keep watching this Which she did and she saw the defining weather film of Nineteen Ninety. Six a movie. I love to hate twister starring Bill Paxton and Helen Hunt in the movie chase down tornadoes trying to find a way to study them up close and personal and eventually they end up finding each other like it is such a good kind of bad movie. Yeah absolutely it's one of those things that you just watch like. Oh it's so good but so bad at the same time. So today. Our first shortwave. Movie Club we're talking one of my personal favorites twister with Alli Burgos meteorologist in analyst for the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. I- Madison via shortwave. The daily science podcast from NPR. Alright here's the plan. I'm GonNa talk about some scenes in the movie alleys going to tell us about the science. Here we go in pretty much any scene with a tornado. It makes the sound. It's so ridiculous because tornadoes don't sound like roaring lion. I'm pretty darn sure. I think when I was reading a little bit about the movie they really want to make the Tornados. Seem like you know. A person are like this thing with like character and soul and generally tornadoes actually sound more like this constant low rumble sound or more like a rushing train. All right all right next up something. They got Kinda right the whole movie. Scientists are trying to get this instrument called Dorothy into the path of a tornado. We put her up inside a tornado. So they don't get sucked up in send out readings from the inside radio back information about the internal structure wind velocities flow a symmetry. We learn more than thirty six and they have in the past thirty years profile. The tornado for the first time the cool thing is is that these instruments are real. Scientists actually tried a version of this in the eighties sprite. Yeah so they modeled Dorothy after a real instrument called toto from wizard of Oz. The little dog toto. That's why they named it. And so the basic idea was to put that in the path of a tornado and had I could measure temperature and pressure and winds because what they really needed was to be able to get measurements real time so they only had things from radar doppler. So that's all from faraway measuring all those things and they tried it a couple of times in. It's really dangerous. As as the movie shows of trying to put something into our tornadoes half but now they actually have a new program that Noah is starting to fund called Torres and this is taking really small weather balloons and putting instruments on that and flying them up in Tornado. Okay so the balloon kind of takes that instrument package with it versus having to put a big clunky metal thing right in the power. So we've come a long way from like dropping something off a pickup truck into the center of the Tornado so cool so so the instrumentation while it wasn't like trying to measure exactly the same things was actually based off of a real experiment yet. They exact concept behind it was was the same so the last big scene of the movie is perhaps in. This is saying the. Let's be honest. It's the best season so the main characters are trying to get as close to an f five tornado. Great idea as they possibly can. And they deliver this device into the tornado and they kind of like get stuck on this farm. They're trying to run away from the Tornado at the same time report. You couldn't do in real life. Okay okay this is good because this is going to ask you about. But they basically find their way into this tiny shed Phil. Paxton is like it's fine. We're going to tether ourselves to this pipe. That goes really deep in the ground. Do with these two leather straps and then f five tornado rolls over the shed. Horrifically over the rips. The shed out of the ground. They're like being pulled up into the center of the tornadoes. One it is the most fun scene of the movie. You feel like you're inside of that Tornado with them. You see lightning bolts going on. There are multiple mini tornadoes within the big tornado. Within the tornado passes and they're totally fine her fine. Yes the biggest issue with that scene. Is that if you did have supposedly an F five tornado which you wouldn't be able to tell just looking at it is that all of the debris flying on around them would most likely kill them an f five tornado has wins upwards of three hundred miles an hour so even if you have a small small screwdriver for example of rats flying at that speed hits you you're gone and if you saw in that scene there is a shed and it's like full of like farming equipment ause and they would probably get hit by something like that but it certainly makes it a fun scene so tell me when you're saying you can't tell just by looking at because they're like this is an f. five right yeah so you can actually determine the scale or the intensity of a tornado just by looking at it what scientists have to do is do a damage survey afterwards and see all of the damage that the tornado caused and then from that they can determine the intensity walked has now moved on to the northeast. I've just got Mordovia. That even stronger Hornet is now starting to form twenty five miles from one you know so at at no point. Can you predict that a tornado is going to be at five before it happened? Correct to do the damage report. And you say okay based on this system this right and they were just going by you. Know bigger means stronger more violent. And that's not always the case you can actually have tornadoes that are look pretty small but that are very very violent. Okay all right so we have hated on twister a little bit by now but I feel like a lot of times in science movies. Scientists seem like pretty buttoned up lay definitely predominantly male. Which they still are in this movie. But you know. The lead researcher in this movie is woman. She's got a personal stake in her science. She's really passionate about helping people in that kind of stuck with me for sure. Yeah I think that stuck with a lot of people and I think a lot of people don't realize that there are tons and tons of researchers out in the field and so it's really cool just seeing people like down getting their hands dirty and really putting their heart and soul especially into something that is so important to help people and you told me that. This movie played a big role in your life to. Oh definitely I was one of those weird kids that watch the weather channel. Every morning waking up from school normal kid and so- twister definitely kind of showed me that there's another side of science besides just being a TV broadcasting like you can go out and research these things and going to college to study meteorology. My parents actually bought me that movie as a parting gift on DVD. It's fair to say that this movie inspired you in some way to go into your. Oh definitely and I think it inspired a lot of people to I know all of my meteorology friends speak very fondly of this movie when they were kids.

Bill Paxton Dorothy Alley. Burgos Nineteen Ninety National Oceanic Atmospheric A Alli Burgos NPR I- Madison Helen Hunt Researcher Noah Phil Analyst Torres
Arctic report card shows rising temperatures and vanishing sea ice

Pacifica Evening News

01:01 min | 3 years ago

Arctic report card shows rising temperatures and vanishing sea ice

"When you report finds warming temperatures and ice melting in the arctic much faster than predicted that's endangering habitats fisheries and indigenous communities no was the national oceanic atmospheric administration released the twenty nineteen arctic report card today is this the last thirteen years have been the lowest ice years since nineteen eighty with ice melt levels increasing nearly each year so much that twenty nineteen was a second winter in a row at the Alaska coastline was ice free the report also finds arctic snow cover for entire North America was the fifth lowest in may and the third lowest in June in the last fifty three years this loss of arctic ice is affecting communities at Qana means and fishing industries hers Timothy gala day a retired navy admiral sample we close the cod fishery early first time in a long time because of the

North America Qana Arctic Alaska Fifty Three Years Thirteen Years